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Журнал
Flight за 1919 г.
853

Журнал - Flight за 1919 г.

Front and side elevations of the Armstrong-Whitworth machines.
Plan views of the Armstrong-Whitworth machines.
Front and side elevations of the Armstrong-Whitworth machines.
Plan views of the Armstrong-Whitworth machines.
THE AUSTIN "GREYHOUND." - This machine is designed to carry three guns, camera, wireless, oxygen apparatus, etc. It is a two-seater, and is fitted with a 320 h.p. A.B.C. "Dragonfly" engine. The weight empty is 2,050 lbs. and fully loaded 3,090 lbs. The speed at 10,000 ft. is estimated at 130 m.p.h., and the climb to 10,000 ft. at 11 mins. The landing speed is about 45 m.p.h.
A GROUP OF AVRO BOMBERS. - The machine farthest from the camera is the Avro "Pike" with two 160 h.p. Sunbeam engines. The machine in the centre is a sister 'plane to the "Pike" but is fitted with two 150 h.p. Green engines. The machine on the right is the type 529, with two 190 h.p. Rolls-Royce engines.
THE AVRO TYPE 529. - This machine is the same as that shown on the right in the preceding illustration. Front View.
THE AVRO TYPE 529A. - This is a sister 'plane to the type 529, but has two Galloway B.H.P. engines.
THE AVRO TYPE 530. - This is a two-seater fighter, fitted with a 200 h.p. Sunbeam Arab engine. It was originally designed for a 300 h.p. Hispano, which could not. however, be obtained at the time of testing the machine.
Front Elevations of the Avro Machines.
Side Elevations of the Avro Machines.
Plan Views of some of the Avro Machines.
THE AVRO "SPIDER." - Note the unusual strutting arrangement.
This BAT FK 23 Bantam, serial no F 1655, the third of nine production aircraft completed, proclaims its British Aerial Transport parentage in bold white lettering down its fuselage in place of the normal roundel, indicating that this photograph dates from after the war and that this was one of the machines sold as war surplus in 1919. The history of the Bantam is convoluted and starts in mid-1917 when Frederick Koolhoven left Armstrong Whitworth to join the newly formed Willesden-based BAT, taking his tell-tale FK design numbers with him. At BAT Koolhoven's first task centred on designing a company-funded single seat fighter venture, designated FK 22. First flown in the early autumn of 1917 this machine gained Air Board interest and a contract for six examples followed. Originally planned to use a 120hp ABC Mosquito radial, one of the four FK 22s known to have been built and flown during 1918 used a 100 hp Gnome Monosoupape, subsequently replaced by a 110hp Le Rhone 9J rotary. To compound matters, virtually all of the FK 22s varied in airframe detail, but out of this melee emerged the 170hp ABC Wasp powered example in the spring of 1918, the change being considered great enough to warrant the new designation of FK 23 Bantam. Others of the original FK 22 were re-engined with the Wasp, but all of these machines were criticised for the ease with which they would enter a vicious, flat or autorotative spin. To cure this problem, the later nine so-called production aircraft incorporated a modified set of increased span wings and tail unit. The later FK 23s that initially appeared in October 1918 had the by now standard twin Vickers guns, along with a top level speed of 128mph at 6,500 feet, falling to 118mph at 18,000 feet. Time to reach 10.000 feet took 9 minutes. Time, however, was about to run out on the Bantam with the coming of the Armistice.
"The Bat," designed by Mr. Frederick Koolhoven, and tested by Mr. Peter Legh, climbing 20,000 ft. in 21 min. When aerial police get going, the "Bat" will, no doubt, be a scout which aerial lawbreakers will have to reckon with.
The B.A.T. Bantam. View of engine housing
K-123, the B.A.T. F.K.23 Bantam flown by C. B. Prodger on 21 June, 1919, in the Victory Aerial Derby. The engine is a 170 h.p. A.B.C. Wasp.
No. 3. - The B.A.T. Bantam, 170 h.p. A.B.C. Wasp, flown by Maj. C. Draper. This machine is the standard Bantam, except that its bottom plane has been cut down in size.
THE AERIAL WELCOME. - Mr. Clifford Prodger, on a B.A.T. Bantam, flew over Paddington on Sunday when the commander and crew of N.C. 4 arrived from Plymouth. Note the American flag on the fuselage.
THE CROSS-COUNTRY HANDICAP AT HENDON AERODROME ON WHIT-MONDAY: The five starters lined up for the race, at the other side of the aerodrome
Finish of the cross-country handicap at Hendon Aerodrome on Whit-Monday by Mr. C. Turner in a single-seater B.A.T. Bantam. Crossing the line at the enclosures at over 120 m.p.h. Inset, the judge, Mr. J. E. Withers, presenting the winner's cup of the Anglo-American Oil Co. to Mr. C. Turner
THE B.A.T. BANTAM. - Sketch of the controls
THE B.A.T. BANTAM. - On the left one side of the undercarriage. On the right the tubular guides which check vibration of the lift and landing wires
THE B.A.T. BANTAM. - Outer front inter-plane strut attachment to bottom spar, and binge for aileron pulley
THE B.A.T. BANTAM. - The landing wires of the inner bay are attached to the lugs on the side of the fuselage, from which point steel straps run to the top of the bulkhead, connecting the external landing wires to the top spar attachment. Inset is indicated the manner of attaching the top spars to the top of the bulkhead
THE B.A.T. BANTAM. - On the left a sketch of the empennage, and on the right the opening in the top plane through which the pilot enters the machine. The straps of the safety belt are shown flung back in readiness for strapping over the pilot's shoulders
THE B.A.T. BANTAM. - Plan, front and side elevations, to scale
FRONT AND SIDE ELEVATIONS OF THE BRISTOL MACHINES. - These are all drawn to a uniform scale, the scale being the same as that of the D.H. Milestones, published on January 9.
PLAN VIEWS OF THE BRISTOL MACHINES. - The scale to which these are drawn is the same as that of the D.H. machines previously published.
No. 12. - The Bristol Monoplane, 110 h.p. le Rhone, flown by Maj. C. H. C. Smith.
THE AERIAL DERBY. - The competitors lined up at the starting line ready for the race.
OVER THE ANDES. - On April 4 Lieut. Cortinez crossed the Andes from Santiago (Chile) to Mendoza (Argentine) and back, attaining a height of nearly 20,000 ft. The machine he used was one of the "Bristol" monoplanes presented by this country to the Chilian Government
FRONT AND SIDE ELEVATIONS OF THE BRISTOL MACHINES. - These are all drawn to a uniform scale, the scale being the same as that of the D.H. Milestones, published on January 9.
PLAN VIEWS OF THE BRISTOL MACHINES. - The scale to which these are drawn is the same as that of the D.H. machines previously published.
Fig. 29. - Two-seater fighter. Bristol Rolls-Royce.
"STILL GOING STRONG": The short life of an aeroplane is a weapon much beloved by those who refuse to believe in the possibilities of commercial aviation. As a matter of fact, with reasonable care, the life of a well-built machine is much longer than is generally thought. By way of an example, we publish above a photograph of a Bristol Fighter which has been in continuous commission on the fighting front and in Holland for over two years without, we are assured, the expenditure of a single penny on renewals or repairs. Recently this machine paid a visit to this country, piloted by the famous Dutch pilot, Versteegh, who was accompanied by another Dutch officer. While in this country the machine paid several flying visits to places in various parts of the country, including its old home and birthplace at Filton, Bristol.
FRONT AND SIDE ELEVATIONS OF THE BRISTOL MACHINES. - These are all drawn to a uniform scale, the scale being the same as that of the D.H. Milestones, published on January 9.
PLAN VIEWS OF THE BRISTOL MACHINES. - The scale to which these are drawn is the same as that of the D.H. machines previously published.
THE VICKERS F.B. 19. - This was really a development of the "Barnwell Bullet," and has a 110 h.p. Clerget engine
Front Elevations of the Vickers machines
Side elevations ot fhe Vickers machines
Plan views of the Vickers machines
The prototype D.H.1A, serial number 4606. This machine is similar to the D.H. 1, except that it has a 120 h.p. Beardmore engine.
Plan views, to a uniform scale, of "Airco." machines Nos.1 to 6 inclusive.
Front elevations, to a uniform scale, of all the "Airco." machines. The D.H. 10A has its engines mounted direct on the lower plane.
Side elevations, to a uniform scale, of "Airco." machines 1 to 10 inclusive. The side elevation of D.H. 10A is similar to that of D.H. 10, except that the engines are mounted direct on the bottom plane.
Plan views, to a uniform scale, of "Airco." machines Nos.1 to 6 inclusive.
Front elevations, to a uniform scale, of all the "Airco." machines. The D.H. 10A has its engines mounted direct on the lower plane.
Side elevations, to a uniform scale, of "Airco." machines 1 to 10 inclusive. The side elevation of D.H. 10A is similar to that of D.H. 10, except that the engines are mounted direct on the bottom plane.
THE BALLOON STRAFER: A D.H. 5 at work.
Plan views, to a uniform scale, of "Airco." machines Nos.1 to 6 inclusive.
Front elevations, to a uniform scale, of all the "Airco." machines. The D.H. 10A has its engines mounted direct on the lower plane.
Side elevations, to a uniform scale, of "Airco." machines 1 to 10 inclusive. The side elevation of D.H. 10A is similar to that of D.H. 10, except that the engines are mounted direct on the bottom plane.
Fig. 27. - Two-seater fighter. F.E. 2b.
A couple of the aeroplane-building departments of Wolseley Motors, Ltd., illustration of which has hitherto been restricted under Dora. One of these shows an erecting shop with a batch of S.E. 5's in course of construction, whilst in the other the S.E. 5's are being fitted with Wolseley "Viper" engines. It hardly needs emphasising that the Wolseley company supplied a very large number of these machines during the War, and the work of these little single-seater fighting planes, fitted with a Vickers gun in the fuselage and a Lewis gun in the top plane, was very remarkable, and had an appreciable effect upon the final collapse of the enemy.
ERECTING SHOP IN THE AUSTIN WORKS. - A large batch of S.E.5's.
A corner of a batch of machines, chiefly S.E.5's, for disposal at Hendon. These are a varying quantity, the numbers being added to each day, whilst those disposed of balance more or less the new-comers.
The position of the control stick when running engine on the ground. One of the series of drawings prepared by the Air Technical Services for using at the R.A.F. Schools.
Fig. 28. - Two-seater fighter. Sopwith 1 1/2 strutter.
The Sopwith 1 1/2-strutter fighter (two-seater)
Side elevations of the Sopwith machines
Front elevations of the Sopwith machines
Three-quarter Rear View of the Sopwith "Pup" (80 h.p. Le Rhone engine).
During the week-end the Prince of Wales again indulged his leaning towards aviation by taking a flight in a Sopwith machine from Hounslow, with, as pilot, Major Barker, V.C., D.S.O., etc., who, it will be remembered, has lost one arm as a result of his wonderful War work. Upon this occasion many "stunts" were executed much to the liking of the Prince. In our photograph the Prince is seen getting into the Sopwith machine.
Squadron Commander Dunning lands his Sopwith Pup aboard HMS Furious on 2 August 1917. This was the first carrier landing ever made by an aeroplane. The picture (wherein a light cruiser is crossing the bows distantly) shows the Lewis gun and rope-toggle hand-holds.
AT THE WAR IN THE AIR EXHIBITION: A difficult feat - pilot's bad luck. - The first aeroplane to land on a warship's deck while the vessel is steaming at full speed. - The airman travels at the same speed as the vessel and in the same direction, and manoeuvres so as to drop on a given position. When held by the landing party he stops his engine. This pilot made two successful landings, but was drowned at the third attempt. Great praise is due to the men who volunteered to undertake this dangerous pioneer work, as they knowingly carried their lives in their hands.
Plan views of Sopwith machines
Side elevations of the Sopwith machines
Front elevations of the Sopwith machines
A SOPWITH TRIPLANE ON THE WAY FOR A DOUBLE EVENT.
Side elevations of the Sopwith machines
Front elevations of the Sopwith machines
Fig. 8a. - Braced N-girder fuselage. Camel.
Side elevations of the Sopwith machines
Front elevations of the Sopwith machines
"RULES OF THE AIR-MEETING ANOTHER MACHINE." - If a change of course is necessary, turn to the right.
Side elevations of the Sopwith machines
Front elevations of the Sopwith machines
Fig. 24. - One-seater fighter. Sopwith Snipe.
A Sopwith "Snipe," B.R.2 engine, presented by Leicester to Canada at Hendon on January 21.
"AND NOW FOR THE OTHER ONE": A Sopwith Snipe gets home on the Fokkers.
Side elevations of the Sopwith machines
Front elevations of the Sopwith machines
"THE JACKALS." - The importance of keeping formation cannot be too strongly impressed upon the pilot. Loss of position is likely to lead to an adventure with the Jackals.
The Aviatik, Type D VII
The Aviatik, Type D VII, Sporting machine.
После войны D XII испытывался в странах Антанты и в США, куда было переправлено несколько самолетов. В настоящее время в музеях сохранилось 4 "пфальца"
A PFALZ SCOUT. - This machine was one of the first to be surrendered under the Armistice terms.
A batch of surrendered Pfalz D XII German aeroplanes
The port side of the D XII Pfalz
Three-quarter front view of D XII Pfalz
Front view of D XII Pfalz. Note radiator and sloping 'N' struts
Three-quarter rear view of the D XII Pfalz
Some constructional details of D XII Pfalz. - 1. Attachment of bottom wing spar to body. 2. Top plane section compared with R.A.F. 14. 3. Spars and ribs. 4. Reinforcement of wing spars at point of attachment of struts. 5. Strong support of false spar, to which aileron is hinged. 6. Spar fitting. 7. Diagrams of struts. 8. Tubular support for pilot's seat.
Some more constructional details of D XII Pfalz. - 9. Framework construction of rear of fuselage. 10. Sketch shows long hinge-bolt of elevator. 11. The radiator. 12. Main petrol tank. 13. Controls. 14. Diagram of gun mounting.
General arrangement drawings of Pfalz Scout D XII
View of the body construction of the Siemens Single-Seater.
THE SIEMENS SINGLE-SEATER. - Engine mounting.
THREE VIEWS OF THE SIEMENS-HALSKE ROTARY ENGINE. - In this engine the cylinders and crankshaft rotate in opposite directions.
THE SIEMENS SINGLE-SEATER. - View of the PUot's cockpit.
THE SIEMENS-HALSKE ROTARY ENGINE. - Part-sectional view.
THE SIEMENS-HALSKE ROTARY ENGINE. - Sectional side elevation.
THE SIEMENS SINGLE-SEATER. - Side and front elevations and plans from above and beneath.
A SOPWITH TRIPLANE ON THE WAY FOR A DOUBLE EVENT.
SOME DUTCH MACHINES AT THE E.L.T.A. AERODROME: 4. The Fokker monoplane on which Lieut. Versteegh does some very clever flying
The Fokker Stand: On the left may be seen the port wing of a parasol monoplane, while in the centre is a sporting two-seater, shown with the port wings folded for transport. In the background, on the right, is a Fokker two-seater biplane, similar to the German Fokker type D.VII.
The Blackburn "Kangaroo," two Rolls-Royce engines
A HENDON PASSENGER CARRIER. - One of the Grahame-White Blackburn "Kangaroos."
Public Flying at London Aerodrome, Hendon: Passengers aboard a G.-W. "Kangaroo" ready for their flight
PASSENGER FLYING AT THE LONDON AERODROME, HENDON: A G.-W. "Kangaroo" plane over the Welsh Harp, on Saturday
THE RAILWAY HOLD-UP AND MAILS BY AEROPLANE: Post Office officials and the despatch and receipt of mails at Hounslow. 2. The above Kangaroo from Grahame-White brought in mails from Leeds. Another Kangaroo of the North Sea Aviation Co. carried mails to Leeds.
BRITISH MACHINES AT THE E.L.T.A.: 3. A Blackburn Kangaroo fitted with a cabin.
R. W. Kenworthy taking off in the North Sea Aerial Navigation Company's first civil Kangaroo, G-EAIT, at the ELTA Exhibition, Amsterdam, in August 1919. Note full registration under both sides of tailplane.
Mr. R. Kenworthy at the "E.L.T.A." (Amsterdam) on the Blackburn Kangaroo, where he was busy carrying passengers continuously for six weeks or more. This machine was last week commandeered for Midlands and the North aerial-post work
THE FLIGHT TO AUSTRALIA: Start of the Blackburn Kangaroo from Hounslow on November 21
Front elevations of the Blackburn machines
Side elevations of the Blackburn machines
THE FLIGHT TO AUSTRALIA: The Blackburn "Kangaroo." Plan, side and front elevations, to scale
ERECTING SHOP IN THE AUSTIN WORKS. - Shown a number of R.E.7 biplanes.
The England-India Handley-Page's arrival at Calcutta Racecourse, from Allahabad, the last stage of the journey from England. The Viceroy and the Governor of Bengal advancing to receive Generals Salmond and Borton immediately upon the landing of the "H.P."
ENGLAND TO INDIA. - Photograph of the Handley-Page biplane, fitted with two Rolls-Royce engines, which flew from England to India, landing at Delhi on the 12th December, 1918. Its first flight was made from England to Egypt during the War, when it had some interesting experiences. On arrival in Egypt, it took an active part in the final advance of the British Forces in Palestine, one of its feats being the dropping of large bombs on the Headquarters of the Turks. Owing to the rapid advance of the British, it was difficult to establish advanced aerodromes, and as there were no roads it was difficult to bring up the supplies of petrol. On the arrival of the H.P. this machine was successfully employed for taking petrol up to the aerodromes, thus greatly assisting the British machines. On being congratulated on the flight, General Salmond paid a tribute to the Rolls-Royce engines, and, excellent as the machine is, the Rolls-Royce motors undoubtedly were, to a very great extent, responsible for the success of the flight.
THE MARCH OF THE GUARDS. - A snap of a Handley-Page machine as it passed over Buckingham-Palace and the Victoria Memorial.
DESCENDING BY PARACHUTE FROM AN AEROPLANE. - Miss Sylvia Borden is seen on the left immediately after leaving the Handley Page at 1,000 ft. Note at this first stage of the opening of the "Guardian Angel" parachute, the position, head downwards, of the parachutist. On the right the next stage is seen with the parachute fully inflated and the Handley Page machine travelling away in the near distance
And It Came To Pass. - The following quotation from Ezekiel, Chapter I, seems curiously appropriate to the above picture :# Verse 13: And under the firmament were their wings straight, the one toward the other: every one had two which covered on this side, and every one had two which covered on that side, their bodies." Verse 24: And wnen they went I heard the noise of their wings like the noise of great waters, like the voice of the Almighty, a noise of tumult like the noise of an host: when they stood, they let down their wings."
This three-engined 1,200 h.p. Caproni triplane, has a span of about 103 ft., and carries a useful load of several tons
A TRI-MOTORED CAPRONI HYDRO-TRIPLANE: It has a span of 31 metres, and the useful load is 2 1/2 to 3 tons. It can be fitted with three 300 h.p. Flat or Liberty engines, and the speed is 140 kiloms. per hour.
Two detail sketches of the Caproni CA-4 Triplane. On the left one of the tail skids, and on the right one of the under-carriage units.
THE ITALIAN REPRESENTATIVES AT THE E.L.T.A.: 3. The Caproni three-engined biplane
A strange-looking Hun twin-engined bomber belonging to the Gotha family. Gotha Ursinus G.U.H. G I
The D.F.W. Military Type R II.: View of the nose of the fuselage, showing transmission shafts, etc.
THE D.F.W. MILITARY TYPE R II: Three-quarter front view.
The D.F.W. Military Type R II.: The port pusher airscrew shaft, above the rear spar of the bottom plane.
TWO VIEWS OF THE ENGINE-ROOM OF THE D.F.W. MILITARY TYPE R II. Left: The port engine installation. Right: The starboard engines.
Two views of the interior of the D.F.W. Military Type R II.: Top: Looking aft from the engine-room. Bottom: Looking forward through the engine-room to the pilot's cockpit.
A D.F.W. design for a giant aeroplane to be driven by eight engines, each of 270 h.p. Owing to the finish of the War this machine was never built.
THE D.F.W. PASSENGER CARRIER: Plan, side and front elevations, to scale.
"NOT A CASE OF BIRDS OF A FEATHER," etc. - The "bird" in the background is a captured German bomber now exhibited sans engine in St. James's Park. The flyer in the foreground is of a much more peaceful character, and hails, we believe, from China.
The skeleton remains on a 5-engined Gotha at Cologne.
THE 80 H.P. AVRO SEAPLANE OF 1914. - This machine bears a strong family resemblance to the 504L, of which scale drawings are published elsewhere in this issue.
The Avro 504K, a slightly modified and strengthened version of the original 80 h.p. type. This machine has been adopted as the standard training aeroplane for the R.A.F.
The Snapper, snapped. - One of the G.W. Avro biplanes, with a cinema operator on board, photographed by our photographer, from a de H. 9 (Airco) machine at Hendon at the week end
CIVILIAN FLYING AT HOUNSLOW AERODROME: Looping the loop in an Avro with three up. Photographed from another Hounslow Aerodrome Avro. An untouched negative
A REMARKABLE PAIR OF PHOTOGRAPHS: Last week we published some Flight photographs taken at Hounslow Aerodrome, and reference in the text was made as follows: "With the co-operation of Messrs. A. V. Roe, we were able to obtain some fine photographic records from the air of looping - taken from the 'looper' by the 'loopee,' and from a sister Avro accompanying the looper. Two of these photographs are of special interest in that one was taken during a loop, showing the ground appearing below the tail." These unique photographs, which, as must be obvious, were taken simultaneously, but independently, from the two machines, are now, by request, reproduced above.
Hounslow Aerodrome as seen from above by the eye of "Flight's" Camera
AT HENDON AERODROME: Racing on Whit Saturday. The two Avros flew evenly together in a remarkable way. The left-hand machine in our photograph, piloted by Mr. G. R. Hicks, won Saturday's race. On the Monday, Maj. Carr, who is flying the other Avro, had a mishap, but without serious consequences
RACING AT THE LONDON AERODROME, HENDON: First heat on Saturday as seen from No. 1 Pylon. High up in the air, Capt. Chamberlayne (final winner), below Capt. Gathergood (21), first in the heat, followed by Lieut. Park (4)
THE CROSS-COUNTRY HANDICAP AT HENDON AERODROME ON WHIT-MONDAY: The five starters lined up for the race, at the other side of the aerodrome
RACING AT THE LONDON AERODROME, HENDON: Line-up of the machines before Saturday's race of the day
RACING AT THE LONDON AERODROME, HENDON: Start on Saturday of the first heat. Capt. Gathergood first away on an Airco, followed by Lieut. Park on an Avro, Capt. Robertson (Avro) and the winner of the final, Capt. Chamberlayne, on a G.W. Bantam.
STARTERS IN HENDON'S AIR RACE ON SATURDAY: Left to right - B.A.T., piloted by Major Draper (winner; Avro, pilot Capt. D. H. Robertson, A.F.C.; Avro, pilot Major R. H. Carr, A.F.C., D.C.M. (second); G.-W. Bantam, pilot Capt. P. R. T. Chamberlayne (third); and Avro, pilot Lieut. G. R. Hicks, D.F.C.
THE AERIAL DERBY. - Competitors lined-up at the start of the 1919 Aerial Derby at Hendon, with Lieut-Col G. L. P. Henderson's Avro 504K H2586 in the foreground.
No. 4. - The Avro Biplane, 110 h . p . le Rhone engine, flown by Lieut.-Col. G. L. P . Henderson, in place of the Martinsyde F 4, Rolls-Royce Falcon engine, originally entered.
The Lord Chancellor, Lord Birkenhead, has a "joy-ride" on an Avro. After the flight, from left to right: Mr. Parrott (Messrs. Roe and Co.'s Southampton Manager), Captain Hamersley, Lord Birkenhead's son, Lord Birkenhead, Commander Chillcott.
OPENING OF THE SEASON AT HENDON. - A youthful visitor is taken for a flip. In the background is seen the new club-house. Inset is one of the Avros starting off.
AT HOUNSLOW AERODROME: A quick service incident. A visitor and his wife arrived in their car, with only a very short time to spare for getting to Folkestone to dinner. In a few minutes they were en route for their destination, and before dark had returned to the aerodrome
AT HOUNSLOW AERODROME: Civilian Flying: A trio of Avros filling up with passengers
The Avro "Aerodrome" on the sands at Southport for the flying meeting
AVRO FLIGHTS AT SOUTHPORT: Captain Collison landing after a popular guinea circuit of the town
THE OPENING OF THE CENTRAL AIRCRAFT AERODROME AT NORTHOLT ON SATURDAY. - A quartette of the Avros used for passenger flying. "Au revoir" to baby by two passengers taking a flight with Lieut. Castleman, and, on right, Mr. Sykes returning from an exhibition of stunting on an Avro.
"GOING AWAY" BY AEROPLANE. - The wedding of Miss Standen and Mr. Hamilton at Chorley Wood last week, when the bride and bridegroom travelled by aeroplane for their honeymoon to Fowey, Cornwall. In the photograph the Avro is just about to depart.
At the E.L.T.A. Aerodrome: One of the Avros which are kept busy all day and every day carrying passengers. Note the registration letters on the fuselage
Homing at Dusk. - the last flight of the day, on an Avro waterplane off Brighton
AVRO SEAPLANES AT BOWNESS, WINDERMERE: The pilot in charge is Capt. Howard Pixton, who won the Jacques Schneider Trophy at Monte Carlo in 1914.
AT HENDON AERODROME: On the right Gen. Fitzpatrick, Chief of Army Aviation in U.S.A. On left, Einer Petersen of the "Politiken," Denmark, has a joy-flight with Pilot Hicks
Front Elevations of the Avro Machines.
Side Elevations of the Avro Machines.
Plan Views of some of the Avro Machines.
Some more Plan Views of Avro Machines.
Front and side elevations of the Armstrong-Whitworth machines.
Plan views of the Armstrong-Whitworth machines.
The A.W. Biplane, Type F.K. 8, with 160 h.p. Beardmore engine.
A.W. 160 H.P. BIPLANE. - This machine is similar to the F.K. 8, but has a Vee undercarriage.
At the R.A.F. "War in the Air" Exhibition at the Grafton Galleries:- "Wind Up!" - A British fighting machine chasing a Hun
Front and side elevations of the Armstrong-Whitworth machines.
Plan views of the Armstrong-Whitworth machines.
One of the F.B.5s used by the Royal Naval Air Service, with modified nose and Vickers machine-gun; for the Admiralty the designation was Vickers Type 32. This (machine, which was fitted with a 100 h.p. Gnome monosoupape engine, was affectionately known as the "Gun-bus."
The D.H.4. - A two-seater tractor, fitted with B.H.P. or Rolls-Royce engines. The pilot sits between the planes, whereas the gunner is placed far back in the body.
Fig. 17. - Artillery machine. De Havilland 4; Eagle VIII.
The Airco D.H.4 375 h.p. Rolls-Royce "Eagle," K-142 being prepared for M. D. Manton to fly it in the 1919 Aerial Derby.
Two views of No. 7, the Airco 4R, 450 h.p. Napier Lion, flown by Capt. G. Gather good. This machine was the winner of the Aerial Derby.
THE AERIAL DERBY. - The winner, Capt. G. Gathergood, A.F.C., on Airco 4 R, 450 Napier Lion engine, crossing the finishing line.
THE AERIAL DERBY. - The competitors lined up at the starting line ready for the race.
A D.H. 4, one of those constructed by Palladium Autocars, Ltd., of Putney, en route for delivery. Certain of these D.H. 4's by the Palladium Co. are being used in the Peace Conference journeys between Paris and London for conveying Ministers and despatches.
Plan views, to a uniform scale, of "Airco." machines Nos.1 to 6 inclusive.
Front elevations, to a uniform scale, of all the "Airco." machines. The D.H. 10A has its engines mounted direct on the lower plane.
Side elevations, to a uniform scale, of "Airco." machines 1 to 10 inclusive. The side elevation of D.H. 10A is similar to that of D.H. 10, except that the engines are mounted direct on the bottom plane.
THE BRITAIN BELGIUM AERIAL GOODS SERVICE. - Conveying Woollen and Cotton Goods and Foodstuff to our Ally's country, at the request of the Belgian Government. This service has been undertaken by Aircraft Transport and Travel, Ltd. - one of Mr. Holt Thomas' very live companies - with the approval of the Government. A squadron of service D.H. machines with R.A.F. pilots left Hawkinge aerodrome for the Belgian aerodrome outside Ghent, carrying nearly two tons of goods, urgently needed by the Belgian people, but obtainable only at prohibitive prices. It is intended that these first Aerial Goods Services, conducted at an average speed of 100 miles an hour, shall be extended to Anthwerp and Brussels as well as Ghent. Our photograph shows the machines ready to start. The aeroplane nearest the camera is seen loaded with stores.
THE KING AND QUEEN OF BELGIUM'S VISIT TO COLOGNE BY AEROPLANE. - The Queen chatting with her pilot at the Bickendorf Aerodrome, Cologne, on April 28, before leaving. Facing the camera is General Sir W. Robertson, G.C.B., etc.
THE KING AND QUEEN OF BELGIUM'S VISIT TO COLOGNE BY AEROPLANE. - The Queen is entering the machine at the Cologne Aerodrome, and the King is seen on the left in flying rig
Fig. 31. - Day bomber. De Havilland 9.
No. 9. - The Airco 9 , 230 h.p. Siddeley Puma, flown by Capt. H. J . Saint.
HENDON FROM ABOVE. - A view of the sheds and enclosures snapped by our photographer from an Airco (de H. 9) machine, the wings of which can be seen in the foreground. Note the machines on the ground in readiness for "flipping."
The Pilot's and the Observer's cockpits on the D.H.9 machine with which on January 3 an altitude record of 30,500 ft. was put up at Martlesham by Capt. Lang, R.A.F., as pilot and Lieut. Blowes as observer, both of whom are inset. At the nose of the machine is seen the Napier "Lion" engine which enabled the height to be attained, whilst the many gauges and instruments installed on the pilot's dash and in the observer's cockpit form in themselves a useful study for the uninitiated.
"THE FOOD-CARRIERS." - Three D.H. 9's with Siddeley "Puma" engines returning from a trip to Belgium.
Plan views, to a uniform scale, of "Airco." machines Nos. 9 and 10. The plan view of D.H. 10A is the same as that of the Liberty-engined D.H. 10.
Front elevations, to a uniform scale, of all the "Airco." machines. The D.H. 10A has its engines mounted direct on the lower plane.
Side elevations, to a uniform scale, of "Airco." machines 1 to 10 inclusive. The side elevation of D.H. 10A is similar to that of D.H. 10, except that the engines are mounted direct on the bottom plane.
Fig. 32. - Day bomber. De Havilland 9a.
THE AIRCO 4R: This machine, fitted with a 450 h.p. Napier Lion engine, is a development of the machine on which Capt. Gathergood won the Aerial Derby, which flight is officially declared a British Speed Record for a flight in a closed circuit. On this machine Capt. Gathergood, who is shown in the photograph, flew to Amsterdam in 2 hours 10 mins., which is, we believe, the fastest time for this journey. While at Amsterdam Capt. Gathergood won a race in a closed circuit, his speed working out at 145 m.p.h. The Napier Lion is rapidly building up for itself an excellent reputation, having established these fast times. It also has the distinction of having been up to an altitude of nearly six miles in an Airco (De Havilland) machine, as well as a non-stop flight from London to Madrid in 7 3/4 hours.
A Record Breaker: As announced in "Flight" last week, a Napiere engined Airco (DeH.) 9R, piloted by Capt. Gathergood, established a number of British records for speed on November 15, 1919. Our photograph shows the machine used for the flights. Capt. Gathergood, the pilot, is standing in front of the machine
Plan views, to a uniform scale, of "Airco." machines Nos. 9 and 10. The plan view of D.H. 10A is the same as that of the Liberty-engined D.H. 10.
Front elevations, to a uniform scale, of all the "Airco." machines. The D.H. 10A has its engines mounted direct on the lower plane.
Side elevations, to a uniform scale, of "Airco." machines 1 to 10 inclusive. The side elevation of D.H. 10A is similar to that of D.H. 10, except that the engines are mounted direct on the bottom plane.
Fig. 15. - Reconnaissance machine. R.E. 8.
A batch of R.E. 8's in the works of the Siddeley-Deasy Motor Car Co., Ltd., where large numbers of these machines have been built in addition to quantities of the B.H.P. type aero engines, known as "Siddeley-Puma." In the alleyway on the right is the partially completed fuselage of a D.H.10A.
THE ITALIAN REPRESENTATIVES AT THE E.L.T.A.: 2. the S.V.A. biplane
A Breguet pusher biplane flown, during the War by the Russians on the Roumanian front.
An impression of the Breguet tractor biplane in flight.
A Breguet tractor biplane about to land
LONDON-PARIS AND LONDON-BRUSSELS: The Handley Page firm are now running two continental air services, one to Paris and one to Brussels. In connection with the Paris service Breguet biplanes now alternate with the Handley Pages, the British machines leaving London on Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday, the French machines on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. The Paris-London service is in the reverse order. Our photographs show : (5) M. Patin, the pilot of one of the Breguet biplanes. (6) One of the Breguet biplanes alternating with the Handley Pages on the London-Paris service.
Four views of Alloa, where the British Caudron Co. have their factory and aerodrome, taken by Rene Desoutter from a G.3 Caudron (inset).
Vedrines' feat of landing on the roof of the Galeries Lafayette in the Boulevard Hausmann, Paris. The 80 h.p. Caudron as seen from the street.
Vedrines' 80 h.p. Caudron on the roof of the Galeries Lafayette, after it had been secured at the corner of the roof so as to be visible from the street. Note the sandbag protection against Hun bombers.
M. Etienne Poulet starting from Paris on October 14 for his attempt to fly to Melbourne. Starting the props, of the twin-engined Caudron
The "Dashing Rumpity," which is bringing in #3 and #5 per five and ten minutes' "flip" in Victoria, Australia, as referred to by "Kahminyah"
The Farman "School" type biplane, which is also suitable as a three-passenger "Tourabout"
The Farman School Machine: View of the nacelle
The D.F.W. C.V 200 h.p. Benz
SOME DUTCH MACHINES AT THE E.L.T.A. AERODROME: 3. A cabin machine which was known as a Fokker, but which was recently an L.V.G.
The Roland (L.F.G.) C ll 160 h.p. Mercedes
Three-quarter front view of the Supermarine "Channel"-type flying boat which is being used for joy flips at Bournemouth, Southampton and the Isle of Wight
The Supermarine "Channel"-type flying boat, with Mr. and Mrs. Harry Tate and Mr. R. Tate on board ready for a flight. Comdr. B. D. Hobbs, D.S.O., D.S.C., the pilot, is standing beside the engine
THE A.W. "ARA" SINGLE-SEATER. - The engine fitted is a 320 h.p. A.B.C. "Dragonfly."
Front and side elevations of the Armstrong-Whitworth machines.
Plan views of the Armstrong-Whitworth machines.
STARTERS IN HENDON'S AIR RACE ON SATURDAY: Left to right - B.A.T., piloted by Major Draper (winner; Avro, pilot Capt. D. H. Robertson, A.F.C.; Avro, pilot Major R. H. Carr, A.F.C., D.C.M. (second); G.-W. Bantam, pilot Capt. P. R. T. Chamberlayne (third); and Avro, pilot Lieut. G. R. Hicks, D.F.C.
Three-quarter Front View of the Blackburn Torpedo-carrying "Blackburd" (350 h.p. Rolls-Royce Engine).
Front elevations of the Blackburn machines
Side elevations of the Blackburn machines
The first Blackburn G.P. seaplane, 1415, at the RNAS experimental establishment, Isle of Grain, in 1916.
Front elevations of the Blackburn machines
Side elevations of the Blackburn machines
Plan views of Blackburn machines
The Blackburn Type "T.B." seaplane, two 110 h.p. Clerget engines
Front elevations of the Blackburn machines
Side elevations of the Blackburn machines
Plan views of Blackburn machines
The Blackburn triplane scout. 100 h.p. Gnome Monosoupape
Front elevations of the Blackburn machines
Side elevations of the Blackburn machines
THE BOULTON AND PAUL "BOURGES." - A "snap" from another aeroplane during a test flight
Looping the loop, Norwich way, on the big Boulton and Paul machine
THE BOULTON AND PAUL "BOURGES" LOOPING. - A photograph secured by our photographer, showing the machine as she frequently appeared at Hendon during last week end
A photographic record when in a spinning nose-dive, taken from a Boulton and Paul "Bourges." Note the effect of the ground appearing to be above the machine
THE BOULTON AND PAUL "BOURGES." - Two views taken by the designer of the machine, Mr. J. D. North, during a recent flight from Norwich to Hendon. On the left: Looking aft. On the right: Snap of port "Dragonfly" engine
Lieut. Courtney, whose handling of the Boulton and Paul "Bourges" was admired alike by the public and by other pilots at Hendon during the week end.
Thrre-quarter rear view of the Bristol bomber.
"Braemar II," the huge Bristol triplane one-time bomber, now converted for passenger-carrying and fcommercial purposes, in flight during the Easter holidays. Photographed from an attendant Bristol two-seater
THE BRISTOL PULLMAN: This machine has a cabin seating 14 passengers.
ON THE STOCKS. - A view of the front portion of the fuselage of the Bristol passenger-carrying triplane. The usual transverse bracing has been modified so as to allow passengers to walk through the whole length of the cabin. There will be seating accommodation for 14 passengers, in addition to the two pilots.
THE BRISTOL PULLMAN: Photo shows one end of the cabin. Owing to lack of space on their stand, the Bristol firm are prevented from showing the actual machine, but a very fine scale model will be on view.
FRONT AND SIDE ELEVATIONS OF THE BRISTOL MACHINES. - These are all drawn to a uniform scale, the scale being the same as that of the D.H. Milestones, published on January 9.
PLAN VIEWS OF THE BRISTOL MACHINES. - The scale to which these are drawn is the same as that of the D.H. machines previously published.
The Bristol Pullman, four 410 h.p. Liberty engines
A "BRISTOL" SCOUT, TYPE F, FITTED WITH 315 H.P. COSMOS "MERCURY" ENGINE: During recent tests at Farnborough this machine attained a speed of 143 m.p.h. at 10,000 ft., to which altitude it climbed in 5 mins. 25 secs. A height of 20,000 ft. was reached in 16 mins. 15 secs. It should be mentioned that this performance was attained without military load, the weight being 1,692 lbs.
The sole Scout F.1 B3991, with Cosmos Mercury engine in place of the Arab used in the original Scout F, at Filton in October 1918.
The Cosmos 300 h.p. "Mercury" engine in a "Bristol" scout.
A Bristol fighting scout fitted with a 350 h.p. A.B.C. air-cooled engine designed by Mr. Bradshaw.
FRONT AND SIDE ELEVATIONS OF THE BRISTOL MACHINES. - These are all drawn to a uniform scale, the scale being the same as that of the D.H. Milestones, published on January 9.
PLAN VIEWS OF THE BRISTOL MACHINES. - The scale to which these are drawn is the same as that of the D.H. machines previously published.
FRONT AND SIDE ELEVATIONS OF THE BRISTOL MACHINES. - These are all drawn to a uniform scale, the scale being the same as that of the D.H. Milestones, published on January 9.
PLAN VIEWS OF THE BRISTOL MACHINES. - The scale to which these are drawn is the same as that of the D.H. machines previously published.
Side view and front view of the Nieuport "Nighthawk," 320 h.p. A.B.C. "Dragonfly" engine.
Three-quarter front and rear views of the Nieuport "Nighthawk," a small, fast, single-seater fighter with a very good performance.
THE NIEUPORT NIGHTHAWK: Three-quarter rear view
THE NIEUPORT NIGHTHAWK: Three-quarter front view
No. 11. - The Nieuport L.C. 1, 320 h.p. A.B.C. Dragonfly, flown by Lieut. L. R. Tait-Cox.
A VERY SPORTY NIEUPORT SINGLE-SEATER: This machine is practically a modification of the "Night-hawk." It is said to possess a remarkable turn of speed
THE NIEUPORT NIGHTHAWK: On the left is shown the mounting of the A.B.C. Dragonfly engine, and on the right the multi-ply engine-bearer
THE NIEUPORT NIGHTHAWK: The rudder and fins, and the rear portion of the fuselage
THE NIEUPORT NIGHTHAWK: Sketch of the engine mounting, and, inset, the manner in which the side bracing in the front bay of the fuselage crosses the first vertical body strut
The Nieuport Nighthawk: Sketches showing front and rear chassis strut attachments. Note the universal joints.
The Nieuport Nighthawk: Some details of the bracket-and-strap mounting of the Imber tanks on the side of the fuselage
THE NIEUPORT NIGHTHAWK: Diagrammatic sketch of the petrol supply system
THE NIEUPORT NIGHTHAWK: Sketch of the cockpit, machine-guns, windscreen, etc.
The Nieuport Nighthawk: On the left the aluminium bracket which supports the control lever, and on the right the adjustable foot bar
SOME TAIL PLANE DETAILS OF THE NIEUPORT NIGHTHAWK: 1. An elevator hinge; 2. The elevator crank; 3. One of the rotatable worms of the tail plane trimming gear; 4. The roots of the tail plane. Note the lugs on the front spar which engage with the blocks on the worms shown in 3
THE NIEUPORT NIGHTHAWK: Sketch showing the attachment of the end section spars to those of the centre section
THE NIEUPORT NIGHTHAWK: Front and rear bottom spar attachments
THE NIEUPORT NIGHTHAWK: Plan, side and front elevations, to scale
The D.H. 3. - A three-seater twin-engine pusher, with two 120 h.p. Beardmore engines. A lack of more powerful engines prevented the production in quantities of this machine, which is really the forerunner of the famous D.H.10a.
Plan views, to a uniform scale, of "Airco." machines Nos.1 to 6 inclusive.
Front elevations, to a uniform scale, of all the "Airco." machines. The D.H. 10A has its engines mounted direct on the lower plane.
Side elevations, to a uniform scale, of "Airco." machines 1 to 10 inclusive. The side elevation of D.H. 10A is similar to that of D.H. 10, except that the engines are mounted direct on the bottom plane.
The D.H. 6. - A school machine, two-seater, dual controls. Has a very low minimum speed, (about 30 m.p.h.), and is not easily stalled. The head resistance is purposely kept high, but by using stream-line wing bracing wires and by cowling in the engine, the speed can be raised to 90 m.p.h., when the machine should be very useful as a moderate priced pleasure plane.
THE CROSS-COUNTRY HANDICAP AT HENDON AERODROME ON WHIT-MONDAY: The five starters lined up for the race, at the other side of the aerodrome
RACING AT THE LONDON AERODROME, HENDON: Line-up of the machines before Saturday's race of the day
RACING AT THE LONDON AERODROME, HENDON: Start on Saturday of the first heat. Capt. Gathergood first away on an Airco, followed by Lieut. Park on an Avro, Capt. Robertson (Avro) and the winner of the final, Capt. Chamberlayne, on a G.W. Bantam.
Capt. Gathergood on a D.H.6 crossing the line in front of the enclosures in the cross-country handicap at Hendon on Monday. He was, however, disqualified, having passed the wrong side of one of the route flags when starting. Note the Pylone, erected for the first time since the War
RACING AT THE LONDON AERODROME, HENDON: First heat on Saturday as seen from No. 1 Pylon. High up in the air, Capt. Chamberlayne (final winner), below Capt. Gathergood (21), first in the heat, followed by Lieut. Park (4)
Plan views, to a uniform scale, of "Airco." machines Nos.1 to 6 inclusive.
Front elevations, to a uniform scale, of all the "Airco." machines. The D.H. 10A has its engines mounted direct on the lower plane.
Side elevations, to a uniform scale, of "Airco." machines 1 to 10 inclusive. The side elevation of D.H. 10A is similar to that of D.H. 10, except that the engines are mounted direct on the bottom plane.
Fig. 33. - Day bomber. De Havilland 10a.
5. Capt. Gathergood, on a D.H. 10, sets out for Glasgow.
A batch of R.E. 8's in the works of the Siddeley-Deasy Motor Car Co., Ltd., where large numbers of these machines have been built in addition to quantities of the B.H.P. type aero engines, known as "Siddeley-Puma." In the alleyway on the right is the partially completed fuselage of a D.H.10A.
Fig. 9. - Three-ply covered fuselage. De Havilland 10.
Plan views, to a uniform scale, of "Airco." machines Nos. 9 and 10. The plan view of D.H. 10A is the same as that of the Liberty-engined D.H. 10.
Front elevations, to a uniform scale, of all the "Airco." machines. The D.H. 10A has its engines mounted direct on the lower plane.
Side elevations, to a uniform scale, of "Airco." machines 1 to 10 inclusive. The side elevation of D.H. 10A is similar to that of D.H. 10, except that the engines are mounted direct on the bottom plane.
THE SCHNEIDER CUP RACE. - The Fairey seaplane is similar in general design to the F 3. It is fitted with a 450 h.p. Napier "Lion" engine.
SCHNEIDER CUP: Starting up. The Fairey seaplane is here seen just before getting away from the beach.
THE START FOR THE SCHNEIDER CUP RACE: 1. The Fairey seaplane getting away.
THE TRANSATLANTIC RACE. - Up to the present the Fairey - Rolls-Royce machine is the only seaplane entered in this country. This photograph shows the standard Fairey 3 C type. The machine to be used for the Transatlantic attempt is very similar in general appearance, although differing in various details. The insets show the machine in flight and Mr. Sidney Pickles, the pilot. Capt. A. G. D. West, R.A.F., has been selected as the navigator.
Fig. 8. - Braced N-girder fuselage. Fairey.
OFF TO LOOK FOR FRITZ. - A British Flying Boat taxying along the surface.
A GOSPORT-BUILT FLYING BOAT OF THE F TYPE: This machine, which still belongs to the R.A.F., flew across from England, and is now anchored in the IJ.
OFF. - A British Flying Boat setting off on its patrol over the North Sea.
The U.S. Naval Seaplane N.C. 4 arrives at Plymouth, completing the crossing of the Atlantic by the air. The N.C. 4 is to the left in Plymouth Harbour, and taxying is British Seaplane N 4499, flying the British and American flags, on its way to greet the voyagers.
Three views showing the construction of the hull of the F-5-L flying-boat
Detail view of the F-5-L flying-boat, showing the engines and rear "cabin"
The petrol tanks and windmill pumps on the F-5-L flying-boat, which are located in the centre of the hull
View of the pilot's and wireless operator's quarters on the F-5-L flying-boat
THE BUSINESS END OF A FLYING BOAT. - The gun ring and BOMB sight may be clarly seen in the nose of the boat.
Diagrams of the fuel installation on the F-5-L flying-boat
THE U.S.A. NAVY F-5-L FLYING-BOAT. - Drawings of the hull.
THE U.S.A. NAVY F-5-L FLYING-BOAT. Plan, front and side elevations to scale
Another view of the Porte Super-Baby triplane flying boat, fitted with five Rolls-Royce Eagle engines of 400 h.p. each.
A three-quarter rear view of the Porte Super-Baby Triplane Flying Boat.
FRONT VIEW OF THE PORTE SUPER-BABY TRIPLANE FLYING BOAT. - This Goliath is fitted with five Rolls-Royce "Eagle 8" engines arranged in two tandem sets and one single "pusher." Two of the rear "pusher" propellers are four-bladed, the centre rear propeller and the two tractor screws in front being two-bladed. The span is 123 ft., length of fuselage 60 ft., height, keel to ring post, 27 ft. 6 in., total weight 23,400 lbs.
Manhandling the Ganymede C3481 at Hendon early in 1919. The photo emphasises the size of the exhaust stacks above the engines, and also shows well the unusual configuration of the tail unit.
THE GRAHAME-WHITE DAY BOMBER "GANYMEDE." - This machine is fitted with three Sunbeam "Maori" engines of 270 h.p. each. Near the ground the speed is 105 m.p.h., and at 10,000 ft. 93 m.p.h. The landing speed is about 52 m .p.h. The total weight of the machine loaded is 16,000 lbs., and she has an endurance of nine hours at 10,000 ft. The photograph shows the machine being wheeled out in readiness for a flight.
THE LONG AND THE SHORT OF IT. - The Grahame-White "Bantam" standing under the wing of the G.W. bomber "Ganymede."
Three-quarter rear view of the Grahame-White day bomber "Ganymede."
Fig. 36. - Night bomber. Handley Page V/1500.
A side view of the centre of one of the Handley-Page bombers, which were to have "pilled" Berlin about Armistice time.
HOW THE ROLLS-ROYCE ENGINES ARE PLACED IN THE HANDLEY PAGE 'PLANES. - Note the two front engines drive two-bladed tractor screws, whilst the two rear engines drive four-bladed propellers.
THE TRANSATLANTIC HANDLEY-PAGE. - The illustration gives a good idea of the size of the machine and also shows the mounting of the four Rolls-Royce engines
BELFAST TO FOLKESTONE NON-STOP FLIGHT. - The Rolls-Royce engined Handley Page which made the trip, at Folkestone, with the pilot, Mr. Clifford P. Prodger (left), and one of the passengers, Mr. Bernard Isaac
Beardmore-built E8290 at Hendon on 17 May, 1919, after being flown nonstop from Inchinnan in 6 1/2 hours by (inset) Clifford Prodger and Bernard Isaacs.
Fig. 12. - Tandem propellers. Handley Page V. 1500.
Fig. 25. - One-seater fighter. Martinsyde F. 3.
No. 10. - The Martinsyde F 4, 275 h.p. Rolls-Royce Falcon III, flown by Lieut. Robert Nisbet.
Fig.10. - Typical monocoque fuselage. Parnall Panther.
TWO VIEWS OF THE SAGE TYPE 2: In the photograph showing the machine uncovered the gunner may be seen standing up taking aim with a machine gun.
Side and front elevations of the Sage machines.
Side and front elevations of the Sage machines.
THE SAGE TYPE 4c SEAPLANE: This machine is very similar to the Type 4b , except that it has folding wings.
Side and front elevations of the Sage machines.
THE TRANSATLANTIC ATTEMPT. - Three-quarter front view of the Short "Shirl." The machine with which this firm will make the attempt is very similar to the "Shirl," but differs in various details. For instance, the wings will be of greater area than those shown in the photograph. The engine is a Rolls-Royce "Eagle."
The Short Transatlantic machine to be flown from East to West, piloted by Major Wood, with Capt.Wyllie as navigator
Three-quarter rear view of the Short Transatlantic machine
General arrangement drawings of the Short Trans-Atlantic machine.
Side elevations of the Sopwith machines
Front elevations of the Sopwith machines
Side elevations of the Sopwith machines
Front elevations of the Sopwith machines
A Sopwith "Baby" seaplane, of a type much used by the R.N.A.S.
Side elevations of the Sopwith machines
Front elevations of the Sopwith machines
The company-funded, single seat Sopwith Scooter was the company's very first monoplane, the aircraft making its debut in June 1918. Purportedly built as an unarmed interim prototype for the Sopwith Swallow fighter, the Scooter actually served as Sopwith Test Pilot, Harry Hawker's personal aircraft. Powered by a 130hp Clerget, the Scooter used a Sopwith Camel fuselage. The sole Scooter never wore a military serial, its first identity being the civil K 135 seen here, later changed to G-EACZ.
Three stages in the evolution of the Sopwith "Tabloid." - The top photograph shows the machine in its original form as a side-by-side two-seater. On the left is a later type, single-seater, in which the chassis struts are slightly more raked, and which has a non-balanced rudder, in front of which is a triangular fin. On the right the Sopwith "Tabloid" in which the late Mr. H. Barnwell flew In the aerial Derby. This machine had a Vee-type undercarriage.
A HISTORICAL EVENT. - Mr. Hawker, on the first Sopwith side-by-side two-seater "Tabloid," pays bis first flying visit to Hendon in 1913.
Side elevations of the Sopwith machines
Front elevations of the Sopwith machines
Side elevations of the Sopwith machines
Front elevations of the Sopwith machines
Fig. 37. - Ground fighter. Sopwith Salamander.
Front elevations of the Sopwith machines
THE VICKERS F.B. 12 PUSHER SCOUT. - This particular machine is fitted with a 100 h.p. Gnome, but others of the same type were fitted with 80 h.p. and 110 h.p. le Rhones and 100 h.p. Anzanis
Front Elevations of the Vickers machines
Side elevations ot fhe Vickers machines
Plan views of the Vickers machines
THE VICKERS F.B. 14. - This machine was a two-seater tractor, with 160 h.p. Beardmore engine!
Front Elevations of the Vickers machines
Side elevations ot fhe Vickers machines
Plan views of the Vickers machines
F.B.16D - known to Barnwell as 'Pot Belly', and the favourite hack of the British ace McCudden; in the centre of the spinner the exit hole for bullets from the engine-mounted machine-gun can be seen. The engine is a 150 h.p. Hispano-Suiza
Front Elevations of the Vickers machines
Side elevations ot fhe Vickers machines
Plan views of the Vickers machines
F.B.26A Vampire II with 200 h.p. Bentley B.R.2 rotary engine and twin machine-guns. This machine, which is a modification of the F.B. 26, is armoured and intended for trench fighting.
Front Elevations of the Vickers machines
Side elevations ot fhe Vickers machines
Fig. 35. - Night bomber. Vickers Vimy.
The final prototype Vimy, F9569, with Rolls-Royce Eagle VIII engines which ensured the success of the new bomber.
THE VICKERS "VIMY-ROLLS." - This is the machine on which Captain J. Alcock and Lieut. A. W. Brown crossed the Atlantic. Three-quarter front view.
Three-quarter rear view of the Vickers "Vimy-Rolls" on which Capt. J. Alcock and Lieut. A. W. Brown crossed the Atlantic.
An interesting souvenir of the Atlantic flight: Filling the petrol tanks of Capt. Sir John Alcock's Vickers-Vimy aeroplane with Shell spirit, in readiness for the now historic flight across the Atlantic. As will be seen, the photograph is autographed by Capt. Alcock.
The historical start from Newfoundland of the Vickers Vimy-Rolls machine for the Atlantic crossing
THE FLIGHT TO AUSTRALIA: The Vickers-Vimy-Rolls entered for the flight to Australia
THE FLIGHT TO AUSTRALIA. - As announced in "Flight" last week, the Vickers-Vimy-Rolls left Hounslow on November 11 on its long journey. Our photograph shows the pilots, mechanics, representatives of the Royal Aero Club, and a few members of the staff of Messrs. Vickers, Ltd., standing in front of the machine. Inset: The machine starting.
VICKERS IN HOLLAND: Two views of the Vickers stand at the E.L.T.A. show at Amsterdam. On the left a general view of the stand, showing the Vickers-"Vimy," and on the right the front portion of the fuselage of a Vickers-Vimy commercial.
Front Elevations of the Vickers machines
Side elevations ot fhe Vickers machines
THE VICKERS "VIMY-ROLLS." - Plan, side and front elevations to scale
THE VICKERS "VIMY-ROLLS." - Plan, side and front elevations to scale
THE VICKERS-VIMY-ROLLS ENTERED FOR THE FLIGHT TO AUSTRALIA: Plan, side and front elevations, to scale
SOME DUTCH MACHINES AT THE E.L.T.A. AERODROME: 1. A Spyker school machine
The Breguet C 2, type XVII 450 h.p. Renault engine
A FRENCH REPRESENTATIVE: The Breguet biplane, which arrived at Amsterdam by air. The machine, which has a 450 h.p. Renault engine, was piloted by the well-known pilot Roget, who had with him as passengers Lieut. Labouchere and a mechanic
THE MORANE FIGHTING BIPLANE, FITTED WITH A BUGATTI ENGINE: Note the "lobster-pot" radiators mounted below the engine, and the back-swept wings.
Schneider Cup: A view of the Nieuport seaplane
The Fokker Stand: On the left may be seen the port wing of a parasol monoplane, while in the centre is a sporting two-seater, shown with the port wings folded for transport. In the background, on the right, is a Fokker two-seater biplane, similar to the German Fokker type D.VII.
SOME DUTCH MACHINES AT THE E.L.T.A. AERODROME: 2. A couple of Fokker biplanes, one with rotary and one with stationary engine
The lesser-known Hun fighter, the Friedrichshafen single-seater scout.
The lesser-known Hun fighter, the Gotha short span two-seater.
THE LINKE-HOFMANN R 1: View of the cabin and airscrew mounting.
THE DIMINUTIVE BIPLANE RECENTLY CONSTRUCTED AT THE PAALSON FACTORY IN SWEDEN: It weighs 700 lb., and carries 400 lbs. at 80 m.p.h. with a 50 h.p. Thulin-Gnome engine. Note the strutting and the peculiar "gadget" above the body#presumably a sort of hand-grip for picking up the machine and carrying it home!
The Christmas "Bullet": Three-quarter view from front.
THE CHRISTMAS "BULLET." - Details of the fuselage and tail group.
Three-quarter rear view of the Curtiss model 18-T triplane
Front view of the Curtiss model 18-T triplane
Side view of the Curtiss model 18-T Triplane
Three-quarter front view of the Curtiss 18-B biplane.
Side view of the Curtiss 18-B biplane.
THE CURTISS MODEL 18-T TRIPLANE. - Plan, side and front elevations to scale.
THE CURTISS MODEL 18-B BIPLANE. - Plan, side and front elevations to scale.
The great American Curtiss flying boat, which has a capacity for carrying fifty passengers, and which was designed as a submarine chaser, on the slip-ways, ready to start. It is stated this machine has a carrying capacity of about six tons, a wing spread of 70 feet, contains three motors, and can carry sufficient fuel for a 13-hour trip. Its speed is 80 miles per hour, and it can attain a height of 2,000 feet in 10 minutes. Its crew consists of five men, two of whom are pilots. It is the intention of the owners to attempt a flight across the ocean with this machine.
Three-quarter front view of the N.C. 1 flying-boat
The Curtiss-built N.C.1 Flying Boat, designed by the U.S. Naval Aircraft Department.
Two detail views of the power plant on the N.C. 1 flying-boat
One of the four-engined "Atlantic" N.C. flying-boats just taking off
The N.C. 1, 3 and 4 leaving Rockaway Air Station on their first leg of the Atlantic flight via the Azores.
The U.S. Naval Seaplane N.C. 4 arrives at Plymouth, completing the crossing of the Atlantic by the air. The N.C. 4 is to the left in Plymouth Harbour, and taxying is British Seaplane N 4499, flying the British and American flags, on its way to greet the voyagers.
THE U.S. NAVY N.C. FLYING-BOAT. - Plan, side and front elevations to scale
Captain Sundstedt's seaplane as seen from behind, upon which he contemplates making a try for the Trans-Atlantic #10,000 flight prize of the Daily Mail. The wings of the 'plane measure 100 ft. It is equipped with two 400 h.p. Liberty motors, and is capable of a speed of 80 miles an hour. The cabin, which is completely enclosed, will hold four passengers. The two tons of petrol needed for the flight will be carried in the tank in the huge tail of the machine. The 'plane, without its passengers or fuel, weighs 10,000 lbs. Captain Sundstedt will fly from Bayonne (N-J.) to St. John's, Newfoundland, and from there attempt the flight across the Atlantic. He hopes to make the journey in 22 hours. The distance between Newfoundland and Ireland is about 1,800 miles.
Three views of a four-engined Sikorsky biplane in flight
Three views of one of the early Sikorsky biplanes, fitted with two 250 h.p. Salmson engines, which side-slipped from about 20 metres during the retreat from Warsaw
A later type Bat boat with 200 h.p. Salmson engine.
Front elevations of the Blackburn machines
Side elevations of the Blackburn machines
One of the first giant bombing 'planes built for Italy by the S.I.A. Co., of Turin, in the early part of 1916. It had two 700 h.p. Fiat engines mounted in the forward portions of the twin fuselages. The central nacelle carried pilot, observers and bombs, the useful load being 3 tons. Span, 108 ft.; chord, 11 ft. 6 ins.; overall length, 57 ft.; and weight, empty, 5 1/2 tons
E.S.I redesigned and rebuilt from the original Barnwell Bullet, shown wearing the 1914 Union Jack insignia. Note the stream-line body. The engine was a 100 h.p. Gnome monosoupape
Front Elevations of the Vickers machines
Side elevations ot fhe Vickers machines
Two views of the French S.E.A. two-seater biplane, which has a speed of 129 m.p.h. at 6,500 ft., and climbs to 17,000 ft. in 21 mins. It is fitted with a 390 h.p. Lorraine-Dietrich engine, and has a span of 39 ft. 5 ins., an area of 404 sq. ft., and a loading of 8-4 lbs./sq. ft.
THE HENRY POTEZ, TYPE S.E.A. IV P.M.: Three-quarter front view
THE SPAD-HERBEMONT TWO-SEATER MONOCOQUE: A Military biplane, 300 h.p. Hispano-Suiza, on which the French pilot, Sadi Lecointe, made a record altitude (solo) flight of 89,200 ft. He also beat the speed record (with passenger) with a speed of 142.8 m.p.h.
The photo is of a 300 h.p. Spad, flown by Sadi Lecointe.
SCHNEIDER CUP: The Spad at anchor. This machine looks very business-like, and should have put up a good performance but for a leaky float. The top plane is swept back, and is of shorter span than the bottom one.
A Lowe, Willard and Fowler DH-4B postal conversion with two 200 h.p. Hall-Scott L-6 engines. Others had 150 h.p. Hispano-Suizas.
An American de Havilland converted from a single to a multi-engined machine. The engines are two six-cylindered Libertys, one of which is capable of maintaining the machine in flight. It is being used, in conjunction with the Martin "bombers" for mail-carrying, and is said to be nice and easy on the controls.
Fig. 7. - Front view of Oertz flying-boat, 1917
Fig. 6. - Oertz flying-boat (1917), with 240 h.p. Maybach engine
The Vickers F.B.7, 2 100 b.p. Gnome monosoupape engines
The Vickers F.B.8, 2 100 h.p. Gnome monosoupape engines
Front Elevations of the Vickers machines
Side elevations ot fhe Vickers machines
THE TARRANT TRIPLANE. - View from the front
THE TARRANT TRIPLANE. - View from behind
THE TARRANT "TABOR." - #View of the great monocoque body
The above photograph, which looks like a tunnel of an underground railway, is really the inside of the fuselage of the big Tarrant flying machine. As will be seen it has an arrangement of circular wooden girders with the longerons passing through each. It is long enough to accommodate a full-size cricket pitch, and is expected to be flying with its engines of 3,000 h.p. in another two or three weeks. With this machine it is claimed it will be easily possible to fly from London to Bombay with but a single stop on route. Another fuselage almost twice the size of this is being designed, and will accommodate about 100 passengers.
ONE OF THE PLANES OF THE TARRANT TRIPLANE. - This view gives a good idea of the size of the wings
THE TARRANT GIANT TRIPLANE. - A drawing of the machine as she will appear in flight. The power plant consists of six Napier "Lion" engines.
THE TARRANT "TABOR." - Sketch showing the machine as it will appear in flight
THE TARRANT TRIPLANE. - Plan, side and front elevations to scale
F3492, the Siddeley Puma engined Avro 533 Manchester Mk. II.
The D.H.4 ENCLOSED MACHINE CLIMBING. - The manner in which the two passengers are seated facing one another is clearly seen in this photograph.
SOME MORE BRITISH MACHINES AT THE E.L.T.A. AERODROME: 2. The Airco 4A
MAJ. STUART-WORTLEY'S D.H 4a AT INTERLAKEN, SWITZERLAND: Maj. Stuart-Wortley took this machine over with a view to giving demonstration flights
Hounslow - Switzerland: Mr. Stewart Wortley, who is the Swiss representative of Aircraft Transport and Travel, Ltd., about to leave for Switzerland.
The New Mode of Travel. - Three Generals flew over to Hendon on Saturday from Stonehenge in a converted de H. 4, piloted by Mr. M. D. Manton of the Aircraft Manufacturing Co.
THE LONDON-PARIS AIR SERVICE: (1) Mr. M. D. Manton discussing matters with Capt. Baylis as the latter is leaving for Paris on a de H. (Airco) 4A. (2) Lieut. Eric Lawford has just arrived with the mail from Paris in a de H. (Airco) 4A. (3) The Airco 4A just before leaving for Paris.
FIRST INTERNATIONAL AERIAL MAIL: This week marks a milestone in aviation, inasmuch as the commencement ot official international mail-carrying was inaugurated. Our photographs show the Paris mails being loaded into an Airco 4A, and the Government pennant, bearing the legend, "Royal Mail," being fixed to the rudder of the machine
THE D.H. (AIRCO) 4A MACHINES USED ON THE LONDON-PARIS ROUTE: Plan, side and front elevations to scale.
Front Elevations of the Vickers machines
Side elevations ot fhe Vickers machines
Front Elevations of the Vickers machines
Side elevations ot fhe Vickers machines
Plan views of the Vickers machines
THE VICKERS F.B.24G. - The engine is a 275 h.p. Lorraine.
Front Elevations of the Vickers machines
Side elevations ot fhe Vickers machines
Plan views of the Vickers machines
Front elevations of the Blackburn machines
Side elevations of the Blackburn machines
Plan views of Blackburn machines
Three-quarter front view of the U.S. Navy HS-2L flying-boat
Side view of the U.S. Navy HS-2L flying-boat
THE U.S. NAVY HS-2L FLYING-BOAT: Plan, side and front elevations to scale
The Aviatik passenger-carrier, Type R III
Diagram of passenger accommodation, etc., in the Aviatik, Type R III
Fig. 9. - The Oertz "Flying Schooner" taxying
Fig. 8. - Three-quarter rear view of 1916 Oertz tandem biplane, known as the "Flying Schooner."
Fig. 10. - The Oertz "Flying Schooner" in the air. This is a unique flying shot from down under giving a good look on the construction of the large hull and the unique tandem wings.
AT THE LONDON AND PROVINCIAL AERODROME, STAGG LANE, HENDON: An L. and P. machine taking over visitors to see the racing at the London Aerodrome
Arrival of Pilot Lieut. Stacks with the Jazz band instruments at the L. and P. Stagg Lane Aerodrome, where, between flights, they helped visitors later to pass the time at tea, tennis, etc.
Fig. 5. - Oertz flying-boat of 1915, fitted with 240 h.p. Maybach engine. The machine was designed for a 260 h.p. Argus, but this could not be obtained
An American camouflaged speed scout, the Berckman, built by the Berckman's Aeroplane Co. It is equipped with a G. V Gnome.
The Cosmos "Jupiter" engine, 450 h.p., installed in a "Bristol" Badger. In the left-hand photograph the engine cowl has been removed to show the mounting.
No. 17. - The Sopwith Biplane, 320 h.p. A.B.C. Dragonfly, which was to have been flown by Mr. H. G. Hawker. The authorities, however, refused to give permission for the machine to take part, the reason given, we believe, being that the engine was Government property. This attitude on the part of the Government naturally caused very keen disappointment.
Three-quarter front view of the Farman "Goliath" aerobus.
A view from in front of the centre of the Farman Paris-England Service Aeroplane, showing the engines and passengers' cabin. There are two engines of 250 h.p. each, giving the machine a speed of 110 m.p.h.
The big Farman Paris-England Service Aeroplane, with enclosed passenger cabin. Side view of the monster showing passengers' cabin in front. The machine has a span of 92 feet, and can lift three tons. The machine can climb 1,500 ft. in 4 mins., 3,000 ft. m 10 mins., and 6,000 ft. in 28 mins.
A "night" view of the Farman "Goliath" aerobus, taken at midnight on August 10th, just before the start for its flight to Dakar.
The Farman Goliath: Side view
The Farman "Goliath" aerobus in flight.
View of the interior of the passengers' cabin of the Farman "Goliath" aerobus.
THE FARMAN GOLIATH: View inside the cabin
THE FARMAN "GOLIATH" AEROBUS: Plan, front and side elevations to scale.
TWO VIEWS OF THE C.A.C. SCHOOL MACHINE. - Inset is the machine in flight. In the bottom photograph Mr. Sykes is in the pilot's seat, while standing against the machine is Mr. "Tony " Fletcher, the designer.
Nurse McMaugh, at the Central Aircraft Co.'s aerodrome at Northolt, where she is taking her ticket, goes up with Mr. Sykes, O.B.E., for a spin. An Australian pupil at the school wishing her a good trip. Inset: A snap of the above pair in the air, taken from a sister Central Aircraft 'bus.
"TICKETS" AT NORTHOLT: The Central Aircraft Co. are busy out Northolt way giving passenger flights and doing school work. Our photograph shows two pupils who have just obtained their Royal Aero Club certificates. On the left is Mr. Tanner, whose actual flying time was 3 hours 15 mins., and on the right, Mr. Pool, who got his "ticket" after 3 1/2 hours in the air. Mr. Herbert Sykes, O.B.E., who is chief instructor, is seen between his two latest pupils. The machine used is the C.A. Co.'s "Centaur 4," with Anzani engine. As each pupil is allowed 10 hours' flying, Messrs. Tanner and Pool are looking forward to nearly 7 hours' flying before leaving the school
THE C.A.C. SIDE-BY-SIDE TOURING AEROPLANE. - 100 h.p. Anzani engine. A sketch of the proposed machine.
THE CENTRAL AIRCRAFT CO.'S 9-SEATER: Three-quarter front view
THE CENTRAL AIRCRAFT CO.'S 9-SEATER: Side view
THE CENTRAL AIRCRAFT CO.'S 9-SEATER: Three-quarter rear view
THE CENTRAL 'AIRCRAFT CO.'S 9-SEATER: On the left, one of the undercarriages; on the right, view of the tail and tail skid
THE C.A.C. TWIN-ENGINE PASSENGER CARRIER. - Two 160 h.p. Beardmore engines. Sketch showing the machine as she will appear in flight.
SOME CONSTRUCTIONAL DETAILS OF THE CENTRAL AIRCRAFT CO.'S 9-SEATER: 1. The hinged interplane strut attachment. 2. Access to the two front seats is by means of steps secured to a tube which is drawn up during flight. The three steps then rest in slots in the floor of the fuselage. 3. The spar joints are of the binge type as the wings are made to fold back. Access to the joint in the front spars is by means of the easily removable section of the leading edge shown on the right-hand side of the sketch. 4. The attachment of the undercarriage struts to the bottom spar
THE CENTRAL AIRCRAFT CO.'S 9-SEATER BIPLANE: Plan, side and front elevations, to scale
THE AVRO BABY, 35-40 H.P. GREEN ENGINE. - Three-quarter front view. The first, short lived, Avro 534 Baby prototype.
THE AVRO BABY, 35-40 H.P. GREEN ENGINE. - Three-quarter rear view.
THE AVRO BABY, 35-40 H.P. GREEN ENGINE. - Front view.
No. 14. - The Avro Baby, 35-40 h.p. Green, flown by Capt. H. A. Hamersley. This machine won the sealed handicap
THE AERIAL DERBY. - Capt. H. A. Hamersley, M.C., on the Avro Baby, 35 h.p. Green engine, winner under the Sealed Handicap.
THE AVRO BABY. - Two views of the machine, before and after covering
THE AVRO BABY. - View of the mounting of the 35-40 h.p. Green engine.
THE AVRO BABY. - On left, view of the fuselage, showing pilot's seat and controls; and on the right, the tail
Avro 534A Water Baby G-EAPS with revised vertical tail surfaces, ready for launching at Hamble, November 1919.
New Avro Type: The annexed photograph shows the fuselage of an Avro Baby, fitted with floats. This machine, which was fully described in "Flight" of June 26, 1919, flies extraordinarily well as a land machine, and although the extra weight of the floats may reduce the speed and climb somewhat, the Baby should still have quite a good performance as a seaplane.
THE AVRO BABY. - Some constructional details and a key sketch indicating the location of the details. In the key sketch the struts of the undercarriage are shown without the streamline fairing. The detail sketches, B and C show attachment of rear and front spars to fuselage, while A is a sketch of the neat standard Avro fuselage socket and wiring lugs
Front Elevations of the Avro Machines.
Side Elevations of the Avro Machines.
Some more Plan Views of Avro Machines.
THE AVRO BABY. - Plan, front and side elevations to scale.
THE G.W. "BANTAM." - Three-quarter rear view.
The G.W. "Bantam" in flight, piloted by Capt. Chamberlain.
THE LONG AND THE SHORT OF IT. - The Grahame-White "Bantam" standing under the wing of the G.W. bomber "Ganymede."
THE CROSS-COUNTRY HANDICAP AT HENDON AERODROME ON WHIT-MONDAY: The five starters lined up for the race, at the other side of the aerodrome
THE AERIAL DERBY. - The competitors lined up at the starting line ready for the race.
STARTERS IN HENDON'S AIR RACE ON SATURDAY: Left to right - B.A.T., piloted by Major Draper (winner; Avro, pilot Capt. D. H. Robertson, A.F.C.; Avro, pilot Major R. H. Carr, A.F.C., D.C.M. (second); G.-W. Bantam, pilot Capt. P. R. T. Chamberlayne (third); and Avro, pilot Lieut. G. R. Hicks, D.F.C.
RACING AT THE LONDON AERODROME, HENDON: Start on Saturday of the first heat. Capt. Gathergood first away on an Airco, followed by Lieut. Park on an Avro, Capt. Robertson (Avro) and the winner of the final, Capt. Chamberlayne, on a G.W. Bantam.
RACING AT THE LONDON AERODROME, HENDON: First heat on Saturday as seen from No. 1 Pylon. High up in the air, Capt. Chamberlayne (final winner), below Capt. Gathergood (21), first in the heat, followed by Lieut. Park (4)
Capt. Chamberlain, the G.W, pilot of the Grahame-White "Bantam,'' in the cockpit, and standing against the machine, M. #. Boudot, the designer.
A SKETCH OF THE GRAHAME-WHITE "Bantam." - The man standing in front gives a good idea of the small size of this machine.
SOME CONSTRUCTIONAL DETAILS OF THE GRAHAME-WHITE SPORTING MODEL. - 1. The spar box and lug for attachment of interplane strut. 2. The wiring plate and socket for tubular compression strut of internal bracing. 2 is secured to 1 by two horizontal bolts. Fig. 3 is an external view of the attachment to the bottom front spar of the interplane struts. The controls are shown in Fig. 4, details of which are indicated in Fig. 5. Fig. 6 shows the fuselage clip. Details of the undercarriage are shown in Figs. 7 and 8.
THE GRAHAME-WHITE "BANTAM." - Plan, side and front elevations to scale.
THE TRANSATLANTIC RACE. - Three-quarter rear view of the Sopwith-Rolls-Royce machine, the "Atlantic." The detachable boat, which forms the turtle back of the rear portion of the fuselage, is clearly shown. The windmill projecting through the port side of the fuselage drives the generator for the wireless set. When not in use, it can be swung inboard. Being driven by a windmill the generator can be worked when the engine is stopped, as during a glide.
This view of the Atlantic (obviously taken on the same occasion as those for which numbers are quoted) shows the retractable wind-driven generator; and, such is the lighting, the cowling louvres are more than usually obvious.
THE TRANSATLANTIC ATTEMPT. - Rear view of the Sopwith machine.
Mr. Hawker's Sopwith machine being replenished with "Castrol," at St. John's, Newfoundland
Hawker's salved Sopwith machine on the roof of Selfridge's, Oxford Street
General arrangement drawings of the Sopwith Trans-Atlantic machine.
SOME MORE BRITISH MACHINES AT THE E.L.T.A. AERODROME: 3. Thf Bat F.K. 26. Note the gentleman examining an aileron hinge
THE RAILWAY HOLD-UP AND MAILS BY AEROPLANE: Post Office officials and the despatch and receipt of mails at Hounslow. 4 . A "B.A.T." arrived from Manchester in 1 1/2 hours, piloted by Turner. Another carried mails to Newcastle, piloted by Duke.
Loading up the B.A.T. commercial aeroplane at Hounslow for its recent emergency flight to Amsterdam, when it carried over 600 lbs. of freightage, including a consignment of Emaillite, urgently wanted by the Dutch Government, and ordered through Messrs. Tashe, the Emaillite representatives in Holland. Note the Customs officer in attendance to seal up the doors
A three-quarter front view of the B.A.T. four-seater biplane.
THE B.A.T. FOUR-SEATER BIPLANE. - The original landing chassis, showing on the left the shock-absorbing gear, and on the right, the hinged stub axles and hub at the top, and below, a general view of the chassis.
One of the radiators, with adjustable shutter, on the B.A.T. four-seater biplane
The oil radiator, filter and filler-cap on the B.A.T. four-seater biplane
THE B.A.T. FOUR-SEATER BIPLANE. - A diagram showing the arrangement of the formers in the fuselage
The B.A.T. Four-seater Biplane. - Some constructional details of formers 3 and 4 on the fuselage.
THE B.A.T. FOUR-SEATER BIPLANE. - On the left, a sketch of the pilot's seat and control. On the right, the tail plane trimming gear, and inset, a detail of the screw-gear of the latter
SOME CONSTRUCTIONAL DETAILS OF THE B.A.T. FOUR-SEATER BIPLANE. - On the left is the top plane attachment to the centre section, which i s similar to those on the lower plane. In the centre is a sketcn of the steerable tall skid, and on the right is the strong but simple elevator crank
THE B.A.T. FOUR-SEATER BIPLANE, F.K. 26. - Plan, side and front elevations to scale.
THE BOULTON & PAUL P.8 COMMERCIAL MACHINE: Three-quarter front view
THE BOULTON & PAUL P.8 COMMERCIAL MACHINE: Three-quarter rear view
THE TRANSATLANTIC BOULTON AND PAUL-NAPIER MACHINE. - The fuselage being erected at the B.P. works at Norwich. The starboard Napier aero engine may be seen in place on the wing. Note the large tanks
The B. & P. P.8: View from behind of the starboard engine and its mounting
The B. & P.P.8: View of the cutoff valves, mounted underneath the bottom of the fuselage, by means of which the water system of either engine can be cut off.
THE B. & P. P.8: View inside the fuselage, looking aft.
THE B. & P. P.8: View of one of the undercarriage Vees with rubber and air shock-absorbing device.
The B. & P. P.8: View of the controls. The levers on the left are engine controls, while the large wheel just in front of them is for raising and lowering the radiator. The central wheel is the control wheel, which, by a very ingenious device, can be turned into an ordinary steering wheel, the aileron and elevator controls then being locked in position. The wheel on the right is for trimming the tail plane.
THE BOULTON AND PAUL TRANSATLANTIC MACHINE. - Two 450-h.p. "Napier-Lions" are fitted. Picture shows machine in original form as a passenger 'bus. For this flight the petror tanks will be fitted in the cabin space
The Boulton and Paul - Napier Machine. - A drawing showing the machine as she will appear in flight
THE B. & P. P.8: Sketch of the engine controls. One set of these is for normal control, the other for altitude control.
The B. & P. P.8: Above, diagram of the water system. On left, diagram of engine mounting structure, which is so designed that there are no offset moments.
THE B. & P. P.8: Combined spar and chassis fittings. On left, fitting on the front spar, and, on the right, the fitting on the rear spar.
THE BOULTON AND PAUL - NAPIER MACHINE. - Plan, side and front elevations to scale
THE B. & P. P8: Plan, side and front elevation to scale.
Three-quarter front view of the Martinsyde-Rolls-Royce "Raymor"
THE "RAYMOR." - Running the engine of the Martinsyde-Rolls-Royce Transatlantic machine
The Martinsyde plane, "Raymor," at St. John's, Newfoundland, in which Capt. W. Morgan, R.N., R.A.F., is attempting a Transatlantic flight. Capt. Morgan is seated in his machine ready for a trial flight
THE MARTINSYDE MACHINE ENTERED FOR THE FLIGHT TO AUSTRALIA: Three-quarter rear view
THE AUSTRALIAN FLIGHT: On the left, the start from Hounslow of the Martinsyde 'plane on December 4. "Goodbye-ee!" At top: Mr. Nesbit of the Martinsyde firm wishes good luck to Capt. C. E. Howell on his journey. On the right: The Martinsyde 'plane gets away at 9.35 a.m.
THE MARTINSYDE-ROLLS "RAYMOR." - Plan, side and front elevations to scale
THE MARTINSYDE MACHINE ENTERED FOR THE ENGLAND-AUSTRALIA FLIGHT: Plan, side and front eievations to scale
THE FLIGHT TO AUSTRALIA: Side elevation of the Martinsyde machine fitted with floats for the last stages of the journey
THE FLIGHT TO AUSTRALIA: Side view of the Alliance machine, 450 h.p. Napier Lion engine
THE ALLIANCE-NAPIER "SEABIRD." - Side view, showing how both pilot and navigator are accommodated in the cabin
Weatherbound: The Alliance-Napier machine entered for the flight to Australia has had to stand by owing to unsettled weather conditions. As soon as conditions improve, a start will be made. Our photograph shows on the left, Lieut. R. Douglas, M.C., D.C.M., the pilot of the machine; on the right, Lieut. Ross, the navigator; and, in the centre, Mr. J. A. Peters, the designer of the Alliance machine. The photograph gives a good idea of the cabin arrangement
ANOTHER PHOTOGRAPH OF THE ALLIANCE-NAPIER BIPLANE: Last week we published a photograph of this machine, which has a speed of 140 m.p.h. and a range of 3,000 miles. It is fitted with a Napier Aero engine. In front of the machine are seen some of the people who have helped to build it
The instrument board and wireless outfit in the cabin of the "Seabird," the biplane manufactured by the Alliance Aeroplane Co., which recently flew from London to Madrid in 7 3/4 hours
THE SIDDELEY "SISKIN." - A couple of snaps taken recently. This machine possesses several unusual features. Thus the undercarriage is of the Oleo type. The top plane is slightly larger than the lower one, and the inter-plane struts are raked. The engine is a 340 h.p. A.B.C. "Dragonfly."
"VICKERS-VIMY COMMERCIAL" AEROPLANES FOR CHINA: One of 100 of these machines ordered from Messrs. Vickers, Ltd., by the Chinese Government, to be used for commercial aeroplane services in China. The speed of the machine is 100 m.p.h., and it has a carrying capacity of 16 passengers and one pilot, or 1 1/2 tons of mails or goods, with an endurance of 5 hours. Our photograph shows one of these machines at the E.L.T. A. aerodrome at Amsterdam. Inset shows the machine in flight
Three-quarter front view of the Vickers "Vimy-Commercial" biplane
Side view of the Vickers "Vimy-Commercial" biplane
Three-quarter rear view of the Vickers "Vimy-Commercial" biplane
Rear view of the Vickers "Vimy-Commercial" biplane
A VISITOR TO HENDON. - The Vickers Vimy-Commercial machine fitted with two Rolls-Royce engines. This machine has a most luxuriously equipped cabin for passengers, enclosed in a monocoque body. In front, in bowler hat, immediately below the port engine nacelle, may be seen Mr. Louis Noel, who was one of the visitors to Hendon during the week end.
SOME MORE BRITISH MACHINES AT THE E.L.T.A. AERODROME: 4. The Vickers Vimy-Commercial.
A snap of the Vickers Vimy-Commercial machine in flight
The Vickers commercial passenger-'plane flies over the grounds of Edgwarebury House.
One of the box-formers for the fuselage of the Vickers "Vimy-Commercial" biplane
VICKERS IN HOLLAND: Two views of the Vickers stand at the E.L.T.A. show at Amsterdam. On the left a general view of the stand, showing the Vickers-"Vimy," and on the right the front portion of the fuselage of a Vickers-Vimy commercial.
THE VICKERS "VIMY-COMMERCIAL" BIPLANE: Four views showing the cabin under construction
THE VICKERS "VIMY-COMMERCIAL" BIPLANE: Two views of the interior of the "luxurious" cabin. On the left, looking forward, and on the right, looking aft. It should be noted, that it is not quite finished, and several fittings have to be added.
Sketch showing the recesses, in the fore part of the cabin, giving access to the control cables. The conduit conveying the engine controls will be seen in the centre.
The biplane tail of the Vickers " Vimy-Commercial."
Sketch showing the mounting of the main petrol tanks under the cabin of the Vickers "Vimy-Commercial"
SOPWITH PASSENGER MACHINE. - One of the Gnu biplanes, with enclosed cabin for the passenger. In the photograph the cabin is shown open
The Sopwith "Gnu" three-seater limousine, 200 h.p. B.A.2
A 60-GUINEA "FLIP." - Mr. Hawker gives Miss Daisy King the first flight at Hendon on Saturday. Secured by our photographer from an Airco (de H. 9) biplane piloted by Capt. Gathergood.
Miss Daisy King, the highest bidder for the first passenger flight with Mr. Hawker at Hendon, being shepherded by Mr, Hawker and Mr. Sigrist into the Sopwith Gnu.
SOME MORE BRITISH MACHINES AT THE E.L.T.A. AERODROME: 1. The Airco 16. This machine is shown on the Airco stand minus its wings
SIDE VIEW OF THE NEW AIRCO (DE HAVILLAND) PASSENGER CARRIER. - As the illustration shows, there is seating accommodation in the cabin for four passengers. The engine is a 350 h.p. Rolls-Royce, and with full complement of passengers the machine has a speed of 126 m.p.h. Mr. M. D. Manton is seen in the pilot's seat
THE AIRCO 16: This photograph shows the cabin of the standard machine which has been used extensively on the London-Paris air service. The Show machine is similar, except for the engine, which is a 450 h.p. Napier Lion
THE LONDON-PARIS AIR SERVICE: Start of the service for Paris from Hounslow Aerodrome on August 25. The Airco machine embarking its passengers, and on the right the first Airco machine just leaving for the journey. Below Gen. F H. Sykes and Gen. Festing, who were present at the inauguration of the service.
THE LONDON-PARIS AIR SERVICE: (1) A de H. (Airco) 16 arrives from Paris, carrying, among others, Miss Edie Thomas, the American concert singer. (2) Lieut. H. Shaw descending from his Airco 16 after piloting a load of passengers safely across from Paris. (3) One of the Airco 16 machines used on the London-Paris service.
A French lady designer of one of the greatest London emporiums goes a flipping at Hendon in a D.H. enclosed machine, no doubt with designs on designs aviatic.
THE AIRCO (DE H.) 16. - On the left a lady passenger is seen, on the side ladder, entering the cabin, and, on the right, a view looking into the cabin, showing how the four seats are arranged
THE D.H. (AIRCO) 16 MACHINES USED ON THE LONDON-PARIS ROUTE: Plan, side and front elevations to scale.
The Airco (D.H.) 16, 450 h.p. Napier Lion
Side and front elevations of the Sage machines.
Plan views of the Sage machines.
The B.R. Fiat biplane which was flown last week from Turin to London, with stops at Rome and Paris.
THE ITALIAN REPRESENTATIVES AT THE E.L.T.A.: 1. The large F.I.A.T. biplane with 700 h.p. engine
Lieut. Brack Papa, the pilot, who flew the B.R. Fiat machine from Turin to London, and the 12-cylindered 700 h.p. Fiat engine used in the flight
THE WESTLAND LIMOUSINE: Three-quarter rear view
THE WESTLAND LIMOUSINE: Three-quarter front view
THE WESTLAND LIMOUSINE: Three-quarter front view
THE WESTLAND LIMOUSINE: 1 and 2, A couple of snaps through one of the starboard windows. 3, The cabin is entered through a door in the side as comfortably as on a motor car. 4, Three-quarter rear view of the Westland limousine. 5, Three-quarter front view of the Westland limousine
THE WESTLAND LIMOUSINE: Diagram of the tail plane trimming gear.
The Westland limousine, 275 h.p. Rolls-Royce Falcon
THE WESTLAND LIMOUSINE: Plan, side and front elevations to scale
Three-quarter front view of the Austin " Whippet."
Three-quarter rear view of the Austin "Whippet."
Front view of the Austin "Whippet" with the wings folded.
Side view of the Austin "Whippet," with the wings folded.
THE AUSTIN "WHIPPET" SINGLE-SEATER BIPLANE: Plan, side and front elevations to scale.
The B.A.T. "Crow": This little machine, fitted with a 2-cyl. A.B.C. "Gnat" engine, attracts great attention at the E.L.T.A. Show. Briefly speaking, it is a "Demoiselle" brought up to date.
SOME DUTCH MACHINES AT THE E.L.T.A. AERODROME: 2. A couple of Fokker biplanes, one with rotary and one with stationary engine
The Fokker Stand: On the left may be seen the port wing of a parasol monoplane, while in the centre is a sporting two-seater, shown with the port wings folded for transport. In the background, on the right, is a Fokker two-seater biplane, similar to the German Fokker type D.VII.
Van Berkels Patent: On this stand is shown a twin-float seaplane without inter-plane wing bracing, the lift being taken by tubes from the floats. This machine was shown minus engine.
Capt H. A. Hamersley coming ashore at Hamble on 29 August, 1919, in the Avro 539A G-EALG Schneider Trophy entrant.
THE AVRO-PUMA SCHNEIDER SEAPLANE: Preparing the machine for a trial flight. In the cockpit is Capt. Hamersley, M.C., who will pilot the machine in the race
HORS DE CONCOURS: The Avro seaplane was not allowed to start in the race, but Capt. Hamersley brought her down and went round the course a few times by way of a demonstration.
Schneider Cup Entrants in dock. - The Avro Seaplane having her float repaired. Note the large fin and balanced rudder which have been substituted for the original ones.
THE AVRO SCHNEIDER CUP SEAPLANE. - Plan, side and front elevations, to scale
THE ITALIAN REPRESENTATIVE. - Front view of a "Savoia" flying boat, types 13, fitted with a 250-h.p. Isotta Fraschini engine.
SCHNEIDER CUP: The Savoia flying-boat at the Saunders sheds at Cowes on the day before the race.
SCHNEIDER CUP: The Savoia flying-boat. Sr. Janello was disqualified, as he was not seen from the Swanage Bay mark boat.
THE START FOR THE SCHNEIDER CUP RACE: 3. The Savoia flying-boat.
SCHNEIDER CUP: Avanti Savoia. A snap of the Italian representative passing between the pier and the committee yacht on his fourth lap.
Three-quarter front view of the Grahame-White "Aero-Limousine."
Three-quarter rear view of the Grahame-White "Aero-Limousine."
THE GRAHAME-WHITE "AERO-LIMOUSINE": Two views showing, on the left, a general view of the cabin, and on the right, the port engine and mounting.
One side of the landing chassis of the Grahame-White "Aero-Limousine."
Sketch showing the pilot's "conning-tower" on the Grahame-White "Aero-Limousine."
View looking into the cabin of the Grahame-White "Aero-Limousine,'' showing the rear seat.
THE GRAHAME- WHITE "AERO-LIMOUSINE": An alternative six-seating arrangement for the cabin.
The Grahame-White "Aero-Limousine": Sketch showing the rudder-bar, which is mounted below the cockpit floor and pedals.
The double switch for the two engines on the Grahame-White "Aero-Limousine."
General arrangement of the landing chassis of the Grahame-White "Aero-Limousine." Note the diagonal strutting of the fuselage to take landing stresses.
One of the wing attachment lugs, showing the ash packing, of the Grahame-White "Aero-Limousine."
Sketch of the tail-skid of the Grahame-White "Aero-Limousine." Note the protecting block beneath the stern-post.
THE GRAHAME-WHITE "AERO-LIMOUSINE": Plan, side and front elevations to scale.
Three-quarter front view of the Lawson "Aerial Transport," Type C 2.
Two views of the fuselage with centre sections and engines, of the Lawson "Aerial Transport."
The interior of the cabin of the Lawson "Aerial Transport."
THE LAWSON "AERIAL TRANSPORT," TYPE C 1: Plan, front and side elevations to scale.
The Aviatik Limousine, Type F.
The Supermarine contender in the 1919 Schneider Trophy event - the Sea Lion I G-EALP flown by Sqn Ldr B. D. Hobbs.
The Schneider Cup Entrants. - Two views of the Supermarine Flying Boat, 450 h.p. Napier Lion engine.
THE START FOR THE SCHNEIDER CUP RACE: 2. The Supermarine flying-boat.
ABOVE THE STARTING POINT FOR THE SCHNEIDER CUP: Bournemouth pier snapped from a Supermarine flying-boat on the morning of the race. To the right of the pier, sitting on the beach, may be seen the Fairey biplane. At one o'clock the public were carried off the pier, and then re-admitted upon payment of a special fee.
THE SOPWITH SCHNEIDER SEAPLANE: Three-quarter front view
The Sopwith "Schneider Cup" racing seaplane, 450 h.p. Cosmos "Jupiter"
THE SCHNEIDER CONTEST: The Sopwith seaplane.
THE START FOR THE SCHNEIDER CUP RACE: 4. The Sopwith seaplane.
THE SCHNEIDER RACE: The fuselage and undercarriage struts of the Sopwith machine, which is nearing completion at the Sopwith works at Kingston. The engine is a 450 h.p. Cosmos "Jupiter."
THE SOPWITH SCHNEIDER CUP SEAPLANE. - Plan, side and front elevations, to scale
The Edmond de Marcay single-seater biplane, which, piloted by Lieut. Lebeau, at Villacoublay, attained speeds of 156 m.p.h. level, 147 m.p.h. at 10,000 ft., and 129 m.p.h. at 20,000 ft. It is fitted with a 300 h.p Hispano-Suiza engine, and has a span of 30 ft. 4 ins., overall length of 21 ft. 4 ins., and a useful load of 745 lbs. Its factor of safety is 14.
The Linke-Hofmann R II: View of the undercarriage, with shock-absorbers.
THE LINKE-HOFMANN R II: The central spur wheel drive.
THE LINKE-HOFMANN R II: General arrangement drawings.
Three-quarter front view of the Cato sporting monoplane
Side view of the Cato sporting monoplane
Wing section of the Cato sporting monoplane
The CATO SPORTING MONOPLANE: Plan, side and front elevations to scale.
Fig. 1. - The first Oertz flying-boat of 1913. The engine was a 100 h.p. Argus
Fig. 2. - 1914 type Oertz flying-boat, 160 h.p. Daimler engine
Fig. 3. - The 160 h.p. Oertz flying-boat of 1915
Fig. 4. - 1915 type Oertz flying-boat, 160 h.p. engine
THE LATEST PRODUCTION FROM THE PIONEER HOUSE OF BLERIOT: The four-engined 28-passenger "Aerobus," which has recently passed its first tests. It has a total horse-power of 1,000, and a speed of 90 m.p.h.
Three quarter rear view of the new Bleriot four-engined 28-passenger "Aerobus," showing the biplane tail with its triple rudders.
The new Bleriot 28-passenger machine with four Hispano-Suiza engines.
THE SOPWITH "TRANSPORT" PASSENGER OR GOODS MACHINE, 375 h.p. ROLLS-ROYCE: This machine is similar to the "Atlantic" and Australian ("Wallaby") machines
THE SOPWITH "WALLABY": Three-quarter rear view
LONDON-AUSTRALIA FLIGHT: The start from Hounslow of the Sop with- Rolls-Royce "Wallaby" on October 21. Capt. Matthews, the pilot, waving farewell
THE FLIGHT TO AUSTRALIA: On the left, the pilot-navigator of the Sopwith machine, Capt. G. C. Matthews, A.F.C.; and, on the right, his engineer, Sergeant T.Kay.
Diagrammatic sketch map of the route to Australia. The distances shown are approximate
THE SOPWITH "WALLABY": Plan, side and front elevations to scale
THE "BRISTOL" COUPE, 275 H.P. ROLLS-ROYCE FALCON III ENGINE: Three-quarter rear view
The "Bristol" Coupe: View into the passenger's cabin.
THE BRISTOL TOURER: This machine is similar to the famous F2B, except that it has a Siddeley engine
The Bristol "Tourer," 230 h.p. Siddeley "Puma"
THE JUNKERS (GERMAN) TOURING MONOPLANE: Three-quarter front view. This machine, which is built of metal throughout, is of the "wireless" type, having no external lift bracing. The wings are built up of tubes and covered with corrugated aluminium sheet, as is also the fuselage. On September 13 last this machine is said to have reached an altitude of 6,750 metres (about 22,200 ft.) with eight people on board. The engine is a 185 h.p. B.M.W. ("Bavarian Motor Works").
The pilot sits in front of the cabin, immediately behind the engine
THE JUNKERS TOURING MONOPLANE: Three-quarter rear view
The Junkers Touring Monoplane: The cabin and the eight passengers with which the machine reached 22,200 ft.
An Interesting French Parasol Monoplane: Although the Parasol type of monoplane had a comparatively short vogue during the War, the type has many advantages, and it is more than probable that it will be revived for civilian flying. Our photograph shows the French Gourdon-Leseurre, fitted with 180 h.p. Hispano-Sujza engine. It will be noted that the wing bracing is unusual, struts being employed instead of the usual lift wires. This obviates the necessity for anti-lift wires above the wing. The speed of this machine is said to be 260 kilometres per hour (about 135 m.p.h.)
Side View of the 1916 Voisin Bombing Triplane
Close-up view of the four Hispano-Suiza engines on the 1916 Voisin bombing triplane.
Sketch showing the first, 1915, model of the Voisin bombing triplane.
THE VOISIN BOMBING TRIPLANE: Plan, side and front elevations to scale, of the modified type constructed in 1916
THE NEW HANDLEY PAGE W.8 BIPLANE: For some considerable time there have been rumours of a new type of H.P. which was going to surpass anything hitherto seen in the way of luxury and comfort. The machine is now an accomplished fact, as will be seen from our photograph, and for once rumour has not been far from the truth. The new H.P., which is fitted with two 450 h.p. Napier Lions, is smaller and faster than the War types, and has a magnificent saloon cabin seating from 15 to 20 passengers. A feature of this is that there is no transverse cross bracing, so that the passengers have ample room to move about, while, if the machine be used for the carrying of cargo, the space available is 470 cub. ft. The machine has a maximum speed of 112 m.p.h., and a cruising speed of 90 m.p.h., while the landing speed is as low as 45 m.p.h. After a short test flight of only 20 minutes' duration, the machine was flown to Paris in 2 hours 10 minutes.
THE HANDLEY PAGE W 8: Three-quarter front view
THE HANDLEY PAGE W 8: View inside the cabin
The Handley Page W 8, two 450 h.p. Napier Lions
The Boulton and Paul P 10: This machine is built entirely of metal, and should prove a great attraction at the Show
The Boulton and Paul P 10,100 h.p. Cosmos "Lucifer"
THE BRISTOL BABE: Photograph of the machine in skeleton form
The Bristol Babe, 40 h.p. Siddeley engine
The Bristol Racer, 450 h.p. Cosmos "Jupiter"
THE SPAD-HERBEMONT, TYPE S. 27, THREE-SEATER MONOCOQUE LIMOUSINE: It is fitted with a 300 h.p. Hispano-Suiza, and has a span of 32 ft., an overall length of 24 ft., and weighs, fully loaded, 2,772 lbs. It has a speed range of 65-143 m.p.h.
The cabin of the Breguet limousine
THE FARMAN SPORTING BIPLANE: Three-quarter front and three-quarter rear views
THE HENRY POTEZ, TYPE VIII: This machine has a 50 h.p. Potez engine
The Sopwith "Dove" sporting two-seater, 80 h.p. Le Rhone
THE DORNIER MONOPLANE FLYING BOAT: Diagrammatic side and front elevations
Zeppelin-Staaken V.G.O. III. A GERMAN (ZEPPELIN) GIANT AEROPLANE. - Note the tractor airscrew in the nose of the fuselage.
ON BOARD A GERMAN GIANT AEROPLANE. - Photograph showing view looking aft from the port engine nacelle.
THE NOSE OF A GERMAN GIANT AEROPLANE. - Photograph taken from the port engine nacelle.
A ZEPPELIN GIANT. - The photograph shows how the fuselage is entered through a door in the side.
THE ZEPPELIN GIANT AEROPLANE. - Looking down from the machine gunner's nest at the two pilots, the observer, and the commander.
A SOPWITH CAMEL, SEA TYPE, TAKING OFF FROM THE DECK OF A BATTLESHIP. - Note the platform carried on the guns and rota table with them.
Sopwith 2F.l Camels on the flying-off deck of HMS Furious in 1918.
AT THE WAR IN THE AIR EXHIBITION. - "All lined up and somewhere to go." "Off we go to strafe the Zepps." The machines are lined up on the deck of H.M.S. "Furious," ready to fly to the sheds at Tondern, in Schleswig-Holstein where the Zepps. had a lair. But the bombs found their target and Germany moaned the low of her much-prized "Gas-bags," one loaded shed being destroyed and others damaged.
LEFT, THE AEROPLANE IN POSITION. - This picture shows how the aeroplane is attached to the airship. AND ON RIGHT, DROPPING OFF. - The aeroplane released from the airship.
Sopwith 2F Camel, serial no N6814, of No 212 Squadron, RAF, slung from beneath R 23 at Pulham. The second Camel used in these trials was serial no 6622 and came from the same squadron. While the first release from R 23 involved an unmanned Camel with locked controls, at least one 'live' release was made, with Lt R.E.Keys landing the Camel back at Pulham.
AT THE WAR IN THE AIR EXHIBITION. - Ready to fight the enemy. An airship carrying a fighting aeroplane which can be released instantly in case of attack by enemy aircraft.
Caproni Triplane. - A close-up view of the cabin. This extends from the bottom to tne middle plane, and the passengers are enclosed, while the pilot is situated in a smaller cockpit on top of the cabin.
A CAPRONI PASSENGER TRIPLANE: This machine appears to be a peace-time development of the type CA 4 described in "Flight" of June 19, 1919. The two tractor engines are mounted in the nose of the twin fuselages, while the pusher engine is placed high in the stern of the central nacelle.
LONDON-PARIS AND LONDON-BRUSSELS: The Handley Page firm are now running two continental air services, one to Paris and one to Brussels. In connection with the Paris service Breguet biplanes now alternate with the Handley Pages, the British machines leaving London on Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday, the French machines on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. The Paris-London service is in the reverse order. Our photographs show : (1) Passengers in the nose of the Handley Page which opened the London-Brussels air service on Wednesday of last week, piloted by Capt. Shakespear.
CRICKLEWOOD-BOURNEMOUTH BY AIR: Last week end the public air-service between Cricklewood and Bournemouth by Handley Page aeroplane was inaugurated, when "Flight" representative joined in the initial journey. The above photographs show - (1) One of the H.P. service machines with propellers ticking over and the passengers. Left to right, "Flight" representative, Lieut. Walker (the pilot), Mr. H. Ashling (Bournemouth Town Clerk), Ex-Mayor Alderman Robson, Mr. Bishop, Mayor of Bournemouth, and the Cricklewood Aerodrome representative. (2) The H.P. starting on its first journey to Bournemouth. 3. In the nose of the H.P., "Flight" photographer, Pilot Lieut. Walker and Mr. Ashling. (4) The Ex-Mayor of Bournemouth, Alderman Robson, and Mayor Mr. E. E . Bishop, in their seats ready for the start
BRITISH MACHINES AT THE E.L.T.A.: 2. The Handley Page passenger machine
BRITISH MACHINES AT THE E.L.T.A.: 1. Visitors are interested in the Handley Page cabin
THE RAILWAY HOLD-UP AND MAILS BY AEROPLANE: Post Office officials and the despatch and receipt of mails at Hounslow. 1. The Handley Page had a busy time. Two, fully loaded with passengers, set out for Paris. Our snap shows various members of the American Express Co. about to go aboard. Later a mail 'plane, loaded with 2,185 lbs. of mail, 250 lbs. of baggage, pilot and the mechanic, left for Brussels.
(4) The Handley Page biplane, two Rolls-Royce engines, used on the London-Paris and London-Brussels routes.
(3) The interior of the Handley Page, which carries 10 passengers and 500 lbs. of general freight.