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Friedrichshafen FF49

Страна: Германия

Год: 1917

Friedrichshafen - FF48 - 1917 - Германия<– –>Friedrichshafen - FF53 - 1917 - Германия


В.Обухович, А.Никифоров Самолеты Первой Мировой войны


Развитием FF 39 стал вариант FF 49с, созданный в середине 1917 г., отличавшийся усиленной конструкцией планера. Поверхности управления имели аэродинамическую компенсацию. На борту самолета устанавливалась радиостанция и вооружение. Произведено около 270 машин данной модификации, в том числе компаниями "Саблатниг" и LFG. FF 49с успешно использовались до конца войны. Вариант FF 49b с двигателем Бенц Bz.IV представлял собой бомбардировщик без оборонительного вооружения, Конструкция самолета была аналогична FF 33. Место пилота находилось в задней кабине. Было построено 25 таких машин.


O.Thetford, P.Gray German Aircraft of the First World War (Putnam)


Friedrichshafen FF 49c

  As a successor to the FF 33j reconnaissance patrol seaplane the Friedrichshafen firm brought out, in May 1917, the FF 49c, although the two types were actually interspersed with a short production batch of FF 39, which amounted to only fourteen aircraft.
  To obtain the required increase in performance more power was obviously necessary, and to this end the FF 49c was fitted with the 200 h.p. Benz Bz IV, another engine of proven reliability. A satisfying improvement resulted and, together with an all-round strengthening of the airframe structure, a more rugged and reliable aeroplane resulted. On more than one occasion 49cs made open-sea landings to rescue other crews and experienced little difficulty in taking off again with the double load.
  In appearance the FF 49c was generally similar to the 33j, although larger. Balancing of all controls improved the handling qualities and lessened pilot fatigue, an important consideration on long patrols. It also enabled the aircraft to give a good account of itself if attacked, as the observer was now armed with a machine-gun, which had not previously been the case with the older FF reconnaissance types. Both transmitting and receiving radio-telegraphy equipment was fitted, which enabled the crews to receive instructions during patrols as well as to transmit their observations.
  A special bomber variant of this machine existed, and was known as the 49b. This was almost identical except that the pilot was moved to the aft cockpit and the observer was not equipped with a machine-gun. Only twenty-five of this variant were built.
  The FF 49c itself was found to possess such a degree of efficiency that it remained in service right up to the end of the war. About 235 aircraft were built by the parent firm and various sub-contractors.
  Testimony to the ruggedness of the type is to be found in the experiences of FF49c No. 1874, which, early on 10th May 1918, was swung out from the seaplane carrier Santa Helena for a reconnaissance patrol over English coastal waters. With an N.C.O. crew - Hans Sommermann (pilot) and Georg Patzoldt (observer) - the Friedrichshafen took off in company with another 49c and commenced to map a new minefield they discovered when they eventually reached their patrol zone. This they continued to do until the fuel gauges indicated time for return; Patzoldt signalled the crew of the accompanying seaplane, whereupon they turned in the direction of Germany.
  By 11.00 hours, after some six hours in the air, fuel was exhausted, the parent carrier ship nowhere in sight; both aircraft alighted on the water, radioing SOS calls as they glided down. On touching down, the sea anchors were streamed to avoid drifting, as surface rescue vessels from either Borkum or Norderney were expected to reach them before dark. However, night fell with no sign of rescue, and with it came a freshening of the wind. The pangs of hunger and thirst became manifest to the crews, but there was no water other than that in the radiators, which, having been mixed with glycerine, was barely palatable. Soon after midnight a strong sea came up and No. 1874 broke away from her sea anchor and rapidly started to drift.
  The drift continued, all through a stormy and overcast Sunday and again through another anxious night. Every second hour the crew of No. 1874 fired Very lights in the hope of attracting the attention of some vessel. With the break of another day came the hope that as the drift had been towards the English coast, perhaps they might be picked up by the Royal Navy, but no vessels materialised, and so their ordeal continued. The wind now backed to the south-west, and the seaplane began to drift away from British waters out into the North Sea again.
  On the fifth day a list developed which they sought to correct by hacking away part of a wing panel but were too weak to wield the axe. Fog obscured the view on the sixth day, but when eventually it lifted fishing vessels were sighted, but these ignored all signals. Eventually, well after midday, Patzoldt somehow managed to tear out a piece of rib to which he fastened his handkerchief, and at last a vessel moved in to pick them up. This was the Swedish fishing smack Argo II, whose master later explained that he had interpreted the red Very lights they had fired as warnings to keep away - had white lights been fired he would have immediately come alongside, but by then they had none left.
  Sommermann and Patzoldt were rescued some 27 miles from the Norwegian coast, and, exactly a week after their ordeal began, were landed at the Swedish port of Marstrand. Here they learned that their companion FF 49c had been rescued on the fourth day by a Dutch boat whose attention had been ingeniously attracted by SOS bursts from the aircraft's machine-gun.
  It was finally reckoned, when Sommermann and Patzoldt returned to Germany, that the FF 49c No. 1874 had drifted almost twice across the North Sea in a period of some 140 hours.

TECHNICAL DATA
  Description: Two-seat reconnaissance patrol twin-float seaplane.
  Manufacturers: Flugzeugbau Friedrichshafen G.m.b.H.
  Sub-contractors: Luftfahrzeug Gesellschaft m.b.H.; Sablatnig Flugzeugbau G.m.b.H.
  Power Plant: One 200 h.p. Benz Bz IV 6 cylinder in-line water-cooled engine.
  Dimensions: Span, 17.15 m. (56 ft. 3 1/4 in.). Length, 11.65 m. (38 ft. 2 3/4 in ). Height, 4.5 m. (14 ft. 9 1/4 in.). Wing area, 71.16 sq.m. (768.5 sq.ft.).
  Weights: Empty, 1.515 kg. (3,333 lb.). Loaded, 2,147 kg. (4,723.4 lb.).
  Performance: Maximum speed, 139.5 km.hr. (87.4 m.p.h.). Initial climb, 1,000 m. (3,280 ft.) in 8 min. Duration, 5 2/3 hr.
  Armament: One fixed Spandau machine-gun forward and one manually operated Parabellum machine-gun in rear cockpit.

  N.B. Data is general. Many machines had slight detail differences from batch to batch.


Friedrichshafen FF 49 B
  This seaplane, of which twenty-live examples were built, was a 49c modified solely for bombing duties. For this role the positions of the crew were reversed, with the pilot in the rear cockpit. No armament was fitted but radio transmitting gear was carried. Engine, 200 h.p. Benz Bz IV. Span, 17.35 m. (56 ft. 11 1/8 in.). Length, 11.525 m. (37 ft. 9 3/4 in.). Height, 4.25 m. (13 ft. 11 3/8 in.). Area, 71.16 sq.m. (769 sq.ft.). Weights: Empty, 1,432 kg. (3,150 lb.). Loaded, 2,097 kg. (4,613 lb.). Speed, 152 km.hr. (95 m.p.h.). Climb, 1,000 m. (3,280 ft.) in 91 min. Duration, 5 1/2 hr. Armament, none.


J.Herris Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI (A Centennial Perspective on Great War Airplanes 21)


Friedrichshafen FF49

  Special thanks to Colin Owers for contributing this section about the FF49.

  The Friedrichshafen FF49 was designed as a successor to the FF33J. The FF39 that followed the FF33J was virtually a refined FF33E and only 14 were supplied from December 1915. The FF49C was a larger aircraft with balanced controls to reduce fatigue on long patrols. It was strengthened to withstand the rigors of floatplane operations and was equipped with the 200 hp Benz Bz.IV motor. The clean lines were complemented by a spinner on the airscrew. The usual ungainly strut arrangement connected the fuselage to the two large pontoons. The observer was equipped with a Parabellum machine gun as standard and both receiving and transmitting wireless equipment were installed. The pilot had a synchronised Maxim 08/15. Of conventional wood and wire construction with fabric covering, the FF49 had two and a half bays to its equal-chord wings. The machine had pronounced sweepback and dihedral. The resulting machine was a robust reconnaissance patrol seaplane.
  With a range of some 430 miles the FF49C was well suited to long-range reconnaissance over the North Sea. There were instances where crews that were forced down were rescued by an FF49C, the machine easily taking off with the extra load. Another job for these aircraft was to meet and escort returning submarines through the channels swept in enemy minefields. The FF49C started to replace the FF33 from May 1917 onwards.
  The FF49B was a special bomber version of the design wherein the pilot was moved into the rear seat and the observer was not equipped with a machine gun. Although the span of the FF49B was greater than the FF49C, the same area is given for the wings in the Atlas tabulations.
  The British captured MN 1796 and reported that the machine appeared to be an improved "Friedrichshafoner" D type FF49. The modifications introduced are apparently principally with the object of improving the control and consist in fitting:
(a) Wing flaps on top and bottom wings - the flaps (ailerons - Ed.) being unbalanced, whereas on the earlier type there (sic) were fitted on the top wing only and balanced.
(b) Balanced elevators.
(c) small fin underneath the fuselage - the depth of the fin forward being much less than formerly.
(d) Tail plane stays between the bottom of the lower fin and rudder post and the tail plane, instead of above the tail plane.

Load Carried

  These seaplanes carry a crew of two - pilot in front and observer behind in a ring mounting resembling the Scarff. Two machine guns, one firing through the propeller. Six 10 kilo bombs, two of which are submarine bombs and explode on second contact, and six hours fuel.
  Wireless both transmitting and receiving as well as a camera are sometimes carried.(1)

(1) Group Bulletin, Operations July 1918. TNA AIR1/288/15/226/138.


Friedrichshafen FF49B Specifications
Engine: 200 hp Benz Bz.IV
Wing: Span Upper 17.35 m
Span Lower 17.00 m
Area 71.16 m2
General: Length 11.52 m
Height 4.25 m
Empty Weight 1,432 kg
Loaded Weight 2,097 kg
Maximum Speed: 152 km/h
Range: 700 km
Climb: 1,000 m 9 min

Friedrichshafen FF49C Specifications
Engine: 200 hp Benz Bz.IV
Wing: Span Upper 17.15 m
Span Lower 16.70 m
Area 71.16 m2
General: Length 11.65 m
Height 4.45 m
Empty Weight 1,515 kg
Loaded Weight 2,147 kg
Maximum Speed: 140 km/h
Range: 700 km
Climb: 800 m 6.2 min
1,000 m 8.0 min
1,500 m 13.2 min


Friedrichshafen FF49B & 49C Production Orders
Type Marine Numbers Quantity Date Ordered Naval Class & Notes
FF49C 1521-1535 15 May 1917 CHFT
FF49B 1536-1550 15 May 1917 BFT
FF49C 1597-1606 10 June 1917 CHFT
FF49B 1607-1609 3 June 1917 CHFT
FF49B 1610-1616 7 June 1917 BFT
FF49C 1669-1698 30 July 1917 CHFT
FF49C 1699-1718 20 August 1917 CHFT
FF49C 1742-1811 70 August 19.17 CHFT
FF49C 1812-1841 30 August 1917 C2MGHFT (1822&.1823 modified to FF59)
FF49C 1842-1856 15 August 1917 CHFT, built by L.F.G. (Roland)
FF49C 1872-1901 30 August 1917 CHFT, ordered from Sablatnig
FF49C 2053-2092 40 September 1917 CHFT
FF49C 3064-3083 20 June 1918 CHFT
FF49C 3084-3143 60 Unknown CHFT
FF49C 4004-4033 30 Unknown C, ordered from Gotha
FF49C 6031-6050 20 Unknown CHFT, ordered from Sablatnig
FF49C 6051-6080 30 Unknown CHFT, ordered from Sablatnig
FF49C 6521-6540 20 June 1918 CHFT, built by L.F.G. (Roland)
FF49C 7031-7040 10 Unknown CHFT, ordered from Travemunde
Note: A total of 25 FF49B St 450 FF49C were ordered. Dates for orders placed after June 1918 are unknown.


Friedrichshafen FF49 Specifications From Different Sources
FF49(1) FF49B(2) FF49C(3) FF49(4)
Span, Upper, m 17.350 17.350 17.150 17.15
Span, Lower, m 17.000 17.000 16.700 -
Chord, m - 2.300 2.300 -
Wing Area, m2 - 71.16 71.16 71.16
Length, m 11.525 11.252 11.650 11.65
Height, m 4.250 4.250 4.450 4.5
Pontoon Length, m 6.555 6.555 6.750 -
Empty Wt, kg - 1,432 1,515 1,515
Loaded Wt, kg - 2,027 2,147 2,147
Max. Speed - - - 139.5 km/h
Endurance - - - 5 2/3 hours
Climb to 800 m - 7.2 minutes 6.2 minutes -
Climb to 1,000 m - 9.1 minutes 8.0 minutes 8 minutes
Climb to 1,500 m - 14.2 minutes 13.2 minutes -
Source: (1) Friedrichshafen factory three-view. Appears to be FF49B as there is no gun ring. (2) Atlas MNs 1536-1550. (3) Atlas MN 1699. (4) Gray, Peter, and Thetford, Owen, German Aircraft of the First World War


Netherlands

  The Netherlands obtained a number of Friedrichshafen floatplanes that were interned during the war years starting with FF19 MN 28 coming down in Dutch waters and washing up on a beach on the Isle of Schiermonnikoog. Stored on the island by the Coast Guard, it was purchased for f 2,000. This was the first of a number of British and German marine aircraft that came into the possession of the Netherlands.
  Three FF49C floatplanes, MNs 1679, 1682, and 1705, came into Dutch territorial waters on 3 May 1918. FF49C MN 1682 (230 hp Benz No. 31939) from Flanders 1 naval air station was heavily damaged. The observer, Flugobermatrose Adolf Haag, later escaped. This machine was purchased for f 16,000 and was entered into the MLD as V-4.
  FF49C M/N 1705(2) (230 hp Benz No. 32133) was interned near Wielingen after suffering a motor failure. The machine was severely damaged but the motor had suffered only slight damage. The floats had been damaged by the blows of an axe as the crew, Flugmaat Wilhelm Carl Geyger and Flugmaat Gerhard Janym from Flandern 1, had tried to sink the machine. The aircraft was purchased for f 14,000 in February 1919. The floatplane was repaired and displayed at the ELTA exhibition in 1919 with the MLD serial V-5.
  The seaplane tender Santa Helena launched two FF49C floatplanes for a reconnaissance patrol over British waters in the early hours of 10 May 1918. After mapping a new mine field the pair completed their patrol and commenced to return to their vessel. Unfortunately, the aircraft missed the tender and by 11:00 hours and some six hours in the air, they were forced to alight as they were out of fuel.
  They sent out an SOS before alighting and set their sea anchors as they expected a rescue vessel to reach them before dark. They were not found by nightfall and a fresh wind sprang up. Shortly after midnight a strong wind broke the sea anchor on MN 1874 and it began to drift away. The crew of Hans Sommermann and George Patzoldt, both NCOs, suffered through a stormy and overcast Sunday and then through another night. They fired a flare every two hours. They were now drifting towards the British shore, but the wind then backed and they started to drift back into the North Sea. The only water they had to drink was that from the radiator and as this was mixed with glycerine, it was hardly palatable. On the fifth day the machine developed a list that the crew unsuccessfully tried to correct by chopping away part of a wing panel but they were too weak. When the fog lifted on the sixth day they saw fishing vessels but they stayed away even though the pair fired flares. Patzoldt eventually made up a flag with his handkerchief and part of a wing rib and a vessel picked them up. This was the Argo II, a Swedish trawler, whose skipper said that he would have approached sooner if they had fired a white flare, but he thought that the red flares meant to stay away. By then the crew only had red flares remaining. They were some 27 miles from the Norwegian coast when picked up and were landed at the Swedish port of Marstrand exactly a week after they were forced to alight. It was calculated that the pair and their redoubtable FF49C had drifted almost twice across the North Sea.
  Their companion FF49C was picked up by a Dutch trawler on the 13th after they had been altered to the situation by an SOS spelt in Morse by bursts of machine gun fire. The Netherlands released the crew they rescued the same month as shipwrecked mariners and the machine was entered into MLD service as V-6.
  M/N 17585 was interned on 8 August 1918, near Schiermonnikoog, Frisian Islands, after suffering a forced alighting on the morning of the 6th. The crew of Flugmaat Willy Poiger and Flugobermaat Walter Platow had cut the wings off the machine and sailed it into Dutch territorial waters. This floatplane machine was purchased for f 5,000.
  1678 crewed by Flugmaat K. Gier and Flugobermaat Dibrodt from 2e Seeflug Abt., Zeebrugge, was interned on 23 August 1918. Dibrodt later escaped from confinement.
  MN 1704, another FF49C was obtained at or around the same time. The crew were Flugmaat H. Haus (or Haag?) and Flugobermaat Krauthoff, the latter was drowned.
  FF49C recorded as 696 crashed on 2 September 1918. This is thought to be its Werke Nummer which would mean that it was MN 1703. The machine hit a dyke completely wrecking the aircraft. It was identified by plates found in the wreckage. Apparently the motor was purchased.
  On 2 October 1918, the two man crew of MN 1679, Flugmaat Hans Roscher and Flugmaat Adolf Imhoff, was picked up by the lugger Nicolass and taken ashore at Ijmuiden.

(2) WN 698


Germany Post-War

  Under the Versailles Treaty the German Navy retained aircraft to assist in clearing mine fields. These aircraft were not allowed to be armed in any way. Brandenburg W29 and FF49C floatplanes were the majority of aircraft that operated from Holtenau, Warnemunde, Bug, List, Heligoland, Norderney, Wilhelmshaven and Hage. In July 1920 the German Government was instructed to remove all mine clearing aircraft from service and deliver them to the Allies.
  The German aircraft industry began to convert to civil aircraft almost immediately after the Armistice. A civil register was established that ran from March 1919 to May 1920 when the Allies caused it to be suspended in their attempt to eliminate the German aircraft industry from the post-war world. A second register was established and some aircraft appear in both registers which can be confusing at times. Luft-Fahrzeug-Gesellschaft mbH (LFG) was founded in 1908 in Berlin. In order to differentiate its products from rival LVG it adopted the trade name Roland. After the end of the war LFG modified the FF49C floatplanes that it had been building under licence, for civilian use. They had a wider fuselage to allow side by side seating and a new aerofoil section to allow for greater weight to be lifted, and a 220 hp Benz engine. Four aircraft were converted in 1919. The V1 had three passenger seats and an enclosed cabin, the V2 had a longer superstructure with two cabins for five passengers. LFG operated a passenger service from July 1919 with these aircraft from Stralsund to Rugen but this proved difficult to maintain with fuel shortages confining their activities to joy flights on the Baltic coast. The V1 floatplanes named Max and Moritz received the civil registrations D-132 and D-133(3), while D-242 Fromme Helene and D-134 Witve Bolte were the V2 version. D-132 and D-242 were impounded by the IAACC in May 1920 but were later released but did not appear on the second German civil register. D-242 was sent on a tour of Sweden in July 1920 but crashed on the return journey.
  Deutsche Luft Reederei (DLR), a postwar German airline, used the FF49C as well as a number of other floatplanes in its services. These were given DLR numbers W1, W3, W5, W6, W7 (D-377), W9 D-378), W10 (D-379), W11 [MN 3078, D-380), and W12 (D-381).
  On 5 July 1920, DLR had the following FF49C aircraft:-
  D-378(?) (MN 3076), D-379 (MN 3077) later D-40, D-381 (MN 3079) later D-49, and MN 3080, 3085 to 3091. A total of eleven FF49 C seaplanes.
  Sablatnig Flugzeugbau GmbH added passenger cabins to their licence-built FF49C floatplanes and successfully exported a number to Denmark, Norway and Sweden. In June 1921 the Company owned four FF49 floatplanes registered D85, D86, D120 and D121, all fitted with 200 hp Benz engines. Sablatnig operated its airline under the name Luftverkehr Sablatnig from March 1919. This was painted on the fuselage sides in large letters.
  FF49C MN 1805, FF33E seaplanes MNs 1988 and 1990, and FF33S 3012, 3013 and 3015, were preserved for the Reichmuseum and along with a number of other aircraft were not required to be destroyed by the IAACC.

(3) D133 was a V2 according to D-242.


Denmark

  Denmark's Ministry of Public Works obtained five FF49C floatplanes in 1919 from Germany with the intention of establishing an experimental airmail service. Although the service was successful it was decided to use land-based mail services. The floatplanes were then taken over by the Navy. Given Royal Danish Naval Air Service serial numbers 31 to 35 they served until 1927. The machines were known as the HB II in RDNAS (Hydro Biplane II) and returned to their reconnaissance role.
  Sablatnig, like many German manufacturers, tried to send as many aircraft outside the reach of the IAACC as possible and sent four FF49C floatplanes to Denmark for use by Dansk Luft-Express but were taken in hand by Denmark's custom service and stored at Aabenraa in January 1919. These four were obtained by the Danish Navy in April 1922. Only two actually entered service, the other two were used for spares. They received the serials 36 and 37.
  The first flights of the Danish airline Det Danske Luftfartselskab were carried out from 7 August by a FF49C obtained (or leased) from the German airline Deutsche Luft-Reederei (DLR). This was registered T-DABA. Apparently this acquisition was not permitted under the Peace treaty and the machine was returned to Germany to be replaced by another FF49C, MN 3078, and this seaplane was also registered T-DABA. This second aircraft was apparently constructed from the fuselage of the original aircraft that was taken back to Denmark and spare parts. Registered in June 1921 the venture proved a financial disaster and the machine was obtained by the RDNAS as spares for its own Friedrichshafens in late 1921, the registration being cancelled the following year.
  Three Danish FF49C floatplanes arrived at Horten after a non-stop flight from Copenhagen on 19 September 1920. An unusual feature of this arrival was the release of pigeons carrying messages back to Denmark. The use of carrier pigeons was a feature of marine aircraft in the recent war with the birds being responsible for the rescue of crews whose seaplanes had come down on the North Sea.
  A static reconstruction of an FF49C is presently being undertaken for the Danish Aviation Museum.


Finland

  A civil war in Finland broke out in 1918 between the Bolshivek (Red) and White forces. Germany sent troops into Finland in early April 1918 at the request of the Finnish government. It suited the Germans to stop a new front opening with the Soviet government. They established a naval base at Koivisto with three Friedrichshafen seaplanes. FF49C Marine Nummer 1799 operated an air-mail service in September 1918 from Hermanni air station until it was destroyed in a crash in the bay just outside the station. After the Armistice the Germans were forced to withdraw from Finland in December 1918 and they took all their equipment including all aircraft with them.
  The end of the war saw Finland looked upon as a bulwark against the Reds and the French sent an aviation mission to Finland early in 1919. In the meantime the Finns had obtained aircraft from other sources that included German and Russian types. Friedrichshafen FF41A and FF49 seaplanes were included in the mix.
  Finland obtained the following Friedrichshafen FF49 biplanes:
  FF49B MN 1546 that received the Finnish serial C84/18 (later 2B307). Purchased from the German Naval air station at Tallinn, Estonia on 26 November 1918. Sank at Koivistolla, 15 October 1919.
  FF49C MN 1749 received the serial Fl8 (later C59/18). Was purchased from Germany in 1918. Deleted 11 August 1919 after it was written off in a fatal accident that month.
  FF49C MN 1750 received the serial F22 (later C72/18 and 2A300). Was acquired from Germany in 1918. Deleted 4 April 1923 with a total flight time 114:17 hours.
  FF49C MN 1807 received the serial C82/18 (later 2B306). ). Obtained from the German Naval air station at Tallinn, Estonia on 26 November 1918. Survived at least until January 1919.
  FF49C MN 1810 received the serial C85/18 (later 2C302). ). Obtained from the German Naval air station at Tallinn, Estonia on 26 November 1918. Deleted 25 May 1923 with a total flight time of 216 hours.


Norway

  In the spring of 1920, the new Norwegian airline company Aero A/S started a co-operation with A/S Norsk Aeroplanfabrik and it appears that this company was the one that ordered the five aircraft mentioned in the newspapers. Four of these machines were FF49C floatplanes. Three arrived in late February and were converted into a civil version at A/S Norsk Aeroplanfabrik. The fourth crashed on its delivery flight. They received the civil registrations N6, N7 (Changed to N9) and N8. N6 was registered on 1 May 1920, in the name of Aero A/S and was in June 1920 used on the first charter flight in Norway, when it carried newspapers between Kristiania and Kristiansund on behalf of the newspaper "Nationen". All were leased to Det Norske Luftfartsrederi A/S (DNL|. After a minor accident N6 was transferred back to Tonsberg for repairs and storage. N6 was eventually sold to the Army in 1922 which used it for spares. N8 crashed and was destroyed beyond repair after an accident near Haugesund. Its registration was subsequently cancelled. The fourth FF49C was flown to Norway by the German pilot Willy Nolting but he crashed destroying the machine and seriously injuring himself at Copenhagen on 15 April 1920.
  JL Tidemanns Tobaksfaabrik whose famous Brandenburg W.33 monoplane (N.21) was used for advertising had earlier obtained a FF49C when Aero A/S was wound up. This was in use from November 1920 to the spring of 1922 when it was written off after a crash.(4) Its replacement was the W.33.
  Despite the good service of the Friedrichshafen floatplanes in Norwegian civil flying, none were operated by the Norwegian military.

(4) Another reference states that the machine was sold to a J.B. Stang of Oslo. The machine's fate remains unknown.


Poland

  Poland bought one FF33E, one FF33L and one FF49B from Danzig in August 1920, and they were delivered to the Polish Navy.


Russia

  At least one FF49C was flown in Imperial Russian markings. The White Russian forces took over a number of marine aircraft of German origin in early 1919 including between six to twelve FF49 floatplanes types B and C along with Albatros W4 and Sablatnig SF5 floatplanes.
  The short lived Crimea Republic operated FF49C floatplanes MN 1554, 1683, 1715, 1716 and 1809 along with a number of FF33 series, Albatros W4, Brandenburg W13, GW and Sablatnig SF5 seaplanes.


Sweden

  Two FF49C floatplanes (MNs 3064 and 3068) were purchased from Friedrichshafen in January 1919. They were powered by 220-hp Benz engines. They received Swedish Navy serials 23 and 24. Both were written off in 1924.
  Svensk Lufttrafik AB obtained two of the seaplanes from Sablatnig that had been converted to carry passengers, however the venture failed and they were also taken over by the Navy. Reconverted to military configuration they received serials 25 and 26. No.25 was used for torpedo trials in 1923. They were to be fitted with dual control for use as trainers. The Swedish Friedrichshafens were never armed. Sweden had also obtained five FF33 seaplanes in August 1918 and the Navy also built five copies as the Sk2 from 1928.


Yugoslavia

  Obtained from Austro-Hungarian aircraft depot at Kotor in Montenegro was a single FF49C (MN 1833) obtained by the Yugoslavian naval air service. Serialled N2-D it carried the code H12 on the fuselage that also bore a white fuselage stripe indicating it was a training machine.


Belgium

  IAACC ordered that six FF49 floatplanes be delivered to Belgium in March 1920. These had been used from the naval air station at Heligoland and Holtenau for mine spotting and search operations. Although delivered they were never used as Belgium had no naval air unit.


А.Александров, Г.Петров Крылатые пленники России


В сентябре 1917 г. дальнейшее совершенствование конструкции привело к созданию моделей ФФ.49б и ФФ. 49ц, выпуск которых составил соответственно 25 и около 240 единиц. Обе модели были оснащены двигателями "Бенц" 200 л. с., но если первая вооружалась лишь 1 подвижным пулеметом "Парабеллум" кал. 7,92 мм, то вторая несла вдобавок еще и неподвижный "Шпандау" в носовой части. Несколько таких трехстоечных бипланов-тракторов были брошены немцами при уходе из Севастополя в 1918 г., в частности, аппарат с флотским номером 1544 (47, а из коллекции Т. Дарси), и один из них, принадлежавший белым, а потому с привычной трехцветной русской кокардой на фюзеляже, изображен на фотографии 47, б (из коллекции Т. Дарси).


E.Hauke, W.Schroeder, B.Totschinger Die Flugzeuge der k.u.k. Luftfahrtruppe und Seeflieger 1914-1918


Kampfflugboote
1688 Friedrichshafen FF49C Bz 200
1822 Friedrichshafen FF49C Bz 200
1833 Friedrichshafen FF49C Bz 200
1834 Friedrichshafen FF49C Bz 200
1835 Friedrichshafen FF49C Bz 200
1855 Friedrichshafen FF49C/Sablatnig Bz 200
  Diese zweisitzigen Schwimmerflugzeuge wurden nur als unbewaffnete Postflugzeuge verwendet und blieben im Stand der kaiserlich deutschen Marine, hatten jedoch die Zeichen der k.u.k. Seeflieger angebracht.
  Эти двухместные поплавковые самолеты использовались только как невооруженные связные самолеты и оставались в составе имперского германского флота, но имели маркировку k.u.k. Seeflieger


Журнал Flight


Flight, October 23, 1919.

SOME FRIEDRICHSHAFEN "MILESTONES"

"The F.F. 49C
  represented a considerable improvement on the type F.F. 39. It is shown in Figs. 28 to 30. The main data relating to it are :- Weight empty and without water, 3,260 lbs.; load, 1,430 lbs.; total weight, 4,690 lbs.; length o.a., 38 ft. 2 in.; span, 55 ft. 6 in.; float volume, 80 cub. ft.; speed, 80-87 m.p.h.; taking-off speed, 50 m.p.h.; climb to 6,600 ft. in 30 minutes; duration, 5 1/2 hours.
  "This machine gives a very robust impression and is at first sight even somewhat clumsy. There is nothing "streamliny" or light about it, but everything is heavy and strong. It is clearly seen that in the construction of this machine not only the aerodynamical expert but also the sailor has had a say. The object which the constructor had to attain was to produce an aircraft which, with a 220 h.p. engine and a load of about 1,430 lbs., should have the greatest possible seaworthiness, and an experience extending over more than two years has shown that this object has been attained in a most complete manner.
  "By seaworthiness is understood the capabilities of the seaplane to start, land and taxi under certain conditions of wind and sea with full load, and piloted by an average pilot. As, in spite of the fact that the designer chiefly aimed at seaworthiness - the machine had a very good performance - it shows how thoroughly the construction has been thought out. A speed of 87 m.p.h. and a climb of 6,600 ft. in 25 to 30 minutes must be considered exceptionally good for a seaplane; especially is the latter satisfactory in view of the fact that seaplanes are usually flown at fairly low altitudes. In the air the machine is very comfortable and easy to fly. The manoeuvrability is extraordinarily good, considering that the machine weighs over 2 tons and has a span of 55 ft. 6 ins.
  "As already mentioned the machine had an opportunity of proving itself during the latter part of the war. It might be further pointed out that on several occasions the crews of other seaplanes have been rescued with this type, and that even with the extra load of the rescued crew the machine has started from a fairly rough sea. Or another example: A machine of this type has floated about in a high sea for seven days at the end of which time the crew - which long ago had been given up as lost - were rescued. The FF. 49C was also used as a reconnaissance machine with one movable machine gun and wireless apparatus.

"The F.F. 49B
  was used purely as a bomber (Fig. 31). In general dimensions and design, the 49B is similar to the F.F. 49C, but in the 49B the pilot occupies the rear seat, while the observer sits in front with the telescopic bomb sights.

  "As a result of the very extensive experience of seaplane construction for War purposes, the Friedrichshafen aircraft works on Lake Constance and its branch factory at Warnemunde are in a position to, and are making every effort to, take up the construction of seaplanes for commercial purposes. As the firm has up till now chiefly devoted its energies to the construction of seaworthy seaplanes, it will be seen that it is in a better position than many other firms to construct seaworthy commercial and sporting seaplanes of all types. Especially suitable for this purpose would be the types which have proved themselves during the war, such as F.F. 49C, 33J(S), 33L, 41A, and 64. The type F.F. 49C is, it will be seen from the particulars given above, especially suitable for commercial work. The useful load of 1,430 lbs. may be divided up in different ways, according to the purpose for which the machine is intended, between crew, fuel passengers and mail. For instance, with sufficient fuel for 3 1/2 hours over 600 lbs. of useful load could be carried. For passenger carrying it would be easy to provide seating accommodation, either open or closed, enabling the machine to carry two or possibly three passengers in addition to the pilot.
  "Seaworthiness means safety. Safety is one of the chief considerations for a commercial aeroplane. Since the seaworthiness of this type has never, in spite of the greatest efforts, been beaten by the machines of any other firm, it would appear that also in post-war competition it will be one of the most suitable types and difficult to beat. Much the same may be said about the lower-powered machines FF. 33J, F.F. 33S and F.F. 64. Especially would the latter machine offer great advantages for commercial work to ship-owners for carrying on board as a ship's 'plane. For instance, it would be possible without going into port, or in other words without any appreciable loss of time, to put ashore or to take on board single passengers or mail. Or, before arriving at the port of destination an officer could be sent ashore in the machine with the ship's papers, thus not only saving time but possibly also making a considerable profit on goods carried through being first in. Also the passenger who is in a hurry can be sent on ahead in the machine, thus shortening his time of crossing by as much as 10 hours. On the other hand, the machine can fetch mail from ashore so that the mail can be on board the ship several hours before she reaches port. The machine can be employed to assist in navigation on approaching the coast in bad weather, and it can also be utilised for flying ahead of the ship, spotting for floating mines. In case of accident it may possibly be used for obtaining assistance quickly. Also from the land, the machine can be used with advantage. For instance, a merchant could be flown out to meet the incoming ship, which is carrying an agent, so that all the business could be transacted by the time the ship arrived in port, thus beating the competitors who have remained ashore. For use by salvage companies it would be possible to use the seaplane for taking an engineer to the place of the stranding in the shortest possible time, where he could photograph the stranded ship and even, if the sea is not too rough, alight and go on board the wrecked ship, so that the salvage contract could be completed before a competitor could arrive by steamer in the ordinary way. F.F. 33L is very suitable for practice flying for young pilots, and would make a good sporting machine. It is light and very comfortable to fly and requires little storage space, while being easy to dismantle and erect. All of which are qualities that make it specially suitable as a sporting machine for the private owner.
  "If it is a question of carrying relatively great loads at lower speeds, a machine similar to the type F.F. 41A or to the type F.F. 33, with two 260 h.p. Mercedes engines, would be suitable."

J.Herris - Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
FF49C MN 1699 in late 1917 featured additions to its late-style camouflage.
J.Herris - Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
FF49C MN 1756 in late 1918; the two diagonal stripes indicate assignment to Norderney. The final digit in the MN is not confirmed.
J.Herris - Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
FF49C MN 1796 was forced down on 17 June 1918 while attacking HMS Furious and was the subject of an Allied report on the type. It was assigned to Helgoland SFS.
J.Herris - Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
FF49C in civilian service postwar. The upper and side surfaces were covered in the late-war hexagonal naval camouflage fabric.
J.Herris - Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
FF49C W7 in postwar Deutsche Luft Reederei (DLR) service. German airline DLR used 11 FF49C aircraft; W7 was later registered D-377.
J.Herris - Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
FF49B of the Polish Naval Air Service, 1920.
J.Herris - Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
FF49C in postwar Finnish service. MN 1810 was acquired from the former German base at Tallinn, Estonia on 26 Nov. 1918 and given serial 85/18, later changed to 2C 302 as shown here. It was deleted 25 May 1923 after 216 hours total flight time.
J.Herris - Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
FF49C /FB II HM32 was one of five in Danish Naval Air Service postwar. These aircraft served until 1927 performing maritime reconnaissance.
J.Herris - Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
FF49C MN 1682 in postwar Netherlands service as V4.
J.Herris - Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
FF49C MN 1682 in postwar Swedish service.
J.Herris - Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
FF49C Marine Number 1521 was the first Friedrichshafen built. The FF49C was a bigger, more powerful development of the FF33 series to perform the same tasks with better performance and heavier payload. Balanced upper ailerons reduced the pilot's workload on patrols while ailerons on all wings provided better maneuverability.
J.Herris - Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
O.Thetford, P.Gray - German Aircraft of the First World War /Putnam/
Friedrichshafen FF 49 B
J.Herris - Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
This FF49 aboard ship appears to be FF49B Marine Number 1608 or 1609 from the second batch of FF49B aircraft built. The aircraft is finished in the standard late-war camouflage scheme for German naval aircraft.
O.Thetford, P.Gray - German Aircraft of the First World War /Putnam/
Friedrichshafen FF 49c with Marine number 1602.
J.Herris - Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
FF49C #1602 was one of a batch of 10 (1597-1606) ordered in June 1917 and carried standard late-war camouflage.
E.Hauke, W.Schroeder, B.Totschinger - Die Flugzeuge der k.u.k. Luftfahrtruppe und Seeflieger 1914-1918
Schwimmerflugzeug 1688, Type Friedrichshafen FF49C, Puntisella, Juli 1918; deutsche Postflugzeuge für die Betreuung der deutschen U-Boot-Besatzungen in Pola und Cattaro, ohne Bewaffnung von deutschen Fliegern betrieben, allerdings mit k.u.k. Markierungen
Гидросамолет 1688, тип Friedrichshafen FF49C, Пунтизелла, июль 1918 г .; Немецкие связные самолеты для обслуживания экипажей немецких подводных лодок в Пола и Каттаро, эксплуатируемые немецкими летчиками без вооружения, но с маркировкой k.u.k.
J.Herris - Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
FF49C #16X8 is being recovered by hoist. The FF49 was robust enough to withstand rough shipboard handling.
J.Herris - Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
FF49C #1699 was first of a batch of 20 (1699-1718) ordered in August 1917 and carried a checkerboard marking.
The Friedrichshafen FF49c replaced the FF33 in production. The more powerful 200 hp Benz Bz.IV engine was fitted to achieve better performance and payload. The observer had a machine gun to defend against aerial attack.
J.Herris - Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Nose details of FF49C #1699 that carries a checkerboard marking; the entire nose is painted dark (black?).
J.Herris - Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
FF49C #175X carries a double white stripe unit marking. (Peter M. Bowers Collection/Museum of Flight)
A.Imrie - German Naval Air Service /Arms & Armour/
Beaching party, suitably attired in waterproof suits, bringing in Friedrichshafen FF49C 1778. When beaching did not allow seaplanes to run up the slipway to have the wheeled chassis fitted, the aircraft was stopped a few yards from the shore and the aircrew were taken off pick-a-back style; the handling crew then walked the machine on to the wheeled chassis and pulled the aircraft up the ramp out of the water.
J.Herris - Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
FF49C MN 1796, the captured FF49C described in the British report, awaiting rescue. FF49C MN 1796 was captured after being shot down when it attacked British aircraft carrier HMS Furious in company with other aircraft on 17 June 1918. MN 1796 was operating from List on Slyt. Furious was engaged in a reconnaissance of the Heligoland Bight before the Tondern raid. Furious launched a Ships Camel piloted by Lt. G. Heath who brought down FF49C #1796. The crew of Leutnant der Reserve Wenke and Flugzeugmaat Schirra were rescued before the aircraft was sunk by gunfire. (See Royal Naval Air Service 1912-1918 by Brad King, p.117.)
J.Herris - Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
FF49C #1832 was one of a batch of 30 (1812-1841) class C2MGHFT ordered in August 1917 and carried the late-style national insignia and standard late-war naval aircraft camouflage.
E.Hauke, W.Schroeder, B.Totschinger - Die Flugzeuge der k.u.k. Luftfahrtruppe und Seeflieger 1914-1918
Schwimmerflugzeug 1856, Type Friedrichshafen FF49C, Puntisella, Sommer 1918; deutsches Postflugzeug mit deutscher Marinetarnung, 1856 stammte aus der Lizenzliefcrung von Sablatnig
Гидросамолет 1856, тип Friedrichshafen FF49C, Пунтизелла, лето 1918 года; Немецкий связной самолет с немецким военно-морским камуфляжем, построен Sablatnig по лицензии
J.Herris - Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
FF49C wearing the late-style national insignia. Later production FF49C aircraft had an actuating strut connecting their ailerons making them more robust than early production FF49C aircraft that connected their ailerons with a wire.
J.Herris - Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
FF49C #1872 was the first aircraft of a batch of 30 (1872-1901) ordered from Sablatnig in August 1917.
J.Herris - Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
FF49C #1878 was one of a batch of 30 (1872-1901) ordered from Sablatnig in August 1917 and carries the early-style national insignia and standard late-war naval aircraft camouflage. No actuating struts connect the ailerons.
J.Herris - Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
An unknown FF49C wearing the late-style national insignia and standard late-war naval aircraft camouflage.
Журнал - Flight за 1919 г.
F.F. 49C
Журнал - Flight за 1919 г.
F.F. 49C
A.Imrie - German Naval Air Service /Arms & Armour/
Since seaplane engines could not be run up to test their power output and serviceability immediately before flight when on the water, this was done either on the ramp before launching or, as shown here, with a Zeebrugge Friedrichshafen FF49C, before lifting the aircraft by crane for lowering to the water. To the rear of the floats can be seen the flat railway car used to move the seaplane from its hangar to the crane.
J.Herris - Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
FF49C #189X was one a batch of 30 license-built by Sablatnig, who received three different orders for a total of 80 FF49C floatplanes; all were class CHFT. Damage to the original print obscured the last digit of the Marine Number.
A.Imrie - German Naval Air Service /Arms & Armour/
Friedrichshafen FF49C from Norderney investigating a suspicious sailing ship. Vessels stopped in prohibited areas and found to have contraband goods aboard were either directed to a German port or destroyed. Initially airships were used for this surveillance, since they could provide crew members to take over shipboard duties, but the risk to the large hydrogen-filled airships was quickly deemed to be too great and this duty was performed by seaplanes for most of the war.
J.Herris - Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
A naval aviation unit is lined up for inspection with their FF49C aircraft behind them. The aircraft carry a white chevron unit marking. (Peter M. Bowers Collection/Museum of Flight)
J.Herris - Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
FF49C at Friedrichshafen's Manzell production facility. At left is Eugen Schramm, who was historian Michael Schmeelke's grandfather. Herr Schramm was badly wounded at the Somme in 1916, losing one eye and a finger. After leaving the army for medical reasons, he went to work at Friedrichshafen's Manzell facility. In 1919 he moved to the Maybach Works in Friedrichshafen. Unfortunately, the other workers are unidentified.
C.Owers - Hansa-Brandenburg Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2 - Biplane Seaplanes /Centennial Perspective/ (2)
A hard landing for MN 2094! It appears that the machine taxied into the seawall between the Helgoland launching ramps. Note the Friedrichshafen FF 49C biplanes in the background and the wooden wharf/slipway. Staffel number 3 is just behind the interim national insignia. There is an individual emblem on the rear fuselage of MN 2094. It lacks detail and may be the background for a detail emblem that has not been painted yet, or over-painting of a previous emblem. This machine had the early curved wing crosses at the time of this accident.
C.Owers - Hansa-Brandenburg Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3 - Monoplane Seaplanes /Centennial Perspective/ (3)
W.29 monoplanes 2580 and 2583 in damaged condition together with two Friedrichshafen FF49 biplanes in the background, (via AHT AL0225-59)
C.Owers - Hansa-Brandenburg Aircraft of WWI. Volume 1 - Landplanes /Centennial Perspective/ (1)
A battered Brandenburg W.12, W.19 or W.29 fuselage lies amongst other wreckage and parts in this hangar at Wilhelmshaven. The wings stacked to the right have the number 2069 stencilled thereon. MN 2069 was a Friedrichshafen FF 49C. (AHT ALAL0225-70)
J.Herris - Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
FF49C in Netherlands service postwar; the crewman provides scale for this large aircraft.
J.Herris - Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Front view of an unknown FF49C in postwar Netherlands service. The propeller thrust line is slightly offset to the right to compensate for"P factor" (asymmetric propeller thrust).The downward moving blade has higher angle of attack and thus more 'lift' (thrust), causing "P factor".
J.Herris - Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
FF49C V2 in postwar Netherlands service. No actuating struts connect the ailerons.
J.Herris - Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
FF49C V4 ready to launch in postwar Netherlands service.
J.Herris - Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
FF49C V6 in Netherlands service postwar is the center of attention for an avid photographer.
J.Herris - Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
FF49C "2C 302" in postwar Finnish service.
J.Herris - Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
FF49C in postwar Finnish service.
J.Herris - Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
FF49C in postwar Polish service.
J.Herris - Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
FF49C "8" in postwar Polish service.
J.Herris - Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
FF49C in postwar Polish service.
J.Herris - Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
FF49C "26" in postwar Swedish naval service. The extensive postwar service with numerous different air arms was a testament to the good performance, reliability, and robustness of the FF49's design, and also makes its license production more understandable.
J.Herris - Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
FF49C #31 in postwar Danish naval service.
J.Herris - Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
FF49C aircraft in postwar Danish naval service where they were used in their original reconnaissance role.
J.Herris - Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
FF49C #33 in postwar Danish naval service.
J.Herris - Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
FF49C floatplanes in postwar Danish service.
J.Herris - Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
FF49C T-DABA was in postwar Danish passenger service.
J.Herris - Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
FF49C T-DABA in postwar Danish passenger service. This FF49C aircraft was MN 3078. This aircraft has the aileron actuating strut of later production aircraft consistent with its Marine Number.
J.Herris - Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
J.Herris - Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
This FF49C in postwar passenger service was covered with camouflage printed fabric. (Peter M. Bowers Collection/Museum of Flight)
J.Herris - Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
FF49C "W7" (D-377) in DLR passenger service in postwar Germany.
J.Herris - Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
FF49C type V1 passenger aircraft conversion MAX. MAX was given civil registration D-132 and seated three passengers in its cabin.
J.Herris - Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
In 1919 Roland modified four of the FF49C aircraft they were building into passenger aircraft. MAX was a type V1 which had a widened fuselage with cabin for three passenger seats, 220 hp Benz engine, and modified airfoils for greater lift. Here MAX, given civil registration D-132, forms the background for a portrait of people at a beach party.
J.Herris - Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
FF49C type V1 passenger aircraft conversion with three passenger seats. This might be MAX, civil registration D-132, but the name is not visible; this type V1 might also be Moritz, civil registration D-133.
J.Herris - Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
FF49C type V2 passenger aircraft conversion Witve Bolte, which was given civil registration D-134. The two V2 conversions had a longer passenger cabin (divided into two) and seated five passengers.
А.Александров, Г.Петров - Крылатые пленники России
(КПР 47а)
А.Александров, Г.Петров - Крылатые пленники России
(КПР 47б)
J.Herris - Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
FF49C in postwar Russian service.
J.Herris - Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
The Zeppelin Musuem at Friedrichshafen has this sample of fuselage fabric from FF49 Marine Number 17XX. In April 1917 the German navy promulgated instructions for a standard camouflage for German seaplanes. The blue-gray color illustrated here was painted on the sides of the aircraft and the upper surfaces were covered with a standard, three-color naval camouflage fabric. Undersurfaces of the fuselage and floats were painted light gray for both improved camouflage and to better protect the aircraft from the elements; however, undersurfaces of the wings were often clear doped finish.
J.Herris - Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
FF49C reproduction being built by the Danish Technik-Museum shows the structure in detail. All Friedrichshafen aircraft featured this type of construction, which was the typical state of the art during WWI. (Photos courtesy F. Gerdessen)
J.Herris - Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
J.Herris - Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Wreckage of an FF49C on top of the Officer's Casino at Kiel-Holtenau shows the late-war camouflage fabric on the upper surfaces. Unfortunately, we do not have the pilot's explanation for this accident to the authorities, which must have been fascinating.
O.Thetford, P.Gray - German Aircraft of the First World War /Putnam/
J.Herris - Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Friedrichshafen FF 49B SVK Drawing
J.Herris - Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Friedrichshafen FF 49C SVK Drawing
J.Herris - Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
FF49C
J.Herris - Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
FF49C
J.Herris - Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
FF49C