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Страна Конструктор Название Год Фото Текст

Rumpler G.I/G.II/G.III

Страна: Германия

Год: 1915

Rumpler - C.I/C.Ia - 1914 - Германия<– –>Rumpler - 6A2 - 1916 - Германия


O.Thetford, P.Gray German Aircraft of the First World War (Putnam)


Rumpler 4A 15
  This first Rumpler Grossflugzeuge appeared in March 1915 and became the prototype for the later G I. The machine made a test climb, carrying ten personnel, to an altitude of 3,200 m. on 15th March 1915, and later the same day attained a height of 1,800 m. while carrying sixteen personnel. On 17th April 1915 this prototype was destroyed. Engines, two 150 h.p. Benz Bz III. Span, 18.75 m. (61 ft. 6 1/4 in.). Length, 11.8 m. (38 ft. 8 5/8 in.).


Rumpler G I (5A 15)
  The Rumpler G I went into small-scale production in 1915 after the tail surfaces had been revised. It was of conventional wood and fabric construction, and a crew of three was carried. The twin engines, which drove pusher airscrews, were neatly encased with fairings extending right down to the lower wing. Car-type radiators were mounted on the forward end of the engine nacelles. Engines, two 160 h.p. Mercedes or 150 h.p. Benz. Span, 19.28 m. (63 ft. 3 1/8 in.). Length, 11.8 m. (38 ft. 8 5/8 in.). Height, 4.0 m. (13 ft. 1 1/2 in.). Area, 78.68 sq.m. (850 sq.ft.). Weights: Empty, 1,998 kg. (4,396 lb.). Loaded, 2,938 kg. (6,574 lb.). Speed, 145 km.hr. (90.625 m.p.h.). Climb, 800 m. (2,624 ft.) in 7 min., 4,000 m. (13,120 ft.) in 2 hr. Duration, ca. 4 hr. Armament, one Parabellum machine-gun in nose cockpit.


Rumpler G II (5A 16)
  This machine differed little from the G I and, as far as can be ascertained, was virtually the same aircraft fitted with more powerful 220 h.p. Benz Bz IV engines. Armament, one Parabellum machine-gun in nose cockpit and one aft of wings.


Rumpler G III (6G 2)
  Final development of the Rumpler twin-engined bombers, the G III followed the previous trend, but now had the engine nacelles considerably cleaned up and mounted well clear of the lower wing. Lateral control was improved by the introduction of horn-balanced ailerons. Engines, two 260 h.p. Mercedes D IVa. Span, 19.30 m. (63 ft. 3 7/8 in.). Length, 1200 m. (39 ft. 4 1/2 in.). Height, 4.50 m. (14 ft. 9 1/4 in.). Weights: Empty, 2,295 kg. (5,049 lb.). Loaded, 3,620 kg. (7,964 lb.).


А.Александров, Г.Петров Крылатые пленники России


Серийных двухмоторных бомбардировщиков в России тоже не существовало, тогда как германские аппараты класса Г в нашем небе летали. В ноябре 1916 г. над Браиловым (Румыния) опытный летчик георгиевский кавалер сотник Ф. Г. Зверев, возглавлявший 4-й авиационный отряд истребителей, сумел сбить большой двухдвигательный "Румплер". Всего лишь одна пуля попала в его правый мотор и разворотила картер, решив дело: аэроплан с номером 7 на фюзеляже (83, а и б) спустился в 15 км от города и попал в плен. "Ньюпор" Зверева пострадал больше, получив 37 пробоин, включая дыру в маслобаке, потеряв винт... Даже шлем летчика был пробит, да и не мудрено: подступиться к вооруженному 2 подвижными пулеметами "Парабеллум" бомбардировщику оказалось нелегко. Один стрелок находился в носу, а другой - в кабине, за коробкой крыльев, откуда мог вести огонь даже вниз, через специальную открывавшуюся амбразуру. Судя по этому описанию, жертвой Зверева стал "Румплер Г. II" - аппарат с двумя 220-сильными толкающими "Бенцами" в двух гондолах, размещенных в бипланной коробке крыльев. Модель создавалась в 1916 г. как развитие предыдущей, выпускавшейся в 1915 г. и несшей "Мерседесы" 160 л. с. или "Бенцы" 150 л. с. Пятьдесят восемь "Г-первых" были на фронте с середины 1915 по август 1916 гг.; 10 "Г-вторых" находились в боевых частях к октябрю 1916 г. (всего построено 72 аппарата). В 1917 г. на смену этим моделям пришла третья, с двумя "Мерседесами" в 260 "лошадей" каждый, и в общей сложности карьера данной конструкции длилась до августа 1918 г. Бомбовозы "Румплер" оказались вполне удачными машинами, хотя им не удалось испытать славы их "собратьев" от компаний "Гота" и "Фридрихсхафен".


J. Herris Rumpler Aircraft of WWI (A Centennial Perspective on Great War Airplanes 11)


Rumpler Bombers

  Rumpler produced a comparatively small number of bomber designs that saw modest production in keeping with their performance. In addition to at least three prototypes, 58 Rumpler production bombers of all types were built as detailed in the adjacent table.
  With limited engineering resources, Rumpler eventually abandoned bomber design in favor of more critical fighters and reconnaissance airplanes.

Rumpler Bomber Production
Type Quantity Serials
G.I 4 15-18/15
G.II 24 106-117/15 &. 119-130/15
G.III 30 300-329/16. See Note.
Note: Idflieg ordered 50 Rumpler G.III bombers but only 30 were built.


Rumpler 4A15

  In July 1914 Rumpler was among several manufacturers asked to develop a Kampfflugzeuge, a battleplane or aerial cruiser. The aircraft was to have a crew of two or three with a flexible gun for the observer/gunner mounted in the front cockpit, and was to have at least 200 hp.
  Rumpler's response was the 4A15, a twin-engine biplane of conventional wood, wire, and fabric construction powered by 150 hp Benz Bz.III engines mounted in pusher configuration. Each engine was mounted on the lower wing and enclosed in a nacelle housing a frontal Windhoff radiator and a 310 liter fuel tank. A gravity tank was installed above each engine. The 4A15 had a span of 18.75 m and a length of 11.8 m. The simple landing gear included a pair of wheels under each engine and another pair under the nose to prevent nose-overs on landing.
  The 4A15 first flew in March 1915 and achieved a maximum speed of 135 km/h at sea level. During informal flight demonstrations the aircraft carried ten people to 3,200 m on March 15th and then carried 16 people to 1,800 m. On 22 March the aircraft reached 2,300 m in 55 minutes while carrying 12 people. However, while flying to Munich on April 10 the 4A15 was forced to make an emergency landing and was damaged. On April 17, 1915 it was destroyed following a carburetor fire. However, during its brief life the 4A15 set the basic configuration for all Rumpler bombers that followed.


Rumpler G.I
  
  Rumpler continued bomber development with the 5A15. Based on the 4A15, the 5A15 used the same basic structure and engines but had a number of refinements. The wing span was increased slightly, the shape of the vertical tail surfaces was revised, and a single gravity tank under the top wing replaced the two separate gravity tanks over the engines. The gunner in the front cockpit was given a windshield and the rear crew member now had a flexible gun.
  The 5A15 first flew on September 4, 1915 and demonstrated acceptable performance, although flight testing revealed a number of improvements were needed. The test pilot, probably Friedrich Budig, then chief test pilot at Rumpler, complained that the fuel system was too complicated and the gravity tank was the sole feed to the carburetors, creating a single point of failure. The aircraft was also too tail heavy and the pusher propellers were subject to damage from debris thrown up by the landing gear. Inadequate clearance (4 cm) between the fuselage and the propeller arc sometimes caused the propellers to hit the screen protecting the rear gunner from the propeller arc.
  The 5A15 passed its acceptance flight on September 16, 1915, and Idflieg ordered it into limited production as the Rumpler G.I, only four aircraft being built. Photographs show the production aircraft had an enlarged rudder for better directional control after an engine failure. The very small number ordered indicates that the aircraft were primarily intended for operational evaluation. One aircraft, G.16/15, was delivered to Kampgeschwader der Obersten Heeresleitung 1 (Kagohl 1) for operational evaluation, where it was flown for a time by Leutnant Ray, while two others, G.17/15 and G.18/15, served briefly that year with Brieftauben Abteilung Metz, or BAM.

Rumpler G.l Specifications
Engines: 2 x 150 hp Benz Bz.III
Wing: Span 19.3 m
Area 78.68 m
General: Length 11.8 m
Height 4.0 m
Empty Weight 1,998 kg
Loaded Weight 2,938 kg
Maximum Speed: 145 kmh
Climb: 800m 7 min
2000m 21 min
4000m 120 min
Service Ceiling: 4000 m
Range: 600 km
Armament: 1 flexible MG & 150-200 kg of bombs


Rumpler G.II

  In November 1915 Idflieg ordered 24 improved aircraft as the Rumpler G.II. The most important change was the use of more powerful, 220 hp Benz Bz.IV engines for improved speed, climb, and ceiling. The G.I airframe was used with minor modifications, but flight testing soon revealed the need for additional modifications for improved flying qualities. The prototype G.II, Rumpler internal designation 5A16, was tail heavy and insufficiently stable. Testing revealed the need for larger propellers to efficiently absorb the greater engine power, so propellers of 3.1 m diameter were fitted and the fuselage was narrowed slightly to provide sufficient clearance.
  Rumpler chief test pilot Friedrich Budig determined that modifications to the lower wing near the propellers were needed, and on May 27, 1916 large cut-outs were made in the lower wing in front of the propellers on the second production aircraft. This modification greatly reduced tail heaviness as determined by Budig during a successful test flight on May 30.
  Rumpler G.II 117/15, the last aircraft of the first production series, was fitted with more powerful 260 hp Mercedes D.IVa engines and larger propellers of 3.17 m diameter. Idflieg accepted this modified aircraft and it went on to serve with Kagohl 2 on the Eastern Front in the summer of 1916. No other G.II aircraft used this engine, but it was a harbinger of things to come in the Rumpler G.III.
  The Rumpler G.II saw much of its service with Kagohl 2. Originally formed from the Brieftauben Abteilung Metz, or BAM, in December 1915, Kagohl 2 had six Kampfstaffeln, Kastas 7-12. Five of these had single-engine C-type aircraft, but one was equipped with the Rumpler G.II and AEG G.III. Kagohl 2 was transferred to the Eastern Front in July 1916 and was eventually stationed at Lasnaja aerodrome. Kagohl 1, originally formed from the Brieftaubenabteilung Ostend, or BAO,was also transferred to the Eastern Front in June 1916, and had some Rumpler G.II aircraft along with other G-types. In September 1916 Kagohl 1 was transferred to northern Bulgaria where it flew a number of bombing missions against Romanian troops. Kagohl 2 was transferred back to the Western Front in October 1916, followed by Kagohl 1 in May 1917.
  The Rumpler G.II bombers were better armed than the C-types and on the Eastern Front were used as long-range reconnaissance aircraft and as escorts for the smaller C-types on bombing raids.

Rumpler G.II Specifications
Engines: 2 x 220 hp Benz Bz.IV
Wing: Span 19.3 m
General: Length 11.8 m
Height 4.0 m
Empty Weight 1,990 kg
Loaded Weight 2,990 kg
Maximum Speed: 164 kmh
Armament: 2 flexible MGs & bombs

  
Rumpler G.III

  The Rumpler G.II had proven itself moderately successful and Idflieg placed an order for the proposed Rumpler G.III in September 1916. Retaining the basic size and configuration of the earlier G.II, the G.III was a new design. Although wingspan was the same as the earlier types, wing area was reduced by a smaller lower wing. The engine nacelles were more streamlined and more powerful 260 hp Mercedes D.IVa engines were fitted in place of the 220 hp Benz engines of the G.II. To reduce the danger of fire the fuel tanks were now mounted in the fuselage instead of in the nacelles. Unfortunately, the weight of the new aircraft increased substantially due to increases in the empty weight and also the designed payload.
  Flight testing of the new prototype, factory designation 6G2, began in December 1916 and quickly revealed unsafe flying qualities. Like the earlier designs, the G.III prototype was tail heavy in flight. To solve this problem the horizontal stabilizer was raised and the fuselage near the plane of the propellers was modified to improve airflow, and these changes greatly alleviated the tail-heaviness. Test pilot Friedrich Budig stated the revised G.III was more stable and had better flying qualities than the G.II. However, adding the rear gunner's gun and ammunition again caused tail-heaviness, and the upper wings had to be moved rearward to restore pitch stability and trim.
  The G.III that arrived at the front in December 1916 was the aircraft assigned to Kagohl 2, which had used the earlier G.II. Some G.III bombers served into at least March 1918 with Kampfstaffel 9 of Kagohl 2.
  The final Rumpler bomber prototype, factory designation 6G4, had increased wing span and tractor-mounted 4-bladed propellers. The first test flight on 18 February 1918 indicated marginal flight characteristics when the aircraft swung to the right on takeoff and the pilot, Budig, was barely able to correct it. With extensive modifications necessary to improve its poor flying qualities and higher priority programs underway, further bomber development was abandoned.

Rumpler G.III Specifications
Engines: 2 x 260 hp Mercedes D.IVa
Wing: Span 19.3 m
Area 78.68 m2
General: Length 12.0 m
Height 4.5 m
Empty Weight 2,365 kg
Loaded Weight 3,620 kg
Maximum Speed: 150 kmh
Climb: 3000m 22 min
Service Ceiling: 5000 m
Range: 660 km
Armament: 2 flexible MGs St 225 kg of bombs

J.Herris - Rumpler Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Rumpler G.I 15/15 as built.
J.Herris - Rumpler Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Rumpler G.II G.109/15 assigned to Kagohl 2, summer of 1916. The black circles were identification markings painted at the unit level.
J.Herris - Development of German Warplanes in WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Rumpler G.II G.109/15 assigned to Kagohl 2, summer of 1916. The light finish is from the factory but the black circles were identification markings painted at the unit level.
J.Herris - Rumpler Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Rumpler G.II G.129/15 assigned to Kagohl 2, late 1916.
J.Herris - Development of German Warplanes in WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Rumpler G.III G.311/16 assigned to Kasta 9, summer of 1917. By now the camouflage finish applied at the factory had changed to dark colors to camouflage the aircraft on the ground. The black circles with white star were a unit marking.
J.Herris - Rumpler Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Rumpler G.III G311/16 assigned to Kasta 9, summer of 1917. The black circles with white star and black/ white wheel covers were unit markings.
J.Herris - Rumpler Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
The Rumpler 4A15 was the first Rumpler bomber design, and all subsequent Rumpler bombers followed its general configuration of pusher engines and simple landing gear with nose wheels to prevent nose-overs on landing. The propellers were mounted on short extension shafts.
J.Herris - Rumpler Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
The Rumpler 4A15 was in response to an Idflieg request for a Kampfflugzeuge, or battleplane. Powered by two 150 hp Benz Bz.III engines mounted as pushers, it set the basic configuration for all subsequent Rumpler bombers.
O.Thetford, P.Gray - German Aircraft of the First World War /Putnam/
Rumpler 4A 15
J.Herris - Rumpler Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
The Rumpler 4A15 was the first Rumpler bomber design, and all subsequent Rumpler bombers followed its general configuration of pusher engines and simple landing gear with nose wheels to prevent nose-overs on landing. The fuel tank below the engine is clearly visible. The propellers were mounted on short extension shafts.
O.Thetford, P.Gray - German Aircraft of the First World War /Putnam/
Rumpler G I (5A 15) (first version)
J.Herris - Rumpler Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
This photograph shows the Rumpler G.I with the first design of fin and rudder, the most visible difference between the Rumpler G.I, military designation for 5A15, and 4A15. A gravity tank was also installed just below the upper wing; the main fuel tank for the starboard engine is visible mounted beneath the engine and forward of it. The fuel tank was located near the aircraft center of gravity so burning off fuel would not adversely impact the type's pitch stability.
J.Herris - Rumpler Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
This photograph shows the Rumpler G.I engine installation in more detail. The under-wing gravity tank and main fuel tank for the starboard engine are clearly visible. The frontal radiator was large and complex.
J.Herris - Rumpler Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Rumpler entered the twin-engine bomber business with the Rumpler G.I. Nose wheels protected against nose-overs on soft fields. The G.I used 150 hp Benz Bz.III engines, but only four were built before production was moved to the more powerful G.II using the same airframe.
In this front quarter view the most visible difference between the Rumpler G.I and A415 is the windshield provided for the front gunner in addition to the gravity tank installed just below the upper wing. The front gunner's flexible machine gun is also visible.
J.Herris - Rumpler Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Rumpler G.I 15/15, the first of four production machines.
K.Delve - World War One in the Air /Crowood/
The Rumpler G.1 went into production in 1915 as a reconnaissance/bomber but only was used in small numbers by the Germans.
J.Herris - Rumpler Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
This front quarter view of Rumpler G.I 16/15 shows the overall workman-like design and construction.The tents in the background indicate this is an operational aircraft at its unit.
J.Herris - Rumpler Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
J.Herris - Rumpler Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Rumpler G.I 16/15, the second of four production machines. The most noticeable difference between this aircraft and the first G.I is the enlarged rudder with large aerodynamic balance for improved directional control with one engine out. The larger rudder was retrofitted to G.I 15/15. The engine cowlings were well streamlined. A black and white measurement bar is included in two photographs to enable measurements to be scaled from the photos.
J.Herris - Rumpler Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Rumpler G.I 16/15
Журнал - Flight за 1918 г.
It appears that the Gotha and Friedrichshafen firms are not having a monopoly in twin-engined bombers, the above illustrations showing a machine produced by the Rumpler firm. - From the numbers painted on the fuselage it appears that this machine was built as long ago as 1915.
J.Herris - Rumpler Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
A Rumpler G.I on the Eastern Front with its lower starboard engine cowling removed for maintenance.
J.Herris - Rumpler Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Rumpler G.I 15/15 is shown moments after lifting off during take-off. This view confirms that the enlarged rudder was retrofitted to this aircraft.
J.Herris - Rumpler Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Rumpler G.I 15/15 in flight.
O.Thetford, P.Gray - German Aircraft of the First World War /Putnam/
Rumpler G II (5A 16)
J.Herris - Rumpler Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
The Rumpler G.II was developed from the Rumpler G.I by upgrading the engines.This G.II, 117/15, the last aircraft of the first production batch of G.II bombers, is virtually indistinguishable from the G.I other than the barely visible cutout of the lower wing trailing edge. This is also the one G.II modified to have 260 h.p. Mercedes D.IVa engines, but the photo is not clear enough to show which engine type is fitted.
J.Herris - Rumpler Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Rumpler G.II G.122/15 ready for a bombing mission; the bombs are already loaded under the fuselage. Only standard factory markings and insignia are visible.The snowy scene was probably at KG2 on the Eastern Front.
J.Herris - Rumpler Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
The most visible differences between Rumpler G.II, 117/15 and the earlier Rumpler G.I are the cutouts in the lower wing trailing edge and the white backgrounds for the iron cross insignia.The screens to protect the rear gunner from the propellers are also visible.
J.Herris - Rumpler Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
In contrast to earlier Rumpler bombers with overall light finish, Rumpler G.II G.129/15, the next to last production G.II, carries an interesting camouflage scheme, with the camouflage on the engine nacelles painted a different pattern than the fuselage. Despite the distinctive camouflage, only standard factory markings and insignia are visible. Because the factory serial number is clearly visible, the camouflage on wings and fuselage was probably painted at the factory. The straps for securing the bombs under the fuselage are clearly visible, as is the lower wing trailing edge cutout. The summer scene was probably taken at KG2 on the Eastern Front.
The Rumpler G.II was based on the Rumpler G.I airframe, but used more powerful 220 hp Benz Bz.IV engines. Performance and bomb load were improved, and 24 were built. The Rumpler G.II served on both the Western and Macedonian Fronts as a bomber. In Macedonia it was also used to escort C-types during day bombing raids.
J.Herris - Rumpler Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
This close-up view of Rumpler G.II G.129/15 shows its interesting camouflage scheme and engine nacelles in more detail. The camouflage appears to be sprayed on the fuselage and brush-painted on the nacelles, indicating the nacelle camouflage may have been applied at the unit. The screens to protect the gunner from the propellers are clearly shown. Although not clear, there appears to be segmented camouflage on the bottom of the upper wing.
J.Herris - Rumpler Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Rumpler G.II G.l 07/15 is shown in flight over the Eastern Front while serving with KG2. The light overall finish still contrasts somewhat with the white backgrounds for the iron cross insignia. Both guns are visible as is the slight sweep-back of the wings.
Because of their heavy defensive armament, the Kagohl's first twin-engined G types of aircraft were used singly for reconnaissance duties, and when accompanying a number of smaller two-seaters on a bombing raid the inclusion of a G type guaranteed that enemy fighters would concentrate on the big machine, leaving the main bomb-carrying force almost unmolested. But a hot reception awaited the attackers. This Rumpler G II (107/15) is seen over the Eastern Front, operating with Kagohl II from Kowel aerodrome in 1916.
J.Herris - Rumpler Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Rumpler G.II in flight is identified by its distinctive cutouts on the trailing edge of the lower wing that significantly reduced the design's tail heaviness in flight.
J.Herris - Rumpler Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
An unknown Rumpler G is shown in the Rumpler factory. In contrast to all available known G.I photographs, this aircraft is in overall dark finish with light engine nacelles typical of the G.II, making one think this was a production G.II. There appears to be a lower wing trailing edge cutout characteristic of the G.II series but the angle and quality of the photo preclude positive verification.
J.Herris - Rumpler Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
A Rumpler G.II in service with BAM (Brieftauben Abteilung Metz). Standing in the pilot's cockpit is Hptm. Fritz Prestien; the officer manning the gun is an observer named von Hachenburg. At the far right is Lt. Franz Ray, who would go on to score 17 confirmed victories as a fighter pilot. Hptm. Paul Backhaus is 3rd from right.
J.Herris - Rumpler Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
The Rumpler G.II was developed from the Rumpler G.I by replacing the 150 hp Benz Bz.III engines of the G.I with more powerful 220 hp Benz Bz.IV engines. This early G.II, possibly the first G.II airframe, is virtually indistinguishable from the G.I.
J.Herris - Rumpler Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
The more powerful Rumpler G.II was much more difficult to fly than the G.I. On 27 May 1916 large cutouts were made in each lower wing beneath the propellers on Rumpler G.II 107/15, the second G.II, as shown here. On 30 May Rumpler test pilot Friedrich Budig successfully flew this aircraft, and all subsequent G.II aircraft featured this cutout.
J.Herris - Rumpler Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Then Unteroffizier Gustav Seitz poses in front of Rumpler G.II G.110/15 of Kampfstaffel 9 of KG2 at Kowel after receiving the Iron Cross 2nd Class. Again the radiators are distinctly different than those fitted to most other Rumpler G.II bombers.
J.Herris - Rumpler Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Rumpler G.II G.109/15 of KG2 damaged at Lasnaja, one of two fields KG2 is known to have used on the Eastern Front, where KG2 served from mid-July to October 1916. The black circle marking is distinctive. The radiators are very different than those fitted to most other Rumpler G.II bombers, but the reason for this modification is unknown.
J.Herris - Rumpler Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Rumpler G.II crash.
J.Herris - Rumpler Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
The remains of Rumpler G.II G.130/15, the last production G.II, are shown here in Russian hands. Since no G.II bombers were downed by the Russians, it is a mystery how they retrieved this dismantled aircraft. G.130/15 appears to have a similar camouflage scheme to G.129/15, further indicating application at the factory.
J.Herris - Rumpler Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
This Rumpler G.III shows its camouflage to advantage. The upper surfaces appear to be sprayed in two colors while the rudder is painted a single dark color and undersurfaces, struts, nacelles, and wheel covers appear to be in a single light shade. Propeller spinners are fitted, showing attention to streamlining details.
A.Imrie - German Bombers /Arms & Armour/
This appears to be another photograph of Rumpler G.III G.304/16 in front of the Rumpler factory, but that cannot be confirmed because the serial number is not legible. This view shows the cleanly-streamlined engine nacelles to advantage. The conical propeller spinners are not fitted in this view. Like the G.II, the G.III featured screens to protect the rear gunner from the propellers. The rudder and horn balance appear larger than that of the Rumpler G.II was would be expected for control of a more powerful aircraft in engine-out situations.
The success of the Rumpler G II at the Front during 1916 led to the development of the Rumpler G III powered by two Mercedes D IVa 260hp engines, but the aircraft had constructional shortcomings and could not compete with the designs of AEG, Friedrichshafen and Gotha, the main suppliers of twin-engined G types. From a limited production batch, the Rumpler G III was used only in small numbers by the Kagohl, reaching a maximum at the Front of ten machines at the end of October 1917.
J.Herris - Rumpler Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Rumpler G.III G.304/16, the fifth G.III aircraft, is shown here on a rainy day at the Rumpler factory. The two-color factory camouflage with lighter engine nacelles and undersurfaces is clearly shown.
J.Herris - Rumpler Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Rumpler G.III, perhaps G.304/16? The photo looks like it could be from the same series as the other two on this page.
J.Herris - Rumpler Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
This front view of a Rumpler G.III emphasizes its clean lines with great attention to streamlining, a Rumpler hallmark.
J.Herris - Rumpler Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
This front view of a Rumpler G.III in a hangar shows a diamond insignia on the nose, which was a unit or personal marking.
J.Herris - Rumpler Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
This G.III is shown under construction at the factory. Although the photo quality is poor, the revised engine nacelles that now were raised above the wing like the Gotha G.V are clearly visible.
J.Herris - Rumpler Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
This photograph of Rumpler G.III G.311/16 of Bogohl 2 is especially interesting because, unlike most G.III photos, it shows unit markings on the nose and the wheel covers are painted half dark and half light; black and white? The aircraft is loaded for a bombing mission with P.u.W. bombs under the fuselage along with a square Kastenbombe for blast effect.
The Rumpler G.III was a new design. Its 260 hp Mercedes D.IVa engines were mounted in nacelles above the wing. Thirty G.III bombers were built. Rumpler started designing a G.IV but its engineering resources were stretched too thin designing fighters and reconnaissance airplanes, and Rumpler dropped out of bomber construction.
J.Herris - Rumpler Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
This front quarter view of a Rumpler G.III apparently at an operational unit shows its camouflage and clean lines to advantage. Interestingly, the rudder appears to be in two colors like the rest of the upper surfaces. The photo gives the impression of being of the same aircraft as the photo below, except the rudder appears to be in a single dark color. Are these two different aircraft or is this a trick of the light?
J.Herris - Rumpler Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
This rear quarter view of a Rumpler G.III apparently at an operational unit shows that the propeller spinners were not fitted. The rear gunner's gun is fitted and his cockpit appears very roomy.
J.Herris - Rumpler Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Rumpler G.III photographed while serving with an operational unit.
J.Herris - Rumpler Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
This over-exposed view of a Rumpler G.III in flight is still interesting. The rudder and horn balance appear somewhat larger than that of the G.II and the lines are cleaner than the competing Gotha bombers.The nose landing gear used in all Rumpler bombers helped reduce the likelihood of a landing accident.
А.Александров, Г.Петров - Крылатые пленники России
(КПР 83а)
А.Александров, Г.Петров - Крылатые пленники России
(КПР 83б)
J.Herris - Rumpler Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
This photo taken from the front gunner's cockpit shows Rumpler test pilot Friedrich Budig (at right) flying a G.III. Only the pilot had a windscreen.
J.Herris - Rumpler Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
The front gunner's cockpit of the Rumpler G.III appears much more compact than the rear gunner's position despite housing a lot of equipment.
J.Herris - Rumpler Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Rumpler G.I & G.II
J.Herris - Rumpler Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Rumpler G.I & G.II
J.Herris - Rumpler Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Rumpler G.I & G.II
J.Herris - Rumpler Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Rumpler G.III
J.Herris - Rumpler Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Rumpler G.III
J.Herris - Rumpler Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Rumpler G.III