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Gaunt No. 2 Baby

Страна: Великобритания

Год: 1911

Gaunt - Cycloplane - 1909 - Великобритания<– –>George & Jobling - biplane - 1910 - Великобритания


M.Goodall, A.Tagg British Aircraft before the Great War (Schiffer)


Deleted by request of (c)Schiffer Publishing


P.Lewis British Aircraft 1809-1914 (Putnam)


Gaunt Biplane No. 1

  The Gaunt No. 1 was a pusher biplane fitted with a two-cylinder Alvaston engine of 30 h.p. which drove twin propellers. The tail unit was of triangular form. The machine was tested at Apperley Bridge, Bedford, during May. 1910. Wing area, 200 sq. ft.


Gaunt Biplane No. 2
  
  The second Gaunt Biplane was of tractor layout. It was built during 1911 and was fitted with a two-cylinder 30 h.p. Alvaston engine. It was flown in September, 1911, at Southport, Lanes., by the Hon. W. S. Leveson-Gower, R.N.


Журнал Flight


Flight, March 11, 1911.

See-Saw Type Aeroplane.

  [1103] I enclose a sketch of the see-saw type of aeroplane that I have invented and for which I claim that it is easier to learn to fly than any other type. The pilot has the whole of the machine in front of him with direct control and "feel" of both elevating and steering handle, which is of gun-metal and similar to the cycle handlebar in use for steering, but with up and down movement for balancing.
  Primarily, the invention is to secure a better sense of direction in beam winds. The present loading of aeroplanes is a central disposition of carried weights, which in a beam wind acts as a pivot for the aeroplane to veer round.
  Features not to be lost sight of are :- the compass is a long way from the engine, so is the pilot, and the provision of a hoe shoe or grapnel will be useful to hold back aeroplane whilst starting engine and as an emergency drag in finishing a flight.
  The idea is the outcome of another original machine I have designed, built and flown with an Alvaston engine.
JOHN GAUNT.


Flight, April 1, 1911.

BRITISH NOTES OF THE WEEK.

Mishap with the Gaunt Monoplane.

  ON Tuesday week the Hon. W. S. Leveson-Gower R.N., visited Southport with the object of trying the Gaunt monoplane, of which he is part owner. After two runs of about a mile each along the North Foreshore the machine on its third trial rose to a height of between 10 and 15 ft. It swerved to the left, and on recovering pitched forward and turned turtle. Fortunately the pilot was thrown clear and escaped with only a bruise or two. The left wing of the monoplane was buckled and the chassis damaged, while the propeller was broken to splinters.


Flight, June 17, 1911.

FROM THE BRITISH FLYING GROUNDS.

South port Aerodrome.

  MR. GAUNT is now making good progress each day in learning to manage the Baby biplane racer he has made at Southport, and hopes soon to be numbered with the constructor-aviators. The machine has but 200 sq. ft. area, and shows a good turn of speed. So far, Mr. Gaunt has been doing straight flights up to half a mile each, and is now making safer landings, being more accustomed to the drag caused by the wheel-contact with the sands, which have been rather of a loose nature lately, sometimes bringing the machine to a sudden stop instead of rolling on.


Flight, July 1, 1911.

FROM THE BRITISH FLYING GROUNDS.

Southport Aerodrome.

  ON the 12th and 13th ult. Mr. Gaunt out the "baby" racing biplane which he has designed and built, and is now learning to fly, and made several straight flights up to half a mile each. On Thursday morning he did a mile, and in the evening a mile and a half, descending with the engine stopped from a height of 60 ft., landing perfectly. Friday was a blank, the weather not clearing until sunset on the 17th ult., when Mr. Gaunt ventured out and flew two miles again, gliding down and landing perfectly after taking a half turn. For speed and steadiness the machine leaves nothing to be desired, and all the flights have been made with the engine (30-h.p. Alvaston) throttled down.
  On the 23rd. ult. Mr. Gaunt made a very good flight from his hangar at the north end of the Promenade to the Pier. In the evening he again made this trip and was able to fly back to his hangar. A third trip was made subsequently, making the total distance flown during the day about seven miles.


Flight, July 8, 1911.

FROM THE BRITISH FLYING GROUNDS.

Southport Aerodrome.

  ON the 3rd inst., after a week's enforced idleness due to squally weather, the Dines anemometer fell to 19 m.p.h., and Mr. Gaunt took out the "Baby" biplane he has made for a straight 2-mile trip, which subsequently he repeated, descending with a neat vol plane. Owing to some mischievous tampering by the crowd, half the elevator got bent 6 ins. out of normal, and Mr. Gaunt had a narrow escape on his next attempt, the machine quickly turning over, landing on the wing tip; but this fortunately held together, and so saved a smash.
  On the 4th, Mr. Gaunt made several trial flights in the evening, after altering the adjustable incidence of planes to do slow flights, and covered over 10 miles with remarkable steadiness in the 12 m.p.h. wind.


Flight, July 15, 1911.

FROM THE BRITISH FLYING GROUNDS.

Southport Aerodrome.

  MR. GAUNT last week put in some very fine trips upon the "Baby" biplane he has made, at times flying 100 feet high and descending neatly with the engine stopped. On Friday evening he was flying quite half an hour, but on Saturday was in difficulties trying to rise in a side wind and damaged the propeller, wheels, and the lower planes, although the chassis stood up to the shock.
  Repairs took until the evening of the 11th, and then on taking out the machine again Mr. Gaunt made several trips to the Pier and finished up with a flight to Crossens.


Flight, July 29, 1911.

FROM THE BRITISH FLYING GROUNDS.

Southport Aerodrome.

  ON the 18th, Mr. Gaunt made several trips over the oreshore, keeping about 100 ft. up, flying very steadily. Mr. Hubert, flying Mr. Graham-White's Farman, at one time crossed over Mr. Gaunt, much to the delight of the crowd of holiday makers. Owing to high winds nothing further was done until Monday, when Mr. Gaunt made his most successful flight to date. Keeping 300 ft. high, he flew from the Pier to Crossens at a good speed, so steadily that the machine appeared to be travelling on a wire.


Flight, August 12, 1911.

FROM THE BRITISH FLYING GROUNDS.

South port Aerodrome.

  OWING to high tides leaving the foreshore muddy, flying had been impossible for twelve days up to the 4thinst. Then, however, conditions were more favourable, and Mr. Gaunt made several pretty flights at a good height, and attempted a left-hand turn for the first time with his Alvaston engine.
  On the 8th further flights were made, but a broken petrol pipe terminated experiments, Mr. Gaunt making a perfect landing after switching off on the first indication of this trouble.


Flight, August 26, 1911.

FROM THE BRITISH FLYING GROUNDS.

South port Aerodrome.

  SINCE the 12th Mr. Gaunt has been able to put in daily practice, flying over the foreshore, and though nothing great has been achieved, everything points to the fact that he has evolved a low-powered machine of great stability with a good turn of speed, and he continues to make splendid landings.


Flight, September 2, 1911.

FROM THE BRITISH FLYING GROUNDS.

Southport Aerodrome.

  ON the 23rd ult. Mr. Gaunt made several flights over the foreshore on his baby biplane, and although the condition of the shore was bad he made very successful landings. Little flying was attempted again until the 28th. In the morning some fine flights were made, and later at 4 p.m., when Mr. Gaunt had an exciting moment or two during a squall. When a mile out and 40 ft. up, he was tossed up over 60 ft. one second, only to drop the next, and when near terra firma a cross gust shot him up again almost capsizing the machine. Mr. Gaunt, however, by skilful warping for level again managed to land without damage.
  The anemometer reading recorded a fairly steady 15 m.p.h. with a sudden squall 32 m.p.h. at this period, whilst the anemoscope reading shows the first squall gust W. by N. and the second gust S. by E.
  A local enthusiast, Mr. Pochin, is building a monoplane and hopes to have it ready for trying here in about six weeks time.


Flight, September 9, 1911.

FROM THE BRITISH FLYING GROUNDS.

Southport Aerodrome.

  ON the 30th and 31st ult. and 1st inst. Mr. Gaunt made flights over the foreshore in the direction of the pier, but was not able to attempt turns owing to the tricky wind. He made a trial flight on the "Baby" biplane on the 5th prior to the Hon. W. S. Leveson-Gower, R.N., taking charge. Mr. Leveson-Gower, after a few preliminary runs, made three short flights, landing perfectly each time, before darkness suspended operations.


Flight, September 16, 1911.

FROM THE BRITISH FLYING GROUNDS.

South port Aerodrome.

  IN the few days last week that the Hon. W. S. Leveson-Gower, R.N., was over, he made rapid progress in handling the small biplane built by Mr. Gaunt, in all making twelve flights, several being of over half a mile each. The wind prevailing was N.W., consequently the course was restricted by the tide, or longer flights would have resulted, as Mr. Gower showed plenty of confidence and made good landings. He is a good five stone heavier than Mr. Gaunt, but the extra weight appeared to make no difference to the 30-h.p. Alvaston.

M.Goodall, A.Tagg - British Aircraft before the Great War /Schiffer/
Gaunt achieved some success at last with his second biplane.
Журнал - Flight за 1911 г.
Mr. J. Gaunt flying his small biplane over the Southport sands.
M.Goodall, A.Tagg - British Aircraft before the Great War /Schiffer/
Gaunt See-Saw aeroplane had no future.