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Страна Конструктор Название Год Фото Текст

Vickers No.2 - No.5, No.7

Страна: Великобритания

Год: 1912

Vickers - Hydravion / No.14 - 1912 - Великобритания<– –>Vickers - No.6 / No.8 - 1912 - Великобритания


C.Andrews Vickers Aircraft since 1908 (Putnam)


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  Early in 1912 the Vickers Flying School was established at Brooklands in sheds near the Byfleet banking, where later the final erecting shops of Hawker Aircraft Ltd were situated. After the successful trials of No. 1 monoplane, more were developed from the basic design and gave good service in the Vickers School as instructional machines.
  No. 1 was written off in a crash. No. 2 was sold to Dr (later Sir) Douglas Mawson for the 1912 Australian Antarctic expedition, but crashed on a trial flight in October 1911 at Adelaide; without its wings it was taken with the expedition as a tractor sledge, but the extreme cold solidified the lubricating oil and the engine seized, so the vehicle never served any useful purpose. However, as a pioneering winterisation test, the steel-tube fuselage stood up so well that in recent years, according to report, its remains have been observed at Cape Denison, the Antarctic base of the expedition.
  The first five Vickers monoplanes were shoulder-wing aeroplanes carrying a pilot and passenger (or pupil). The fuselages were of steel tubing with welded and bolted tubular end-fittings at the joints, braced with piano wire and covered with fabric. According to Archie Knight, then an instructor at the School, doping was done by any agent that would tighten up the fabric, various concoctions being tried until the advent of acetate dopes as developed by Dr J. E. Ramsbottom of the Royal Aircraft Factory and by various companies in the paint trade.
  The undercarriages of the first Vickers monoplanes had dual wooden skids and four wheels sprung by elastic cord on a lever system at the top of the legs. As was common at the time, lateral control was by wing warping. Various engines and propellers were experimented with, but usually Vickers-built R.E.P. five-cylinder fan radials with air cooling were fitted, reputed to be of 60 hp each. Maximum speed attained was around 56 mph and the empty weight about 1,000 lb. No. 5 monoplane was deeper bodied, which gave the crew more protection from the elements, and various small geometrical changes were made between the individual aircraft, including fin and stabiliser configuration.
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  In No. 7 monoplane, Vickers' designers reverted to the earlier and larger layouts with tandem seating, a two-skid four-wheel undercarriage and a 100 hp Gnome rotary engine as power unit.


Monoplanes Nos. 1-7
   Nos 1, 2 and 3 No. 6 No. 7
Accommodation: Pilot and passenger Pilot and passenger Pilot and passenger
Engine: 60 hp R.E.P.* 70 hp Viale** 100 hp Gnome
Span: 47 ft 6 in 35 ft 34 ft 6 in
Length: 36 ft 5 in - 25 ft
Wing Area: 290 sq ft 220 sq ft 220 sq ft
Empty Weight: 1,000 lb - 730 lb
Gross Weight: - - 1,200 lb
Max Speed
  at Ground Level: 56 mph 63 mph 70 mph
Range: - - 350 miles
* Changed to 60 hp Vickers-REP on No. 2.
** Changed to 70 hp Gnome rotary.


M.Goodall, A.Tagg British Aircraft before the Great War (Schiffer)


Deleted by request of (c)Schiffer Publishing


P.Lewis British Aircraft 1809-1914 (Putnam)


Vickers Monoplanes Nos. 1 to 8

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  Monoplane No. 2 was similar to No. 1, and Monoplanes Nos. 3, 4 and 5 complied fairly closely with the R.E.P. specification, but incorporated experimental differences in the depth of the fore-fuselages and in the undercarriages and also in the tail units. Steel tubing with built-up tubular joints was employed for the fuselage in place of the original R.E.P. system of brazing. Wire formed the bracing, and the covering was of fabric. In each of the machines the two occupants were seated in tandem, and in No. 3 extra room for them was conferred by changing the triangular area around the cockpits to a rectangular section. A tail unit and four-wheeled undercarriage similar to No. 1 were employed, but wings of a new plan-form with straight leading- and trailing-edges were fitted. The same cabane as No. 1 was retained, consisting of front inverted-vee struts and a single one at the rear. No. 5 showed several distinct differences from its predecessors. The fuselage was modified greatly with a deep fore-belly of rectangular section to provide lower seating for the two passengers. Towards the tail, the side elevation of the fuselage was tapered sharply. The cabane consisted of two pairs of inverted-vee struts, joined at the top by a further horizontal member. A fixed fin of revised shape was provided, together with a well-rounded rudder. The four-wheel undercarriage and its attendant skids were of the same type as before, and the wings followed the same pattern as those of No. 3.
  Monoplanes Nos. 2, 3, 4 and 5 were on the strength of the Vickers School of Flying at Brooklands in 1912 as instructional aircraft, but proved to be rather heavy for this type of work.
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  Yet another Vickers Monoplane was the No. 7, which appeared in 1913. This reverted to the tandem-seat lay-out and, with its 100 h.p. two-valve Gnome engine and three-bladed propeller, was the most powerful of the monoplanes. Rather oddly, the early form of four-wheel, twin-skid under-carriage was revived for it. Further changes were made in the empennage, which incorporated a fixed fin.
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M.Goodall, A.Tagg - British Aircraft before the Great War /Schiffer/
Vickers No.II monoplane at Brooklands in 1911-1912.
C.Andrews - Vickers Aircraft since 1908 /Putnam/
No. 2 monoplane at Brooklands in 1911 - the primitive giraffe-type servicing steps are interesting.
P.Lewis - British Aircraft 1809-1914 /Putnam/
Vickers No. 3
P.Lewis - British Aircraft 1809-1914 /Putnam/
Vickers No.5
C.Andrews - Vickers Aircraft since 1908 /Putnam/
Nos. 3 and 5 monoplanes taxying at Brooklands - No. 5 has the deeper body - No. 4 closely resembled No. 3.
M.Goodall, A.Tagg - British Aircraft before the Great War /Schiffer/
Vickers No.V monoplane at Brooklands. Major changes to the basic design were incorporated in this version, the fuselage being much deeper.
M.Goodall, A.Tagg - British Aircraft before the Great War /Schiffer/
Журнал - Flight за 1912 г.
The Vickers monoplane, with Mr. C. MacDonald at the wheel, flying in a cross-country handicap at Brooklands at Whitsun.
P.Lewis - British Aircraft 1809-1914 /Putnam/
Three-quarter front view of No. 7 monoplane with three-bladed propeller.
M.Goodall, A.Tagg - British Aircraft before the Great War /Schiffer/
Vickers No.VII monoplane with 100hp Gnome was the most powerful of the type.
C.Andrews - Vickers Aircraft since 1908 /Putnam/
Side view of No. 7 disclosing reversion to the elaborate well-sprung four-wheel undercarriage of Nos. 1 to 5.
Журнал - Flight за 1913 г.
Mr. Barnwell, on the Vickers mono, gilding down into Brooklands Aerodrome after his non-stop flight to Hendon and back on Sunday.
Журнал - Flight за 1913 г.
Biplane versus monoplane in the Easter Aeroplane Handicap for the Shell prize at Brooklands on Easter Monday. - Mr. Barnwell, on the Vickers monoplane, passes Mr. Hawker, on the Sopwith, in the first lap.
Журнал - Flight за 1912 г.
A trio of Vickers monoplanes at the Vickers Brooklands School.
Журнал - Flight за 1913 г.
Ready for the day's work at the Vlckers Flying School at Brooklands Aerodrome.
Журнал - Flight за 1913 г.
AT THE VICKERS SCHOOL, BROOKLANDS. - On the left, Chief Pilot and School Manager, Mr. R. H. Barnwell, in the seat of Vickers No. 5 monoplane. On the right, Mr. T . W. Elsdon, who has been appointed assistant pilot at the Vickers School.
Журнал - Flight за 1913 г.
TWO PUPILS AT THE VICKERS FLYING SCHOOL, BROOKLANDS. - On the left in the pilot's seat of Vickers No. 5 monoplane, Mr. A. E. Morgan; on the right, Mr. Henry Webb.
C.Andrews - Vickers Aircraft since 1908 /Putnam/
Staff of Vickers Flying School at Brooklands, pre-first world war, posing in front of Vickers-REP Monoplane; under propeller boss, R. H. Barnwell, chief instructor, also with cap, Archie Knight, assistant instructor.