Самолеты (сортировка по:)
Страна Конструктор Название Год Фото Текст

Vickers ES.1 / ES.2

Страна: Великобритания

Год: 1915

Fighter

Vickers - EFB.7 / EFB.8 - 1915 - Великобритания<– –>Vickers - FB.9 Gunbus - 1915 - Великобритания


C.Andrews Vickers Aircraft since 1908 (Putnam)


Vickers Designs 1914-18

When war broke out in 1914 there was a serious shortage of British military aircraft compared with those possessed by France and Germany, and various aeronautical experimenters made efforts to remedy this deficiency. Among these private-venture attempts was one by Harold Barnwell, who had been appointed chief test pilot by Vickers after the closing of their flying school at Brooklands. In spare moments from testing production Gunbuses he took upon himself the task of designing and constructing under cover a small high-speed scout, fitted with a Gnome engine spirited out of Vickers' Erith stores.
Barnwell's creation was a tubby little machine with a circular-section streamlined fuselage and stubby unstaggered wings of small span. It soon acquired the name of the Barnwell Bullet. On its first flight early in 1915, in the hands of its designer, it was found to have insufficient control, particularly on the elevators. On landing, its undercarriage collapsed, and the Bullet stood on its nose. This mishap must have revealed its existence to Vickers' management, for R. K. Pierson, a young graduate apprentice then in the drawing office who had also learned to fly at Vickers' Flying School, was given the task of redesigning the Bullet into an experimental scout with the designation of E.S.1, powered with a Gnome monosoupape engine.
E.S.1 had larger tail surfaces than those of the original Barnwell Bullet and a stronger undercarriage. No armament was carried. After a period of flight testing it was sent to the Central Flying School at Upavon for official trials. Certain disadvantages were disclosed, particularly in the pilot's view upwards as well as downwards over the side of the fat body. There was no drain hole in the engine cowling to jettison surplus oil and petrol vapour centrifuged by the rotary engine.
An improved version was then developed with the 110 hp Clerget rotary engine. A small window of celluloid was inserted in the top centre section to improve the pilot's view upwards, and the fairing was removed from the underside of the fuselage. In this form the type was known to Vickers as the E.S.2. (In official documents it appears as E.S.I Mk. II) Two were made, and one was used for trials of the Vickers-Challenger gun synchronising gear which enabled a fixed machine-gun to be fired through a tractor propeller. This gear was used operationally on the Sopwith One-and-a-half Strutter two-seat fighter. In the summer of 1916 one E.S.2, equipped with a forward-firing fixed Vickers gun and the synchronising gear, was sent to France for operational trials by No. 11 Squadron, RFC, then operating Vickers Gunbuses. There it kept company with a small number of Bristol Scouts, but reports on the Vickers Bullet, as the E.S.2 was known, confirmed the CFS opinion of the E.S.1 that it was too blind from the pilot's point of view. The E.S.2 was also flown before H.M. King George V during a visit to Vickers' Crayford works in September 1915 and demonstrated to a visiting Russian Imperial aviation mission.


  E.S.1 - Barnwell Bullet rebuilt - One 100 hp Gnome monosoupape. Span 24 ft 4 1/2 in; length 20 ft 3 in; height 8 ft; wing area 215 sq ft. Empty weight 843 lb; gross weight 1,295 lb. Max speed 114 mph at 5,000 ft; climb to 10,000 ft - 18 min; endurance 3 hr. No armament.
  E.S.2 - Bullet - One 110 hp Clerget. Span 24 ft 5 1/2 in; length 20 ft 3 in; height 8 ft; wing area 215 sq ft. Empty weight 981 lb; gross weight 1,502 lb. Max speed 112.2 mph at ground level; climb to 10,000 ft - 18 min; service ceiling 15,500 ft; initial climb 1,000 ft/min; endurance - 2 hr at 8,000 ft. Armament one Vickers gun (synchronised by Vickers Challenger interrupter gear).


H.King Armament of British Aircraft (Putnam)


E.S.1. Extremely neat installations of a single Vickers gun were made on single-seat 'scouts' of this type during 1915/16. The gun was recessed into the fuselage just inboard of the port centre-section struts, tiring, in one type of installation at least, through a hole in the front of the engine cowling. The recessing of the gun is indicated in Vickers diagrammatic drawings which will be reproduced in Volume 2 in the context of the Vickers synchronising gear, and the E.S.1 undoubtedly played a part in the development of that gear. Certain it is that one machine was used at Farnborough for gunsight experiments, the sight apparently being of frame type.


W.Green, G.Swanborough The Complete Book of Fighters


VICKERS E.S.1 UK

  Early in 1915, Rex K Pierson was tasked with the redesign of the so-called Barnwell Bullet, an unarmed single-seat biplane designed as a private venture by Vickers' then chief test pilot, Harold Barnwell. Assigned the designation E.S. (Experimental Scout) 1 and completed in August 1915, the redesigned aircraft was powered by a 100 hp Gnome Monosoupape rotary and carried no armament. An equi-span single-bay unstaggered biplane, the E.S.1 was aerodynamically clean and possessed an excellent performance, but view for the pilot was extremely poor. An improved version was then developed, powered by the 110 hp Clerget nine-cylinder rotary engine. This was assigned the official designation E.S.1 Mk II. although it was known to Vickers as the E.S.2. Two E.S.1 Mk IIs were built, one of these being fitted with a 0.303-in (7,7-mm) Vickers machine gun with Vickers-Challenger synchronising gear and sent to France in the summer of 1916 for operational trials with No 11 Sqn. RFC. The other E.S.1 Mk II was eventually similarly armed and tested with a 110 hp Le Rhone rotary, while the original E.S.1, too, was fitted with the gun and synchronization gear, and was at one time included on the strength of an RFC Home Defence squadron (No 50). The official evaluation of the E.S.1 in both versions pronounced the aircraft tiring to fly and difficult to land, and no production was ordered. The E.S.1 did, however, serve as a basis for the design of the later F.B.19. The following data relate to the Clerget-engined E.S.1 Mk II.

Max speed. 112 mph (180 km/h) at sea level, 106 mph (170 km/h) at 8,000ft (2 440 m).
Time to 8.000 ft (2 440 m), 12.65 min.
Endurance, 2.0 his.
Empty weight, 981 lb (445 kg).
Loaded weight, 1,502 lb (681 kg).
Span, 24 ft 4 1/2 in (7,43 m).
Length, 20 ft 3 in (6,17 m).
Height, 7 ft 8 in (2,34 m).
Wing area, 215 sq ft (19.97 m2).


Журнал Flight


Flight, November 12, 1915.

FLYING AT HENDON.

<...>
  The second incident was the flying visit of an unknown pilot on a chunk of greased lightning disguised as a scout-biplane. He suddenly appeared over the aerodrome, descended to a few hundred feet, and executed two of the finest loops I have ever seen. They were not only perfectly clean and in rapid succession, but the machine climbed on each loop in a remarkable manner. He then gave us a display of speed and "vertical" climbs, executed another loop starting at a height of about 250 feet, and then vanished! Some wizard! Even Louis Noel, who has had the opportunity of witnessing many types of "extra special" war-planes in flight, expressed a most enthusiastic opinion on the whole performance. It was, he said, the fastest 'bus he had seen, and asked me to convey to the pilot and designer his congratulations, which I take the opportunity of doing here. We managed during the stranger's passing over to secure a good snap of him right way up, and also at the moment of his chassis facing the heavens. We are hoping to publish these unique photos; but if they are censored for the moment - well, later on they will be just as interesting.
<...>

EDDIES.

  During Noel's visit to Hendon on Saturday, he had an opportunity of admiring some of the new British machines that have sprung into existence since he left for France at the beginning of the war. Most interesting among these was, perhaps, that of the unknown pilot who, I hear, appeared suddenly from nowhere in particular, circled the aerodrome a few times, executed a succession of loops of a most extraordinary character, and disappeared as suddenly as he came, nobody knew whither. Who the stranger was I am not in a position to tell, as I did not happen to be at Hendon at the time, but from the descriptions of the machine and the astounding speed at which she was apparently travelling, I am inclined to hazard the opinion that it was none other than our old friend Harold Barnwell on a Vickers scout. Still, not having been there myself, I cannot guarantee the accuracy of this surmise. But it was "some" scout without a "possible probable doubt."


Flight, June 12, 1919.

"MILESTONES"

THE VICKERS MACHINES

"Barnwell Bullet," or E.S. 1. (Aug., 1915)

  This machine, which was the first of the tractors, was produced in August, 1915. It was a streamline all-wood machine, built to a very great extent by the late Harold Barnwell personally, and was the pioneer of high performance aeroplanes, as the particulars in the accompanying tables will prove. All considerations having been sacrificed for performance, the view was unsatisfactory, and, as the synchronized firing gear had not yet been invented, it was not a real fighting machine.
  It might be mentioned that the E.S. 1 was probably the first aeroplane which could be looped continuously, and yet climb so that each loop was higher than the previous one.

The E.S. 2. (Sept., 1913)

  Owing to the experience gained with the E.S. 1, a second machine was built in August, 1915, which proved to be a really fast tractor scout, attaining a speed of over 120 miles per hour. The machine flew before His Majesty the King on the occasion of his visit to the Crayford works in September, 1915. Exhibition flights were also carried out before the Russian authorities.
  The E.S. 2 was flown to Upavon for the official trials in November, 1915. The pilot proceeded via Hendon, stunted round the aerodrome, and left for his destination without landing. The exploits of the unknown aviator on the unknown machine aroused considerable interest.
  As in the case of the E.S. I, everything in this machine had been sacrificed to performance, and the Vickers synchronised firing gear not having yet been invented, the E.S. 2 could not be considered as a Fighting Scout.

Журнал - Flight за 1919 г.
E.S.I redesigned and rebuilt from the original Barnwell Bullet, shown wearing the 1914 Union Jack insignia. Note the stream-line body. The engine was a 100 h.p. Gnome monosoupape
Форум - Breguet's Aircraft Challenge /WWW/
C.Andrews - Vickers Aircraft since 1908 /Putnam/
E.S.I bearing Service markings for official trials at the CFS, Upavon.
W.Green, G.Swanborough - The Complete Book of Fighters
Two examples of the E.S.1 Mk II were built and, also known as E.S.2s, were briefly tested by the RFC.
C.Andrews - Vickers Aircraft since 1908 /Putnam/
E.S.2 or E.S.I Mk II, according to taste, in its war paint ready for Service trials.
W.Green, G.Swanborough - The Complete Book of Fighters
Two examples of the E.S.1 Mk II were built and, also known as E.S.2s, were briefly tested by the RFC.
Журнал - Flight за 1915 г.
AT HENDON - A STRANGER MAKES A "COURTESY" CALL. - The machines in the air are: top, Vickers scout flown by Mr. Harold Barnwell; and below, a Grahame-White biplane. Inset at the top, left, is the Vickers scout witl its chassis heavenwards, during one of the loops which it made upon its "courtesy" call at Hendon, and to which reference was made in "Eddies" and Hendon Notes last week.
Журнал - Flight за 1919 г.
Front Elevations of the Vickers machines
Журнал - Flight за 1919 г.
Side elevations ot fhe Vickers machines
Журнал - Flight за 1919 г.
Plan views of the Vickers machines
C.Andrews - Vickers Aircraft since 1908 /Putnam/
E.S.1