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Albatros W.1/W.2

Страна: Германия

Год: 1914

Albatros - Taube seaplane - 1914 - Германия<– –>Albatros - seaplane - 1914 - Германия


O.Thetford, P.Gray German Aircraft of the First World War (Putnam)


Albatros W 1
  Powered with 150 h.p. Benz III, the W I was basically an unarmed reconnaissance seaplane version of the three-bay Albatros B II land machine.

Albatros W 2
  Intended for armed patrol duties, the W 2 utilised the basic fuselage and wing cellule of the C III, although the centre-section strut arrangement and installation of the 160 h.p. Mercedes D III engine differed somewhat. The considerable increase in upper fin area is also noticeable. Most notable feature of this aircraft was the extremely clean and simple float chassis, but it is doubtful if it was sufficiently rugged. Only a single example (Marine No. 450) was supplied, in June 1916, armed with manually operated Parabellum machine-gun in rear cockpit.

O.Thetford, P.Gray - German Aircraft of the First World War /Putnam/
Albatros W 1
O.Thetford, P.Gray - German Aircraft of the First World War /Putnam/
Albatros W 2
A.Imrie - German Naval Air Service /Arms & Armour/
Mobilization seaplanes on the ramp at Kiel-Holtenau in August 1914. Aircraft identified in this early wartime photograph include: Rumpler 4BIl (150hp Benz) from Warnemunde, Sopwith Bat-Boat 44 (which was never used operationally but merely for short local flights), Friedrichshafen FF19 23 and Albatros B I on floats, which was another machine taken over on the outbreak of war at Warnemunde. All aircraft are carrying red streamers from the bottom wings near the tips for identification purposes and are marked with the Iron Cross type of national insignia.
A.Imrie - German Naval Air Service /Arms & Armour/
Despite the inscription on this contemporary postcard and the use of a Rumpler rudder, 'Kiel 55' was an early Albatros seaplane, and is shown being towed after retrieval in the Baltic. The crew have carried out the laid-down survival drill well. They have chopped off the outer wing panels to prevent them becoming waterlogged, thus reducing the risk of capsizing; and to 'lighten ship', heavy components from the engine have been detached and dumped overboard. This procedure enabled twin-float seaplanes to remain afloat for long periods in sea conditions well in excess of their seaworthiness rating. Many crews were saved as a result.