Книги

Centennial Perspective
J.Herris
LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters
269

J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)

LVG C.VI (in middle) with two Albatros B.II trainers postwar. These aircraft were seized by the Czech authorities for their use but Czech insignia have not yet replaced German insignia. (Zahalka)
Unidentified LVG C.VI with a white 'V' marking on the fin; the unit is unknown. A DFW C.V is in the background.
1 st Eskadra Wielkopolska (12th EW) photographed during its move from Wojnowice airfield to the North-East Bolshevik Front, September 1919. From left aircraft LVG C.V 14442/17 (wk. 32544) no '1', next DFW C.V 7897/18 (wk. 33000) no.'2' and LVG C.V no.'5' 15948/17. (Piotr Mrozowski)
Postwar Czech airfield with LVG C.VI at right front; Austro-Hungarian Fokker D.VII at left front. (Zahalka)
Light-colored LVG C.VI 7154/18 if photographed at Breslau in 1919; a Halberstadt C.V heads the lineup at left.
LVG B.I Early
LVG B.I
LVG B.I
LVG B.I
LVG C.II in the field. (Greg VanWyngarden)
LVG C.II
LVG C.II
LVG C.II Short-Span Wings
LVG C.II
LVG C.IIN
LVG C.III
LVG Fighters

  LVG was very successful designing two-seat, single-engine reconnaissance airplanes and trainers, the types in greatest demand in Germany. However, LVG had no luck designing fighters. The state of the art in fighters advanced more rapidly than for any other aircraft types, and typically those who designed successful fighters, such as Anthony Fokker and T.O.M. Sopwith, specialized in fighters.
  LVG's only success in fighters was producing the LVG D.I, which was the original designation for the Albatros D.II built under license by LVG. Eventually the designations of license-built aircraft were rationalized for clarity, and this type became the Albatros D.II(LVG).
  In contrast, LVG had no success with fighter designs despite some original thinking. The best fighter idea from LVG was their E.I two-seat monoplane fighter. This aircraft had good potential but, like many other monoplanes, suffered from a fatal in-flight wing failure and was abandoned. Had it reached the front, it would have been Germany's first two-seat fighter with a gun for each crew member.
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LVG Fighter Specifications
LVG D 10 LVG D.II LVG D.III LVG D.IV LVG D.V LVG D.VI
Engine 120 hp Mercedes D.II 160 hp Mercedes D.III 185 hp NAG C.III 195 hp Benz Bz.IIIb 195 hp Benz Bz.IIIb 195 hp Benz Bz.IIIb
Span, Upper - - 10.00 m 8.50 m - -
Wing Area - - 26.20 m2 18.06 m2 - -
Length - - 7.53 m 6.28 m - -
Empty Weight - - 773 kg 680 kg - -
Loaded Weight - - 1,028 kg 935 kg - -
Max. Speed - - 175 km/h - - -
Climb 5000 m - - 25 minutes 28 minutes - -

LVG E.I

  LVG E.I is a combination of tragedy and missed potential. A 1915 design, the E.I, serial E.600/15, was advanced for its time and perhaps the first German aircraft we would recognize as a two-seat fighter rather than an armed two-seater or battle plane.
  Powered by a 120 hp Mercedes D.II, it was fitted with a flexible machine gun for the observer and a fixed, synchronized gun for the pilot. This became the standard armament for the later CL-type two-seat fighters and ground-attack aircraft. Its monoplane configuration gave the crew an excellent field of view and provided a good field of fire for the gunner. Unfortunately, the monoplane design was also the aircraft's structural weak point. The design appears to be sound, but the E.I was lost due to structural failure while enroute to the front for combat evaluation, the crew being killed. Investigation revealed that the lower wing struts had not been screwed in sufficiently and the wings collapsed. Ensuring integrity of the wing bracing before flight would seem to be an obvious and essential practice, but was either overlooked or not performed with sufficient rigor. Perhaps the design made it difficult to assess visually?
  In any case, the E.I was abandoned after this fatal accident despite its promise, which seems an unfortunate over reaction to a problem that could have been readily solved.
The first LVG designed for air combat was a two-seat fighter, the E.I. An advanced design for 1915 when it was built, it featured a fixed, synchronized gun for the pilot in addition to a flexible gun for the gunner. It is shown here after camouflage paint was applied to the upper surfaces in preparation for combat evaluation at the front. Tragically, the wing bracing failed during the delivery flight due to not being adequately attached and inspected, with fatal results. The E.I was then abandoned; only one was built. Since the fatal fault was due to poor pre-flight maintenance and inspection by the air and ground crew and not the design itself, abandoning the design may have been a significant missed opportunity. (Peter M. Grosz Collection/SDTB)
The LVG E.I before armament was installed and camouflage was applied. The typical LVG ailerons are clearly visible. Unfortunately, no specifications survive for the E.I other than its engine type. (Peter M. Grosz Collection/SDTB)
The LVG E I two-seat fighter monoplane, the company’s first fighter of original design.
The gunner in the LVG E.I demonstrating his excellent field of fire while the pilot visualizes shooting down an enemy aircraft with his fixed, synchronized gun, an advanced feature for 1915. (Peter M. Grosz Collection/SDTB)
The gunner in the LVG E.I demonstrating his excellent field of fire while the pilot visualizes shooting down an enemy aircraft with his fixed, synchronized gun, an advanced feature for 1915. (Peter M. Grosz Collection/SDTB)
The LVG E.I cockpit. (Peter M. Grosz Collection/SDTB)
Two views of the LVG E.I pilot's cockpit and synchronized machine gun mechanism. (Peter M. Grosz Collection/SDTB)
LVG Bombers

  LVG was one of the most important aircraft production companies in Germany during the war. Virtually all LVG aircraft to reach production were two-seat reconnaissance airplanes, but LVG also built some experimental fighters and bombers, none of which were built in quantity for operational service.


LVG G.I

  The LVG G.I was designed to the 1914 Kampfflugzeug (battle plane) specification that lead to the AEG K.I and G.I among other designs. Featuring a forward gunner standing upright with a clear field of fire above the wings and propellers, the LVG G.I was clearly designed to attack other aircraft in the manner of naval combat, a concept quickly shown to be faulty once airplanes engaged in actual air combat.
  Made possible by the abbreviated nose, the two 150 hp Benz Bz.III engines were mounted close together. In addition, the engines rotated in opposite directions to cancel propeller torque on the aircraft. The direction of rotation was chosen to minimize asymmetric thrust in case of engine failure, assisted by the proximity of the engine to the aircraft centerline. While the design gave the forward gunner an exceptional field of fire, the profusion of struts and the gunner's upright position, fully exposed to the air stream, created excessive drag that certainly limited speed. Apparently only one example of the G.I was built in 1915. Performance was undoubtedly insufficient to intercept enemy aircraft and the design had too much drag for a successful bomber.



LVG G.II

  Almost nothing is known of the LVG G.II bomber. Apparently a single prototype was built, but even that is not confirmed. The design was for a two-engine biplane bomber, with each engine in its own fuselage with a central fuselage pod, a configuration similar to the Caproni bomber but without the center engine. This was a 1915 design and the G.II, if built, was built in 1915.
The LVG G.I had a large wingspan in addition to the significant drag of its gunner, who stood upright to use his weapon. The excessive drag ensured the LVG G.I could not be fast enough to successfully intercept enemy aircraft, the fatal flaw with the battle plane concept as a weapon. (Peter M. Grosz Collection/SDTB)
The LVG G.I in front of the LVG factory with the gunner still exploring the field of fire of his flexible machine gun. Many national insignia decorated the LVG G.I to identify it to friendly aircraft and avoid a 'friendly fire' accident. (Peter M. Grosz Collection/SDTB)
Two more views of the LVG G.I showing additional details and the enthusiastic gunner still exploring the wide field of fire available to him. The raised gun mount gave a 360° field of fire above the upper wing. (Peter M. Grosz Collection/SDTB)
LVG C.IV
LVG C.IV
LVG C.IV
LVG Fighters

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  Like some other German manufacturers, LVG attempted radical streamlining and odd proportions with their D 10 biplane. Speed matters in combat aircraft, but so do maneuverability and flying qualities, and LVG's fighter designs became somewhat more conventional but not more successful.


LVG Fighter Specifications
LVG D 10 LVG D.II LVG D.III LVG D.IV LVG D.V LVG D.VI
Engine 120 hp Mercedes D.II 160 hp Mercedes D.III 185 hp NAG C.III 195 hp Benz Bz.IIIb 195 hp Benz Bz.IIIb 195 hp Benz Bz.IIIb
Span, Upper - - 10.00 m 8.50 m - -
Wing Area - - 26.20 m2 18.06 m2 - -
Length - - 7.53 m 6.28 m - -
Empty Weight - - 773 kg 680 kg - -
Loaded Weight - - 1,028 kg 935 kg - -
Max. Speed - - 175 km/h - - -
Climb 5000 m - - 25 minutes 28 minutes - -


LVG D 10

  LVG's first original single-seat fighter design to be built was the D 10; this was an internal factory designation as no military designation was given. Built in 1916, the D 10 was a contemporary of the DFW Floh and Roland C.II that also used streamlined, wood-wrapped fuselages that were deep enough to provide sufficient wing gap without use of cabane struts. In addition to its very streamlined fuselage, the D 10 had an under-fuselage keel to which the under-carriage struts were attached. There was no fixed vertical fin, the design apparently depending on its rear fuselage side area for stability.
  This extreme streamlining usually gave good speed for the available power, which in the case of the D 10 was provided by a 120 hp Mercedes D.II. Certainly the Roland C.II and DFW Floh were both fast for their time, but there are no surviving performance specifications or pilot's evaluation for the D 10.
  However, flying qualities, maneuverability, and climb rate are also important attributes of a combat aircraft, especially a fighter, and the D10 was deficient in flight characteristics and perhaps more of these qualities. The D10 was heavy for its compact size, and that weight may have been a major contributing factor.
The LVG D 10 fighter prototype had a deep, streamlined fuselage eliminating cabane struts, and approach similary to the DFW T 28 Floh and Roland C.II. (Peter M. Grosz Collection/SDTB)
These front and rear views of the LVG D 10 fighter prototype show its deep, streamlined fuselage to advantage. Power was from a 120 hp Mercedes D.II engine. (Peter M. Grosz Collection/SDTB)
LVG D.II

  The designation LVG D.I was applied to the Albatros D.II built under license by LVG. The LVG D.II, internal factory designation D 12, was the second original LVG fighter design to be built and first to receive a military designation.
  Like the earlier D 10, the LVG D.II was designed with a wood fuselage with the wings attached directly to it without use of cabane struts. The D.II used a more conventional fuselage that was not as deep as that of the D 10, resulting in a more conventional appearance. The large I-struts of the D 10 were replaced by V-struts, which improved the pilot's field of view at the expense of strength. The under-carriage was now of the typical simple design used by nearly all other contemporary aircraft.
  Despite using technology similar to the Albatros D.III, then the leading German fighter, plus an excellent field of view for the pilot, the LVG D.II remained a single prototype and no performance data or dimensional specifications have survived. The D.II purportedly achieved 200 km/h during testing; if that is true, its other qualities must have been very poor for it to remain a single prototype because no German front-line fighter achieved that speed until mid-1918, and having that speed available earlier would have been very important to the pilots.



LVG Fighter Specifications
LVG D 10 LVG D.II LVG D.III LVG D.IV LVG D.V LVG D.VI
Engine 120 hp Mercedes D.II 160 hp Mercedes D.III 185 hp NAG C.III 195 hp Benz Bz.IIIb 195 hp Benz Bz.IIIb 195 hp Benz Bz.IIIb
Span, Upper - - 10.00 m 8.50 m - -
Wing Area - - 26.20 m2 18.06 m2 - -
Length - - 7.53 m 6.28 m - -
Empty Weight - - 773 kg 680 kg - -
Loaded Weight - - 1,028 kg 935 kg - -
Max. Speed - - 175 km/h - - -
Climb 5000 m - - 25 minutes 28 minutes - -
The LVG D.II was built in 1916 and used a 160 hp Mercedes D.III. The design was more conventional than the earlier D 10. Here it is seen at the LVG factory at Johannisthal on a winter day. (Peter M. Grosz Collection/SDTB)
LVG C.XI(Schul)

  The LVG C.XI(Schul) was an improved, more powerful development of the LVG B.III designed for training use. It was built by Schutte-Lanz as indicated by the suffix "Schul" after the designation. As shown in the post-war photo, the aircraft featured an enlarged rudder similar to late-production LVG B.III aircraft.
  Little is known of the type except it was powered by a 160 hp Mercedes D.III engine and built in significant numbers as shown in the photo. It was built for training use, likely advanced training as the 'C' designation indicates it was armed, which was not necessary for a primary trainer.
  The missing numbers in the LVG C-type sequence, C.VII, C.IX, and C.X, may have been assigned to the same or very similar designs produced by different manufacturers under license. For example, the Gotha GL.IX(LVG) was the same aircraft as the Gotha GL.VIII, just re-designated when built under license by LVG. Given the engine production situation in Germany, it would also not be surprising if engines by different manufactures but similar power were used in these obscure trainer aircraft.
  Alternatively, the missing numbers in the LVG C-type sequence may have been uncompleted or cancelled projects; documentation of prototypes that were not completed is mostly missing, especially if the companies disappeared, which LVG did.
  Lufriko, the German counterpart to the Inter-Allied Control Commission, gives 365 LVG B.III(Schul) in storage in January 1920, including aircraft from all manufacturers. Lufriko also gives 75 LVG C.XI in storage in January 1920.
This post-war photo of the Schutte-Lanz factory shows both LVG B.III(Schul) and LVG C.XI(Schul) trainers. (Peter M. Grosz Collection/SDTB)
Pristine LVG B.III without markings. Is the box-shape under the wing an additional fuel tank? (Greg VanWyngarden)
LVG B.III D279 in postwar passenger service with Detscher Lloyd airline. (Greg VanWyngarden)
LVG B.III
LVG B.III
LVG B.III
LVG Aircraft in Polish Aviation

  With the regaining of independence in 1918 and the return of Poland to the maps of Europe, the Polish army revived, along with the newly formed Polish Air Service. During the great war, Polish pilots were trained in almost all European armies. Such a conglomerate, in theory, had no right to achieve anything, but the Polish Air Service, new born from Europe's ashes was able to fight effectively to defend the borders of the young Polish Republic and to win complete air superiority during the Polish-Bolshevik war. Initially, most of the aircraft captured from occupying countries were German. Lawica Air Station (Flieger Ersatz Abteilung Nr 4 - Lawitz/Posen) became the largest source, where about 500 aircraft were captured,of which over 100 were suitable for immediate use. In general, in the initial time Polish aviation had about 200 LVG aircraft of various types. Historians report that more than 150 LVG C.V aircraft were acquired from four different sources (the first batch captured from the Germans, the second from the Inter-Allied Reparations Commission, the third purchased in Germany, and the fourth from the Eastern Front). Aircraft of this type were used by several reconnaissance and one bomber fights (escadrilles).
  Interesting is that LVG C.V was chosen by Polish Aviation Headquarters to mass production at Lawica workshops (but end of the Polish - Soviet war ending this project). About 15 LVG C.VI aircraft were deployed in different units. 14 LVG C.II aircraft were included in one that was used in combat (by 12 Eskadra Lotnicza - 12 Air Escadrille), but the rest were unusable and had to be struck off charge. There were also two LVG C.III (3300/17? and 3309/17? captured at Lawica) and one LVG B.II. In addition to combat squadrons, LVG aircraft were used in the air schools in Grudziadz, Krakow, Poznan, Torun and Warsaw. So we could say that the LVG C.V and C.VI were the 'work horses' of the Polish aviation in the initial period and had a big share in its victories...

Piotr Mrozowski



LVG Aircraft in Sweden

  Although relatively few LVG aircraft were used in Sweden, they served both with civilian and military operators. A total of four LVG C.V's, eight LVG C.VI's and one LVG P.I were sold to Sweden.

LVG C.V

  Four LVG C.V's were imported in 1920. One of these was bought by Rudolf Christensen, "Sweden's first flying businessman". The LVG was impounded at Philippenhof, Demmen, on 14 June 1920, but was nevertheless flown to Sweden by Alfred Schiessler (without permission), arriving at Ljungbyhed on 7 October. It was then flown to Stockholm, where it was painted overall red and given the name Rodfageln (Red Bird), and then dismantled. The LVG C.V remained stored until March 1921 at least, when it was offered to Armens Flygkompani (Army Aviation Service). Although considered "usable", the offer was rejected as Christiansen was "being prosecuted for smuggling gold out of the country". Another LVG C.V (c/n 14532) was bought from DLR by the Malmo Aero Club, arriving at Bulltofta on 7 January 1920. The aircraft was badly damaged in a crash on 16 July 1920. In January 1921, the Army Aviation Service workshops received a request to rebuild the LVG. This was rejected. On 15 April 1920, Eskil Forsbeck (then a minor), residing at Junsele in northern Sweden, purchased an LVG C.V via Ludwig Sudicatis &. Co. The aircraft, s/n 9071/18, was impounded at Hannover, but it seems to arrived in Sweden nevertheless. Most likely, it remained firmly grounded. The fourth LVG C.V was bought in Berlin on 15 March 1920 by Sven du Rietz. Arriving in Sweden the following day, it was flown to Norrkoping, where it was destroyed by gales on 18 March. The wreck was impounded by Swedish Customs, and sold at auction on 28 September 1920 for 1,500 kronor.


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Offers

  Following the end of the Great War, a multitude of offers for various left-overs from the German and Austria-Hungarian air arms were submitted. These included the company Steffen & Heyman, which offered various aircraft to the Naval Air Service, including 18 LVG B.III's. The German company B Plage offered 60 LVG and DFW aircraft to Armens Flygkompani (Army Aviation Service). An advertisement in the newspaper Skanska Aftonbladet, dated 28 August 1920, offered no less than 72 former German military aircraft at a bargain price of 11,500 kronor each. This included 12 LVG C.VI's, all powered by 200 h.p. Benz engines. The aircraft were located in Denmark, Test flights at the prospective buyer's expense could be made.
  The individual to contact was Mr. E.L. Fabiansson. The exact circumstances of these cloak-and-dagger offers remain are a fascinating aspect of German aviation.

Jan Forsgren
LVG C.V 9754/17 after capture and being painted in French markings. December 1917.
LVG C.V 15820/17 of FI.Abt.(A) 208. The swastika, an ancient Nordic good luck sign, was the unit marking.
LVG C.V 1026/18 of Flieger Abteilung (A) 287b, Lt. Wittmann, observer, Malmalson Aerodrome, Spring 1918. Note reworked cross.
LVG C.V 1766/17 (1766/18 ???) was photographed after repair, during which the fuselage was given two-tone camouflage with the same colors as the wings. The serial was applied on the fuselage and not the rudder. New crosses were also applied.
LVG C.V 2228/17 Maria Ema, 12 Eskadra Wywiadowcz Kakenkowicze Aerodrome, September 1919
LVG C.V 15917/17, 1st Eskadra Wielkopolska, Przemysl Aerodrome, April 1919
LVG C.V 9495/18 III Repair Depot Lwow Aerodrome
LVG C.V in Latvian service postwar. A modified radiator is mounted under the fuselage.
LVG C.V 9746/17 captured by the British on 29 April 1918 and given the captured aircraft designation G-3-5 (G/3rd Brigade /5) and British markings.
The crew of Vzfw. Georg Gund (left) and observer Lt.d.R. Karl Eisenmenger of Fl. Abt. (A) 263 were on an artillery spotting flight in this LVG on 23 May 1918 when they were attacked by six British fighters. They fought their way back, claimed five of the fighters shot down, and were actually credited with four (in one fight). That is why they were memorialized in Sanke Card #636. Gund was killed in a crash on 9 June 1918 and Eisenmenger was badly wounded on 17 June 1918. Here Eisenmenger has a full rack of flares. (Peter M. Grosz Collection/SDTB)
LVG C.VI 120X4/18 (work number 5105) heads a lineup of LVG C.V and C.VI aircraft thought to be the final wartime production batch from LVG in October 1918. Behind it is a C.V, offering an opportunity to compare nose contours.
LVG C.V Polish no. 211/17 from 3rd Eskadra Wielkopolska. Aircraft mounted in Poznan Lawica with interesting three tone green, brown, and yellowish sand camouflage.
LVG C.V 15917/17 '2' named ‘Stasia' from 1st Eskadra Wielkopolska (Wielkopolan Squadron). The aircraft has two-tone German camouflage. Photo taken in April 1919 at Hureczko near Przemysl airfield, during operation code name ‘Jazda' ('Ride'). Note the two color (red-white) painted propeller spinner. All 1 EW Squadron's aircraft at this time had red-white spinners, some with painted girl's names at white spinner strip. (Piotr Mrozowski)
LVG C.V 15948/17 (wk. 33249) '5', from 1st EW (12th reconnaissance squadron). At this time the aircraft has two girls names,'Halka'/'Zosia', painted on the fuselage. The aircraft is still in original German camouflage. (Piotr Mrozowski)
Group of airmen from 1 st Eskadra Wielkopolska (12th EW) just before a combat mission, photographed near LVG C.V 15948/17 (wk 33249) '5' named 'Halka'. Hureczko n/Przemysl airfield, 18 March 1919. Aircraft in original German, two-tone, violet-green camouflage. Note: The girl's name was painted at propeller boss and small CSL (?) logo was painted at nose. The dynamo mount is seen at undercarriage leg. (Piotr Mrozowski)
Pilots and mechanics from 12 Eskadra Wywiadowcza photographed at front of the LVG C.V 9.5 aircraft. Siekierki/near Warsaw airfield, August 1920. (Piotr Mrozowski)
LVG C.V 15948/17 (wk. 33249) '5' named 'Halka/Zosia' from 1 st Eskadra Wielkopolska (12th EW). From left: air mechanic Przywarski, pilot Lt. Ludwik Halagiera, pilot Lt. Teofl Krzywik, observer sergeant Leonard Hudzicki, unknown, and air mechanic Waller. Note small white airplane silhouette in circle painted at nose - very probably CSL (Centralna Skladnica Lotnicza - Central Air Depot Warsaw) logo.
LVG C.V 3201/17 (wk. 30746) '3' named ‘Kotek'. (Piotr Mrozowski)
Group of 12 Eskadra Wywiadowcza pilots and observers, photographed near LVG C.V 2228/17 '4' Mania/Ema at Kalenkowicze near Bobrujsk airfield in September 1919. From left observer sergeant Roman Swiecicki, pilot sergeant Kazimierz Burzynski, pilot Lt. Franciszek Jach, pilot sergeant Jozef MuhInikiel, observer Lt. Bogdan Baczynski, observer Lt. Maksymilian Kowalewski, pilot Sergent Boleslaw Gallus, and pilot sergeant Jozef Napierala. Note:The Squadron honor emblem "For defending Eastern Borderlands" (Za Obrone Kresow Wschodnich) painted at the front of aircraft. The aircraft is in violet/green on the top and light blue on the bottom camouflage. (Piotr Mrozowski)
LVG C.V 2228/17 (work no. 31122) '4' named 'Mania'/'Ema'. (Piotr Mrozowski)
LVG C.V Polish no. 9.5 from 12 Eskadra Wywiadowcza (reconnaissance squadron) with beautiful individual lizard badge. Aircraft from batch of 12th machines mounted in CWL from parts delivered from Poznan in 1920. All aircraft in this batch (CWL no.: 9.1 to 9.12) are adopted to mount an Austro-Daimler (225 hp) engine. Fuselages camouflaged green from the top and blue from bottom, and wings CDL. The crew pilot - Staff Sgt. Antoni Katarzynski and observer Ensign Kazimierz Szczepanski, photographed during the Battle of Warsaw 1920. Note. Observer has a Lewis-Dame machine gun. (Piotr Mrozowski)
Two LVG C.V from 17 EW. At front machine CWL no. 9.7 (from CWL 9.1 to 9.12 batch), powered with Austro-Daimler engine. Both machines are in CWL green - light blue camouflage.
LVG C.V 15948/17 '5', with painted girl's name 'Halka' from 1st Field Air Squadron (1-sza Wielkopolska Eskadra). The aircraft is in original German camouflage characteristic for this production batch. Photo taken in Minsk Lit., during changing railways track, from European gauge to Russian standard gauge, which is wider. (Piotr Mrozowski)
1 st Eskadra Wielkopolska (12th EW) photographed during its move from Wojnowice airfield to the North-East Bolshevik Front, September 1919. From left aircraft LVG C.V 14442/17 (wk. 32544) no '1', next DFW C.V 7897/18 (wk. 33000) no.'2' and LVG C.V no.'5' 15948/17. (Piotr Mrozowski)
LVG C.V from 8th Reconnaissance Squadron (8. EW). Chelm airfeld, September 1920. The photo was taken during a short break from the action. At this time the squadron was experiencing heavy clashes with the Budionny cavalry. Note the white-red painted spinner.
Commemorative photo taken at 1st EW (12 EW) during Gen. Daniel Konarzewski's visit. In the center of flying and ground personnel is guest Gen. D. Konarzewski and Eskadra CO Lt. pilot Wladyslaw Jurgenson. Note interesting unidentified LVG C.V seen at center, with closed fuselage side engine ventilation and partially seen painted girl name 'Milka'. Kisielewicze airfield, April 1919. (Piotr Mrozowski)
LVG C.V from 21 st Eskadra Niszczycielska (Destroying Squadron). First from left is pilot Ludomil Rayski, squadron C.O., future commander of the Polish Air Force (1926 to 1939). Aircraft is from the CWL batch.
LVG C.V Polish CWL no. 9.5 photographed after crash. Note: No lizard painted at right side and upper wings replaced after cannibalized from another machine (very probably after combat damage) with two-tone German camouflage.
Crashed LVG C.V 3234/17 from OSOL Toruh (Ofcerska Szkola Obserwatorow Lotniczych - Air Observers Officers' School). The aircraft is in early Polish camouflage, green fuselage with white stencils, wings clear-doped linen.
LVG C.V 9495/18 mounted at III RPL Lwow (3rd aircraft depot at Lwow) in characteristic camouflage and markings for machines mounted/repaired in this depot. Fuselage dark olive-green (using ex A-H paint) and wings CDL.
Crashed LVG C.V Polish no. 211/17 from 3rd Eskadra Wielkopolska. The aircraft mounted in Poznan Lawica with interesting three tone green, brown, and yellowish (sand) camouflage. Note: “Stacja Lotnicza Poznan
Lawica. Tel. 425" information was painted in front of the fuselage chessboard. (Piotr Mrozowski)
Crashed LVG C.V 9777/17 from the 1st Air Regiment, Warsaw - Mokotowin 1921. The aircraft is in early Polish camouflage: the fuselage is painted green, wings same green patches from the top and CDL from bottom.
Crashed LVG C.V 3364/17 that belonged to the 14 Eskadra Wywiadowcza. Aircraft was mounted in April 1919 in Poznah/Lawica. Wings camouflaged from top, with large green patches applied by brush straight onto the CDL covering.
Crashed LVG C.V 3364/17 from 14th Eskadra
Guest of 1 st Eskadra Wielkopolska (12th EW), Gen. Daniel Konarzewski (with mustache) photographed near Squadron pilots, observers, and mechanics in front of the wreck of LVG C.V 9614/17, Kisielewicze near Bobrujsk airfield, spring 1920. Aircraft was crashed by pilot Lt. Witold Rutkowski. Standing near the fuselage chessboard CO 12 EW Squadron, pilot Lt. Wladyslaw Jurgenson, shot down (10 May 1920), captured, and brutally murdered by Bolsheviks. (Piotr Mrozowski)
LVG C.V
LVG C.V
LVG C.V
LVG C.V
LVG D.III

  The next single-seat fighter from LVG retained the structural technology of its predecessors - plywood covered, semi-monocoque fuselage - but eliminated the tall, gap-filling fuselage for a more conventional design. The landing wires were replaced by struts although the D.III used flying wires. The D.III differed from its predecessors in other ways, including its use of a 185 hp NAG C III engine instead of a Mercedes engine and fitting of two LMG 08/15 machine guns, which appear to have not been installed in the previous single-seat fighter prototypes.
  The D.III type test was completed on 2 June 1917, about the time the Albatros D.V first arrived at the front. However, Idflieg considered the LVG D.III to be too large and heavy and therefore no production was undertaken. The LVG D.III weighed 773 kg empty compared to 717 kg for the Albatros D.V, and had a wingspan of 10.0 m compared to 9.0 m for the Albatros D.V, so there was some basis for Idflieg’s decision. Unfortunately, it is not known if there was any side-by-side flight comparison of the LVG D.III with the Albatros as one might expect. If there was such a comparison, the results have been lost.


LVG Fighter Specifications
LVG D 10 LVG D.II LVG D.III LVG D.IV LVG D.V LVG D.VI
Engine 120 hp Mercedes D.II 160 hp Mercedes D.III 185 hp NAG C.III 195 hp Benz Bz.IIIb 195 hp Benz Bz.IIIb 195 hp Benz Bz.IIIb
Span, Upper - - 10.00 m 8.50 m - -
Wing Area - - 26.20 m2 18.06 m2 - -
Length - - 7.53 m 6.28 m - -
Empty Weight - - 773 kg 680 kg - -
Loaded Weight - - 1,028 kg 935 kg - -
Max. Speed - - 175 km/h - - -
Climb 5000 m - - 25 minutes 28 minutes - -
The LVG D.III was built in mid-1917 and used a 185 hp Mercedes D.III. The design was more conventional than the earlier LVG fighter prototypes. (Peter M. Grosz Collection/SDTB)
The D III was considered too large and heavy by the Idflieg to warrant production.
From the rear the LVG D.III still somewhat resembles the early Albatros D.V in general, but the wings and bracing look more distinctive than in the factory photograph when the planform is more visible. (Peter M. Grosz Collection/SDTB)
The LVG D.III being built in mid-1917. Other than the struts replacing the landing wires it looks very conventional. In fact, it looks a lot like the early Albatros D.V with headrest except the lower wing is larger and used two spars. The N-struts are also noteworthy, preceding their use in the Fokker D.VII. (Peter M. Grosz Collection/SDTB)
LVG D.IV

  The LVG D.IV prototype followed quickly on the D.III. Reported as nearing completion in September 1917 according to an Idflieg report, it was flying later in 1917. The Albatros and LVG main factories were next door to one another at Berlin-Johannisthal, separated only by an airship hangar, and the influence of the Albatros D.V on the LVG D.IV is apparent. Both types had similar wing structures with single-spar lower wings and V-struts, and the tailplanes were also similar. In fact, the LVG D.IV resembled a V-8 powered Albatros.
  The LVG D.IV served as a flying testbed for the experimental 185 hp Benz Bz.IIIb V-8 engine. During a test flight on 5 January 1918 the crankshaft broke in flight and the D.IV caught fire and was destroyed. Another D.IV was completed later that month but suffered continuing engine problems. Despite this it was entered in the first fighter competition at Adlershof. On 29 January 1918, the first day of the competition, the engine in the second prototype D.IV caught fire and this prototype was also destroyed. At that point there was no possibility of another D.IV prototype entering the competition and further D.IV development was abandoned.
  With the exception of the single-spar lower wing, the D.IV makes a good impression with its good streamlining and V-8 engine - which was still experimental itself and thus the Achilles Heel of the aircraft. One wonders why LVG would change to a single-spar lower wing despite widespread knowledge of the lower wing failures in the Albatros fighters with similar single-spar lower wings.


LVG Fighter Specifications
LVG D 10 LVG D.II LVG D.III LVG D.IV LVG D.V LVG D.VI
Engine 120 hp Mercedes D.II 160 hp Mercedes D.III 185 hp NAG C.III 195 hp Benz Bz.IIIb 195 hp Benz Bz.IIIb 195 hp Benz Bz.IIIb
Span, Upper - - 10.00 m 8.50 m - -
Wing Area - - 26.20 m2 18.06 m2 - -
Length - - 7.53 m 6.28 m - -
Empty Weight - - 773 kg 680 kg - -
Loaded Weight - - 1,028 kg 935 kg - -
Max. Speed - - 175 km/h - - -
Climb 5000 m - - 25 minutes 28 minutes - -
An L.V.G. D.IV Type Single-seater Scout of 1918 (195 h.p. Benz Bz IIIb.)
The LVG D.IV was under construction in September 1917. The influence of the Albatros D.V built in the adjacent Albatros factory is apparent. (Peter M. Grosz Collection/SDTB)
This rearview emphasizes the resemblance between the LVG D.IV and the Albatros D.V and D.Va that were built in the adjacent Albatros factory. The tailplane closely matches that used by Albatros fighters and the rounded fuselage and V-struts greatly strengthen the likeness. Had devastating failures of its experimental Benz V-8 engine not put a stop to D.IV development one wonders if failures of the single-spar lower wings have done so. (Peter M. Grosz Collection/SDTB)
LVG D.IV
LVG D.IV
LVG C.VI

  With the LVG C.V in large-scale production, design of the LVG C.VI was started in August 1917, and Idflieg approved the project for prototype construction in October 1917 when it ordered three prototypes. By 5 January 1918 the C.VI was in final assembly and the first flight was later that month. The C.VI passed its type-test in early February and the first production order was given in March. The first production aircraft were modified in June 1918 before being shipped to the front to correct minor issues, with the most important being replacement of a weak lift-cable bolt with a stronger bolt. Despite that delay, by the end of June 1918 173 C.VI aircraft were at the front.
  Like the LVG C.V and its DFW C.V predecessor, the LVG C.VI was a short-range reconnaissance two-seater with synchronized gun for the pilot and a flexible gun for the observer seated in the rear cockpit. All three types used similar structural materials and technology and all used the same basic Benz Bz.IV six-cylinder engine, although later versions of the engine gave somewhat more power due to continued development.
  The LVG C.V had been a more elegant, streamlined development of the DFW by the same designer, who had been hired away from DFW by LVG. Sabersky, the designer of all three types, took a similar direction with the C.VI. The C.VI was slightly smaller than the C.V and, combined with even more structural refinement, therefore lighter. Sabersky also worked on improving streamlining, although the C.VI with its rounded nose did not look as streamlined as the elegant C.V with its spinner. Despite appearances, elimination of the spinner in favor of the rounded nose had proven to reduce drag in wind-tunnel testing, and these results were also used to advantage by Rumpler among others.
  The smaller, lighter LVG C.VI was faster and more maneuverable than the C.V and also offered better climb and ceiling. The specifications table, with data taken from inconsistent sources of varying reliability, unfortunately does not reflect the improved performance of the C.VI compared to the C.V. However, actual combat experience did confirm the superiority of the C.VI. Like the earlier DFW C.V and LVG C.V, the LVG C.VI was well-liked by its crews for its robust reliability, excellent handling and maneuverability, and good all-around performance. The LVG C.VI was not surpassed in its role until advent of the Halberstadt C.V that was regarded as the best aircraft in its class.
  The C.VI was built in large numbers and 392 were serving or in storage in 1920 even after many were turned over to the Allies. That, combined with its reliability and good performance, ensured a successful post-war career.



LVG Aircraft in Polish Aviation

  With the regaining of independence in 1918 and the return of Poland to the maps of Europe, the Polish army revived, along with the newly formed Polish Air Service. During the great war, Polish pilots were trained in almost all European armies. Such a conglomerate, in theory, had no right to achieve anything, but the Polish Air Service, new born from Europe's ashes was able to fight effectively to defend the borders of the young Polish Republic and to win complete air superiority during the Polish-Bolshevik war. Initially, most of the aircraft captured from occupying countries were German. Lawica Air Station (Flieger Ersatz Abteilung Nr 4 - Lawitz/Posen) became the largest source, where about 500 aircraft were captured,of which over 100 were suitable for immediate use. In general, in the initial time Polish aviation had about 200 LVG aircraft of various types. Historians report that more than 150 LVG C.V aircraft were acquired from four different sources (the first batch captured from the Germans, the second from the Inter-Allied Reparations Commission, the third purchased in Germany, and the fourth from the Eastern Front). Aircraft of this type were used by several reconnaissance and one bomber fights (escadrilles).
  Interesting is that LVG C.V was chosen by Polish Aviation Headquarters to mass production at Lawica workshops (but end of the Polish - Soviet war ending this project). About 15 LVG C.VI aircraft were deployed in different units. 14 LVG C.II aircraft were included in one that was used in combat (by 12 Eskadra Lotnicza - 12 Air Escadrille), but the rest were unusable and had to be struck off charge. There were also two LVG C.III (3300/17? and 3309/17? captured at Lawica) and one LVG B.II. In addition to combat squadrons, LVG aircraft were used in the air schools in Grudziadz, Krakow, Poznan, Torun and Warsaw. So we could say that the LVG C.V and C.VI were the 'work horses' of the Polish aviation in the initial period and had a big share in its victories...
Piotr Mrozowski



LVG Aircraft in Sweden

  Although relatively few LVG aircraft were used in Sweden, they served both with civilian and military operators. A total of four LVG C.V's, eight LVG C.VI's and one LVG P.I were sold to Sweden.


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LVG C.VI

  The history of the LVG C.VI in Sweden is closely associated with the airline Svenska Lufttrafikaktiebolaget (Swedish Airline Traffic Co., SLA). Originally formed in 1919, SLA had ambitious plans to establish several different civilian air traffic routes. Apart from Stockholm, bases were established at Gothenburg, Malmo, and Sundsvall. In November 1919, six LVG C.VI's were bought by SLA from DLR, costing 35,000 German Marks each. These arrived at Ljungbyhed in January 1920, with a seventh aircraft being delivered the following month. A number of German pilots, including Hans Eichler, A. Gothe, Hermann Goring, G. Juterbock and R. Longo, were hired by SLA. The LVG's were known as L 1 to L 7 respectively. Unfortunately, details on the previous identity of these aircraft are sparse. One, L 7, had previously been registered as D-59. In the spring of 1920, SLA initiated a tour of Sweden, known as the Flygande Tombolan (Flying Lottery). Many of the SLA LVG's suffered mishaps and accidents. One such example occurred on 13 April
when Hans Eichler suffered an engine failure in L 6 over Stockholm. The resulting forced landing near the exercise field of an artillery regiment saw Eichler wiping off the undercarriage of the LVG. According to an unconfirmed story, Goring (who according to the same source spoke fluent Swedish) wanted to show off his piloting skills to the other SLA pilots. When Goring was preparing to land, the pilots walked to a muddy area of the field. The LVG overturned on landing, thoroughly embarrassing Goring.
  SLA did not have much luck in establishing airline traffic. Not for want of trying, though. In order to operate during wintertime, 24 pairs of skis were ordered from the Naval Aviation Service workshops. One LVG C.VI, L 7, was also converted as a floatplane by one of its pilots, Gosta Hultstrom.
  On 21 August 1920, the Army and Naval Air Services were offered to buy three or four LVG's. This was rejected, with two (including L 2) ultimately being sold to the Finnish company Suomen Ilmailuliikenne O/Y in December 1920. Both of these eventually ended up with the Suomen Ilmavoimat (Finnish Air Force) as s/ns 3A31 and 3A32 respectively. The FAF LVG C.VI's were struck off charge in 1924/25.
  Two other LVG's were sold in March 1921 to Sven Hjort of Rasunda. SLA folded in late 1921. Two of the LVG C.VI's were bought by Marinens Flygvasende (Naval Air Service) in December
  Powered by 200 h.p. Benz engines, they were given the serials 9 and 10, and based at Hagernas near Stockholm. The LVG's were used, albeit only sparingly, in training observers in aerial gunnery and photography as well as how to drop bombs. One (s/n 9) was also used by Flory for ice reconnaissance flights on the west coast. Both were struck off charge in January 1924. One (c/n 4929, the former s/n 10) was sold to the famous aviator Albin Ahrenberg, and registered as S-AXAA, later becoming S-AABK and, ultimately, SE-ABK. This LVG C.VI was cancelled from the Civil Aircraft Register on 17 May 1929. The aircraft survived until 1933, eventually being expended in anti-aircraft gun trials conducted by Swedish gun manufacturer Bofors.
  The eighth Swedish LVG C.VI was c/n 5061, being formerly registered in Germany with DLR as D-265. Sold to the Consul Hjalmar Janek who on 17 October 1919 obtained a permit to fly a "Rumpler 200 Benz" to Sweden. The aircraft arrived in Sweden on 27 October, being flown by Wilhelm Schubert with Janek and his wife as passengers. The following month, the LVG was offered to the Naval Air Service, but then sold to the "Managing Director of Nordiska Luftbolaget", Nils Englund. The company referred to was Nordiska Luftrederiaktiebolaget (Nordic Air Shipping Company Ltd, NLR). The LVG suffered several accidents, including a watery landing on 12/13 June 1920. On 2 February 1920, the lawyer Erik Lindfors (the legal custodian of Nils Englund) applied for permission to use the aircraft for air shows and air experience flights. The pilot was to be the former Austrian fighter pilot Edmund Sparmann. This was rejected, after which the LVG was sold to Gustaf Landgren, who intended to use the aircraft in the same way as Lindfors. Landgren's application was approved on 27 May 1921, with Sparmann performing a test flight the following month. On 1 October 1921, the aircraft was registered as S-AAN. However, the LVG was broken up a few months later.


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Jan Forsgren
LVG C.VI 1562/18 of Uffz. Friedemayer and Lt. Kuchenthal, unit unknown.
LVG C.VI 1563/18, unit unknown. Camouflage appears factory-applied as stencils can be seen over both colors.
LVG C.VI 1589/18 of Fl.Abt(A) 286b in the Summer/Fall of 1918. Several of the aircraft bore whimsical markings such as this bird head squeezing out of a beer tankard.
LVG C.VI 3976/18, unit unknown, Summer/Fall 1918.
LVG C.VI 4806/18, unit unknown, Summer/Fall 1918. Note the observer's Lewis gun and the vertical exhaust.
LVG C.VI 4891/18, unit unknown, Summer/Fall 1918. Fuselage cross is ahead of usual position, and the serial number has been re-applied forward of it sans "LVG C.VI" and year.
LVG C.VI 'H', unit unknown.
LVG C.VI '2', unit unknown.
LVG C.VI with checkerboard marking, unit unknown, Summer/Fall 1918.
LVG C.VI of Flieger Abteilung 19. The three-pointed 'Mercedes' star was the unit insignia.
LVG C.VI of Flieger Abteilung (A) 278s flown by Vzfw. Joseph Gawlik and Lt. Heckenleitner, downed by Adj. Raymond Vanier of Spa 57 on 19 July 1918.
LVG C.VI turned over to the US Air Service postwar. Romoratin Aerodrome.
LVG C.VI 48.69 of the postwar Czech Air Service.
LVG C.VI 1505/18, 7st Eskadra Lotnicza, Lwow Aerodrome, 1919
LVG C.VI, Deutsche Luft-Reederei #30 postwar.
LVG C.VI D 148 of the Deutsche Luft Reederei (later Lufthansa). This aircraft was flown by Lothar Freiherr von Richthofen when he flew German-American actress Fern Andra on a flight from Berlin-Hamburg when the fatal July 4, 1922 crash ocurred.
The Shuttleworth's C.VI 7198/18 in a hangar. This aircraft has been retired from flying and is now displayed in the RAF Museum.
View of the LVG C.VI in the Belgian Army Museum in Brussels in its original camouflage colors. The stained wood fuselage and camouflage fabric applied to the wings with light rib tapes come through clearly. The wheels are wood to replace the missing originals.
Views of the LVG C.VI in the Belgian Army Museum in Brussels in its original camouflage colors. The stained wood fuselage and camouflage fabric applied to the wings with light rib tapes come through clearly. The wheels are wood to replace the missing originals.
LVG C.VI Details in Color
LVG C.VI Details in Color
LVG C.VI Details in Color
The LVG C.VI was a more compact design derived from the LVG C.V and powered by a 220 hp Benz Bz.IVa. It was the last LVG combat type to go into production. Photographed during type-testing at Adlershof in February 1918, the obsolete ear radiators were fitted solely to expedite flight tests. (Peter M. Grosz Collection/SDTB)
Another view of prototype LVG C.VI 14400/17 during type-testing at Adlershof in February 1918. Teves & Braun developed an airfoil radiator for production C.VI aircraft. Elimination of the spinner used on the C.V and its replacement by a rounded nose gave the C.VI a less elegant, more purposeful appearance. (Peter M. Grosz Collection/SDTB)
LVG C.VI 1562/18 (works number 4012) wears an unusual camouflage scheme. (Peter M. Grosz Collection/SDTB)
Above: LVG C.VI 1562/18 with crew Uffz. Friedemayer and Lt. Kuchenthal. The original fuselage insignia has been reduced in size and the airfoil radiator in the center section is clearly visible.
Below: Close up of the camouflage applied to LVG C.VI 1562/18.
Detail of the wing camouflage of LVG C.VI 1562/18.
Close up of the camouflage applied to LVG C.VI 1562/18.
Close up of the camouflage applied to LVG C.VI work number 4012. This is the fin from LVG C.VI 1562/18.
Another photo of LVG C.VI. 1562/18 (works number 4012) of Uffz. Friedemeyer (pilot) and Lt. Kuchenthal, with the bizarre camouflage scheme on the fuselage and both sides of the wings. The visitors in the strange uniforms are Swedish.
LVG C.VI 1563/18 (work number 4013) illustrates the LVG-developed integral machine gun ring which produced less drag than the previous LVG gun ring copied from the Scarff-ring. This C.VI has the fuselage camouflaged in two hazy colors - this is seen on other early production C.VI aircraft and it looks remarkably like the camouflage on the C.VIII prototype. (Peter M. Grosz Collection/SDTB)
The observer has a rack of flares and the crew of LVG C.VI 1669/18 is ready for their next mission. (Reinhard Zankl)
The observer in C.VI 1674/18 is Hptm. Eduard Wimmer, commander of Bavarian Fl. Abt. 48 (FA 48b). He is actually taking on two cages with carrier pigeons (Brieftauben). (Reinhard Zankl)
Last-minute instructions are given to the crew of LVG C.VI 1728/18 before its mission. The canister above the radiator condenser indicates a cooling system problem eliminated on later aircraft. The observer has a flare gun and a good supply of flares.(Peter M. Grosz Collection/SDTB)
LVG C.VI 3976/18 carries a two-color fuselage band and late 1918 insignia. The unit is unknown. Visible changes from the LVG C.V to C.VI included deletion of the spinner and replacement by a streamlined nose, replacement of the leading edge radiator with centrally-mounted airfoil radiator, elimination of horn-balanced ailerons, an angular cut-out in the upper wing trailing edge, modified cabane structure, and a generally chunkier appearance. The observer's gun ring was also lower and less prominent.
LVG C.VI 4806/18 at the front with tactical number '6' applied. The observer had a captured Lewis machine gun, and recognition streamers are attached to the lower wing. Production LVG C.VI aircraft had an airfoil radiator in the upper wing center section instead of a leading edge radiator like the C.V. (Peter M. Grosz Collection/SDTB)
Colorfully-marked LVG C.VI 4891/18 of an unidentified unit. The box mounted on the side of the observer's cockpit was a unit modification to hold hand grenades, either the Wurfgranate 15 (throwing grenade) or Iflmaus (infantry mouse, also known as the Fliegermaus), or flares. (Peter M. Grosz Collection/SDTB)
Light-colored LVG C.VI 7154/18 if photographed at Breslau in 1919; a Halberstadt C.V heads the lineup at left.
Preserved LVG C.VI 7198/18 at Farnborough is the same aircraft later owned and flown by the Shuttleworth Trust. In the early 1960's it had this weird and inaccurate camouflage scheme, but by 1969 was restored to a very accurate state.
LVG C.VI 7640/18 from the fifth production batch photographed on the factory airfield.
The crew of LVG C.VI 7715/18 (work number 4672) is ready to go. The aircraft may be in postwar communications service. The wheels being uncovered is unusual. It has a JC Spinn and Sohn exhaust stack.
LVG C.VI 7766/18 tactical no. 1 on a home visit. (Greg VanWyngarden)
LVG C.VI 8945/18 at Trier postwar. (Greg VanWyngarden)
LVG C.VI 8945/18 photographed in US possession at Trier postwar. A Breguet 14 is in the hangar at far right.
LVG C.VI 8945/18 in US hands at Trier postwar. (Greg VanWyngarden)
LVG C.VI 8945/18 in US hands at Trier postwar. (Greg VanWyngarden)
LVG C.VI works number 4938 photographed at Trier postwar. (Charles G. Thomas)
LVG C.VI 120X4/18 (work number 5105) heads a lineup of LVG C.V and C.VI aircraft thought to be the final wartime production batch from LVG in October 1918. Behind it is a C.V, offering an opportunity to compare nose contours.
LVG C.VI with a checkerboard marking and number 12 on the fin. The light rectangle below the cockpit was a Cellon-covered case containing the rigging instructions. (Peter M. Grosz Collection/SDTB)
LVG C.VI on a home visit draws an admiring crowd. (Greg VanWyngarden)
Well-equipped LVG C.VI with its air crew and ground crew.
Franz und Emil with their LVG C.VI XX73/18 of an unknown unit.
Partially dismantled LVG C.VI number 5 photographed postwar. It is in American possession, probably at Romorantin. The mud guards on the wheels indicate it was used for training.
Unarmed LVG C.VI with engine running. (Greg VanWyngarden)
These two LVG C.VI aircraft carry slightly different styles of national insignia on their fuselages. The aircraft in the foreground displays light colored rib tapes over its camouflage fabric on its wings. The aircraft are unarmed and the full 'winter' cowling is fitted to each.
LVG C.VI at Trier postwar. (Greg VanWyngarden)
A typical LVG C.VI waits for its next flight. The serial is not quite legible against the dark-stained fuselage. The interplane struts are made of wood to conserve steel tube and wrapped with fabric to prevent splintering.
LVG C.VI with 'H' marking. The crew and unit are unknown. (Greg VanWyngarden)
LVG C.VI observer and gun. (Greg VanWyngarden)
LVG C.VI with 'H' marking. This is a detail of the 'H' marking and flare rack. (Greg VanWyngarden)
LVG C.VI with 'H' marking. This is a detail of the barograph box. (Greg VanWyngarden)
The crew of the LVG C.VI with 'H' marking as shown on the facing page. (Greg VanWyngarden)
LVG C.VI fuselage with wings removed.
LVG C.VI of Marine Shusta II. C.VI no. IIN with pilot Rudolf Heimer. (Greg VanWyngarden)
This is a U.S. Air Service pilot in a postwar photo of a C.VI in US hands. The airfoil radiator in the center section is clearly seen and the upper wing fabric is torn.
Unidentified LVG C.VI with a white 'V' marking on the fin; the unit is unknown. A DFW C.V is in the background.
Pristine LVG C.VI. The presence of brick buildings in the background may indicate a factory photograph.
LVG C.VI with Meinecke, Fahren and Finzef postwar.
An LVG C.VI and aircrew from an unknown unit. A dynamo is attached to the right front undercarriage strut.
LVG C.VI of Fl. Abt. 19. The observer standing on the right is Lt.d.R. Hans Weichold; the pilot remains unknown. Just to the left of the pilot's head you can see a white "point". This is the leading point of a three-pointed Mercedes Star, the insignia of Fl. Abt. 19. The white number "4" appears on the fuselage ahead of the cross.
LVG C.VI of Fl. Abt. 19, Lt.d.R. Hans Weichold on left. (Greg VanWyngarden)
Unidentified LVG C.VI and crew. There is a dark number '2' on the nose. (Greg VanWyngarden)
LVG C.VI at Trier postwar. (Greg VanWyngarden)
Crew with their LVG C.VI. (Greg VanWyngarden)
LVG C.VI postwar with cowling panels removed.
LVG C.VI with dark number 2 on the fuselage.
Photographs of a captured LVG C.VI arranged into a British recognition poster.
LVG C.VI aircraft in Allied custody postwar. The C.VI above is with American officers. The aircraft below was photographed with an American soldier. The C.VI at bottom with American markings was at Romorantin.
LVG C.VI aircraft in British custody postwar with British markings applied.
LVG C.VI hanging in the Belgian Army Museum in Brussels before restoration. Note sliding hatch for the camera.
Additional views of the LVG C.VI in the Belgian Army Museum. On this page we see the full cowling above and with the cowling panels removed to see more engine details below. The fixed pilot's gun is visible in this view.
Additional views of the LVG C.VI in the Belgian Army Museum. On this page we see another view of the pilot's gun, the entire aircraft above, and the view from the pilot's seat below.
Detail views of the restored LVG C.VI in the Shuttleworth Collection. Above is the interior fuselage construction, and below is the undercarriage.
Detail views of the restored LVG C.VI in the Shuttleworth Collection. Above is a closeup of the wing with camouflage fabric, and below are engine closeups.
Additional view of the LVG C.VI in the Shuttleworth Collection. After restoration this aircraft was flown for a time in displays, the only original WWI German two-seater still flying. This page shows more engine details.
Additional view of the LVG C.VI in the Shuttleworth Collection. After restoration this aircraft was flown for a time in displays, the only original WWI German two-seater still flying. Photo shows the engine details and fixed gun for the pilot.
Postwar photo of LVG C.VI airframes awaiting destruction.
LVG C.VI at the LVG factory at Johannisthal had the block radiator associated with the 230 hp Hiero and may have been the 08.100 test aircraft built for trials for the Austro-Hungarian Luftfahrtruppen. In early 1918 the Austro-Hungarian Luftfahrtruppen planned to purchase 50 LVG C.VI biplanes to ensure the supply of quality reconnaissance aircraft. Built completely of wood, the LVG C.VI was a candidate for license production. On 27 March a 230 hp Hiero was shipped to LVG at Johannisthal for installation in an LVG C.VI; apparently C.VI 3978/18 was used as that aircraft was on a 1919 inventory of Luftfahrtruppen aircraft. Flight tests were completed satisfactorily by 14 April. An order for 50 LVG C.VI aircraft on 27 July was approved subject to a performance comparison with the UFAG C.I and Phonix C.I. The Phonix C.I won the comparison and the order for the LFG C.VI aircraft was cancelled on 31 August.
LVG C.VI 7744/18 converted to three-seater (Dreisitzig) civilian use with room for two passengers after the war rests in front of its hangar. The aircraft retains its late 1918 German insignia.
LVG-owned LVG C.VI converted to passenger service in front of the LVG factory at Johannisthal postwar.
Postwar photo of a civil LVG C.VI with passengers Louis Davids and Margie Morris ready to board.
LVG C.VI D478 converted to postwar civil service taking off.
Postwar photo of an LVG C.VI on the civil register in flight with one passenger on the rear fuselage.
LVG C.VI aircraft converted to passenger service postwar with the German airline Deutsche Luft-Reederei (D.L.R.).
LVG C.VI converted to postwar passenger service with the German airline Deutsche Luft-Reederei (D.L.R.) loading mail. (Reinhard Zankl)
LVG C.VI 9052/18 (possibly) in the postwar DLR.
LVG C.VI D-35 Ex C.VI 5071/18 DLR, then to Severa GmbH, next DLH, next to J.Becker photographed at Schwerin. The aircraft is being refueled by hand.
LVG C.VI converted to passenger service postwar with the German airline Deutsche Luft-Reederei (D.L.R.).
LVG C.VI converted to civil use postwar. The registration number is D18. It was ex 5097/18 and formerly belonged to DLR. Note the Lufthansa symbol on the rudder that is still in use today.
LVG C.VI of the Aero Lloyd airline postwar. (Greg VanWyngarden)
In the 1920s Raab-Katzenstein built a number of LVG C.VI aircraft. This one was used by Trumpf, the German chocolate manufacturer, for aerial advertising with illuminated underwing letters.
Postwar LVG C.VI used for aerial advertising; wing insignia have been painted over, and the work 'Gables' painted under the left wing; the work under the right wing is 'Coral' but is not quite legible.
LVG C.VI (in middle) with two Albatros B.II trainers postwar. These aircraft were seized by the Czech authorities for their use but Czech insignia have not yet replaced German insignia. (Zahalka)





Postwar Czech airfield with LVG C.VI at right front; Austro-Hungarian Fokker D.VII at left front. (Zahalka)
Postwar Czech LVG C.VI aircraft in flight. (Zahalka)
LVG C.VI 550/18 photographed after arrival from Lawica to the OSOL Toruri. Fuselage camouflaged with hand painted lozenges, wings with printed dark from the top and light pattern from the bottom. Light yellow tapes at ribs. Note: The red or black painted wheels and legs, also interesting are the Palmer Cord Aero Tyres.
Group of pilots photographed at front of the LVG C.VI 550/18 after Virtuti Militari cross (Polish highest military order) decoration. From left: Lance Sergent Jozef Burnagel; Sergeant pilot Waclaw Wanczura; Sergent pilot Franciszek Przybylski; F/O pilot Witold Rutkowski; F/O pilot Stanislaw Jakubowski; F/L pilot Franciszek Jach; (lying) Warrant Officer Pawel Senecki; Sergeant pilot Jozef Zuromski; Warrant Officer Wladyslaw Dittmer; Sergent pilot Wojciech Wieczorek; unk.
LVG C.VI Polish no. 550/18 (German number unknown) named ‘Stefa' (the name is seen painted at nose under the propeller) from OSOL Toruh, photographed with a group of pilots. Note the lozenge camouflage painted on the fuselage. Close inspection of original photographs suggest that colors are similar to the printed lozenge fabric covering. A similar camouflaged aircraft is seen in Latvian Air Force LVG C.VI no. 9014/18 '24'. The swastika at this time was a personal badge and lucky symbol of the flying instructor pilot Wladyslaw Dittmer who had 40 combat sorties from the Warsaw Battle in August 1920 to the end of war with Torunska Eskadra Wywiadowcza. Note: The Lewis machine gun is mounted at the gunner's ring. (Piotr Mrozowski)
Pilot Flying Lieutenant Franciszek Jach (at left) freshly decorated with the Virtuti Militari cross, photographed in front of LVG C.VI 550/18 'Stefa' from OSOL Toruh in 1921.
LVG C.VI 1505/18 CWL no. 23, from III Air Group, 7th Eskadra Lotnicza, Lewandowka near Lwow airfeld 1919. Standing before aircraft, from left to right: Pilot Lt. Mieczyslaw Garsztka and observer Lt. Kazimierz Swoszowski. Aircraft mounted in CWL from Warsaw/Mokotow airfeld booty. Machine in original German green-violet camouflage on fuselage and wings. Note the characteristic for early CWL painted chessboards with thin red outline and little white circle logo probably CSL (Centralna Skladnica Lotnicza - Central Air Depot Warsaw) painted at nose. The characteristics for Lwow airfield, red-white-red strips painted on the underside of the elevator seen at bottom picture are interesting.
Group of pilots photographed at front of the LVG C.VI 1574/18 during Gen. Konarzewski's inspection of the 12th EW squadron, Kisielewicze near Bobrujsk airfield. Aircraft in original German two-tone violet and green camouflage, characteristic for this production batch.
Three aircraft photographed inside the OSOL Toruh hangar. At front LVG C.VI Polish no. 550/18 with hand painted camouflage at fuselage, next LVG C.VI 1505/18 with mount for photo camera at the side of the fuselage and last Breguet XIV B2, Polish no. 10.47 with similar mount at side of the fuselage. (Piotr Mrozowski)
Postwar photos of an LVG C.VI in Latvian service.
LVG C.VI in postwar Latvian service undergoes engine testing.
Postwar photo of an LVG C.VI serving with the Lithuanian air service.
LVG C.VI in postwar Finnish civil service registered L.I.1.
LVG C.VI 'S'on skis in Swedish service postwar.
LVG C.VI number 10 on skis in Swedish service postwar.
Additional view of the LVG C.VI '10' on skiis in Swedisch postwar service. The aircraft was modified with a block radiator like those used by Phonix aircraft. This in one of two aircraft bought by the Swedish Navy for training. In 1924 they were sold to Albin Ahrenberg (at left). Ahrenberg used '10' for airshows and passenger flying while using the other aircraft, '9', for spare parts.
LVG C.VI 7712/18 of Bavarian Fl. Abt. (A/ 199b, after a bad landing. (Greg VanWyngarden)
After a bad landing, the salvage crew arrives to retrieve LVG C.VI 7712/18 of Bavarian Fl. Abt. (A) 199b. (Greg VanWyngarden)
Another view of LVG C.VI 7712/18 of Bavarian Fl. Abt. (A) 199b, after a bad landing. The intact propeller indicates the engine was not running during the landing; was engine failure the source of the accident? (Greg VanWyngarden)
LVG C.VI of Saxon FA (A) 278 was downed on 19 July 1918; Lt. Heckenleitner, observer, was taken POW; the pilot, Vzfw. Joseph Gawlik, was KIA, dying of his wounds. They were brought down by Adj. Raymond Vanier of SPA 57 at Cuperly. A video was made of the occasion and many screen captures are reproduced here. (Greg VanWyngarden)
LVG C.VI of Saxon FA (A) 278 was downed on 19 July 1918; Lt. Heckenleitner, observer, was taken POW; the pilot, Vzfw. Joseph Gawlik, was KIA, dying of his wounds. They were brought down by Adj. Raymond Vanier of SPA 57 at Cuperly. A video was made of the occasion and many screen captures are reproduced here. Adj. Vanier is shown in the lower left photo. (Greg VanWyngarden)
LVG C.VI crashed in the snow with the crew inside. (Greg VanWyngarden)
LVG C.VI of Marine Shusta II. Crew with crashed C.VI. (Greg VanWyngarden)
LVG C.VI derelict after a crash.
LVG C.VI with chevron markings that came down in the Netherlands and was interred.
LVG C.VI of a postwar Freikorps unit Grenzschutz Allenstein. (Greg VanWyngarden)
Postwar a number of countries introduced the LVG C.VI into their air services. Above a Belgian example has crashed. Note the modified leading edge radiator fitted in place of the standard production airfoil radiator.
The photo shows a Czechoslovakian LVG C.VI with Czech serial 48.69. It was painted in the Czech camouflage scheme of three colors.
LVG C.VI aircraft in postwar Czech service that have experienced landing accidents. (Zahalka)
Two views of a postwar Czech LVG C.VI aircraft after a bad landing. The two exhaust manifolds suggest use of a Hiero engine. (Zahalka)
Crashed LVG C.VI, 1505/18 from OSOL Torun (Oficerska Szkola Obserwatorow Lotniczych - Air Observers Officers' School). After the war aircraft were repaired in Lawica and received green camouflage plus white stencils. Note the OSOL badge (Eye of Providence) painted on the fuselage. This aircraft was assembled (from parts delivered from Poznan) in CWL Warsaw with CWL no. 23 at this time machine have normal green-violet camouflage and served at the front in 7th EW. (Piotr Mrozowski)
Crashed LVG C.VI 1505/18, 25 May, 1921 in OSOL Toruh. The "brave" crew, surrounded by mechanics, survived the crash with slight injuries. The pilot (instructor) wears the combat decorations Gapa - Field Combat Pilot Badge - and Virtuti Militati cross. (Piotr Mrozowski)
Captured Ukrainian LVG C.VI P (passenger version) adopted by Polish Aviation. Here photographed after crash in II. Pilots School in Krakow in Autumn 1919. (Piotr Mrozowski)
Lothar von Richthofen's fatal crash of LVG C.VI in Deutche Luft-Reederei D148 on 4 July 1922.
LVG C.VI Idflieg Drawing
The LVG C.VI from 1497/18 to 1746/18 prod. batch. Trial camouflage reconstruction, April, 2019
Most of the LVG C.VI prod, batches was in similar camouflage. Trial camouflage reconstruction, March, 2019
LVG C.VI from last war and post war production batches. At this time machines receive different individual camouflage patterns. Trial camouflage reconstruction, April, 2019
LVG C.VI
LVG C.VI
LVG C.VI
LVG C.VI
LVG C.VIII

  The last LVG design for a two-seater combat aircraft was the LVG C.VIII; the C.XI(Schul) and probably the missing designations were all trainers.
  Clearly developed from the successful LVG C.VI, the C.VIII was powered by a 240 hp Benz Bz.IVu high-altitude engine to provide better speed and climb at higher altitudes and give a higher ceiling. A nose radiator was fitted and to improve maneuverability the C.VIII had ailerons on all wings with actuating struts between the ailerons on upper
and lower wings.
  As the photo on this page shows, the LVG C.VIII was completed in August 1918 and photographed on 30 August. As far as is known, only one C.VIII was built. Apparently development did not progress fast enough for the C.VIII to be ordered into production before the Armistice. The airframe used a conventional structure and aerodynamics proven in the successful C.VI, so perhaps the pacing item was development or production of the high-altitude engine or difficulties with the nose radiator. In any case, the C.VIII was the end LVG combat two-seater development.
The LVG C.VIII prototype photographed at Johannisthal on 30 August 1918. This handsome two-seater was powered by a 240 hp Benz Bz.IVu high altitude engine. (Peter M. Grosz Collection/SDTB)
The LVG C.VIII prototype photographed at Johannisthal; the bottom photo was taken on 30 August 1918 and it is likely the others were also. The nose radiator is the most distinctive feature that differentiates the C.VIII from its C.VI predecessor, followed by the ailerons on all wings connected by actuating struts. The 240 hp Benz Bz.IVu high altitude engine was a development of the 220 hp Benz Bz.IVa used in the LVG C.VI. (Peter M. Grosz Collection/SDTB)
The LVG C.VIII prototype photographed at Johannisthal. (Peter M. Grosz Collection/SDTB)
The LVG C.VIII prototype photographed at Johannisthal with some members of the test and development team. (Peter M. Grosz Collection/SDTB)
The LVG C.VIII prototype photographed at Johannisthal post-war as indicated by the large "L.V.G." painted underneath each lower wing. (Peter M. Grosz Collection/SDTB)
LVG C.VIII
LVG C.VIII
LVG C.VIII
LVG C.VIII
LVG D.V

  With its D.IV prototypes LVG seemed to be developing fighters that had ever more in common with production fighters. Despite its fragile experimental V-8 engine the LVG D.IV at least looked like a serious fighter, even if the single-spar lower wings were a retrograde step.
  Then came the LVG D.V fighter prototype designed by Paul Ehrhardt that flew for the first time in June 1918. Perhaps noting that building a fighter that resembled production fighters had not been successful, Ehrhardt erred in the opposite direction.
  Unlike all other successful production fighters, the LVG D.V had a lower wing of much larger chord and area than the upper wing. Furthermore, the upper wing panels outboard of the center section rotated differentially to act as ailerons. This was another feature possessed by no other successful production aircraft. Huge I-struts obscured the pilot's field of view to the sides. And a tiny, fragile-looking rudder with no vertical fin was attached to a slab-sided, plywood-covered fuselage. Two guns were fitted and the engine was basically the same experimental Benz Bz.IIIbm V-8 of 185 hp whose spectacular failures had doomed the preceding LVG D.IV. However, this Benz was the variety with a geared propeller, its chief difference from the ungeared Benz V-8 tried so unsuccessfully in the unfortunate LVG D.IV.
  With all these unsuccessful design features, the designer must have had an interesting experience when he test flew the aircraft. The D.V was fast but unstable at speed and controllability was poor. Perhaps there was a reason differential rotating wingtips appeared on no production aircraft? In July 1918 Ehrhardt was flying the sole D.V prototype when he made a crash landing. The D.V over-turned and development was stopped.



LVG D.VI

  The LVG D.VI was in final assembly in September 1918 and flew shortly before the Armistice. The D.VI used the same fuselage, engine, and armament as the D.V prototype coupled to a totally different wing cellule.
  The D.VI featured a swept-back lower wing and small I-struts supplemented by cross-bracing with metal straps that should have improved the pilot's field of view. Conventional ailerons now appeared on all four wings. Sweep back on the lower wings was unlikely to improve handling characteristics.
  Perhaps mercifully, the D.VI was the last prototype single-seat fighter from LVG. No performance or dimensional data for the D.VI survive.



LVG Fighter Specifications
LVG D 10 LVG D.II LVG D.III LVG D.IV LVG D.V LVG D.VI
Engine 120 hp Mercedes D.II 160 hp Mercedes D.III 185 hp NAG C.III 195 hp Benz Bz.IIIb 195 hp Benz Bz.IIIb 195 hp Benz Bz.IIIb
Span, Upper - - 10.00 m 8.50 m - -
Wing Area - - 26.20 m2 18.06 m2 - -
Length - - 7.53 m 6.28 m - -
Empty Weight - - 773 kg 680 kg - -
Loaded Weight - - 1,028 kg 935 kg - -
Max. Speed - - 175 km/h - - -
Climb 5000 m - - 25 minutes 28 minutes - -
The LVG D.V had little in common with the earlier D.IV except use of the geared version of the same experimental Benz V-8 engine.
Differentially pivoting upper wing tips were an unusual feature of the D V.
This view of the LVG D.V shows the cooling air inlet underneath the propeller, probably the only successful new design feature incorporated in the aircraft. (Peter M. Grosz Collection/SDTB)
This view of the right side of the LVG D.V does nothing to improve the aesthetics of the aircraft nor inspire greater confidence in its flying qualities.
This rearview of the LVG D.V shows the over-size lower wing and narrow-chord upper wing with seams where the differentially rotating outer panels were attached to the fixed center section. Massive struts were used in place of landing wires and combined with the I-struts to eliminate the flying wires. There is a simple and important reason that successful biplanes do not have lower wings larger than their upper wings; most of the lift of a biplane wing cellule is generated by the upper wing. The use of differentially rotating outer panels in place of ailerons is also avoided due to the potential for control 'snatch', or over-centering of the controls leading to full control deflection. Control snatch can occur with badly rigged ailerons as well (a surprise that, in the author's experience, when near stall speed can produce an immediate spin and a lot of adrenalin), but is not as likely. (Peter M. Grosz Collection/SDTB)
The LVG D.VI used the ungainly fuselage and experimental Benz V-8 engine used in the earlier D.V coupled to an entirely new wing cellule. The D.VI was the final LVG single-seat fighter design built.
An L.V.G. Single-seater Scout produced towards the end of the War, presumably of the D.VI class (195 h.p. Benz Bz IIIb.).
Last of the LVG fighters, the D VI was not tested until the last week of World War I.
LVG D.V
LVG D.V
LVG D.VI
LVG D.VI
LVG G.III

  The last LVG bomber was the massive G.III.
  Unusually, the G.III was built by LVG to a Schutte-Lanz design, the Schutte-Lanz G.V. Why LVG should build a Schutte-Lanz design is not known but undoubtedly had something to do with manufacturing capability, at which LVG excelled.
  The LVG G.III was a massive, twin-engine triplane bomber with biplane tail and three vertical tail surfaces. The airframe was made of wood and the fuselage was covered with plywood for strength and a smooth surface finish. The middle wings extended outward from the engine nacelles and did not reach the fuselage. However, the nacelles were attached to the fuselage with heavy struts. There were gun positions fore and aft; each gunner was equipped with a single flexible machine gun.
Designed as a night bomber, the G.III's triplane configuration emphasized bomb load and reliability rather than speed or altitude performance. Unfortunately, the G.III appeared too late to go into production before the Armistice and little is known about its flying qualities.


LVG G.III Specifications
Engines: 2 x 245 hp Maybach Mb.IV
Wing: Span 24.6 m
Area 115.0 m2
General: Length 10.25 m
Height 3.9 m
Empty Weight 2,960 kg
Loaded Weight 4,100 kg
Maximum Speed: 130 kmh
Climb: 3,000m 20 min
Duration: 5 1/2 hrs
Armament: 2 flexible MGs
LVG G.III prototype.
Built in 1918, the massive LVG G.III triplane was designed as a night bomber.
An L.V.G. G.III Twin-engined Tractor Triplane. Note, as in the Friedrichshafen and the Gotha the "sawed-off" nose. Appeared at end of war (two 245 h.p. Maybach Mb IV engines). The G.I biplane bomber (prototype only) had appeared in 1915.
The triplane design of the LVG G.III emphasized bomb carrying capacity for its intended role as a night bomber. The middle wings were attached to the engine nacelles instead of the fuselage.
Rearview of the LVG G.III shows that, although the middle wings were attached to the engine nacelles instead of the fuselage, hefty struts were still required to connect the engine nacelles to the fuselage structure. Had the middle wings been extended to the fuselage, some additional lift could have been gained at little or no additional drag since the struts generated about as much drag as airfoils of the same length.
LVG Post-War

  Like other German aircraft manufacturers, LVG tried to survive post-war by converting military designs to civilian use, but soon failed due to the limited market and the restrictions of the Treaty of Versailles as the Allies intended. The two post-war LVGs were both modifications of the C.VI.


LVG P.I & P.II

  The LVG P.I was a post-war modification of the wartime LVG C.VI to carry two passengers in the rear cockpit. The photo of what is thought to be the sole P.I produced shows the modifications were very minor. However, a number of existing C.VI aircraft were converted to civil use after the Armistice.
  The drawing shows the intention to enclose the rear cockpit to improve passenger comfort. This more extensive modification was actually completed in 1919 as the P.II despite the limited market for these aircraft, the extensive competition from other firms doing the same thing with their late-war C-types, and the Allied determination to destroy the German aviation industry via the terms of the Treaty of Versailles. However, the LVG "Limousine" remained a one of a kind.



LVG Aircraft in Sweden

  Although relatively few LVG aircraft were used in Sweden, they served both with civilian and military operators. A total of four LVG C.V's, eight LVG C.VI's and one LVG P.I were sold to Sweden.

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LVG P.I

  One LVG P.I was bought in November 1919 by former RAF pilot G.L.R Henderson. Henderson was an employee of P O Herrstroms Flygkompani, which offered air experience flights across Sweden, using Avro 504's, an Airco DH 6, an FK 8, and several Fairey IIIC's. Formal paperwork completed, the aircraft arrived in Sweden on 27 January 1920. While flown by another former RAF pilot, Youell, on 26 February, one of the turnbuckles failed, resulting in a forced landing. The LVG was inspected on 18 March, but no permit to fly resulted. On 18 November 1920, the LVG was offered to the Naval Air Service. Unsurprisingly, the offer was rejected. At the time, the aircraft was located at Barkarby airfield north of Stockholm.

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Jan Forsgren
The post-war P.I serial 11/19 was a straight-forward modification of the wartime C.VI to carry passengers in the rear cockpit. (Peter M. Grosz Collection/SDTB)
Pristine LVG P.I 11/19 in postwar Czech service.
LVG P.II
The LVG W.I was a passenger-carrying floatplane derivative of the wartime C.VI. The rear cockpit was enlarged to carry two passengers and the aircraft had an enlarged vertical tail and rudder to compensate for the forward side area of the floats. Although the photos show rudders of different sizes, they show different stages of development of the only W.I aircraft, which was built in 1919. (Peter M. Grosz Collection/SDTB)
Front view of the LVG W.I passenger-carrying floatplane derivative of the LVG C.VI. The W.I definitely had a much more robust structure to support the floats than the earlier floatplane conversions of the LVG C.II.
The LVG W.II serial 20/19 was another passenger-carrying floatplane derivative of the wartime C.VI. The W.II appeared to differ from the W.I in the type of engine installed.
LVG C.VI 8945/18 photographed in US possession at Trier postwar. A Breguet 14 is in the hangar at far right.
Three aircraft photographed inside the OSOL Toruh hangar. At front LVG C.VI Polish no. 550/18 with hand painted camouflage at fuselage, next LVG C.VI 1505/18 with mount for photo camera at the side of the fuselage and last Breguet XIV B2, Polish no. 10.47 with similar mount at side of the fuselage. (Piotr Mrozowski)