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Gotha WD.5/WD.9

Страна: Германия

Год: 1915

Gotha - WD.3 - 1915 - Германия<– –>Gotha - G.II/G.III - 1916 - Германия


O.Thetford, P.Gray German Aircraft of the First World War (Putnam)


Gotha WD 5
  There is no record of a Gotha WD 4 and the WD 5 was only a one-off type. It was, in fact, a modified WD 2 and retained the same Marine No. 118. The span was reduced to a two-bay cellule, and a 160 h.p. Mercedes engine replaced the Benz. Of interest are the two narrow strip-type radiators, which were attached to the front centre-section struts. This machine was retained by Capt. Langfeld, C.O. of Haltenau naval air station, as his personal aircraft - even when he was later transferred to Constantinople. Engine, 160 h.p. Mercedes D III. Span, 12.5 m. (41 ft. 0 1/4 in.). Length 10.3 m. (33 ft. 9 5/8 in.). Area, 42.5 sq.m. (459 sq.ft.). Weights: Empty, 900 kg. (1,980 lb.). Loaded, 1,465 kg. (3,223 lb.). Speed, 126 km.hr. (78.5 m.p.h.). Armament, none.


Gotha WD 9
  Appearing in February 1916, the WD 9 was largely a development of the WD 5. Only a single machine (fitted with a 160 h.p. Mercedes D III) was supplied to the German Navy. However, several aircraft (with the 150 h.p. Benz) were supplied to the Turkish Government. Engine, 160 h.p. Mercedes D III. Span, 15.0 m. (49 ft. 2 5/8 in.). Length, 9.8 m. (32 ft. 1 7/8 in.) Height, 3.8 m. (12 ft. 5 5/8 in.). Area, 51.3 sq.m. (554 sq.ft.). Weights: Empty, 1,040 kg. (2,288 lb.). Loaded, 1,490 kg. (3,278 lb.). Speed, 136 km.hr. (85 m.p.h.). Climb, 1,000 m. (3,280 ft.) in 10 min. Duration, 3 1/2 hr. Armament, one manually operated Parabellum machine-gun in rear cockpit.


J.Herris Gotha Aircraft of WWI (A Centennial Perspective on Great War Airplanes 6)


Gotha WD5

  The Gotha WD5, Marine Number 118, was ordered on 26 April 1915 as a high-speed seaplane for bombing surface targets. Powered by a 160 hp Mercedes D.III engine, it was the first Gotha seaplane with a two-bay wing cellule.
  The WD5 was considered fast for the time but with "overly sensitive rudder" making bomb aiming difficult. Further development was not recommended, and the sole WD5 was sent to Turkey on 13 July 1916.

Gotha WD5 Specifications
Engine: Wing: 160 hp Mercedes D.III
Span Upper Span Lower Area 12.00 m 10.00 m 42 m2
General: Length 10.35 m
Height 3.80 m
Empty Weight 980 kg
Loaded Weight 1465 kg
Maximum Speed: 126 km/h
Climb: 1000m 12 min
2000m 40 min
Service Ceiling: 2800 m
Range: 440 km


Gotha WD9

  The Gotha WD9, Marine Number 572, was ordered on 26 October 1915. Designed by Karl Rosner and A. Klaube and powered by a 160 hp Mercedes D.III, it was derived from the WD5. The WD9 had a flexible gun for the observer; to increase the field of fire, the inner wing bay bracing was eliminated to enable the gunner to fire forward between the wings.
  Delivered on 19 April 1916, the WD9 was assigned to Flandern I at Zeebrugge, where it arrived 10 May 1916. It remained until June 1916. It was ready to be sent to Turkey on 27 Sept 1916. It eventually was at Chanak, where it was flown by several aviators, including Vflgmr. Schubert.

Gotha WD9 Specifications
Engine: 160 hp Mercedes D.III
Wing:
Span Upper 12.50 m
Span Lower 11.30 m
Area 42.5 m2
General: Length 9.80 m
Height 3.80 m
Empty Weight 967 kg
Loaded Weight 1472 kg
Maximum Speed: 132 km/h
Climb: 1000m 12.5 min
2000m 36 min
Service Ceiling: 3000 m


Gotha Seaplane Production Summary
Type Ordered Marine Numbers Remarks
WD5 1 118 118 was sent to Turkey
WD9 1 572 Assigned to Zeebrugge, then sent to Turkey

J.Herris - Gotha Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
The Gotha WD5 in the Gotha factory pond. The compact, 2-bay design was for more speed; power was from a 160 hp Mercedes D.III engine.The insignia are on both top and bottom surfaces of the top wing.
J.Herris - Gotha Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
The Gotha WD5 on the water. Designed as a fast seaplane for bombing surface targets, the rudder was too sensitive for a steady bombing platform, and only one WD5 was built. On 13 July 1916 it was sent to Turkey.
J.Herris - Gotha Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
The Gotha WD5 in the Gotha factory pond shows its comparatively compact, 2-bay design.
The one and only Gotha WD.5, used as a personal aircraft by Capt. Langfeld, commanding officer of the Haltenau naval air station.
J.Herris - Gotha Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
The Gotha WD5 taxiing with identification pennants attached.
J.Herris - Gotha Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Gotha WD9 Marine Number 572 on beaching dollies. The WD9 was derived from the earlier WD5 and used the same 160 hp Mercedes D.III engine, but unlike the WD5 it was armed with a flexible gun for the observer. The WD9 had an enlarged fin and rudder to improve directional stability, and aerodynamic refinements made it slightly faster.
J.Herris - Gotha Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Gotha WD9 Marine Number 572 on beaching dollies. The inner wing bay wire bracing of the WD9 was eliminated to enable the gunner to safely fire forward between the wings. Only one WD9 was built. Initially assigned to Flandern I at Zeebrugge, it was later sent to Turkey.
J.Herris - Gotha Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Gotha WD9 Marine Number 572 on beaching dollies. The WD9 had an aerodynamic balance on the bottom of the rudder, a feature that by now was becoming a hallmark of Gotha floatplanes.
J.Herris - Gotha Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Gotha WD9