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Friedrichshafen FF9 / FF15

Страна: Германия

Год: 1913

Friedrichshafen - FF8 - 1913 - Германия<– –>Friedrichshafen - FF11 / FF21 - 1914 - Германия


J.Herris Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI (A Centennial Perspective on Great War Airplanes 21)


Friedrichshafen FF9

  With the FF9 that first flew in June 1913, Friedrichshafen returned to the pusher configuration. The FF9 strongly resembled the earlier FF1 but was larger and more powerful, using a 135 hp NAG six-cylinder engine. As with the FF1, wheels could be attached to simplify ground handling.
  Pilot Dahms flew a long distance course from Manzell over Basel-Cologne-Amsterdam-Emden to Hamburg in the FF9 during the period 20-23 September 1913. However, in Blankensee the plane crashed and was badly damaged, Dahms and his passenger being injured. The FF9 was repaired and on 12 November was flown to a new world endurance record for biplanes, flying for 6 hours, 16 minutes, and 30 seconds. Like earlier Friedrichshafen aircraft, only a single example was built.
  
Friedrichshafen FF9 Specifications
Engine: 135 hp NAG
Wing: Span Upper 15.10 m
Span Lower 10.35 m
Area 42.0 m2
General: Length 12.00 m
Empty Weight 850 kg
Loaded Weight 1,250 kg
Maximum Speed: 115 km/h


Friedrichshafen FF15

  The next Friedrichshafen aircraft design to be built was the FF15, an aircraft that owed much to the earlier FF1 and FF9. The FF15 was an improved FF9 and used the same 135 hp NAG as the FF9; other specifications were very similar.
  Pilot Truckenbrodt flew the sole FF15 at the 1914 Bodensee Competition.

Friedrichshafen FF15 Specifications
Engine: 135 hp NAG
Wing: Span Upper 15.10 m
Area 42.0 m2
General: Length 12.00 m
Empty Weight 850 kg
Loaded Weight 1,270 kg
Maximum Speed: 115 km/h


Журнал Flight


Flight, October 16, 1914.

AIRCRAFT "MADE IN GERMANY"
WHICH MAY BE EMPLOYED AGAINST THE ALLIES.

13. The F.F. Seaplane
  is an earlier type, and is, as the illustration shows, of the propeller or "pusher" type. Its main planes are of rectangular plan form, and the top plane has a considerable overhang, the weight of which is taken when the machine is at rest by steel tubes sloping down to the lower ends of the outer pair of interplane struts. The 135 h.p. engine is mounted in the rear of the nacelle, and in front of it, arranged tandem fashion, are the two seats. A wide central float of the single stepped type is fitted, and two small cylindrical floats are fitted to the tips of the lower main plans. The two wheels may be raised or lowered at will from the pilot's seat.

J.Herris - Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
The Friedrichshafen FF9 was a larger, more powerful aircraft than the FF1 it resembled. Here it uses the wheels that could be extended for land operations.The text on the rudder reads 'T.F. Flugzeugbau Friedrichshafen G.m.b.H.'
J.Herris - Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
With its wheels folded out of the way the Friedrichshafen FF9 operates from water at Hamburg, 1913.
J.Herris - Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
The Friedrichshafen FF9 reverted to the configuration of the earlier FF1 and greatly resembled it, but was a larger, more powerful aircraft.
J.Herris - Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
The Friedrichshafen FF9 attracts attention in Dusseldorf. All its structural details are exposed for examination.
J.Herris - Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Obermeister Sauter in the cockpit of the Friedrichshafen FF9.
J.Herris - Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
The Friedrichshafen FF15 followed the configuration of the earlier FF1 and FF9. The FF15 was basically an improved FF9 and had similar specifications and engine type.
J.Herris - Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Pilot Truckenbrodt in the cockpit of the Friedrichshafen FF15 before the war.
J.Herris - Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
J.Herris - Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/