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Friedrichshafen G.V

Страна: Германия

Год: 1918

Friedrichshafen - G.IV - 1918 - Германия<– –>Friedrichshafen - FF71 - 1919 - Германия


O.Thetford, P.Gray German Aircraft of the First World War (Putnam)


Friedrichshafen FF 62
  No details available of this twin-engined bomber, but probably similar to the G IV, and may possibly have been designated G V


J.Herris Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI (A Centennial Perspective on Great War Airplanes 21)


Friedrichshafen G.V

  The final development of the basic Friedrichshafen bomber family was the G.V. Based on the G.IIIa airframe with box tail using a central fin, the nose turret was removed and the engines were mounted in tractor configuration. Elimination of the nose gun position enabled the engines to be mounted closer together, reducing asymmetric thrust in case of engine failure and making the bomber easier to fly in that situation, which was important for flight safety, especially during night operations.
  Two versions were built that differed in the type of engine used, factory designation FF55 being powered by two 245 hp Maybach Mb.IVa engines and factory designation FF62 using two 260 hp Mercedes D.IVa engines. Other than their engines, the two versions appear essentially identical.
  Apparently three examples of the FF55 were built and this version was the Friedrichshafen G.V. First flight of the FF55 was on 9 May 1918. The Maybach engine, which developed its rated power at 2,000 m, was more suited to high-altitude performance and was used because the G.V was a contender for high- altitude day bombing, but lost the competition to the faster Gotha GL.VII series. One source states the G.V had provision for a fixed gun for the pilot.
  Powered by lower-altitude Mercedes engines, first flight of the FF62 was 20 November 1918. Carrying a heavier bomb load (12x100 kg bombs) than the FF55, the FF62 was almost certainly an attempt to re-purpose the basic design as a night bomber. Apparently only one FF62 was built, and neither version of the G.V saw operational service.


Notes on Friedrichshafen Bomber Serials by Reinhard Zankl
Confirmed Fdh G.IIIb aircraft: G.1465/18, G.1466/18, G.1470/18, G.1471/18, G.1472/18 (the only confirmed serials in the G.1465-1564/18 range)
Confirmed Fdh G.IV aircraft: G.508/18, G.526/18, G.827/18, others known in this series are G.IIIa or G.IV
Confirmed Fdh G.IV(Daim) aircraft: G.1071/I8, G.1091/18, G.1093/18, others known in this series are G.IIIa(Daim) or G.IV(Daim)

J.Herris - Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Photographed May 18, 1918, the Friedrichshafen G.V represented a significant modification of the basic Friedrichshafen bomber airframe. The nose turret was removed and the engines were mounted in tractor configuration, enabling them to be moved closer to the aircraft's centerline. This reduced asymmetric thrust after an engine failure, making the aircraft easier to control. Good handling qualities were vital to flight safety, especially during night landings, and the G.V also featured Flettner tabs on the ailerons to reduce the control forces, making flight less tiring for the pilot. The box tail featured a fixed central fin, which was tested but not used on earlier production Friedrichshafen bombers. The Friedrichshafen FF55, given the military designation G.V, was powered by 245 hp Maybach Mb.IVa engines for higher ceiling and speed at altitude with the intention of high-altitude day bombing, although the basic airframe was also tested as the FF62 with the 260 hp Mercedes D.IVa as a night bomber. Only three FF55 aircraft with Maybach engines and one FF62 with Mercedes engines were completed before the Armistice, so the G.V did not see operational service. Photographs showing G.V 900 and G.V 901 are probably G.900/17 and G.901/17.The prominent drag-producing radiators must have adversely affected maximum speed, likely one reason the Gotha GL.VII series was favored for day bombing. The brace supporting the tail has been retouched out of the photo. (Peter M. Bowers Collection, Museum of Flight)
J.Herris - Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
FF62, the prototype G.V with Mercedes engines.
J.Herris - Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
The Friedrichshafen G IV was a four-bay version of the G IIIa. The increased wing area allowed it to fly on one engine for 70-90 minutes from a height of 3,000m until it reached the ground, which was a great improvement on other types in use. Further attempts to improve single-engine performance produced the Friedrichshafen G V; by shortening the fuselage nose, the engines could be placed closer together, thus reducing their asymmetric moment. This is the G V prototype with a centre fin added to its biplane tail unit during a modification programme. The aircraft had a payload of 2,100kg but had not been placed into production before the Armistice.
O.Thetford, P.Gray - German Aircraft of the First World War /Putnam/
Friedrichshafen FF 62
J.Herris - Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
A Friedrichshafen G.V prototype carrying a 1,000 kg P.u.W. bomb photographed on May 9, 1918, the day of its first flight. Doubled wheels are fitted to support the additional weight. Unlike the Friedrichshafen G.IIIa and G.IV, the box tail now has a fixed fin. Like AEG and Gotha, Friedrichshafen continuously experimented the tail configuration of its bombers in a search for improved handling qualities, especially after an engine failure. Provision was apparently made for a fixed gun for the pilot, which makes sense for an aircraft originally intended for high-altitude daylight bombing. The brace supporting the tail has been retouched out of the photos. (Peter M. Bowers Collection, Museum of Flight)
J.Herris - Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
This rear view shows the tail details of the Friedrichshafen FF62, the version of the Friedrichshafen G.V airframe that used Mercedes D.IVa engines. The tractor engine configuration was not used in earlier Friedrichshafen bombers, but elimination of the forward gun turret enabled the engines to be mounted closer to the fuselage centerline if they were mounted as tractors.