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Страна Конструктор Название Год Фото Текст

LVG C.VI

Страна: Германия

Год: 1918

Two-seat reconnaissance and artillery observation

LVG - D.IV - 1917 - Германия<– –>LVG - C.VIII - 1918 - Германия


В.Кондратьев Самолеты первой мировой войны


LVG C-VI

   Весной 1918-го разработан и запущен в серию DFW C-VI с 200-сильным мотором, каплевидным "эльфауговским" килем, роговой компенсацией элеронов и увеличенной кабиной летнаба (для удобства обращения с турельным пулеметом). Вскоре появился аналогичный LVG C-VI. Оба типа применялись одновременно и были очень похожи, что нередко приводило к ошибкам в идентификации.
   Всего построено более 500 DFW C-VI и LVG C-VI.
   После вывода немецких войск из Польши и Украины в конце 1918 - начале 1919 годов несколько десятков DFW и LVG различных модификаций осталось на территории этих новосозданных государств, которые тут же задействовали их в пограничных конфликтах друг против друга. Также есть данные о закупках таких машин Советской Россией и применении их в гражданской войне.


А.Александров, Г.Петров Крылатые пленники России


В 1918 г. родилась модель "Эльфауге Ц. VI", сохранившая почти все черты предшественницы и оснащенная таким же 200-сильным мотором. Притом чтобы дать летчикам лучший обзор, верхнюю плоскость передвинули примерно на 25 см вперед, сняли часть обтекателя двигателя и убрали радиатор в центроплан (у некоторых машин он, разделенный на 2 части, находился на бортах фюзеляжа). Кок воздушного винта исчез. В целом "шестерка" стала легче и немного меньше, причем главное внимание при ее создании уделялось удобству эксплуатации, а не чистоте линий. До конца войны компания успела построить примерно 1000 экземпляров "Эльфауге Ц. VI", разошедшихся затем по авиаотрядам Бельгии, Чехословакии, Голландии, Латвии, Литвы, Швейцарии, Польши, Украины и т. д. Возможно, что в 1919-1920 гг. через посредников небольшое количество "Ц-шестых" досталось и России, а вот в начале 1922 г. 20 таких машин были приобретены советским руководством. Их доставили в страну в апреле - мае, собрали на Государственном авиационном заводе (ГАЗ) # 1 и использовали в различных ролях до 1924 г. Имелись и другие пути: так, самолет на снимке 69 в 1919 г. прилетел к нам с грузом медикаментов, и крест на его борту - красный.


O.Thetford, P.Gray German Aircraft of the First World War (Putnam)


L.V.G. C VI

   Following the L.V.G. C V into service in 1918 came the C VI, of which some 1,000 odd examples were built up to the end of the war. In general, it did not differ greatly from its predecessor, but was lighter and slightly more compact, with the accent on utility and serviceability rather than nicety of line.
   The same 200 h.p. Benz Bz IV engine was installed, although without a spinner, and the extreme forward end of the fuselage simply enclosed in bulbous metal panels. The cylinder block was no longer cowled in, and the radiator was of the flush type installed in the revised centre-section panel, which featured a large angular cut-out in the trailing edge. All these factors, coupled with the staggering of the upper wing some 10 in. farther forward, combined to give a much superior view from the front cockpit than was the case with the C V. Although slightly shorter, the fuselage was of the same basic construction and completely plywood covered, except for the metal panels of the nose section. Tail surfaces were also very similar to those of the earlier C V, retaining the wooden-framed fin surfaces, although the profile of the horizontal surfaces was much rounder, resulting in reduced span and increased chord.
   The wings again followed the C V style of construction, but with the substitution of wooden compression members for steel tube. The upper panels were slightly raked at the tips, with a large radius curve on the leading edge. Ailerons were of parallel chord and no longer balanced, falling entirely within the tip profile. With the exception of the steel tube crank at mid-span, they were entirely of wooden framing, which seems to indicate the need for economy in the use of steel at this juncture. The lower wing panels presented a different outline from those of the C V, the trailing edge now being straight and parallel to the leading edge and the tips rounded in a near semicircular curve. At the roots were quadrant cut-outs to improve downward visibility.
   Undercarriages of both C V and C VI were identical in design and material, including the tailskid; however, in the C VI the under-fin was simplified and strengthened.
   Some L.V.G. C VIs were fitted with "ear"-type radiators on the sides of the fuselage, but it has not been possible to establish whether this cooling system was ever standardised.
   The figures on captured aircraft showed the loaded weight of the C VI to be 105 lb. (almost 1 cwt.) less than the C V, which factor undoubtedly contributed to its improved performance.
   An instance of a typical artillery observation sortie is translated from a report by Frhr von Peckmann, himself an L.V.G. observer.
   "At 6 a.m. on a bright June (1918) morning we took off to register targets for a heavy field battery and a 15 cm. gun in the vicinity of Albert.
   "An ammunition dump at Becourt-Becordel was earmarked as the primary target. A shoot was also to be carried out on a sugar factory at Ribemont, to subdue a hostile battery that was shelling our line of communication. A message to our battery and the guns were seen to flash. Some 40 seconds later the shells were observed bursting about 200 yards short whereupon the enemy battery ceased firing in an endeavour to conceal its position. We were not deceived, however, and after giving correction the next salvo placed two shells upon the sugar factory and two close by. After half an hour of bombardment the whole factory went up in flames including the ammunition dump of the enemy battery. During this period five enemy fighters appeared but did not attack due to the proximity of a Staffel of triplanes as top cover overhead.
   "Our next target was a battery on the outskirts of Hesle on which we registered for nearly two hours, after which period ground signals were laid out for us to proceed to our final target. As we had been airborne some two hours we were anxious to get the job done before our fuel became exhausted. This third target was the most important and difficult; an ammunition dump to the east of Warloy. As our triplane escort had now to depart and was being relieved by a patrol of Albatroses, some Sopwiths attempted to surprise us by diving out of the sun. Before we could get to work we were twice driven well back behind our own lines. Our Albatroses then attacked the enemy scouts and one was soon sent down in flames, whereupon the others retired and work was resumed.
   "The first shell dropped in Warloy itself, some 550 yards short of the target but, by good fortune, disorganised a motor transport column which was given a few more shells for good measure. While studying the results through binoculars, supposedly secure in the knowledge of the protective Albatroses overhead, I was rudely awakened by the rattle of machine-gun fire to find two Sopwiths blazing away less than 100 yards distant. The radiator was riddled and with the boiling water streaming past our faces, my pilot put the L.V.G. into a steep spiral. It was only by his skilled manoeuvring that we were able to avoid further bullets from the persistent Englishmen; in fact so steep did our descent become I thought our L.V.G. was really out of control and the pilot badly wounded. However, the engine lasted as far as Montauban before seizing completely. There was no chance to select a landing place for even the shell holes overlapped, but with great skill the machine was put down in a clear patch no more than 15 yards long. Two days later, with a new engine fitted, we were once again about our business."
   One surviving example of an L.V.G. C VI is in the hands of the Shuttleworth Collection's air museum at Old Warden, Beds. Shot down 2nd August 1918 by two S.E. 5s of No. 74 Squadron, it later flew at the R.A.F. Hendon Display in 1937. It has recently been refurbished after long storage.

TECHNICAL DATA
   Description: Two-seat reconnaissance and artillery observation.
   Manufacturer: Luft-Verkehrs Gesellschaft m.b.H. Johannisthal, Berlin (Lvg.).
   Power Plant: One 200 h.p. Benz Bz IV 6 cylinder in-line water-cooled engine, developing maximum 230 h.p.
   Dimensions: Span, 130 m. (42 ft. 7 3/4 in.). Length, 7.45 m. (24 ft. 5 1/4 in.). Height, 2.8 m. (9 ft. 2 1/4 in.). Area, 34.6 sq.m. (375.68 sq.ft.).
   Weights: Empty, 930 kg. (2,046 lb.). Loaded, 1,309 kg. (3,058 lb.). Empty, 2,090 lb. Loaded, 3,036 lb. (Captured aircraft.)
   Performance: Maximum speed, 170 km.hr. (106.25 m.p.h.). Climb, 1,000 m. (3,280 ft.) in 4 min., 2,000 m. (6,560 ft.) in 8 min., 3,000 m. (9,840 ft.) in 15 min., 6,000 m. (19,680 ft.) in 40 min. Ceiling, 21,350 ft. Duration, 3 1/2 hr.
   Armament: One fixed Spandau machine-gun forward and one manually operated Parabellum machine-gun in the rear cockpit. Light bomb-load, up to 250 lb.


L.Andersson Soviet Aircraft and Aviation 1917-1941 (Putnam)


Luft-Verkehrs- Gesellschaft LVG C VI

   The LVG C V and C VI, which served simultaneously, were two of the most successful German reconnaissance and artillery observation aircraft of the First World War. About 1,100 C VI aircraft were built in 1918. This two-seat biplane did not differ much from the LVG C V, but was lighter and more compact. The same engine, a water-cooled six-cylinder inline 220hp Benz Bz IV, was installed, but the extreme forward part of the fuselage was remodeled to make the fitting of a spinner unnecessary. The cylinder block protruded through the metal plating around the engine and a chimney-type manifold exhaust was fitted. A flush radiator was installed in the centre section of the wing, which featured a large angular cut-out in the trailing edge for better view for the pilot.
   The fuselage was plywood-covered except for the metal panels in the nose, and built up on a framework consisting of slab-sided formers and four longerons, covered with a thin layer of plywood. The vertical tail surfaces had an egg-shaped form similar to that of Halberstadt aircraft and the tailplane also had a rounded profile. The rudder and elevators had small horn-balances. The fabric-covered staggered wings were of parallel chord and the upper wings were slightly raked at the tips, the tips of the lower wings being rounded. The ailerons mounted on the upper wings were of parallel chord and unbalanced. A standard type under-carriage was fitted. Armament consisted of one fixed forward-firing machine-gun for the pilot and one flexibly mounted machine-gun for the observer in the rear cockpit. Small bombs could also be carried.
   After the war LVG C VI aircraft appeared in small numbers in the military air services of Belgium, Czechoslovakia, Holland, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Switzerland, the Ukraine and a few other countries. Several attempts were made by Russians to purchase LVG aircraft in Germany in 1919-1920 but it has not been possible to establish who these buyers were acting for or if they were ever successful. Among the first foreign aircraft acquisitions made by the Soviet Government in 1922 involved twenty LVG C VI aircraft, delivered in April/May 1922 and assembled at RVZ No. 1. The first one completed was c/n 12/3, test-flown on 2 May and then assigned to the NOA. Constructor's numbers of the whole batch were: 14/1, 40/2, 12/3, 41/4, 42/5, 11/6, 43/7, 44/8, 45/9, 13/10, 11, 75/12, 13, 14, 15, 74/16, 17, 18, 14599/19 and 20. It is not known if the numbers 1-20 were original or if they were added by RVZ No. 1.
   The LVG was called the 'El'fauge' in the Soviet Union after the pronunciation of its designation in German. It was used by the 2nd, 4th and 8th Otdel'nye razvedivatel'nye aviatsionnye otryady at Tashkent until replaced by de Havilland D.H.9s and Junkers F 13s in 1924, and by the 14th Otdel'nyi razvedivatel'nyi aviatsionnyi otryad at Severnaya, just north of Moscow, until 1924. The 1st Otdel'nyi razvedivatel'nyi aviaotryad at Leningrad and the 6th Otdel'nyi razvedivatel'nyi aviaotryad at Khar'kov had one each. Two LVG C Vis (12/ 75 and 16/74) were used at the NOA in 1923. In connection with the withdrawal from use of the LVG C VI in 1924-25 Dobrolet was offered eight aircraft (and seventeen Benz engines) for their aerial photography department in September 1924, but they rejected the offer. However, LVGs had already been in use for civil purposes earlier.
   Deruluft acquired two LVG C Vis for local flights and communications between their airports. RR11 (c/n 4643, ex-D-123) was delivered from Germany in December 1922 and was used until 1926. A second aircraft, RR14 (c/n 4590, probably ex-D-76), was delivered in June 1923, but this machine did not pass its airworthiness tests in October 1924 and was probably scrapped. An organisation called Kashirstroi purchased another old LVG C VI cheaply in Berlin. This aircraft also arrived in Moscow in June 1923. It was to be used for personal transport between the Kashirstroi offices in Moscow and the construction sites at the Kashirka River south of the capital but no further details are known about this aircraft.


   M220hp Benz Bz VI
   Span 7.45m; length 13m; height 2.8m; wing area 35 m2
   Empty weight 945kg; loaded weight 1,375kg
   Maximum speed 170km/h; climb to 1,000m in 4min; endurance 3hr


E.Hauke, W.Schroeder, B.Totschinger Die Flugzeuge der k.u.k. Luftfahrtruppe und Seeflieger 1914-1918


01. — 010. Flugzeuge ausländischer Produktion (Самолеты иностранного производства)
08.100 L.V.G. C.VI (Projekt) FI 230


J.Herris LVG Aircraft of WWI. Vol.1: B-Types & C.I (A Centennial Perspective on Great War Airplanes 34)


LVG C-Types
  
<...>
  The next LVG was the C.VI, a more compact development of the C.V. Arriving at the front in May 1918, the C.VI offered improved performance and maneuverability compared to the C.V and gradually replaced it in combat units. Still in production at the Armistice, the C.VI had a successful post-war career with the air arms of other countries and therefore is better known today than its C.V predecessor despite the fact the C.V served longer and in greater numbers.
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LVG C-Type Specifications
LVG C.V LVG C.VI LVG C.VIII LVG C.XI(Schul)
Engine 200 hp Benz Bz.IV 220 hp Benz Bz.IVa 240 hp Benz Bz.IVu 160 hp Mercedes D.III
Span, Upper 13.60 m 13.0 m 13.0 m -
Span, Lower 12.83 m - - -
Chord, Upper 1.75 m - - -
Chord, Lower 1.60 m - - -
Gap 1.73 m - - -
Wing Area 40.5 m2 34.6 m2 35.7 m2 -
Length 8.07 m 7.45 m 7.0 m -
Height 3.36 m 2.8 m 2.8 m -
Empty Weight 1,009 kg 930 kg 975 kg -
Loaded Weight 1,505 kg 1,309 kg 1,380 kg -
Maximum Speed 170 km/h 170 km/h 165 km/h -
Climb to 1,000 m 3 minutes 4 minutes - -
Climb to 2,000 m 7 minutes 8 minutes - -
Climb to 3,000 m 12.5 minutes 15 minutes - -
Climb to 4,000 m 23.5 minutes 25.0 minutes - -
Climb to 6,000 m - 40.0 minutes - -


Known LVG C-Type Production Orders
Type Date Qty Serials Notes
C.VI Oct. 1917 3 14400-14402/17 Prototypes
C.VI Mar. 1918 250 1497-1796/18 Combined with last C.V production batch
C.VI May 1918 100 3900-3999/18
C.VI June 1918 150 4750-4899/18
C.VI July 1918 100 7600-7799/18
C.VI July 1918 200 7600-7799/18
C.VI July 1918 50 08.101-150 For Austria-Hungary. Order cancelled, none delivered
C.VI Aug. 1918 200 8900-9099/18
C.VI Oct. 1918 200 11100-12099/18 Serial numbers not confirmed


J.Herris LVG Aircraft of WWI. Vol.3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters (A Centennial Perspective on Great War Airplanes 36)


LVG C.VI

  With the LVG C.V in large-scale production, design of the LVG C.VI was started in August 1917, and Idflieg approved the project for prototype construction in October 1917 when it ordered three prototypes. By 5 January 1918 the C.VI was in final assembly and the first flight was later that month. The C.VI passed its type-test in early February and the first production order was given in March. The first production aircraft were modified in June 1918 before being shipped to the front to correct minor issues, with the most important being replacement of a weak lift-cable bolt with a stronger bolt. Despite that delay, by the end of June 1918 173 C.VI aircraft were at the front.
  Like the LVG C.V and its DFW C.V predecessor, the LVG C.VI was a short-range reconnaissance two-seater with synchronized gun for the pilot and a flexible gun for the observer seated in the rear cockpit. All three types used similar structural materials and technology and all used the same basic Benz Bz.IV six-cylinder engine, although later versions of the engine gave somewhat more power due to continued development.
  The LVG C.V had been a more elegant, streamlined development of the DFW by the same designer, who had been hired away from DFW by LVG. Sabersky, the designer of all three types, took a similar direction with the C.VI. The C.VI was slightly smaller than the C.V and, combined with even more structural refinement, therefore lighter. Sabersky also worked on improving streamlining, although the C.VI with its rounded nose did not look as streamlined as the elegant C.V with its spinner. Despite appearances, elimination of the spinner in favor of the rounded nose had proven to reduce drag in wind-tunnel testing, and these results were also used to advantage by Rumpler among others.
  The smaller, lighter LVG C.VI was faster and more maneuverable than the C.V and also offered better climb and ceiling. The specifications table, with data taken from inconsistent sources of varying reliability, unfortunately does not reflect the improved performance of the C.VI compared to the C.V. However, actual combat experience did confirm the superiority of the C.VI. Like the earlier DFW C.V and LVG C.V, the LVG C.VI was well-liked by its crews for its robust reliability, excellent handling and maneuverability, and good all-around performance. The LVG C.VI was not surpassed in its role until advent of the Halberstadt C.V that was regarded as the best aircraft in its class.
  The C.VI was built in large numbers and 392 were serving or in storage in 1920 even after many were turned over to the Allies. That, combined with its reliability and good performance, ensured a successful post-war career.



LVG Aircraft in Polish Aviation

  With the regaining of independence in 1918 and the return of Poland to the maps of Europe, the Polish army revived, along with the newly formed Polish Air Service. During the great war, Polish pilots were trained in almost all European armies. Such a conglomerate, in theory, had no right to achieve anything, but the Polish Air Service, new born from Europe's ashes was able to fight effectively to defend the borders of the young Polish Republic and to win complete air superiority during the Polish-Bolshevik war. Initially, most of the aircraft captured from occupying countries were German. Lawica Air Station (Flieger Ersatz Abteilung Nr 4 - Lawitz/Posen) became the largest source, where about 500 aircraft were captured,of which over 100 were suitable for immediate use. In general, in the initial time Polish aviation had about 200 LVG aircraft of various types. Historians report that more than 150 LVG C.V aircraft were acquired from four different sources (the first batch captured from the Germans, the second from the Inter-Allied Reparations Commission, the third purchased in Germany, and the fourth from the Eastern Front). Aircraft of this type were used by several reconnaissance and one bomber fights (escadrilles).
  Interesting is that LVG C.V was chosen by Polish Aviation Headquarters to mass production at Lawica workshops (but end of the Polish - Soviet war ending this project). About 15 LVG C.VI aircraft were deployed in different units. 14 LVG C.II aircraft were included in one that was used in combat (by 12 Eskadra Lotnicza - 12 Air Escadrille), but the rest were unusable and had to be struck off charge. There were also two LVG C.III (3300/17? and 3309/17? captured at Lawica) and one LVG B.II. In addition to combat squadrons, LVG aircraft were used in the air schools in Grudziadz, Krakow, Poznan, Torun and Warsaw. So we could say that the LVG C.V and C.VI were the 'work horses' of the Polish aviation in the initial period and had a big share in its victories...
Piotr Mrozowski



LVG Aircraft in Sweden

  Although relatively few LVG aircraft were used in Sweden, they served both with civilian and military operators. A total of four LVG C.V's, eight LVG C.VI's and one LVG P.I were sold to Sweden.


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LVG C.VI

  The history of the LVG C.VI in Sweden is closely associated with the airline Svenska Lufttrafikaktiebolaget (Swedish Airline Traffic Co., SLA). Originally formed in 1919, SLA had ambitious plans to establish several different civilian air traffic routes. Apart from Stockholm, bases were established at Gothenburg, Malmo, and Sundsvall. In November 1919, six LVG C.VI's were bought by SLA from DLR, costing 35,000 German Marks each. These arrived at Ljungbyhed in January 1920, with a seventh aircraft being delivered the following month. A number of German pilots, including Hans Eichler, A. Gothe, Hermann Goring, G. Juterbock and R. Longo, were hired by SLA. The LVG's were known as L 1 to L 7 respectively. Unfortunately, details on the previous identity of these aircraft are sparse. One, L 7, had previously been registered as D-59. In the spring of 1920, SLA initiated a tour of Sweden, known as the Flygande Tombolan (Flying Lottery). Many of the SLA LVG's suffered mishaps and accidents. One such example occurred on 13 April
when Hans Eichler suffered an engine failure in L 6 over Stockholm. The resulting forced landing near the exercise field of an artillery regiment saw Eichler wiping off the undercarriage of the LVG. According to an unconfirmed story, Goring (who according to the same source spoke fluent Swedish) wanted to show off his piloting skills to the other SLA pilots. When Goring was preparing to land, the pilots walked to a muddy area of the field. The LVG overturned on landing, thoroughly embarrassing Goring.
  SLA did not have much luck in establishing airline traffic. Not for want of trying, though. In order to operate during wintertime, 24 pairs of skis were ordered from the Naval Aviation Service workshops. One LVG C.VI, L 7, was also converted as a floatplane by one of its pilots, Gosta Hultstrom.
  On 21 August 1920, the Army and Naval Air Services were offered to buy three or four LVG's. This was rejected, with two (including L 2) ultimately being sold to the Finnish company Suomen Ilmailuliikenne O/Y in December 1920. Both of these eventually ended up with the Suomen Ilmavoimat (Finnish Air Force) as s/ns 3A31 and 3A32 respectively. The FAF LVG C.VI's were struck off charge in 1924/25.
  Two other LVG's were sold in March 1921 to Sven Hjort of Rasunda. SLA folded in late 1921. Two of the LVG C.VI's were bought by Marinens Flygvasende (Naval Air Service) in December
  Powered by 200 h.p. Benz engines, they were given the serials 9 and 10, and based at Hagernas near Stockholm. The LVG's were used, albeit only sparingly, in training observers in aerial gunnery and photography as well as how to drop bombs. One (s/n 9) was also used by Flory for ice reconnaissance flights on the west coast. Both were struck off charge in January 1924. One (c/n 4929, the former s/n 10) was sold to the famous aviator Albin Ahrenberg, and registered as S-AXAA, later becoming S-AABK and, ultimately, SE-ABK. This LVG C.VI was cancelled from the Civil Aircraft Register on 17 May 1929. The aircraft survived until 1933, eventually being expended in anti-aircraft gun trials conducted by Swedish gun manufacturer Bofors.
  The eighth Swedish LVG C.VI was c/n 5061, being formerly registered in Germany with DLR as D-265. Sold to the Consul Hjalmar Janek who on 17 October 1919 obtained a permit to fly a "Rumpler 200 Benz" to Sweden. The aircraft arrived in Sweden on 27 October, being flown by Wilhelm Schubert with Janek and his wife as passengers. The following month, the LVG was offered to the Naval Air Service, but then sold to the "Managing Director of Nordiska Luftbolaget", Nils Englund. The company referred to was Nordiska Luftrederiaktiebolaget (Nordic Air Shipping Company Ltd, NLR). The LVG suffered several accidents, including a watery landing on 12/13 June 1920. On 2 February 1920, the lawyer Erik Lindfors (the legal custodian of Nils Englund) applied for permission to use the aircraft for air shows and air experience flights. The pilot was to be the former Austrian fighter pilot Edmund Sparmann. This was rejected, after which the LVG was sold to Gustaf Landgren, who intended to use the aircraft in the same way as Lindfors. Landgren's application was approved on 27 May 1921, with Sparmann performing a test flight the following month. On 1 October 1921, the aircraft was registered as S-AAN. However, the LVG was broken up a few months later.


<...>

Jan Forsgren


J.Forsgren Swedish Military Aircraft 1911-1926 (A Centennial Perspective on Great War Airplanes 68)


LVG C.VI

  Two former Svenska Lufttrafik AB (SLA) airline LVG C.VIs were purchased in December 1921, with the serial numbers 9 and 10 respectively being allocated. The former had previously been registered in Germany as D-59. When used by SLA, the LVG CVI carried the identity L7. The price was 1,000 kronor, including skis and an assortment of spares. The second LVG CVI was c/n 4929, having served with SLA as serial number L5. Both LVG CVIs were delivered to the naval yard in Stockholm in November 1921, being accepted on November 28.
  Both airplanes had seen considerable use with SLA, with the low price being seen as a good opportunity for a great deal. The LVG C.VIs were intended for gunnery, bomb dropping and observer training. Although seemingly suitable for the job, the aircraft were only used sparingly. It would also appear that neither LVG C.VI ever carried any kind of armament.
  Nevertheless, the pair of LVG C.VIs were the fastest airplanes in naval service, being capable of speeds of up to 175 km/h. The rate of climb was also considered as being excellent. Three major drawbacks were the propensity to turn turtle on landing, constantly leaking radiators, and the fact (or belief) that the wings lacked sufficient strength. As a result, orders were that the LVG C.VIs were to be ’’flown carefully”.
  Beginning on February 19, 1922, LVG C.VI serial number 9 was used for ice reconnaissance off the west coast. Flying the LVG C.VI was Arvid Flory, with Einar Christell serving as observer. The AFK also participated in these flights, with two Dront’s being used. The reasoning behind choosing the LVG C.VI was due it being the fastest naval airplane, also being fitted with wheels instead of floats. Due to poor weather, the flights had to be curtailed by the end of February. On their way back to Hagernas, Flory and Christell became the first naval aviators to land at Malmen in a naval airplane.
  Both LVG C.VIs were struck off charge in November 1923, being sold to navy pilot Albin Ahrenberg. The former serial number 10 registered as S-AXAA on June 20, 1924. It was later registered as S-AABK and SE-ABK, eventually being struck from the civil aircraft register on May 20, 1928. In his memoirs, Ett flygarliv (A Life in Aviation), Ahrenberg describes how he came into possession of the airplanes: "The MFV High Command eventually grew tired of the constant repairs, and the airplanes were withdrawn from use. While peering out the window of my office one beautiful day, I saw people dragging one of the ’planes to the heating central, obviously to hand it over for cremation. I immediately ran to the Boss, who confirmed my suspicions - it would be burnt. I opened the window, yelling that they should wait a bit before starting the act of destruction. The Boss understood.
  “Do you want to buy it?”
  “Yes, that’s right! How much does it cost?”
  “Well, there’s not much firewood in one of these. Shall we say 150 kronor?'
  The offer was immediately accepted.
  Then you can take the other one as well for the same price, just so that we can get rid of this junk!”
  In 1928, the seemingly indestructable LVG C.VI was sold to gun manufacturer Bofors, surviving until 1933 by which time it was expended as a target during anti-aircraft gunnery trials.

LVG C.VI Technical Data and Performance Characteristics
   Engine: 1 x 200 h.p. Benz Bz IV
   Length: 7,45 m
   Wingspan: 13,00 m
   Height: 2,80 m
   Wing area: 34,60 m2
   Empty weight: 930 kg
   Maximum weight: 1,420 kg
   Maximum speed: 170 km/h


P.Grosz, G.Haddow, P.Shiemer Austro-Hungarian Army Aircraft of World War One


LVG C.VI Series 08.100

  Concerned that the worker's strike at UFAG and production delays at Phonix could threaten the supply of two-seater biplanes, the LFT made plans in early 1918 to purchase 50 German LVG C.VI biplanes as insurance. Built completely of wood, including wing and undercarriage struts, the versatile C.VI was also eyed as a potential candidate for license manufacture. On 27 March, a 230 hp Hiero engine was shipped to Johannisthal for installation in a C.VI, and LVG flight tests were satisfactorily concluded on 14 April. An order for 50 LVG C.VI biplanes, numbered 08.101 to 08.150, was approved on 27 July 1918. However, the order was subject to a performance comparison with the latest Phonix and UFAG C.I production machines. The Phonix C.I emerged the winner and, with manufacturing problems on the mend, the LFT cancelled the C.VI order on 31 August 1918. In fact, the LFT recommended that LVG stop C.VI production and build the Phonix C.I instead. LVG C.VI 3978/18 (engine unknown but possibly the Hiero-engined test machine) and a Benz-powered C.VI 3843/18 were listed in the 1919 inventory of LFT aircraft.


Журнал Flight


Flight, December 19, 1918.

THE L.V.G. TWO-SEATER BIPLANES
[Issued by Technical Department (Aircraft Production), Ministry of Munitions]

   THIS report is concerned with two L.V.G. biplanes, of which one is of the C.V. type, while the other, a C.VI. type machine, is of later design, embodying certain alterations and improvements. The C.V. machine is allotted G/3Bde/5, and the C.VI. which was brought down near Proven on August 2nd by two S.E. 5's, piloted by Lieuts. Gordon and Gould, is alloted G/2 Bde/21.
   Any description which follows and is not definitely stated to apply to either model, must be read as appertaining to the C.VI type.
   The C.V. machine was only slightly damaged, and has been put into flying order, but the C.VI. has suffered severely, and it must be stated that on this account the G.A. drawings are not guaranteed to be of absolute accuracy in every respect. The greatest care has, however, been taken in their preparation, and only features of rigging such as dihedral and stagger (besides the tail planes, which are in a very fragmentary condition) are at all doubtful. In matters of detail the drawings are accurate.
   Some leading particulars of both machines are given below :-

   C.V. Type. C.VI. Type.
Weight empty 2,188 lbs. 2,090 lbs.
Total weight 3,141 lbs. 3,036 lbs.
Area of upper wings
   (with ailerons) 238.4 sq. ft. 196.0 sq. ft.
Area of lower wings 190.4 sq. ft. 160.0 sq. ft.
Total area of wings 428.8 sq. ft. 356.0 sq. ft.
Loading per sq. ft. of
   wing surface 7.3 lbs. 8.5 lbs.
Area of aileron, each 13.6 sq.ft. 11.2 sq. ft.
Area of balance of
   aileron 0.4 sq. ft. 0.0 sq. ft.
Area of tail plane 21.6 sq. ft. 28.0 sq. ft.
Area of fin 5.2 sq. ft. 5.2 sq. ft,
Area of rudder 6.8 sq. ft. 6.8 sq. ft.
Area of balance of
   rudder 0.6 sq. ft. 0.6 sq, ft.
Area of elevators 20.8 sq. ft. 16.0 sq. ft.
Area of balance of
   elevator (one) 1.2 sq. ft. 0.8 sq. ft.
Total weight per h.p. 13.7 lbs. 13.2 lbs.
Crew 2 - Pilot and observer.
Armament 1 Spandau and 1 Parabellum
   gun.
Engine 230 h.p. Benz.
Petrol capacity 52 1/2 gals. 52 1/2 gals.

Wings.
   There are several important differences between the arrangement of main planes of the two models, as will be seen by referring to the G.A. drawings.
   The wings of the C.V. L.V.G. are without stagger, and are not swept back, but both upper and lower planes are set at a dihedral angle, this being 1° for the upper, and 2° for the lower wings. The lower planes are smaller all round than the upper, and have rounded tips. The upper planes only have ailerons, which are of equal chord throughout their length, and are balanced. These planes also follow what was, until recently, the usual enemy practice, by being joined at their roots to a central cabane. There is, therefore, no horizontal centre section in this aeroplane, except for the 3-ply box (about 4 in, wide), which surrounds the horizontal tube of the cabane. For improving the view, the upper plane is cut away over the pilot's cockpit. Relative to the crankshaft the upper wing has a constant angle of incidence of 5°. That of the lower wing is the same, except at the tip, where the angle is washed out to 4°, and at the root to 4 1/2°.
   Both upper and lower wings are attached to the body by the same general means, this being adapted to the particular positions and conditions of each joint. In the case of the upper planes, the cabane has lugs welded to its upper side at both ends. Fig. 1 shows the fitting at the forward end, and the pierced lug on the wing spar (see Fig. 2) fits into the fork. The same type of hinge pin is used for all wing joints, and for the aileron hinges also. It consists of a short length of steel tube, carrying at one end some form of stop, and at its other end a slot in which a short rectangular piece of steel is free to rotate, the steel piece being pivoted at its centre. Thus, when the steel piece is placed parallel to the tube, the whole fitting can be passed through any hole which will accommodate the tube, but when the piece is placed at right angles to the tube axis, the tube cannot be withdrawn through a small hole. A helical spring ensures that the steel piece shall be pressed against the hole, and not be free to slip into the parallel position.
   The lower wing attachments are very similar, as will be gathered from Figs. 3 and 4, which show respectively the front and rear joints, and this plan has not been changed on the C.VI. type of L.V.G., except that the lug on the wing spar is now fashioned as shown in Fig. 5.
   In the later model - the C.VI - the planes are of the same general shape, but important changes are remarked. The radiator has been moved from the position it occupied on the C.V. (see G.A. drawings), and is now built into the horizontal centre section. It is, of course, common German practice to build the radiator into the upper plane, and such a position is not incompatible with the cabane type of centre section strutting. This is particularly true when-as is the case in the. L.V.G.-a service petrol tank is supported by the upper plane, and can be made to balance the radiator. It is clear, therefore, that the alteration in design from the cabane system to the centre section system has not been made solely to accommodate the radiator.
   So far as may be judged from the machine in its present condition, the C.VI has a positive stagger of 10 in., and both upper and lower planes have a similar dihedral angle, viz., 1°. Ailerons are still fitted to the upper plane only, but are not balanced in this model. The upper and lower wing sections of the C.VI. model are shown in Fig. 6, and Fig. 7 gives the C.VI. upper wing section with the R.A.F. 14 section superimposed. The R.A.F. 14 section is dotted.

(To be concluded.)


Flight, December 19, 1918.

THE L.V,G. TWO-SEATER BIPLANES
[Issued by Technical Department (Aircraft Production), Ministry of Munitions.]
(Concluded from page 1431.)

Wing Construction
   (THESE details were all noticed in the C.VI. machine, as in the earlier type the planes are still covered with fabric.)
   Both front and rear spars are of the box type, and wrapped with fabric. Sections drawn to scale are given in Fig. 8, but these drawings do not show internal construction, as the spars have not yet been divided.
   The overall height and width of each spar, taken respectively parallel and perpendicular to the vertical walls, are :- Upper plane, front spar, height 3 1/4 in., width 1 7/16 in.; rear spar, height 3 in., width 1 15/16 in.; lower plane, rear spar, height 3 in., width 1 11/16 in.; front spar, height 2 7/8 in., width 1 11/16 in.
   It has been possible to draw a section of the front spar of the C.V. machine, and the result is given in Fig. 9. There is every reason to believe that all the other spars of the L.V.G. are of similar construction. Fig. 10 shows a crude but effective method of repairing a broken spar. The repair was carried out by the enemy, probably in the field.
   The leading edge is of the customary C section, and is followed at 7 in. interval by the front spar. The space between the two spars - 25 3/4 in. wide - is braced with cables and piano wire, and contains four ash compression struts of I section, which are simply butted into sockets obviously intended to carry steel tubes. (These compression struts are steel in the C.V. model.) The distance from the rear spar to the wire trailing edge is 2 ft. 6 3/8 in. The ribs, of which a section is shown, are of the usual type, and are spaced at intervals of 16 3/4 in., centre to centre. They are unlightened. Equally between them are placed two false ribs - mere strips of wood let into the leading edge and tacked to the spars. These false ribs have floating ends 7 1/2 in. behind the rear spar.
   The construction of the lower plane does not differ from that of the upper plane just described, except that the false ribs are not found in it.

Ailerons
   The ailerons of the L.V.G. no longer possess the peculiar step in the trailing edge that has for so long been associated with the design, and the ailerons are rather different in the two types. The C.V. model has ailerons which are balanced while those of the C.VI. are not. The respective areas are given on the first page of the report. With regard to the constructional features, only those of the later type can be described. The whole construction is of wood, with the exception of the aileron lever, a sketch of which is given (Fig. 11). This is of the usual curved type in the C.V. machine (see Fig. 12), but is made to serve as a rib also in the C.VI. type. The wooden ribs, together with the wood leading and trailing edges, form a structure which is very light. Both machines have the ailerons hinged to a false spar some distance behind the rear spar, and the hinges are all of the type that has already been described in connection with the wing attachments (see Fig. 13).

Struts
   The L.V.G. is one of the few enemy aeroplanes that employ interplane struts of wood. They are of the shape shown in, Fig. 14, and are of streamline section (2 1/4 in. x 1 9/16 in.), slightly hollowed out for lightening purposes. Fabric is wrapped round the strut in three places, and the form of the strut sockets is made clear in the sketch (Fig. 14), which shows one of the C.V. struts.
   The types of strut socket employed in the C.VI. machine is shown in Fig. 15, while Fig. 16 shows how the strut is attached to the spar. The socket is held in place on the strut by simply inserting a suitable length of steel tube through a drilled hole in socket and strut and riveting over the ends.
   As has already been mentioned, the centre section struts are different in the two types. In the C.V. machine the cabane, the shape of which is made clear by the G.A. drawings, is made of streamline steel tubing. This has been changed, and the C.VI. model has parallel centre section struts of wood, which are like the letter N when seen from the port side. Fig. 17 shows the pint between the spar of the centre section and the strut. The unusual arrangement of the cross-bracing of this centre section should be noticed in the front view, G.A. drawings.
   The line of the front limb of the N is carried on by the third fuselage bulkhead, and finishes at the front joint of fuselage and undercarriage. The angle between the rear two limbs of the N is practically bisected by the line of the fifth bulkhead, which finishes at the rear joint of fuselage and undercarriage. This is shown by a diagram, Fig. 18. The C.V. machine has a sloping steel tubular strut between engine bearer and rear undercarriage attachment (see Fig. 19), but by the rearrangement of bulkheads the necessity for this has vanished, and the strut is not found in the later model.

Fuselage
   The earlier types of L.V.G. had bodies built on the cross-braced girder system. Both the machines described possess the same type of fuselage, totally different from the girder system, viz., a framework of bulkheads and longerons, covered with a thin layer of 3-ply and totally without wire bracing. Fig. 20 gives the number of shapes of the bulkhead in the C.V. machine, and incidentally reveals the shape of the fuselage. The C.VI. type has generally the same arrangement, but the third and fifth, bulkhead are no longer vertical in this model, and the tail part of the body has been strengthened by the insertion of another cross piece.
   Although the fuselage of the L.V.G. biplane ends in a vertical wedge, the provision of a centre section for the tail plane gives a cruciform appearance to this part. This is shown clearly by Fig. 21, where the two sides of the tail plane centre section are drawn in thin lines. The 3-ply covering to the fuselage rounds off the joint of body and tail plane in the neat way that is found in so many German aeroplanes. (See Fig. 22.)

Tail
   The shape of the fixed tail planes is shown in the G.A. drawings. The main box spar (see dotted section in Fig. 21) passes right through the body. The rear spar, to which the elevators are hinged, is of rectangular section wood, hollowed on its rear face to take the steel tube which serves as the elevator spar. The tail is so badly damaged that detailed analysis is impossible, but the fixed tail planes are of wooden construction, with the usual ribs and semicircular leading edge. It will be noticed that the tail plane is not set parallel to the crankshaft line, but is raised through an angle of 5°, and it has a symmetrical streamline section.
   The elevator, which is balanced and undivided in both models, is a welded structure of light steel tubing, and presents no unusual feature. There is a small protecting horn provided on the tail plane, to prevent damage to the corner of the balanced portion of the elevator - Fig. 23 gives a clear idea of this example of thoroughness.
   The tail skids are both of the same general type as that of the Pfalz Scout, i.e., the member is entirely exposed, and does not project into the fuselage. It is of ash, and the upper end is so shaped as to avoid the necessity for any metal link or fitting. Both machines also have a small triangular fin on the underside of the fuselage which serves the double purpose of providing fin area and of adapting the shape of the fuselage to the slope required for the tail skid. (See Fig. 22.)
   It will be seen from the sketch (Fig. 24) that the skid of the C.V. machine carries a four-leaved fiat spring bolted a little to the rear of the pivot. In the later model this has been discarded. The shape of the lower triangular fin also differs slightly - that of the C.VI. has been simplified and strengthened. The workmanship of the sheet steel angle piece on the C.VI. machine gives one the impression that it is a "squadron fitting." It is of fairly heavy gauge, and may have replaced a weaker part fitted by the manufacturer.

Undercarriage
   The landing gears of both machines are similar, and in general arrangement conform to the practice that is now practically standard. The vee struts are of streamline section, and constructed of fabric-covered wood. The practice of using wood for undercarriage struts is, of course, unusual in enemy machines, but is in conformity with the other struts - interplane and centre section - on this machine.
   The major and minor axes of cross section of one of the front struts (and all four, front and rear, are of equal dimensions) are respectively 2 9/32 in. and 4 7/8 in.
   The upper and lower extremities are capped with steel sockets, which allow of attachment to the fuselage at the upper extremities and at the lower ends serve to connect the two limbs of the vee, and are provided with accommodation for the shock absorber. Figs. 25 and 26 show respectively the component parts of the attachment to the fuselage, and the socket at the lower part of the vee. From Fig. 25 it will be noticed that the ball at the head of the strut beds into a hemispherical socket attached to the fuselage. The lower half of the ball articulates with a curved surface on the ferrule, and the ferrule next slipped over attachment. In assembling this joint - and this is a matter of seconds only - the ball is first passed through the opening provided on the ferrule, and the ferrule next slipped over the body lug and pinned in place. All four body attachments are of this type in the C.VI, machines, but in the C.V. model the joint was made by simply pinning the ball to its socket, without the refinement of a ferrule.
   The shock absorber is of the coil spring type, with three small diameter springs lying side by side, as indicated in Fig. 26. A loop of cable limits the amount of axle travel, and between the lower extremities of the vees is a steel compression tube, of 1 1/2 in. O.D., and behind this lies the axle, which is encased in a 3-ply fairing. It will be noticed that the compression tube is not included in the fairing, and when the axle is raised as the machine lands, the fairing travels with the axle. This method allows of good accessibility to these components, but is not quite so good an arrangement from the streamline point of view as the common method of allowing the axle to lift out of a fixed fairing.
   The schedule of principal weights, given at the end of this report, is of considerable interest as regards the undercarriage.
   The wheels are 810 x 125, and the track 6 ft. 7 in. The cross bracing does not start from either front or rear fuselage attachments, but from the front spar joint on the fuselage.

Controls
   As is the case throughout the design, the controls of the two aeroplanes are generally similar, but differ in detail. In the C.V. machine, the control lever, at the head of which is the usual two-handed grip, operates two rocking shafts which axe perpendicular to one another. The transverse tube, which actuates the elevators, is cranked in the middle and supported on four brackets, marked a, b, c, and d, in Fig. 27, which act as bearings. To the middle point is pinned the front half of the jaw which is found on the bottom of the control lever. This pin A, always points directly to the centre of the pin B, which passes through the rear half of the jaw and is itself always exactly in line with the bearing of the transverse shaft. This somewhat complicated arrangement allows the transverse shaft to be rotated round axis a, b, B, c, d, and at the same time permits the other shaft to rock on its own bearings. A simple contracting band brake controlled by a Bowden lever and cable serves to lock the elevator controls in any desired position. This brake is found in both types.
   The C.VI. controls are rather different, and are shown in Fig. 28, which clearly explains their operation. The naked aileron control cables pass through the lower wing near the rear spar, and run over the aluminium pulleys illustrated in Fig. 29. The upper extremities of these cables are attached to the welded control lever which works in a slot in the upper plane. The differences between the two types in the matter of the aileron lever has already been commented upon.
   The rudder bars of the two types are of the same general design, but the problem of leading the cables round the base of the large petrol tank immediately behind the rudder bar, is solved in different ways. In the later type, a semicircular extension to the rudder bar avoids the necessity for the two extra pulleys and bearings found in the C.V. type. Reference to Fig. 30 will make this point clear.

Engine Mounting and Control
   The 230 h.p. Benz engine is mounted on wooden bearers of rectangular section, 1 5/8 in. wide and 3 1/4 in. deep, supported on the cross bulkheads found in the front of the fuselage. In the C.V. machine there is a steel tubular strut on each side which is in compression between the rear portion of the engine bearer and the front undercarriage joint (see Fig. 19). As has already been mentioned, the rearrangement of the fuselage bulkheads allows this strut to be dispensed with in the C.VI. model.
   The throttle lever is of the familiar ratchet-quadrant type, and in the C.V. machine there is no interconnected throttle lever on the control stick. Although the C.VI. control lever is missing, it is fairly certain that this is true of this type also. Those bulkheads which are likely to receive oil drippings from the crankcase are protected by aluminium strips employed in the manner shown in Fig. 31.

Oil and Petrol Systems
   Both machines have a main petrol tank under the pilot's seat and a gravity tank attached to the upper plane. In the C.V. machine this tank is placed on the upper surface of the port plane, alongside the narrow centre section. The later type has the tank beneath the port upper plane, as will he noticed from the scale drawings. In this case the filler passes through the plane, and has the cap on the plane's.
   The C.VI. main tank has a capacity of 47 gallons, and the gravity tank a capacity of 5 1/2 gallons, thus giving a total petrol capacity of 52 1/2 gallons. There is a hand petrol pump which allows the pilot to fill the gravity tank from the main tank, and an engine petrol pump which draws fuel from the main tank and passes it on under pressure to the small cylindrical compartment of the main tank, whence it flows to the carburettor. This is, of course, the usual Benz system, and has been fully reported upon.
   The exhaust pipes are of welded sheet steel, and are carried higher than is usual in the C.VI. model (see Fig. 32).

Radiator
   The positions respectively occupied by the radiators of the two models are quite different; though both are in conformity with enemy practice. Reference to the scale drawings will make it clear that the C.V radiator is supported in front of the leading edge of the upper plane on struts clamped to the cabane, while that of the C.VI. occupies the middle part of the centre section and is flush with the curvature. The construction also differs. The vertical (C.V.) radiator is composed of flat vertical films, which are crimped and set "staggered" so that their appearance is similar to that of a honeycomb radiator. The C.V. type has the usual oval section brass tubes running perpendicular to the chord of the wing. Fig. 33 gives a sketch of the earlier radiator, and of its supports. The shutters work on different systems, as will be noticed from the sketches. The vertical shutter of the C.V. machine is of the roller blind type, with cables which operate positively, one to unroll and the other to roll up the blind. This shutter puts out of action approximately one-third of the radiator area. The C.VI. shutter effect is obtained by moving a handle which alters the slope of nine parallel hinged flaps, as illustrated in Fig. 34.

Instruments
   The pilot's cockpit is not provided with a dashboard, but the instruments are distributed chiefly on the left-hand side of the pilot. They comprise the usual Bosch starting magneto and key switch; an oil-pressure gauge calibrated to 4 kg. per sq. cm.; a petrol-pressure gauge to 5 kg. per sq. cm.; a Maximall petrol gauge to the main tank, a grease pump, and throttle and ignition levers of the usual type.
   The observer's cockpits of both machines are provided with circular camera holes in the flooring, and each hole is fitted with an aluminium cover, but these covers are manipulated differently. The aperture of the C.V. machine is about 9 in. in diameter, and the type of cover is clearly shown in Fig. 35. That of the C.VI. model is 12 in. in diameter, and is covered simply by an aluminium sheet which slides in parallel grooves outside the fuselage. The C.VI. biplane was fitted with a complete wireless outfit when captured, but of the internal fittings only the aerial and reel remain, and these m entirely standard. The current was obtained from a dynamo attached to the undercarriage strut, which is still in situ, though its propeller is missing. This dynamo is shown in Fig. 36.
   The fitting shown in Fig. 37 was found on the starboard side of the C.V. machine; and is obviously a release for some light object. Its precise function is unknown. Fig. 38 shows the C.VI. gun ring, and it will be noticed that the padded clip is not in its usual vertical position.

Fabric and Dope
   The usual printed fabric with a design of coloured polygons is used - and nothing regarding fabric or painting calls for comment

Schedule of Principal Weights (C.VI. Type)
   lbs. ozs.
Fuselage, without undercarriage, engine, or centre
   section 440 0
Lower wing, covered complete (no ailerons) 76 12
Upper wing, covered complete (with ailerons) 85 4
Centre section without struts or cable 64 0
Centre section N struts 5 8
Interplane strut, each 3 11
Aileron, covered, each 8 4
Balanced elevator, covered, complete in one piece 14 8
Undercarriage, comprising :-
   2 Vees, bare 29 1
   2 Wheels with tyres 55 8
   2 axle caps, with pins 0 6
   2 shock absorber bobbins 1 4
   2 shock absorber 17 6
   Axle and fairings 23 2 1/2
   Compression tube in front of axle 3 0
   2 bracing wires, with strainers 2 0
   4 ferrules 0 10
Undercarriage, complete 132 5 1/2
Tail skid, bare 4 6
Brass oil tank with 20 ins. copper pipe 9 7
Ammunition magazine (aluminium) 5 0
Exhaust pipe 16 4
Spinner 2 9
Dynamo, without propeller 23 12

   Both of these aeroplanes are at present at the Enemy Aircraft View Room, Islington. Passes may be obtained on application to :- The Controller, Technical Department, Ap.D. (L.), Central House, Kingsway, W.C. 2.

В.Кондратьев - Самолеты первой мировой войны
LVG C-VI ВВС Германии, 1918г.
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
LVG C.VI 1562/18 of Uffz. Friedemayer and Lt. Kuchenthal, unit unknown.
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
LVG C.VI 1563/18, unit unknown. Camouflage appears factory-applied as stencils can be seen over both colors.
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
LVG C.VI 1589/18 of Fl.Abt(A) 286b in the Summer/Fall of 1918. Several of the aircraft bore whimsical markings such as this bird head squeezing out of a beer tankard.
В.Обухович, А.Никифоров - Самолеты Первой Мировой войны
LVG C VI
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
LVG C.VI 3976/18, unit unknown, Summer/Fall 1918.
J.Herris - Development of German Warplanes in WWI /Centennial Perspective/ (1)
LVG C.VI 3976/18 displays a modest black and white fuselage stripe over the standard factory finish.
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
LVG C.VI 4806/18, unit unknown, Summer/Fall 1918. Note the observer's Lewis gun and the vertical exhaust.
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
LVG C.VI 4891/18, unit unknown, Summer/Fall 1918. Fuselage cross is ahead of usual position, and the serial number has been re-applied forward of it sans "LVG C.VI" and year.
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
LVG C.VI 'H', unit unknown.
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
LVG C.VI '2', unit unknown.
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
LVG C.VI with checkerboard marking, unit unknown, Summer/Fall 1918.
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
LVG C.VI of Flieger Abteilung 19. The three-pointed 'Mercedes' star was the unit insignia.
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
LVG C.VI of Flieger Abteilung (A) 278s flown by Vzfw. Joseph Gawlik and Lt. Heckenleitner, downed by Adj. Raymond Vanier of Spa 57 on 19 July 1918.
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
LVG C.VI turned over to the US Air Service postwar. Romoratin Aerodrome.
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
LVG C.VI 48.69 of the postwar Czech Air Service.
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
LVG C.VI 1505/18, 7st Eskadra Lotnicza, Lwow Aerodrome, 1919
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
LVG C.VI, Deutsche Luft-Reederei #30 postwar.
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
LVG C.VI D 148 of the Deutsche Luft Reederei (later Lufthansa). This aircraft was flown by Lothar Freiherr von Richthofen when he flew German-American actress Fern Andra on a flight from Berlin-Hamburg when the fatal July 4, 1922 crash ocurred.
Сайт - Pilots-and-planes /WWW/
Сайт - Pilots-and-planes /WWW/
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
The Shuttleworth's C.VI 7198/18 in a hangar. This aircraft has been retired from flying and is now displayed in the RAF Museum.
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
View of the LVG C.VI in the Belgian Army Museum in Brussels in its original camouflage colors. The stained wood fuselage and camouflage fabric applied to the wings with light rib tapes come through clearly. The wheels are wood to replace the missing originals.
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
Views of the LVG C.VI in the Belgian Army Museum in Brussels in its original camouflage colors. The stained wood fuselage and camouflage fabric applied to the wings with light rib tapes come through clearly. The wheels are wood to replace the missing originals.
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
LVG C.VI Details in Color
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
LVG C.VI Details in Color
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
LVG C.VI Details in Color
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
The LVG C.VI was a more compact design derived from the LVG C.V and powered by a 220 hp Benz Bz.IVa. It was the last LVG combat type to go into production. Photographed during type-testing at Adlershof in February 1918, the obsolete ear radiators were fitted solely to expedite flight tests. (Peter M. Grosz Collection/SDTB)
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J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
Another view of prototype LVG C.VI 14400/17 during type-testing at Adlershof in February 1918. Teves & Braun developed an airfoil radiator for production C.VI aircraft. Elimination of the spinner used on the C.V and its replacement by a rounded nose gave the C.VI a less elegant, more purposeful appearance. (Peter M. Grosz Collection/SDTB)
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
LVG C.VI 1562/18 (works number 4012) wears an unusual camouflage scheme. (Peter M. Grosz Collection/SDTB)
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
Above: LVG C.VI 1562/18 with crew Uffz. Friedemayer and Lt. Kuchenthal. The original fuselage insignia has been reduced in size and the airfoil radiator in the center section is clearly visible.
Below: Close up of the camouflage applied to LVG C.VI 1562/18.
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
Detail of the wing camouflage of LVG C.VI 1562/18.
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
Close up of the camouflage applied to LVG C.VI 1562/18.
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
Close up of the camouflage applied to LVG C.VI work number 4012. This is the fin from LVG C.VI 1562/18.
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
Another photo of LVG C.VI. 1562/18 (works number 4012) of Uffz. Friedemeyer (pilot) and Lt. Kuchenthal, with the bizarre camouflage scheme on the fuselage and both sides of the wings. The visitors in the strange uniforms are Swedish.
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
LVG C.VI 1563/18 (work number 4013) illustrates the LVG-developed integral machine gun ring which produced less drag than the previous LVG gun ring copied from the Scarff-ring. This C.VI has the fuselage camouflaged in two hazy colors - this is seen on other early production C.VI aircraft and it looks remarkably like the camouflage on the C.VIII prototype. (Peter M. Grosz Collection/SDTB)
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
The observer has a rack of flares and the crew of LVG C.VI 1669/18 is ready for their next mission. (Reinhard Zankl)
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
The observer in C.VI 1674/18 is Hptm. Eduard Wimmer, commander of Bavarian Fl. Abt. 48 (FA 48b). He is actually taking on two cages with carrier pigeons (Brieftauben). (Reinhard Zankl)
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
Last-minute instructions are given to the crew of LVG C.VI 1728/18 before its mission. The canister above the radiator condenser indicates a cooling system problem eliminated on later aircraft. The observer has a flare gun and a good supply of flares.(Peter M. Grosz Collection/SDTB)
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
LVG C.VI 3976/18 carries a two-color fuselage band and late 1918 insignia. The unit is unknown. Visible changes from the LVG C.V to C.VI included deletion of the spinner and replacement by a streamlined nose, replacement of the leading edge radiator with centrally-mounted airfoil radiator, elimination of horn-balanced ailerons, an angular cut-out in the upper wing trailing edge, modified cabane structure, and a generally chunkier appearance. The observer's gun ring was also lower and less prominent.
Сайт - Pilots-and-planes /WWW/
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
LVG C.VI 4806/18 at the front with tactical number '6' applied. The observer had a captured Lewis machine gun, and recognition streamers are attached to the lower wing. Production LVG C.VI aircraft had an airfoil radiator in the upper wing center section instead of a leading edge radiator like the C.V. (Peter M. Grosz Collection/SDTB)
Сайт - Pilots-and-planes /WWW/
LVG C.VI 4806/18
Сайт - Pilots-and-planes /WWW/
Сайт - Pilots-and-planes /WWW/
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
Colorfully-marked LVG C.VI 4891/18 of an unidentified unit. The box mounted on the side of the observer's cockpit was a unit modification to hold hand grenades, either the Wurfgranate 15 (throwing grenade) or Iflmaus (infantry mouse, also known as the Fliegermaus), or flares. (Peter M. Grosz Collection/SDTB)
Сайт - Pilots-and-planes /WWW/
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
Light-colored LVG C.VI 7154/18 if photographed at Breslau in 1919; a Halberstadt C.V heads the lineup at left.
Сайт - Pilots-and-planes /WWW/
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
Preserved LVG C.VI 7198/18 at Farnborough is the same aircraft later owned and flown by the Shuttleworth Trust. In the early 1960's it had this weird and inaccurate camouflage scheme, but by 1969 was restored to a very accurate state.
Сайт - Pilots-and-planes /WWW/
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
LVG C.VI 7640/18 from the fifth production batch photographed on the factory airfield.
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
The crew of LVG C.VI 7715/18 (work number 4672) is ready to go. The aircraft may be in postwar communications service. The wheels being uncovered is unusual. It has a JC Spinn and Sohn exhaust stack.
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
LVG C.VI 7766/18 tactical no. 1 on a home visit. (Greg VanWyngarden)
Сайт - Pilots-and-planes /WWW/
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
LVG C.VI 8945/18 at Trier postwar. (Greg VanWyngarden)
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
LVG C.VI 8945/18 photographed in US possession at Trier postwar. A Breguet 14 is in the hangar at far right.
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
LVG C.VI 8945/18 in US hands at Trier postwar. (Greg VanWyngarden)
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
LVG C.VI 8945/18 in US hands at Trier postwar. (Greg VanWyngarden)
J.Herris - Development of German Warplanes in WWI /Centennial Perspective/ (1)
The LVG C.VI was a more compact development of the LVG C.V and offered somewhat better speed and maneuverability as a result. It was powered by the 200-230 hp Benz Bz.IV/IVa engine and saw widespread service until the end of the war.
LVG C.VI 9027/18 (?) work number 4938 photographed at Trier on January 3, 1919. The aircraft had been turned over to American troops in compliance with the Armistice conditions. The photo shows the basic factory finish of stained wood fuselage and wings covered with hexagonal camouflage fabric with light rib tapes.
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
LVG C.VI works number 4938 photographed at Trier postwar. (Charles G. Thomas)
Сайт - Pilots-and-planes /WWW/
LVG C.VI 9027/18 (?) work number 4938 photographed at Trier on January 3, 1919. The photo confirms the scheme and shows the camouflage fabric also covered the tailplane. The photo of the rear of the aircraft confirms the care the design team took to minimize frontal area and thus drag.
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
LVG C.VI 120X4/18 (work number 5105) heads a lineup of LVG C.V and C.VI aircraft thought to be the final wartime production batch from LVG in October 1918. Behind it is a C.V, offering an opportunity to compare nose contours.
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
LVG C.VI with a checkerboard marking and number 12 on the fin. The light rectangle below the cockpit was a Cellon-covered case containing the rigging instructions. (Peter M. Grosz Collection/SDTB)
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
LVG C.VI on a home visit draws an admiring crowd. (Greg VanWyngarden)
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
Well-equipped LVG C.VI with its air crew and ground crew.
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
Franz und Emil with their LVG C.VI XX73/18 of an unknown unit.
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
Partially dismantled LVG C.VI number 5 photographed postwar. It is in American possession, probably at Romorantin. The mud guards on the wheels indicate it was used for training.
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
Unarmed LVG C.VI with engine running. (Greg VanWyngarden)
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
These two LVG C.VI aircraft carry slightly different styles of national insignia on their fuselages. The aircraft in the foreground displays light colored rib tapes over its camouflage fabric on its wings. The aircraft are unarmed and the full 'winter' cowling is fitted to each.
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
LVG C.VI at Trier postwar. (Greg VanWyngarden)
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
A typical LVG C.VI waits for its next flight. The serial is not quite legible against the dark-stained fuselage. The interplane struts are made of wood to conserve steel tube and wrapped with fabric to prevent splintering.
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
LVG C.VI with 'H' marking. The crew and unit are unknown. (Greg VanWyngarden)
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
LVG C.VI observer and gun. (Greg VanWyngarden)
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
LVG C.VI with 'H' marking. This is a detail of the 'H' marking and flare rack. (Greg VanWyngarden)
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
LVG C.VI with 'H' marking. This is a detail of the barograph box. (Greg VanWyngarden)
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
The crew of the LVG C.VI with 'H' marking as shown on the facing page. (Greg VanWyngarden)
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
LVG C.VI fuselage with wings removed.
В.Кондратьев - Самолеты первой мировой войны
LVG C-VI, принадлежавший австрийским ВВС, а ныне - экспонат авиационного музея
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
LVG C.VI of Marine Shusta II. C.VI no. IIN with pilot Rudolf Heimer. (Greg VanWyngarden)
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
This is a U.S. Air Service pilot in a postwar photo of a C.VI in US hands. The airfoil radiator in the center section is clearly seen and the upper wing fabric is torn.
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
Unidentified LVG C.VI with a white 'V' marking on the fin; the unit is unknown. A DFW C.V is in the background.
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
Pristine LVG C.VI. The presence of brick buildings in the background may indicate a factory photograph.
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
LVG C.VI with Meinecke, Fahren and Finzef postwar.
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
An LVG C.VI and aircrew from an unknown unit. A dynamo is attached to the right front undercarriage strut.
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
LVG C.VI of Fl. Abt. 19. The observer standing on the right is Lt.d.R. Hans Weichold; the pilot remains unknown. Just to the left of the pilot's head you can see a white "point". This is the leading point of a three-pointed Mercedes Star, the insignia of Fl. Abt. 19. The white number "4" appears on the fuselage ahead of the cross.
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
LVG C.VI of Fl. Abt. 19, Lt.d.R. Hans Weichold on left. (Greg VanWyngarden)
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
Unidentified LVG C.VI and crew. There is a dark number '2' on the nose. (Greg VanWyngarden)
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
LVG C.VI at Trier postwar. (Greg VanWyngarden)
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
Crew with their LVG C.VI. (Greg VanWyngarden)
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
LVG C.VI postwar with cowling panels removed.
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
LVG C.VI with dark number 2 on the fuselage.
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
Photographs of a captured LVG C.VI arranged into a British recognition poster.
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
LVG C.VI aircraft in Allied custody postwar. The C.VI above is with American officers. The aircraft below was photographed with an American soldier. The C.VI at bottom with American markings was at Romorantin.
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
LVG C.VI aircraft in British custody postwar with British markings applied.
Jane's All The World Aircraft 1919 /Jane's/
Front and three-quarter front views of the L.V.G. biplane. Type C.VI. Note the absence of balanced extension on the ailerons and the different nose-piece.
Jane's All The World Aircraft 1919 /Jane's/
Three-quarter rear view of the L.V.G. biplane. Type C.VI.
Журнал - Flight за 1918 г.
Views of the Type C. VI. L.V.G. Biplane.
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
LVG C.VI hanging in the Belgian Army Museum in Brussels before restoration. Note sliding hatch for the camera.
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
Additional views of the LVG C.VI in the Belgian Army Museum. On this page we see the full cowling above and with the cowling panels removed to see more engine details below. The fixed pilot's gun is visible in this view.
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
Additional views of the LVG C.VI in the Belgian Army Museum. On this page we see another view of the pilot's gun, the entire aircraft above, and the view from the pilot's seat below.
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
Detail views of the restored LVG C.VI in the Shuttleworth Collection. Above is the interior fuselage construction, and below is the undercarriage.
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
Detail views of the restored LVG C.VI in the Shuttleworth Collection. Above is a closeup of the wing with camouflage fabric, and below are engine closeups.
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
Additional view of the LVG C.VI in the Shuttleworth Collection. After restoration this aircraft was flown for a time in displays, the only original WWI German two-seater still flying. This page shows more engine details.
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
Additional view of the LVG C.VI in the Shuttleworth Collection. After restoration this aircraft was flown for a time in displays, the only original WWI German two-seater still flying. Photo shows the engine details and fixed gun for the pilot.
A.Imrie - German Naval Air Service /Arms & Armour/
Kampfgeschwader Sachsenberg's first base was the airship station at Wainoden in Kurland. Equipped with the latest products of the German aviation industry and using Schlachtstaffel tactics, it provided valuable support for the ground forces. Here using the airship shed guidance rails as chocks is a Junkers D I all-metal cantilever single-seater, with an LVG C VI and two Junkers CL I two-seaters in the background.
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt C.V in the hands of French Escadrille 35, postwar. The works number on the rudder is 1376, which may have corresponded to C.3478/18. LVG C.VI W/Nr 4732 is in the background. (Reinhard Zankl).
J.Herris - AEG Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/ (16)
This view of the inside of the Zeppelin hangar in Trier shows AEG J.II 353/18 tactical '7' with its wings still on. A USAS Salmson 2 A2 is at lower left with a Rumpler C.IV in the center, an LVG C.VI behind the AEG J.II, and Fokker D.VII fighters among the aircraft that can be identified.
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
Postwar photo of LVG C.VI airframes awaiting destruction.
J.Herris - Friedrichshafen Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/ (21)
Friedrichshafen 1425/18 in derelict condition postwar. It was ordered as a G.III but completed with the G.IIIa tail. The fuselage insignia have been cut out for souvenirs. An LVG C.VI missing its rudder rests at left.
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
LVG C.VI at the LVG factory at Johannisthal had the block radiator associated with the 230 hp Hiero and may have been the 08.100 test aircraft built for trials for the Austro-Hungarian Luftfahrtruppen. In early 1918 the Austro-Hungarian Luftfahrtruppen planned to purchase 50 LVG C.VI biplanes to ensure the supply of quality reconnaissance aircraft. Built completely of wood, the LVG C.VI was a candidate for license production. On 27 March a 230 hp Hiero was shipped to LVG at Johannisthal for installation in an LVG C.VI; apparently C.VI 3978/18 was used as that aircraft was on a 1919 inventory of Luftfahrtruppen aircraft. Flight tests were completed satisfactorily by 14 April. An order for 50 LVG C.VI aircraft on 27 July was approved subject to a performance comparison with the UFAG C.I and Phonix C.I. The Phonix C.I won the comparison and the order for the LFG C.VI aircraft was cancelled on 31 August.
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
LVG C.VI 7744/18 converted to three-seater (Dreisitzig) civilian use with room for two passengers after the war rests in front of its hangar. The aircraft retains its late 1918 German insignia.
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
LVG-owned LVG C.VI converted to passenger service in front of the LVG factory at Johannisthal postwar.
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
Postwar photo of a civil LVG C.VI with passengers Louis Davids and Margie Morris ready to board.
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
LVG C.VI D478 converted to postwar civil service taking off.
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
Postwar photo of an LVG C.VI on the civil register in flight with one passenger on the rear fuselage.
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
LVG C.VI aircraft converted to passenger service postwar with the German airline Deutsche Luft-Reederei (D.L.R.).
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
LVG C.VI converted to postwar passenger service with the German airline Deutsche Luft-Reederei (D.L.R.) loading mail. (Reinhard Zankl)
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
LVG C.VI 9052/18 (possibly) in the postwar DLR.
J.Herris - AEG Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/ (16)
An AEG J.II is at right in this postwar lineup, with two LVG C.VI aircraft at left.
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
LVG C.VI D-35 Ex C.VI 5071/18 DLR, then to Severa GmbH, next DLH, next to J.Becker photographed at Schwerin. The aircraft is being refueled by hand.
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
LVG C.VI converted to passenger service postwar with the German airline Deutsche Luft-Reederei (D.L.R.).
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
LVG C.VI converted to civil use postwar. The registration number is D18. It was ex 5097/18 and formerly belonged to DLR. Note the Lufthansa symbol on the rudder that is still in use today.
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
LVG C.VI of the Aero Lloyd airline postwar. (Greg VanWyngarden)
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
In the 1920s Raab-Katzenstein built a number of LVG C.VI aircraft. This one was used by Trumpf, the German chocolate manufacturer, for aerial advertising with illuminated underwing letters.
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
Postwar LVG C.VI used for aerial advertising; wing insignia have been painted over, and the work 'Gables' painted under the left wing; the work under the right wing is 'Coral' but is not quite legible.
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
LVG C.VI (in middle) with two Albatros B.II trainers postwar. These aircraft were seized by the Czech authorities for their use but Czech insignia have not yet replaced German insignia. (Zahalka)





C.Owers - Hansa-Brandenburg Aircraft of WWI. Volume 1 - Landplanes /Centennial Perspective/ (17)
Czech B.I biplanes with an LVG C.VI biplane on a muddy field for what appears to be an open day at the airfield. Note the roundel type of national insignia.
C.Owers - Hansa-Brandenburg Aircraft of WWI. Volume 1 - Landplanes /Centennial Perspective/ (17)
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
Postwar Czech airfield with LVG C.VI at right front; Austro-Hungarian Fokker D.VII at left front. (Zahalka)
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
Postwar Czech LVG C.VI aircraft in flight. (Zahalka)
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
LVG C.VI 550/18 photographed after arrival from Lawica to the OSOL Toruri. Fuselage camouflaged with hand painted lozenges, wings with printed dark from the top and light pattern from the bottom. Light yellow tapes at ribs. Note: The red or black painted wheels and legs, also interesting are the Palmer Cord Aero Tyres.
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
Group of pilots photographed at front of the LVG C.VI 550/18 after Virtuti Militari cross (Polish highest military order) decoration. From left: Lance Sergent Jozef Burnagel; Sergeant pilot Waclaw Wanczura; Sergent pilot Franciszek Przybylski; F/O pilot Witold Rutkowski; F/O pilot Stanislaw Jakubowski; F/L pilot Franciszek Jach; (lying) Warrant Officer Pawel Senecki; Sergeant pilot Jozef Zuromski; Warrant Officer Wladyslaw Dittmer; Sergent pilot Wojciech Wieczorek; unk.
LVG C.VI Polish no. 550/18 (German number unknown) named ‘Stefa' (the name is seen painted at nose under the propeller) from OSOL Toruh, photographed with a group of pilots. Note the lozenge camouflage painted on the fuselage. Close inspection of original photographs suggest that colors are similar to the printed lozenge fabric covering. A similar camouflaged aircraft is seen in Latvian Air Force LVG C.VI no. 9014/18 '24'. The swastika at this time was a personal badge and lucky symbol of the flying instructor pilot Wladyslaw Dittmer who had 40 combat sorties from the Warsaw Battle in August 1920 to the end of war with Torunska Eskadra Wywiadowcza. Note: The Lewis machine gun is mounted at the gunner's ring. (Piotr Mrozowski)
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
Pilot Flying Lieutenant Franciszek Jach (at left) freshly decorated with the Virtuti Militari cross, photographed in front of LVG C.VI 550/18 'Stefa' from OSOL Toruh in 1921.
A.Olejko - War Wings Over Galicia 1918-1919 /Aeronaut/
German "trash"... LVG C.VI No. 23 aircraft from the 7th Air Squadron at Lwow Lewandowka - next to it - from the left - Lieutenant Mieczyslaw Garsztka and Second Lieutenant Stanislaw Bylczynski. (TJ. Kopanski, 7th Fighter Squadron of Tadeusza Kosciuszki 1918-1921, Warszawa 2011)
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
LVG C.VI 1505/18 CWL no. 23, from III Air Group, 7th Eskadra Lotnicza, Lewandowka near Lwow airfeld 1919. Standing before aircraft, from left to right: Pilot Lt. Mieczyslaw Garsztka and observer Lt. Kazimierz Swoszowski. Aircraft mounted in CWL from Warsaw/Mokotow airfeld booty. Machine in original German green-violet camouflage on fuselage and wings. Note the characteristic for early CWL painted chessboards with thin red outline and little white circle logo probably CSL (Centralna Skladnica Lotnicza - Central Air Depot Warsaw) painted at nose. The characteristics for Lwow airfield, red-white-red strips painted on the underside of the elevator seen at bottom picture are interesting.
A.Olejko - War Wings Over Galicia 1918-1919 /Aeronaut/
Lewandowka - May 1919... LVG C.VI aircraft armed with a Schwarzlose M 7/12 machine gun on which additional flights over Eastern Galicia were carried out by the crew of Second Lieutenant Mieczyslaw Garsztka and Lieutenant Kazimierz Swoszowski. (collections of Lt. Col. drT. Kopanski)
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
Group of pilots photographed at front of the LVG C.VI 1574/18 during Gen. Konarzewski's inspection of the 12th EW squadron, Kisielewicze near Bobrujsk airfield. Aircraft in original German two-tone violet and green camouflage, characteristic for this production batch.
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
Three aircraft photographed inside the OSOL Toruh hangar. At front LVG C.VI Polish no. 550/18 with hand painted camouflage at fuselage, next LVG C.VI 1505/18 with mount for photo camera at the side of the fuselage and last Breguet XIV B2, Polish no. 10.47 with similar mount at side of the fuselage. (Piotr Mrozowski)
A.Olejko - War Wings Over Galicia 1918-1919 /Aeronaut/
Lwow 6th Flying Squadron... In the winter of 1918/1010, the 6th Flying Squadron was stationed at Lewandowka airport, which was equipped with a variety of several types of aircraft. On the left an LVG C.VI on which Second Lieutenant flew Lieutenant Mieczyslaw Garsztka, Brandenburg C.I visible on the right - various types of chessboard insignia can be noticed, (collections of Lt. Col. Dr.T. Kopanski)
A.Olejko - War Wings Over Galicia 1918-1919 /Aeronaut/
An unusual event... LVG C.VI of Ukrainian aviation - visible marking in the form of tryzubes at the bottom of the lower wing - after landing at Lewandowka airport surrounded by Polish pilots and mechanics. (collection of the Polish Aviation Museum in Krakow)
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
Postwar photos of an LVG C.VI in Latvian service.
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
LVG C.VI in postwar Latvian service undergoes engine testing.
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
Postwar photo of an LVG C.VI serving with the Lithuanian air service.
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
LVG C.VI in postwar Finnish civil service registered L.I.1.
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
LVG C.VI 'S'on skis in Swedish service postwar.
J.Forsgren - Swedish Military Aircraft 1911-1926 /Centennial Perspective/ (68)
During the winters, the pair of LVG C.VI's were usually flown on skis. Via Arlanda Flygsamlingar
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
LVG C.VI number 10 on skis in Swedish service postwar.
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
Additional view of the LVG C.VI '10' on skiis in Swedisch postwar service. The aircraft was modified with a block radiator like those used by Phonix aircraft. This in one of two aircraft bought by the Swedish Navy for training. In 1924 they were sold to Albin Ahrenberg (at left). Ahrenberg used '10' for airshows and passenger flying while using the other aircraft, '9', for spare parts.
А.Александров, Г.Петров - Крылатые пленники России
(КПР 69)
L.Andersson - Soviet Aircraft and Aviation 1917-1941 /Putnam/
Twenty German LVG C VI reconnaissance aircraft were acquired by the RKKVF in 1922 and used by units based at Tashkent and Moscow until replaced in 1924.
Сайт - Pilots-and-planes /WWW/
Сайт - Pilots-and-planes /WWW/
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
LVG C.VI 7712/18 of Bavarian Fl. Abt. (A/ 199b, after a bad landing. (Greg VanWyngarden)
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
After a bad landing, the salvage crew arrives to retrieve LVG C.VI 7712/18 of Bavarian Fl. Abt. (A) 199b. (Greg VanWyngarden)
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
Another view of LVG C.VI 7712/18 of Bavarian Fl. Abt. (A) 199b, after a bad landing. The intact propeller indicates the engine was not running during the landing; was engine failure the source of the accident? (Greg VanWyngarden)
Сайт - Pilots-and-planes /WWW/
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
LVG C.VI of Saxon FA (A) 278 was downed on 19 July 1918; Lt. Heckenleitner, observer, was taken POW; the pilot, Vzfw. Joseph Gawlik, was KIA, dying of his wounds. They were brought down by Adj. Raymond Vanier of SPA 57 at Cuperly. A video was made of the occasion and many screen captures are reproduced here. (Greg VanWyngarden)
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
LVG C.VI of Saxon FA (A) 278 was downed on 19 July 1918; Lt. Heckenleitner, observer, was taken POW; the pilot, Vzfw. Joseph Gawlik, was KIA, dying of his wounds. They were brought down by Adj. Raymond Vanier of SPA 57 at Cuperly. A video was made of the occasion and many screen captures are reproduced here. Adj. Vanier is shown in the lower left photo. (Greg VanWyngarden)
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
LVG C.VI crashed in the snow with the crew inside. (Greg VanWyngarden)
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
LVG C.VI of Marine Shusta II. Crew with crashed C.VI. (Greg VanWyngarden)
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
LVG C.VI derelict after a crash.
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
LVG C.VI with chevron markings that came down in the Netherlands and was interred.
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
LVG C.VI of a postwar Freikorps unit Grenzschutz Allenstein. (Greg VanWyngarden)
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
Postwar a number of countries introduced the LVG C.VI into their air services. Above a Belgian example has crashed. Note the modified leading edge radiator fitted in place of the standard production airfoil radiator.
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
The photo shows a Czechoslovakian LVG C.VI with Czech serial 48.69. It was painted in the Czech camouflage scheme of three colors.
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
LVG C.VI aircraft in postwar Czech service that have experienced landing accidents. (Zahalka)
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
Two views of a postwar Czech LVG C.VI aircraft after a bad landing. The two exhaust manifolds suggest use of a Hiero engine. (Zahalka)
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
Crashed LVG C.VI, 1505/18 from OSOL Torun (Oficerska Szkola Obserwatorow Lotniczych - Air Observers Officers' School). After the war aircraft were repaired in Lawica and received green camouflage plus white stencils. Note the OSOL badge (Eye of Providence) painted on the fuselage. This aircraft was assembled (from parts delivered from Poznan) in CWL Warsaw with CWL no. 23 at this time machine have normal green-violet camouflage and served at the front in 7th EW. (Piotr Mrozowski)
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
Crashed LVG C.VI 1505/18, 25 May, 1921 in OSOL Toruh. The "brave" crew, surrounded by mechanics, survived the crash with slight injuries. The pilot (instructor) wears the combat decorations Gapa - Field Combat Pilot Badge - and Virtuti Militati cross. (Piotr Mrozowski)
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
Captured Ukrainian LVG C.VI P (passenger version) adopted by Polish Aviation. Here photographed after crash in II. Pilots School in Krakow in Autumn 1919. (Piotr Mrozowski)
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
Lothar von Richthofen's fatal crash of LVG C.VI in Deutche Luft-Reederei D148 on 4 July 1922.
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
Журнал - Flight за 1918 г.
Some L.V.G. Constructional Details. - 1. Spar fitting on cabane of the Type C.V. L.V.G.; 2. Lug on spar engaging with fitting in 1; 3. Bottom front spar Joint; 4. Bottom rear spar joint; 5. Wing spar lug on the C.VI. Type; 6. Upper and lower wing sections of C.VI.; 7. C.VI. upper section with RAF. 14 section superimposed.
Журнал - Flight за 1918 г.
L.V.G. Constructional Details. - 8. C.VI. wing spar sections; 9. Front spar section of C.V.; 10. Field repair of broken spar; 11. Aileron crank of C.VI.; 12, Aileron crank of C.V.; 13. Aileron hinge of both types.
Журнал - Flight за 1918 г.
L.V.G. Constructional Details. - 14. C.V. inter-plane strut; 15. C.VI. inter-plane strut socket; 16. Attachment of strut to spar; 17. Attachment of centre section strut to spar on C.VI.; 18. Centre section struts and bulkheads of C.VI.; 19. Bracing tube between rear chassis strut and engine bearer on C.V.
Журнал - Flight за 1918 г.
L.V.G. Constructional Details. - 20. The bulkheads of the C.V. fuselage; 21. Mounting of the tail plane; 22. Stern of fuselage, showing plywood covering and mounting of tail skids; 23. Protection piece for balanced portion of elevator; 24. Tail skids of the two types.
Журнал - Flight за 1918 г.
25 and 26. Undercarriage_details.
Журнал - Flight за 1918 г.
L.V.G. Constructional Details. - 27. Controls of C.V.; 28. Details of C.VI. controls; 29. Aileron pulleys; 30. Rudder bars of the two types; 31. Aluminium strip protectors of bulkheads against oil.
Журнал - Flight за 1918 г.
L.V.G. Constructional Details. - 32. Exhaust pipes of C.VI.; 33. C.V. Radiator supports and radiator; 34, C.VI. radiator shutter; 35. Camera hole and cover of C.V.; 36. Wireless generator mounted on chassis strut of C.VI.; 37. Release gear for unknown object on C.V.; 38. Gun ring of C.VI.
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
LVG C.VI Idflieg Drawing
Jane's All The World Aircraft 1919 /Jane's/
L.V.G. Biplane. Type VI.
Сайт - Pilots-and-planes /WWW/
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
The LVG C.VI from 1497/18 to 1746/18 prod. batch. Trial camouflage reconstruction, April, 2019
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
Most of the LVG C.VI prod, batches was in similar camouflage. Trial camouflage reconstruction, March, 2019
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
LVG C.VI from last war and post war production batches. At this time machines receive different individual camouflage patterns. Trial camouflage reconstruction, April, 2019
Журнал - Flight за 1918 г.
General Arrangement Drawings of the Type C. VI L.V.G. biplane.
В.Кондратьев - Самолеты первой мировой войны
LVG C-VI
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
LVG C.VI
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
LVG C.VI
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
LVG C.VI
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
LVG C.VI