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Halberstadt CL.IV

Страна: Германия

Год: 1918

Light two-seat C type, ground attack and escort

Halberstadt - C.VII/C.VIII - 1918 - Германия<– –>Halberstadt - CLS I - 1918 - Германия


В.Кондратьев Самолеты первой мировой войны


ХАЛЬБЕРШТАДТ CL-IV / HALBERSTADT CL-IV

   Кроме CL-II, выпускался CL-IIa с двигателем повышенной мощности.
В январе 1918-го на его базе был разработан "Хальберштадт" CL-IV с укороченным фюзеляжем, винтом без кока, округлой носовой законцовкой и слегка видоизмененными контурами оперения.
   К началу августа в немецких "шлахтштаффелях" (штурмовых авиаэскадрильях) на западном фронте числилось 175 "Хальберштадтов" CL-IIa и 136 - CL-IV.
   Помимо фирмы-разработчика, CL-IV строили на заводе "Роланд", a C-V выпускали по лицензии на предприятиях фирм Авиатик, BFW и DFW. По окончании войны единичные экземпляры "Хальберштадтов" оказались в Голландии, Эстонии, Польше, на Украине и в Советской России. В 1922 году правительство РСФСР закупило в Германии еще 20 машин.
  
  
ДВИГАТЕЛЬ
  
   BMW, 185 л.с. (CL-IV).
  
  
ВООРУЖЕНИЕ
  
   1-2 синхронных "Шпандау" и 1 турельный "Парабеллум", до 50 кг бомб.


O.Thetford, P.Gray German Aircraft of the First World War (Putnam)


Halberstadt CL IV

   The Halberstadt CL IV was introduced with the vast expansion of the Schlachtstaffeln for the March 1918 offensive to supplement - and eventually supersede - the Halberstadt CL II.
   By this period the Schlastas had become highly organised formations and operated with devastating effect in close support of their own infantry or in breaking up Allied counter-attacks. The effective fighting strength of a Schlasta had not to be less than four aircraft; the actual establishment was six. This number was found to be the maximum for efficient command - or co-ordination - once airborne. They were intended for use only at decisive points of attack, and not squandered singly over the whole front of an attack. Less-important sectors had to dispense with their services. Utmost precision in the time of their attack was necessary. To arrive too soon would draw enemy attention prematurely to the point of the attack; if too late they became a danger to their own advancing troops. Consequently, highly detailed and precise orders were compiled by the German Staff. In attack the prior objective of the "Battle Flights" was to fly ahead of the infantry, straffing, and to keep down the fire of the enemy's infantry and their artillery batteries. Each flight was given a specific target, and there were orders not to abandon this for a more favourable one.
   In defence, as soon as the enemy's preparations indicated an imminent offensive, the Schlastas were ordered in to relentlessly attack and disorganize assembly points in an endeavour to delay or break up the attack. As the infantry battle swayed to and fro the "Battle Flights" were held in readiness until local reserves could be mustered to mount an organised counterattack, to which the air support could be added.
   During the final German onslaught of March 1918 no less than thirty eight Schlachtstaffeln had been formed and were largely equipped with Halberstadt CL II and CL IV aircraft, supplemented by Hannover CL IIIa units. Some twenty-seven of these units were opposed to the British forces.
   Although intended as a replacement for the CL II, the Halberstadt CL IV was not unlike its predecessor in concept, and did not offer much improvement in performance other than in manoeuvrability, which, for the duties required, was a prerequisite quality. The same 160 h.p. Mercedes D III power plant was retained, although the airscrew spinner was omitted, and modified bulbous panels encowled the nose, imparting a more aggressive appearance. As before, the wooden fuselage was ply-skinned and still incorporated the communal cockpit with an elevated gun ring for the observer.
   Horizontal tail surfaces were considerably redesigned, being of greater span and higher aspect ratio than in the CL II. The one-piece elevator was horn balanced, which, together with the shorter fuselage, afforded a much greater degree of fore-and-aft sensitivity and all-round improvement in manoeuvrability.
   The wings were of normal wooden construction as in the CL II, but due to the fuselage being some 3 ft. shorter, it was necessary for them to be repositioned to ensure location of the centre of gravity around the crew compartment. Particular attention was paid to the lower wing/fuselage junction to ensure a smoother airflow over the tail surfaces. No actual fairing was used, but the wing root was washed out, and to achieve this the rear spar had to be both bent and twisted. The upper wing was largely the same as on the earlier machine, with swept outer panels; radiator and gravity fuel tank were located in the starboard and port sides of the centre-section, respectively. The large balanced ailerons were retained at the upper wingtips, operated through torque tubes as before.
   Steel-tube vees of streamline section, with two spreader bars, were employed in the undercarriage chassis and the axle sprung with multiple steel springs. The ash tailskid was hinged to a small underfin, which was added to increase directional stability.
   Provision was made for the mounting of two fixed forward-firing machine-guns, but only one was usually fitted. Anti-personnel grenades in shallow boxes were carried on the fuselage sides, and rows of Very cartridges were often strapped across the rear fuselage decking.
   After the failure of the 1918 offensive when the Allies began to counterattack, the Schlastas came to be used more and more in defensive support of their own infantry instead of in their intended offensive role. Life was indeed very hectic and uncertain in these units and, not being armoured, they had only their manoeuvrability to avoid the small-arms fire to which they were increasingly exposed and to which they so often became victims.
   When not on close-support duties they were used as ordinary two-seat fighters on escort work, and were able to give an extremely good account of themselves when attacked by Allied aircraft. They also found employment towards the end of the war on bright moonlight nights when they attempted to intercept and destroy Allied bombing machines as they returned from their missions. Night sorties against Allied billets and aerodromes were also made. Although these lacked the decisiveness of the daylight attacks, they had a considerable nuisance value and caused many casualties.

TECHNICAL DATA
   Description: Light two-seat C type, ground attack and escort.
   Manufacturers: Halberstadter Flugzeug-Werke G.m.b.H. (Halb.).
   Sub-contractor: Luftfahrzeug Gesellschaft m.b.H. (Rol.).
   Power Plant: One 160 h.p. Mercedes D III 6 cylinder in-line water-cooled engine.
   Dimensions: Span, 10.742 m. (35 ft. 2 7/8 in.). Length, 6.538 m. (21 ft. 5 1/2 in.). Height, 2.67 m. (8 ft. 9 1/8 in.). Area, 27 sq.m. (297 sq.ft.).
   Weights: Empty, 728 kg. (1,602 lb.). Loaded, 1,068 kg. (2,349.6 lb.).
   Performance: Maximum speed, 165 km.hr. (103.12 m.p.h.). Climb, 5,000 m. (16,400 ft.) in 32 min. Duration, 3-3 1/2 hr.
   Armament: One or two fixed Spandau machine-guns forward and one manually operated Parabellum machine-gun in rear cockpit. Anti-personnel grenades and four or five 10 kg. (22 lb.) bombs.


W.Green, G.Swanborough The Complete Book of Fighters


HALBERSTADT CL IV Germany

   Early in 1918, the Halberstadter Flugzeugwerke began work on a higher-performance and more manoeuvrable derivative of the CL II. By February the prototype of this CL IV had arrived at Adlershof for its official type test. Lighter than its predecessor as a result of some structural refinement, the CL IV possessed a similar armament and a 160 hp Mercedes D IIIa engine. It passed its type test during March-April 1918, the official report referring to its ‘‘very favourable climb rate and superlative handling qualities”. Commencing in May 1918, a total of 450 CL IVs was ordered from Halberstadt and a further 250 were ordered from the Luftfahrzeug Gesellschaft (Roland). The CL IV supplemented the CL II in the Schlachtstaffeln, and a total of 136 was recorded at the Front on 31 August 1918, deliveries still being under way when hostilities terminated.

Max speed, 104 mph (168 km/h) at 16,405 ft (5 000 m).
Time to 16,405 ft (5 000 m), 32 min.
Endurance, 325 hrs.
Empty weight, 1,605 lb (728 kg).
Loaded weight, 2,354 lb (1 068 kg).
Span, 35 ft 2 3/4 in (10,74 m).
Length, 21 ft 5 1/2 in (6,54 m).
Height, 8 ft 9 in (2,67m).
Wing area, 311.7 sqft (28,96 m2).


J.Herris Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 1: A-types to C.III (A Centennial Perspective on Great War Airplanes 44)


Halberstadt CL-Type Specifications
Spec \ Type CL.II Prototype CL.II Production CL.IV
Engine 160 hp Mercedes D.III 160 hp Mercedes D.III 170 hp Mercedes D.IIIa
Span, upper 9.40 m 10.77 m 10.70 m
Span, lower 9.40 m 10.65 m 9.98 m
Chord, upper 1.6 m 1.60 m 1.60 m
Chord, lower 1.30 m 1.30 m 1.30 m
Wing Area 24.0 m2 27.5 m2 26.66 m2
Length 7.32 m 7.30 m 6.50 m (later 6.89 m)
Height - - 2.70 m
Weight empty 701 kg 773 kg 700 kg
Weight loaded 1,071 kg 1,133 kg 1,040 kg
Speed 165 km/h 165 km/h 165 km/h
Climb
1,000 minutes - 3.5 4.3
2,000 minutes - - 5.5
3,000 minutes - - 12.7
4,000 minutes - - 22.1
5,000 minutes - 38 30.8
CL.IV(Rol) Empty Wt. 720 kg, Loaded Wt. 1,060 kg.


J.Herris Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters (A Centennial Perspective on Great War Airplanes 45)


Halberstadt CL.IV

  Developed from the highly successful Halberstadt CL.II, the CL.IV had a shorter fuselage and lighter weight due to careful attention to detail design and the reduced fuselage size. Powered by the same 170 hp Mercedes D.IIIa inline engine as used in later production CL.II aircraft, the empty aircraft weighed 161 pounds (73 kg) less than the CL.II. Aerodynamics were improved with better streamlining and a new wing section. The Mercedes D.IIIa was generally referred to as an 160 hp engine like the D.III, but had slightly more power due to its refinements and actually produced 165-170 hp.
  The CL.IV first flew in February 1918. It immediately demonstrated excellent climb and maneuverability. The type test was performed between 5-27 March. The load tests took three weeks because the designer, Karl Theis, had submitted three different sets of wings each with a slightly different structure. The strongest wings were chosen for production.
  In April-May Idflieg assigned the first production order for 150 of the Halberstadt CL.IV. An engine shortage delayed production. In May and June, Idflieg reported that comparative flight trials had demonstrated that the CL.IV was the best aircraft in the CL-category. The CL.IV arrived at the front in June 1918 and was reported as "unsurpassed by any CL-aircraft at the front."
  Pilots did report slight pitch instability due to the shorter fuselage. This made the aircraft tiring to fly and less suitable as a gun platform. Halberstadt engineers solved the problem by adding a frame to the tail section, increasing the fuselage length by about 0.4 m (15.7 inches). This longer fuselage was required for the Roland-built aircraft. However, Idflieg delayed making the change in Halberstadt-built aircraft pending evaluation of front-line reports. It is not known if later Halberstadt-built CL.IV aircraft had the extended fuselage.
  An early-production Roland-built CL.IV was static load tested between July 22 and August 14, 1918. Unfortunately, Roland engineers had 'improved' the wing structure and weakened it. The wings had to be built essentially on the original Halberstadt design. Conditional approval was granted for operational service pending a second load test. These were performed between 11-25 September. Minor structural problems were discovered requiring more strengthening. All Roland-built aircraft were delivered with the longer fuselages. All these changes made the Roland-built aircraft 20 kg heavier than Halberstadt-built aircraft.


Halberstadt CL.IV Production Orders
Date Quantity Serials Notes
May 1918 150 4600-4749/18
June 1918 200 5770-5969/18
July 1918 150 8050-8199/18 Roland
August 1918 200 6439-6589/18 Only aircraft in the 6500-6599/18 range have been seen
August 1918 200 9400-9599/18
November 1918 300 Not known Roland, cancelled
November 1918 100 Not known cancelled
3 prototypes normally ordered, one for flight tests, one for static tests, and one spare.



Afterword: Halberstadts Postwar by Colin Owers

<...>
  Some 13 CL.II and nine CL.IV fighters, together with 18 C.V reconnaissance biplanes were taken into US custody and inspected in Europe, but very few made it back to the USA. An inventory of Enemy Material in the USA of 27 August 1919, lists five Halberstadt C types, five Halberstadt C.V and one Halberstadt (spares). One of these was a CL.II as 6312(/17) that was offered for sale without engine for $250 in the 1920s at an Army sale of unwanted aircraft. This particular CL.II had been found in a Zeppelin hangar at Treves in France in an unserviceable condition.
<...>
  The Estonian Aviation Regiment obtained a number of Halberstadts of different varieties as illustrated. C.V 6905/18 was captured at Narva in 1919 and given the Serial No. 9. This was the C.V that was turned into a floatplane. In 1921 four C.V biplanes, four CL.IV (Rol) were purchased from the German stores at Vamdrup in Denmark.
  Amongst the approximate one hundred German aircraft that Lithuania captured or purchased were the following Halberstadt biplanes as tabulated at right.
  Polish Aviation used more than 20 Halberstadt CL.II, CL.IV, and C.V aircraft, which were found at Lawica/Poznan airfield after the end of WWI. The biggest part were remnants from the German Fliegerersatz-Abteilung 4 Posen and smallest come from Mokotow / Warszawa, ex German Fliegerbeobachterschule Warschau and Albatros-Militar-Wekstatten (REFLA) Warschau. Thirteen Halberstadt CL.IIs and CL.IIAs were refurbished at Poznan (most received new Polish numbers) and two were refurbished at Warsaw/Mokotow. All went to Squadrons at the front or to flying schools. Four Polish Halberstadt CL.IIs were lost during the Polish-Russian war. All Polish Halberstadt CL.IVs came from Lawica (two had Mercedes D.III engines and one (C.5894/18) had a Benz Bz.IV engine) and were used by 2 EW and 14 EW squadrons. One of them was captured and used by Russia, one was lost in Germany after the war (pilot got lost and crashed during a storm). All twelve Polish Halberstadt C.Vs were refurbished at Lawica. Most of them were from BFW production. Most were used during the Polish-Russian war in 2. Eskadra Wielkopolska. One aircraft, C.V C.8843/18, mounted a carrier for four 12.5 kg P.u.W. bombs. At least three Halb. C.Vs were lost during the Polish-Russian war and one fell into Russian hands.
  Soviet Russia used a number of Halberstadt types either captured during the Civil War and following conflicts, or purchased in the 1920s. Halberstadt CL.IV and C.V biplanes are known to have carried the Red star of the Soviets.
  Switzerland purchased Halberstadt C.V (DFW) 4146/18 via the IAACC in January 1920, and entered service with the Swiss air force as Serial 704. This machine was used mainly for high altitude training flights, however the lack of spares caused the Halberstadt to be withdrawn in June 1921 after only about 20 flying hours. It was then scrapped. Three Halberstadts also came onto the Swiss civil register. CH68 was registered as a CL.II but was a modified CL.IV with two-bay wings; two C.V biplanes were CH72 and CH85.
  As mentioned above, none of the Halberstadts that were taken to the USA after the war survived. However, now the National Museum of the USAF and the NASM Smithsonian Museum each display a Halberstadt CL.IV. How this came about is a remarkable story that has to go back to the end of the war when Paul Strahle was demobilized from the German Army Air Service. Credited with 14 victories, Strahle was a competent airman and purchased a number of surplus Halberstadt CL.IV airframes and spares from Hellmuth Hirth, the famous pre-war flyer. The actual number is unknown but included at least four. Luftverkehr Strahle was formed in 1919 and included civil conversion of the CL.IV that had a cabin over the rear cockpit for two passengers while the pilot's cockpit was unaltered. D.71, D.111 and D.144 were registered to the airline. From 1921 to 1923 he flew from Stuttgart to Constance, thence to Nuremberg. With the Depression Strahle performed aerial photography, this business lasting until 1938. D.71 was preserved along with the remaining stock of fuselages, wings, etc., in a barn. D.71 was placed on display in the Daimler-Benz Museum in 1960 until 1995 when it was restored by the staff of the Deutsches Technik Museum (MVT), Berlin. At this time, it was restored to its original colours, having previously been displayed in an inaccurate blue and white colour scheme. After negotiations, in 2004 D.71 was moved to a new museum in Schorndorf dedicated to three local technical pioneers, Strahle being the aviation pioneer.
  In the 1980s Strahle looked to have the aircraft restored. Not being able to raise any interest in Germany the airframes, etc., were purchased by Ken Hyde and Stan Parris and brought to the USA for restoration. They were traded to the USAF Museum for six surplus North American T-28 trainers. The USAF Museum did not have any genuine WWI German aircraft in its collection at this time. An arrangement was reached between the USAF Museum, the NASM and the MVT to restore three airframes. They were shipped to Berlin in 1989. Enough parts of D-IBAOD (formerly D.144), including the fuselage in two parts, enabled the machine to be restored as Strahle's aircraft as used for his photographic flights. This machine is now displayed in the MVT in Berlin. The USAF Museum's example was completed as an aircraft of Schlachtstaffel 21, a unit that had operated against US forces during the Chateau Thierry offensive in France. The Smithsonian's CL.IV was built by Roland under license and the original colors could be determined, including the fact that the serials were painted in light blue and not white as always thought. This machine required more work than the other two but enough material was available to enable a splendid restoration to be carried out.
<...>


Журнал Flight


Flight, December 12, 1918.

THE HALBERSTADT TWO-SEATER TYPE C.L. IV
[Issued By Technical Department (Aircraft Production), Ministry of Munitions]

   THIS machine, which is allotted G/5Bdr./22, landed near Chipilly on August 23rd, 1918. Dates stamped on the main planes give the date of construction as July, 1918.
   It is very similar in design and construction to the C.L. II type, which has already been fully reported upon (see issue of "FLIGHT" for October 10th), but many detail differences are incorporated.
   Below is a comparative list of the principal dimensions of both C.L. II and C.L. IV types :-

   C.L. IV C.L. II
Span of upper plane 35 ft. 2 1/4 in. 35 ft. 3 1/4 in.
Span of lower plane 34 ft. 9 1/4 in. 34 ft. 11 in.
Chord of upper plane 5 ft. 2 5/8 in. 5 ft. 3 1/4 in.
Chord of lower plane 4 ft. 3 1/2 in. 4 ft. 3 1/2 in.
Gap, maximum 4 ft. 4 in. 4 ft. 0 in.
Gap, minimum 4 ft. 0 in. 3 ft. 8 1/2 in.
Dihedral angle of lower plane 2 deg. 2 deg.
Horizontal dihedral of main planes 4 deg. 4 deg.
Total area of main planes 308 sq. ft. 310 sq. ft.
Area of each aileron 12 sq. ft. 12 sq. ft.
Area of aileron balance 2.0 sq. ft. 2.0 sq. ft.
Area of tail planes 16 sq. ft. 13.6 sq. ft.
Area of elevator 13.6 sq. ft. 12.4 sq. ft.
Area of fin 11.4 sq. ft. 6.4 sq. ft.
Area of rudder 7.9 sq. ft. 7.9 sq. ft.
Area of rudder balance 1.0 sq. ft. 1.0 sq. ft.
Horizontal area of body 36 sq. ft. 44 sq. ft.
Vertical area of body 41 sq. ft. 52.8 sq. ft.
Length overall 20 ft. 11 1/2 in. 24 sq. ft. 0 in.
Engine 180 Merc. 180 Merc.
Capacity of petrol tanks 34 galls. 34 galls.
Capacity of oil system 4 galls. 4 galls.
Crew Two Two
Guns One fixed and one movable

Wings
   The wings, both in disposition and construction, are substantially the same as in the former machine. The characteristic wash-out at the root of the lower planes is even more pronounced than was the case in the C.L. II machine. It will be seen from photograph A that the rear spar is bent and twisted by this wash-out. The exact shape of the trailing edge of one of the lower planes is shown in the scale drawings.
   Fig. 1 gives a section of the upper wing drawn to scale, and Fig. 2 a comparison of the upper aerofoil of the C.L. IV with the R.A.F. 14 section, which is dotted. From Fig. 1 it will be noticed that the 3-ply surrounds to the spars are still employed. They are drawn to scale in Fig. 3.
   The ailerons remain unaltered in the C.L. IV machine, and this is also true of the interplane and centre section struts.
   The attachment of upper wings to centre section and of lower wings to fuselage are unaltered, except that the tube which, in the earlier machine, passed right across the fuselage and connected the spars of the port and starboard lower wings is no longer found. Its place is taken by two fuselage fittings of the type shown in Fig. 4.

Fuselage
   Although the fuselage of the C.L. IV machine is very like that of the C.L. II type, the machine now being described has a body which is practically 3 feet shorter than that of the earlier machine.

Tail planes and Skid
   It is in these components that the greatest differences between the two types are found. The tail plane is now in one piece, and is laid across the rear of the fuselage, and attached there by the bolts shown in Fig. 6. The undivided elevator is now balanced, and the aspect ratio of the whole horizontal tail is larger than was the case in the earlier model. Besides this the actual area is greater. (It has been remarked that the C.L. IV body is 3 feet shorter.)
   The fin and rudder were not salved, and comparison is therefore not possible, but it is clear from the fuselage design that the fin is a separate unit simply attached to the body, and not an integral part of it. It is also established that the rudder post is now found in the same vertical plane as the leading edge of the elevator. It will be remembered that the rudder post, in the C.L. II type, was fixed more than a foot forward of the elevator fulcrum.
   The inverted camber of the C.L. II tail plane is now abolished, and a symmetrical camber substituted, and the rather elaborate tail skid of the earlier model has been simplified to the type found in the modern L.V.G. biplanes. In this type the skid is entirely exposed, and is pivoted on the lower edge of a small triangular fin under the tail plane. (See photograph and general arrangement drawings.)

Undercarriage
   The landing gear is substantially the same as in the C.L. II machine, but, as may be seen in Fig. 5, two compression tubes now run parallel to the axle, instead of one, as before.

Fittings
   The gun ring has been additionally stayed in front, but otherwise remains the same. It was fitted with a Parabellum gun.
   Two fixed guns of the Spandau type are arranged for, one each side of the camshaft, but only the one on the starboard side was fitted at the time of capture.
   A ten-loop Very cartridge belt is tacked to the top of the fuselage just behind the cockpit - it may be seen in the photograph - and a total of twelve light hand grenades may be carried in the wooden racks, one of which may be seen on either side of the fuselage.
   The practice of enclosing the control wires in the cockpit is still continued, but aluminium shields are used instead of the more permanent three-ply construction.
   The machine is internally wired, but no wireless apparatus was on board at the time of capture. The dynamo bracket is no longer to be found alongside the engine, but is now on the front port undercarriage strut, and is driven by a propeller.
   The pilot's seat is a shallow three-ply bucket, which rests on two cross pieces of wood supported on ribbed brass strips sweated to the top of the petrol tank, thus providing a fair amount of adjustment. This is the subject of a sketch (Fig. 7).
   The fabric is throughout of the usual colour-printed type.

Schedule of Weights, Halberstadt, C.L. IV.
   lbs. ozs.
Body, with undercarriage, engine,
   Spandau gun, petrol tank, gauges, and
   controls 1220 0
Engine (dry), 180 Mercedes 635 0
Upper wing, complete (no bracing wires) 70 8
Lower wing, complete (with bracing wires) 64 0
Centre section, complete (with struts and
   wiring) 108 8
Gravity petrol tank 11 4
Radiator 36 0
Centre section strut (Vee) 5 3
Centre section strut (straight) 2 4
Interplane strut (front), with cable 4 8
Interplane strut (rear), with cable 4 0
Undercarriage, complete, approximately 112 0
Shock absorber (one) 4 6
Axle, with bobbins and caps 14 8
Wheel, complete with tyre 20 4
Tyre and tube 8 12
Leading spar of wings (per foot run) 1 4
Trailing spar of wings (per foot run) 0 14 1/2
Tail plane and elevator (covered) 25 0

   The aeroplane is in the Enemy Aircraft View Rooms, Islington, and may be seen on production of a pass, to be obtained by writing to :- The Controller, Technical Department, Ap.D. (L.), Central House, Kingsway, W.C. 2 .

J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CL.IV(Rol) 9455/18, III Marine Brigade, tactical '2'
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CL.IV '5' of Schlasta 6
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CL.IV '6' of Schlasta 6
J.Herris - Development of German Warplanes in WWI /Centennial Perspective/ (1)
Halberstadt CL.IV tactical number '6' from Schlasta 6 flown by Lt. Gunther Ludeke and Uffz. Karl Steck, October 1918. Oblt. Jurgen Ludeke commanded Schlasta 6 and the death's head unit marking is derived from the Ludeke brothers' previous service with Braunschweigesches Husaren-Regiment Nr.17, Totenkopf (Death's Head).
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CL.IV, Schlasta 9, tactical '6'
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CL.IV flown by Lt. Ebel of Schlasta 21
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CL.IV, Schlasta 26 tactical '6'. Note: Thin '6' shown; thick numerals also used.
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CL.IV '2' Brunhilde, Schlasta 27
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CL.IV of Marine Brigade
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CL.IV '5' with axe marking
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CL.IV
Сайт - Pilots-and-planes /WWW/
Halberstadt CL.IV
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CL.IV(Rol) 8078/18. Taken over after the war at Bickendorf airport (Butzweilerhof), this aircraft was repainted on the top and sides with PC 10. In the list of planes taken over by the RAF there is a plane with a similar number (8070/18). Everything indicates that the number of this aircraft was read and written incorrectly. The trail ends at the end of 1919.
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CL.IV 525/18 of the 14th Reconnaissance Sqdn., Polish Air Service. On 4 June, 1921 in this plane, Pilot Lt. Stefan Berezowski & Observer Lt. Mieczyslaw Danecki got lost during a storm and landed in German territory in Drezdenko near the Notec River. During the crash the observer was seriously injured and died in hospital two days later. The plane was scrapped.
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CL.IV No.1770 (ex 5893/18), Obojan (Обоянь) airport 1921. This plane belonged to the Polish 2nd Reconnaissance Squadron. On June 26, 1920, Sgt. Pilot Stefan Niewitecki and Lt. observer Jan Zardecki were shot down over enemy territory and taken prisoner (from which they escaped after a few weeks). The damaged airframe was captured by the Soviets and renovated.
J.Herris - Development of German Warplanes in WWI /Centennial Perspective/ (1)
"Хальберштадт" CL-IV, восстановленный до летного состояния (современный снимок)
Restored Halberstadt CL.IV in the spectacular colors of the leader of Schlasta 21 on display at the USAF Museum.
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Restored Halberstadt CL.IV of the commanding officer of Schlachtstaffel 21. This aircraft is in the National Museum of the USAF. The compact design of the Halberstadt CL.IV is evident.
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 1: A-types to C.III /Centennial Perspective/ (44)
Restored Halberstadt CL.IV in the colors of the commanding officer of Schlactstaffel 21 on display at the National Museum of the USAF at Wright-Patterson AFB, Dayton, Ohio.
Сайт - Pilots-and-planes /WWW/
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CL.IV restored in the colors of Lt. Ebele, commander of Schlachstaffel 21, on display at the National Museum of the USAF at Wright-Patterson AFB.
J.Herris - Development of German Warplanes in WWI /Centennial Perspective/ (1)
Cockpit of the restored Halberstadt CL.IV of the USAF Museum shows the proximity of the pilot and gunner for close cooperation during combat. The gunner had an exceptional field of fire.
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CL.IV restored in the colors of Lt. Ebele, commander of Schlachstaffel 21, on display at the National Museum of the USAF at Wright-Patterson AFB.
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CL.IV restored in the colors of Lt. Ebele, commander of Schlachstaffel 21, on display at the National Museum of the USAF at Wright-Patterson AFB.
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CL.IV restored in the colors of Lt. Ebele, commander of Schlachstaffel 21, on display at the National Museum of the USAF at Wright-Patterson AFB.
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CL.IV restored in the colors of Lt. Ebele, commander of Schlachstaffel 21, on display at the National Museum of the USAF at Wright-Patterson AFB.
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CL.IV restored in the colors of Lt. Ebele, commander of Schlachstaffel 21, on display at the National Museum of the USAF at Wright-Patterson AFB.
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CL.IV restored in the colors of Lt. Ebele, commander of Schlachstaffel 21, on display at the National Museum of the USAF at Wright-Patterson AFB.
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CL.IV restored in the colors of Lt. Ebele, commander of Schlachstaffel 21, on display at the National Museum of the USAF at Wright-Patterson AFB. The black and white stripes on the fuselage were the unit markings.
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CL.IV restored in the colors of Lt. Ebele, commander of Schlachstaffel 21, on display at the National Museum of the USAF at Wright-Patterson AFB. The black and white stripes on the fuselage were the unit markings. The white stripes on the tailplane were applied directly over the camouflage fabric; the dark stripes on the upper surface of the tailplane were not black.
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CL.IV restored in the colors of Lt. Ebele, commander of Schlachstaffel 21, on display at the National Museum of the USAF at Wright-Patterson AFB.
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CL.IV(Rol) 8103/18 in the National Air & Space Museum. This aircraft was finished according to Roland factory practice; the serial and data block were applied in bright blue paint.
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Restored Halberstadt CL.IV(Rol) at NASM's Udvar-Hazy facility. The factory finish of this Roland-built aircraft was well documented during its restoration. Roland finished late-production Roland D.VIb aircraft from the 6100-6149/18 and 7500-7549/18 production batches in the same colors.
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CL.IV(Rol) 8103/18 in the National Air & Space Museum. This aircraft was finished according to Roland factory practice; the serial and data block were applied in bright blue paint.
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CL.IV(Rol) 8103/18 in the National Air & Space Museum. This aircraft was finished according to Roland factory practice; the serial and data block were applied in bright blue paint.
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CL.IV(Rol) 8103/18 in the National Air & Space Museum. This aircraft was finished according to Roland factory practice; the serial and data block were applied in light blue paint. Roland finished late-production Roland D.VI fighters in the same colors.
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Two views of Paul Strahle's civilianized D-IBAO on display. (Michael Schmeelke)
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Paul Strahle's restored Halberstadt CLIV(Rol) D-IBAO on display in the museum. The exhaust is nonstandard. (Michael Schmeelke)
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CL.IV prototype on the factory airfield in February 1918. Note the old-style national insignia. The wooden mockup of a Parabellum LMG 14 shows its wide arc of fire. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CL.IV type-test aircraft, probably photographed in March 1918. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Early production Halberstadt CL.IV on the factory airfield on May 1918. The lower wings of the CL.II and CL.IV were very similar but not interchangeable. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
The CL IV derivative of the CL II offered greater manoeuvrability and better performance.
Early production Halberstadt CL.IV on the factory airfield on May 1918. The lower wings of the CL.II and CL.IV were very similar but not interchangeable. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CL.IV 4636/18 Medi, Wnr 1433, with crew. An identification streamer is attached to the lower left wingtip.
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CL.IV(Rol) 8171/18 of the first production series from Roland. The camouflage of this aircraft was that normally applied by the Roland factory, not the same as the Halberstadt factory camouflage. The name and serial number were applied with light blue paint. Most parts were stencilled with the designation Halb CL.IV(Rol). (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Halberstadt Cl.IV was developed from the Cl.II to improve its maneuverability and was the best German two-seat fighter used during the war.
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CL.IV(Rol) 8171/18 of the first production series from Roland. The camouflage of this aircraft was that normally applied by the Roland factory, not the same as the Halberstadt factory camouflage. The name and serial number were applied with light blue paint. Most parts were stencilled with the designation Halb CL.IV(Rol). (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CL.IV(Rol) 8171/181 of the first production series from Roland. In this view the underside of the airfoil radiator can be seen. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CL.IV(Rol) 8176/18 with white nose of postwar Freikorps unit FA 426 at Radziwilliszki, Lithuania in September 1919. The white nose was the unit marking. The man in light colored jacket is Abteilungsfuhrer Oblt. Hellmuth Weinschenck. The remains of this aircraft were captured by Lithuanians on 21.11.1919. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Roland-built Halberstadt CL.IV(Rol) 8197/18 with members of the Polizei Fliegerstaffel Hamburg. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Crewman photographed with Halberstadt CL.IV(Rol) 9411/18. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CL.IV(Rol) 9440/18 from a manual photo showing how the seat pack version of the parachute was attached to the observer. It could also be worn as a back pack. The static line (Zugleine) was tied to the gun ring, (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CL.IV 9455/18 of III Marine Brigade undergoing maintenance, in the field. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CL.IV(Rol) 9455/18 '2' of III Marine Brigade with its crew. The aircraft has sustained damage to the lower port wing that has been repaired. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CLIV(Rol) 9466/18 with unknown crewman. The Roland logo in metal is under the exhaust.
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CLIV(Rol) 9470/18 of the second Roland production batch carries the national insignia on the fuselage without the normal white outline. The Roland logo was a metal plate. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CL.IV probably of Schlachtstaffel 33 photographed on August 10, 1918 with Halberstadt chief engineer Karl Theis. The armament rack holds four Wurfgranaten 15 for ground-attack. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Unarmed Halberstadt CL.IV of the Polizeifliegerstaffel Hamburg in 1919-1920. The Hamburg coat of arms was painted on the fuselage side. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CL.IV at its Schlasta with two mechanics. The rear fuselage and tail are painted in black and white stripes, the Schlasta colors.
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CL.IV '2' of an unknown unit with hammer unit insignia. On the original photo the parachute installation is seen, two metal cables as static lines were used for the crew. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CLIV in French hands in 1919.
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Early Halberstadt CL.IV at Adlershof. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
A Halberstadt CL.IV(Rol) provides the background for this photo of unknown unit personnel. Tenth from the left is pilot Johan Neumann, who from Spring 1919 was in Polish aviation. During the Polish-Russian war he was pilot in the 8th Eskadra Wywiadowcza. His Bristol-Fighter was shot down during strafing Russian cavalry and crashed in enemy territory. He escaped but the gunner was WIA and made PoW.
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CL.IV of the Fliegerabteilung of the III Marine Brigade (Lowenfeld) photographed at Dorsten. The written text on the lower photo refers to "Kapputsch"; no doubt this refers to the "Kapp-Putsch", which dates the photos to mid-March 1920. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Crew in their Halberstadt CL.IV with axe insignia. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CL.IV and crew of an unknown unit with hammer unit insignia. Note Heinecke parachute harness for crew with static lines going under the fuselage. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CL.IV '1' of an unknown unit. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CL.IV of an unknown unit with aircrew and ground crew. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
This aircraft with axe insignia has a propeller-driven electrical generator. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CL.IV and crew of an unknown unit with axe unit insignia shows that the axe insignia was also applied to the underside of the lower wings. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halb CL.IV(Rol) with light painted nose of an unknown unit and unknown personnel. A chevron marking is on the fuselage.
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halb CL.IV(Rol) with light painted nose of an unknown unit and unknown personnel. A chevron marking is on the fuselage.
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CL.IV of the Fliegerabteilung of the III Marine Brigade (Lowenfeld) photographed at Dorsten. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Early Halberstadt CL.IV at Adlershof in mid-1918. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Early Halberstadt CL.IV at Adlershof. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CL.IV of an unknown unit with crew. The printed fabric on the lower wing is unusual. (Reinhard Zankl)
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halb. CL.IV on display in Schlachstaffel 21 colors. (Michael Schmeelke)
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Uffz. August Beckerdorf (gunner, at left) and Vzfw. Binnewald (pilot) of Schlasta 10 at Eppes bei Laon in August 1918 with their Halberstadt CL.IV.
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CL.IV with crewmen of an unknown unit. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CL.IV of Schlasta 26b with painted girl's name Else and its crew.
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CL.IV of Schlasta 26b with its crew. The tactical number '3' is painted with a thick numeral as is '6' behind it.
J.Herris - Development of German Warplanes in WWI /Centennial Perspective/ (1)
Halberstadt lineup of Schlachtstaffel 21. The commanding officer's CL.IV is third from right and is the aircraft depicted in the colors of the restored CL.IV in the National Museum of the USAF. The other CL.II aircraft have their black and white colors reversed; their black stripes are wider than their white stripes. The distinctive markings of the leader's aircraft helped the others maintain formation on it during combat.
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CL.IV '3' and a Halberstadt CL.II of Schlasta 33 and Hannover CL.IIIa aircraft of Schlasta 20. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CL.IV second from left from Schlasta 33 and Hannovers in the background of (probably) Schlasta 20 on August 10,1918. Aircraft at left is a Halberstadt CL.II with another behind the CL.IV. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
C.Owers, J.Herris - Hannover Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/ (46)
Hannover CL.II and Halberstadt aircraft of Schlachtstaffelgruppe D. Note the white tail of the machine in flight.
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 1: A-types to C.III /Centennial Perspective/ (44)
Two views of a Schlachtstaffel 24b lineup with Halberstadt CL.II aircraft in the foreground, a Halberstadt CLIV in the middle, with Hannover CL-types in the background. Documents say that Schlasta machine no. 5 is seen after plywood replacement in the Germania works. Each Halberstadt's early types had trouble with wrinkled plywood, the worst being replaced with new plywood in other factories not necessary Halberstadt. After that process the fuselage was painted in other ways characteristic for this manufacturer's camouflage. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Two different solutions to a similar problem, the armored Junkers J.I at left shares afield with the maneuverable Halberstadt CL.IV at right.
Roland-built Halberstadt CL.IV and Junkers J.I 750/18 belonging to FliegerAbteilung 431, stationed at Breslau/Klein Gandau in 1919. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Unidentified Halberstadt CL.IV flying low during a mission. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CL.IV in flight. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CLIV '4' of an unknown unit being towed by car.
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
The same Halberstadt CL.IV '4' loaded on a train car for return to a repair depot.
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halb CL.IV '6' loaded on a train on to railway cars at the huge American collection center at Romorantin postwar. Some of these Halberstadts were shipped to the USA.
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CL.IV derelicts in a group of aircraft gathered for destruction after the Armistice. The first aircraft in view in both photos is C.IV(Rol) 9433/18. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CL.IV undergoing field maintenance in a tent hangar and the mechanics who are performing it. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CL.IV prototype in February 1918. The simplified nose entry without spinner was a change from the CL.II. There were two machine guns mounted just for pilot; production CL.IV aircraft were normally fitted with one gun due to weight concerns. The speckled camouflage was a Halberstadt standard. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
ON THE BRITISH WESTERN FRONT IN FRANCE. - Winged by Australians on the Western Front. A German bombing and reconnaissance machine brought down by a machine gunner. It reminds us very much of the Halberstadt 2-seater illustrated in our Issue of August 1st.
Australian troops surround a downed Halberstadt CLIV 4675/18 'V' of Schlasta 13. The aircraft was flown by Uffz. Ackenhausen and Flgr. Amzehnhoff. The aircraft was probably downed by ground fire. The rack below the observer's cockpit held six Wurfgranaten 15; these were held by a wire running through their nose caps. The observer could pull the wire to drop a salvo of grenades. Captured on September 23, 1918. This aircraft received the British Serial G/5Bde/22 and was subject of a Ministry of Munitions report. It was sent to Islington for display in the Enemy viewing room. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
A downed Halberstadt CLIV 4675/18 'V' of Schlasta 13. The aircraft was flown by Uffz. Ackenhausen and Flgr. Amzehnhoff. The aircraft was probably downed by ground fire. Captured on September 23, 1918. This aircraft received the British Serial G/5Bde/22 and was subject of a Ministry of Munitions report. It was sent to Islington for display in the Enemy viewing room. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Журнал - Flight за 1918 г.
Rear view of tail and fuselage of Halberstadt C.L. IV.
Журнал - Flight за 1918 г.
Photograph showing internal construction of lower plane of Halberstadt C.L. IV. Notice the pronounced wash-out.
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CL.IV of FliegerAbteilung 432 postwar. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CL.IV postwar with an interesting insignia. (Reinhard Zankl)
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Closeup of the insignia of the postwar Halberstadt CL.IV. (Reinhard Zankl)
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CLIV converted to civilian service postwar. (Michael Schmeelke)
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
This Dutch Halberstadt CL.IV was used on a commercial service - Hengelo-Schiphol-London. Photograph circa August 1920. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CL.IV in Lithuanian service; the pilot was Jurgis Dobkevicius and the passenger was Aleksandras Stulginskis, the president of Lithuania, Aleksotas/Kaunas, 1922. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Dobi-I (at right), design of J. Dobkevicius, next to three Halberstadt CL.IV aircraft of the Lithuanian 1st Air Squadron at Aleksotas/Kaunas, 1922. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Estonian Halberstadt CL.IV with (LtoR) A. Kaat (mechanic); P. Paev (pilot) & G. Michelson (observer). (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CL.IV in postwar Lithuanian service with Belgian or French style marking. (Moshe Bukhman)
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt modified for Swiss civil service postwar and registered as Halberstadt C II CH-68. Although these photos appear to show a C.V aircraft at first glance, it is actually a Halberstadt CL.IV modified with 2-bay wings. Note that the interplane struts are not parallel, but the C.V had parallel interplane struts. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CL.IV possibly work number 1770 in postwar Soviet Russian service. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CL.IV refurbished and in Soviet service in 1921.
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CL.IV postwar with the gun ring removed; the German civil 'D' registration is being applied but the number has not been. The star was used to indicate that the machine was allowed by the inter Allied Control Commission for civil purposes. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Paul Strahle's Halberstadt CL.IV D111 taking off. The work number was 1410. A six-pointed star was applied to the bottom of the lower wing lower wing indicating it was approved for civil use by the IAACC. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CL.IV D144 at a postwar air show. D144 was an aircraft of the Strahle Luftverkehr. (Peter M. Grosz collection/ STDB)
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CL.IV of the postwar Luftverkehr Strahle. This was the initial flight of Strahle's D-71 on 3 January 1921, with the Stuttgart Oberburgermeister (Mayor) Lautenschlager as passenger. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
This civil CL.IV, D.71, was used by Luftverkehr Paul Strahle of Schorndorf from January 1921. Preserved in the Daimler-Benz Museum, Stuggart, In 2005 it was moved to a new museum in Schorndorf. This is the oldest existing German civil airliner. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CL.IV D71 after its restoration by MVT into its original colors. This is the oldest German civil airliner in existence.
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CL.IV D71 after its restoration by MVT into its original colors. This is the oldest German civil airliner in existence.
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CL.IV of the Strahle Luftverkehr on display after restoration as D71.
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CL.IV of the Strahle Luftverkehr on display after restoration as D71.
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CL.IV of the Strahle Luftverkehr during restoration.
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CL.IV of the Strahle Luftverkehr during restoration.
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CL.IV of the Strahle Luftverkehr during restoration.
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CL.IV of the Strahle Luftverkehr during restoration.
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
The unrestored, remnant fuselage of CL.IV (Rol) 8103/18 which was restored from the Strahle collection and that is now beautifully displayed at the NASM at Udvar-Hazy.
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Wing with original camouflage fabric of Halberstadt CL.IV D144 (probably from a Halberstadt CL.II used as a spare part) before it was restored.
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Wing with original camouflage fabric of Halberstadt CL.IV D144 (probably from a Halberstadt CL.II used as a spare part) before it was restored.
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CL.IV '5' after a bad landing. Some discussion is comically taking place.
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CL.IV of FliegerAbteilung 426 crashed by Vzfw. Bachert at Suwalki on 13 April, 1919. The photo shows details of its upper wing center section with radiator offset to the right of centerline and fuel tank at left. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Crashed Halberstadt CL.IV shows its factory finish on the fuselage and tailplane. The notation on the photograph indicates it was taken 30 October, 1918. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Crashed Halberstadt CL.IV 4633/18 from the first production batch.
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Derelict Halb CL.IV from Schlasta 9 postwar.
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Derelict Halb CL.IV from Schlasta 9 postwar.
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CL.IV '61' crashed 29 May 1925 by Ferdinand Alev in Estonian service. (Reinhard Zankl)
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CLIV(Rol) '61' (work no. 4328) crashed in Spring 1925 in Estonian service when it ran into a wall around the airfield at Lasnamagi. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CL.IV(Rol) '59' (work no. 4315) in Estonian service. Purchased from Dansk Luft Express, Sablatnig's subsidiary, at Vamdrup, Denmark, on 5 December 1921. Crashed by pilot Lt. Alev an 29 May 1925. Mechanic Tonishof sustained severe injuries and died in hospital. Written off 2 July 1925. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt wartime advertisement. (Michael Schmeelke)
Журнал - Flight за 1918 г.
Some constructional details of the Halberstadt C.L. IV. - 1. Top plane wing section. 2. Comparison between the section shown in 1 and the R.A.F. 14. 3. The three-ply surrounds to the spars, drawn to scale. 4. Fuselage fitting for bottom plane. 5. Shock absorber and undercarriage cross-tubes. 6. Tail plane attacnmeni. 7. Adjustable mounting of seat.
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CL.IV 1st Production Batch Factory Colors
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CL.IV Roland Production Batch Factory Colors
Jane's All The World Aircraft 1919 /Jane's/
Halberstadt C.4
W.Green, G.Swanborough - The Complete Book of Fighters
O.Thetford, P.Gray - German Aircraft of the First World War /Putnam/
Журнал - Flight за 1918 г.
General arrangement drawings of the Halberstadt C.L. IV.
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CL.IV
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CL.IV
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CL.IV
J.Herris - Halberstadt Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: CL.IV-CLS.I & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (45)
Halberstadt CL.IV