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Gotha LD.6/LD.7/B.I

Страна: Германия

Год: 1915

Gotha - G.I (Gotha-Ursinus) - 1915 - Германия<– –>Gotha - WD.3 - 1915 - Германия


O.Thetford, P.Gray German Aircraft of the First World War (Putnam)


Gotha LD 6a
  The LD 6a appeared in March 1915 and was designed (by Rosner) for long-distance reconnaissance and to carry a small bomb load. Of conventional wood and fabric construction, the LD 6a featured balanced tail in faces but plain ailerons. Engine was the 150 h.p. Benz Bz III, with radiators alongside the front (observer's) cockpit. Data was probably similar to that of LD 7.


Gotha LD 7
Another product of March 1915 was the LD 7 designed (by Burkhard) for standard reconnaissance duties. It was the last machine of the LD series. Engine, 120 h.p. Mercedes D II. Span, 12.4 m. (40 ft. 8 1/4 in.). Length, 8.4 m. (27 ft. 6 3/4 in.). Area, 39.5 sq.m. (467 sq.ft.). Weights: Empty, 725 kg. (1,595 lb.). Loaded, 1,125 kg. (2,475 lb.). Speed, 125 km.h (78.125 m.p.h.). Climb, 800 m. (2,624 ft.) in 8 1/2 min.


J.Herris Gotha Aircraft of WWI (A Centennial Perspective on Great War Airplanes 6)


Gotha LD6

  Construction of the Gotha LD6 began on 17 December 1914. Powered by a 150 hp Benz Bz.III engine, the LD6 was a larger, more powerful aircraft than its predecessors. Unfortunately, Gotha test pilot Oswald Kahnt was killed when the LD6 crashed on its maiden flight on 30 January 1915.
  Undeterred by this setback, Idflieg ordered the modified Gotha LD6a with larger tail surfaces and other improvements in February 1915. Failing to meet the acceptance specifications, the LD6a was assigned to the Herzog Carl Eduard Fliegerschule, where it received school number 70.

Gotha LD6 Specifications
Engine: 150 hp Benz Bz.III


Gotha LD7 (Gotha B.I)

  Designed by Ingenieur Hans Burkhard, Gotha began work on the LD7 on 10 December 1914. Powered by a 100 hp Mercedes, the LD7 was intended as a trainer for the Herzog Carl Eduard Fliegerschule. In May 1915 Idflieg ordered 18 LD7 trainers under the designation Gotha B.I. These were numbered B.960-974/14 and B.884-886/15. Early delivery was a priority, but modifications for observation missions and a switch from the 100 hp to the 120 hp Mercedes substantially delayed production, and the last B.I was not accepted until 11 November 1915.
  Five machines, B.961-965/14, were dispatched to the German Air Service in Turkey via Chernowitz in August-September 1915. The remaining aircraft were used as trainers at FEA 3 in Gotha.

Gotha LD7 / B.I Specifications
Engine: 120 hp Mercedes D.II
Wing:
Span Upper 12.40 m
Span Lower 12.07 m
Area 39.5 m2
General: Length 8.40 m
Height 3.00 m
Empty Weight 725 kg
Loaded Weight 1125 kg
Maximum Speed: 125 km/h
Climb: 800m 8.5 min
2700m 45 min
Range: 530 km

J.Herris - Gotha Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
The ill-fated original LD6 with small fin and rudder. It crashed on its maiden flight, killing test pilot Oswald Kahnt.
J.Herris - Gotha Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Another view of the original LD6 with small fin and rudder that crashed on its first flight.
J.Herris - Gotha Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
J.Herris - Gotha Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
The Gotha LD6a with larger fin and rudder. Only one LD6a was built, and it was assigned to the Herzog Carl Eduard Fliegerschule, where it received school number 70. The engine was a 150 hp Benz Bz.III.
The Gotha LD 6a was a two-seat long-range reconnaissance type in service from March 1915. In common with most operational types of this period it was also employed as a light bomber with the observer dropping small bombs over the side of the aircraft.
J.Herris - Gotha Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Side view of the revised LD6a with larger fin and rudder. It failed to meet the Idflieg acceptance requirements and was assigned to the Herzog Carl Eduard Fliegerschule, where it received school number 70.
J.Herris - Gotha Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
This side view of the Gotha B.I emphasizes the enlarged fin and rudder compared to earlier Gotha types.
J.Herris - Gotha Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Gotha B.I with rhino-horn exhaust that discharged the hot, toxic gases over the wing for benefit of the crew.
Only ten of these 1915 two seat Gotha B Is were produced, just sufficent to equip a single Field Flight Section, although no evidence of their deployment, if ever, has survived. Using a 120hp Mercedes D Ia, the LD-7 to give its design bureau designation, had a top level speed of 77.5mph, with a range of 330 miles.
J.Herris - Gotha Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
The Gotha B.I was a conventional, two-bay biplane powered by a 120 hp Mercedes D.II engine.
J.Herris - Gotha Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
This Gotha B.I is likely in training service at FEA 3 at Gotha. Of the 18 aircraft built, five went to the German Air Service in Turkey and the other 13 were assigned to FEA 3.
J.Herris - Gotha Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
This Gotha B.I is in service at the Gotha Fliegerschule, as indicated by the circular insignia and the lettering below it. The phone number is given for the convenience of anyone finding one of these aircraft force-landed away from the aerodrome. The Gotha B.I in this photograph had a different design exhaust manifold than the one at the bottom of the next page.
J.Herris - Gotha Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
This Gotha B.I and aviator appear to be the same as in the previous photograph.
J.Herris - Gotha Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Gotha B.I B.961/14 is one of five sent to Turkey for use by the German Air Service. Despite being attached to the German Air Service, it carries Turkish markings.