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Sablatnig SF.1/SF.2/SF.5/B.I

Страна: Германия

Год: 1916

Ruth-Rohde - biplane - 1912 - Германия<– –>Sablatnig - C.I/C.II/N.I/P.I - 1917 - Германия


O.Thetford, P.Gray German Aircraft of the First World War (Putnam)


Sablatnig SF 1
   Only a single example of this two-seat seaplane was built, and it was accepted by the Navy in October 1917. Engine, 160 h.p. Mercedes D III. Span, 191 m. (62 ft. 8 1/8 in.). Height, 4.35 m. (14 ft. 3 1/4 in.). Weights: Empty, 1,015 kg. (2,233 lb.). Loaded, 1,650 kg. (3,630 lb.). Speed, 125 km.hr. (78.125 m.p.h.). Climb, 1,000 m. (3,280 ft.) in 10 min. Armament, none.

Sablatnig SF 2
   The Sablatnig SF 2 was a conventional wood and fabric seaplane used for reconnaissance and coastal patrol. A radio transmitter was carried, but no armament. Some twenty-six aircraft were delivered from August 1916 onwards, and were allocated Navy Numbers 580-585, 609-618, 705-714. Nos. 791-800 were built by L.V.G. (Koslin) and were probably SF 2s. Engine, 160 h.p. Mercedes D III. Span, 18.53 m. (60 ft. 9 5/8 in.). Length, 9.525 m. (31 ft. 3 in.). Height, 4.25 m. (13 ft. 11 1/4 in.). Area, 56 sq.m. (605 sq.ft.). Weights: Empty, 1,078 kg. (2,372 lb.). Loaded, 1,697 kg. (3,733 lb.). Speed, 130 km.hr. (81.25 m.p.h.). Climb, 1,500 m. (4,920 ft.) in 18 min. N.B. Data applies to aircraft 609, each batch often differing slightly from each other.

Sablatnig SF 5
   A development of the earlier SF 2, the SF 5 was a conventional reconnaissance seaplane. Radio transmitter only was carried, and no armament. Altogether 101 aircraft of this type were delivered from March 1917 onwards, and it was only lack of sufficient data that prevented the type being dealt with in the main text. Navy Numbers allotted: 791-800 (L.F.G. built), 968-987, 1017-1036 (L.V.G. built), 1214-1223 (L.V.G. built), 1224-1233, 1352-1371, 1459-1468 (L.F.G. built), 1514. Engine, 150 h.p. Benz Bz III. Span, 17.3 m. (56 ft. 9 1/8 in.). Length, 9.6 m . (31 ft. 6 in.). Height, 3.55 m. (11 ft. 7 3/4 in.). Area, 50.5 sq.m. (545 sq.ft.). Weights: Empty, 1,052 kg. (2,314 lb.). Loaded, 1,605 kg. (3,531 lb.). Speed, 148 km.hr. (92.5 m.p.h.). Climb, 1,000 m. (3,280 ft.) in 11.6 min., 2,000 m. (6,560 ft.) in 21.8 min. N.B. Data applies to aircraft No. 1361, each batch often differing slightly from the other.

Sablatnig SF 6 (B I)
   This machine was no more than an SF 5 fitted with an orthodox land undercarriage chassis and was intended for training duty. Only a single aircraft is thought to have been built. Engine, 150 h.p. Benz Bz III. Span, 17.3 m. (56 ft. 9 1/8 in.). Length, 8.3 m. (27 ft. 2 3/4 in.).


J.Herris German Seaplanes of WWI (A Centennial Perspective on Great War Airplanes 15)


Sablatnig SF1

  The Sablatnig SF1 was designed as an unarmed, two-seat reconnaissance floatplane of conventional design and wire-braced, fabric-covered wood construction typical of the time. Powered by a 160 hp Mercedes D.III engine, only one airframe, Marine #490, was built. Delivered to the SVK (SVK - Seeflugzeug-Versuchskommando) on 26 August
1915, tests were satisfactory and it was transferred to Borkum in November. The SF1 flew several operational patrols from Borkum in December.
  On February 3, 1916, the SF1 failed to return from a patrol and no trace of the floatplane was found. Production orders for a modified SF1, the SF2, followed.


Sablatnig SF2
  
  The SF2 was derived from the earlier SF1 by enlarging the vertical tail surfaces for improved directional stability and modifying the wing bracing by deleting a diagonal strut on each side. Like the SF1, the SF2 was an unarmed, two-seat reconnaissance floatplane; however, a radio transmitter was carried, making it a naval category BFT. Powered by the 160 hp Mercedes D.III as was the SF1, the SF2 was slightly lighter and faster than the SF1.
  The SF2 was put into production for the German navy and 36 were produced in the following batches and Marine Numbers:
  First production batch: Marine Nr: 580-585 (6 aircraft)
  Second production batch: Marine Nr: 609-618 (10 aircraft)
  Third production batch: Marine Nr: 705-714 (10 aircraft)
  Fourth production batch: Marine Nr: 791-800 (LVG built) (10 aircraft)
  The first production SF2 floatplanes were delivered between June and September 1916. The SF2 was used both for operational reconnaissance missions and training.


Sablatnig SF5
  
  Based on the modest success of the earlier SF2, the SF5 was developed to replace it in production.
  Like the SF2, the SF5 was an unarmed two-seat reconnaissance floatplane with wireless transmitter, naval category BFT. The SF5 was powered by the 150 hp Benz Bz.III instead of the 160 hp Mercedes D.III used in the SF2, probably because fighter aircraft had priority for the preferred Mercedes. The SF5 also had revised wing bracing; an additional pair of struts bracing the outer wingtips of the upper wing replaced the pylon struts over the outboard bay of interplane struts. This gave the SF5 a sleeker appearance and may have reduced drag. The SF5 also had enlarged vertical tail surfaces. The SF5 was somewhat lighter than the SF2; in light of subsequent experience this lighter structure may have compromised its strength. The final production batch had revised wing bracing to address shortcomings in the original design.
  A total of 91 SF5 floatplanes were built in the following series, with minor differences between them. The LVG machines omitted the wireless transmitter for their role as trainers. The first two LVG series were delivered from summer 1917 through the end of the year.
  Marine Nr: 968-987 [20 airplanes]
  Marine Nr: 1017-1036 (LVG) [20 airplanes]
  Marine Nr: 1214-1223 (LVG) [10 airplanes]
  Marine Nr: 1224-1233, [10 airplanes]
  Marine Nr: 1352-1371 [20 airplanes]
  Marine Nr: 1459-1468 (LVG) [10 airplanes]
  Marine Nr: 1514 [1 airplane]
  The first production batch by Sablatnig was delivered between January and May 1917. The SF5 was not popular with its crews, who had probably expected an improvement over the earlier SF2 but were disappointed. The SF5 had poor speed and climb rate; moreover, it was not especially stable. Some crews asserted that its rated cruising speed of 110 km/h (68 mph) was instead its maximum speed, and "Lame Crow" was reportedly its nickname amongst the crewmen who flew it.


Sablatnig SF6 / B.I
  
  The SF6 land plane, a derivative of the SF5 intended for training, is included here for continuity of the SF series and because it is not in the N-type book. Also known as the Sablatnig B.I, it was powered by the same 150 hp Benz Bz.III as the SF5. As far as is known, only one aircraft was built.
  


Sablatnig SF-Series Specifications
SF1 SF2 (#609-618) SF4 (#900)
Engine 160 hp Mercedes D.III 160 hp Mercedes D.III 150 hp Benz Bz.III
Span 19.1 m 18.53 m 12.0 m
Length - 9.525 m 8.33 m
Wing Area - 56 m2 28.26 m2
Wt. Empty 1,105 kg 1,078 kg 798 kg
Wt. Loaded 1,650 kg 1,697 kg 1,078 kg
Speed 125 km/h 130 km/h 158 km/h
Climb:
1,000 m 10 minutes - 5.5 minutes
1,500 m - 18 minutes -
2,000 m - - 14 minutes
Armament None None 1 Spandau
Notes:
1: SF3 was powered by a 220 hp Benz Bz.IV; no other data available.
2: SF4 #901 (triplane) spanned 9.25 m, was 8.33 m long, and had a wing area of 28.38 m2.


Sablatnig SF-Series Specifications
SF5 (#1361) SF6 SF7 SF8
Engine 150 hp Benz Bz.III 150 hp Benz Bz.III 240 hp Maybach Mb.IV 150 hp Benz Bz.III
Span 17.3 m 17.3 m - 16.0 m
Length 9.6 m 8.3 m - 10.2 m
Wing Area 50.5 m2 - - 54.6 m2
Wt. Empty 1,052 kg - - 1,183 kb
Wt. Loaded 1,605 kg - 2,120 kg 1,574 kg
Speed 148 km/h - 162 km/h 130 km/h
Climb:
1,000 m 11.6 minutes - 8 minutes 14.7 minutes
1,500 m - - - -
2,000 m 21.8 minutes - - 24.8 minutes
3,000 m - - 36 min. -
Armament None None 1 Spandau & 1 Parabellum None

J.Herris - German Seaplanes of WWI /Centennial Perspective/ (15)
Sablatnig SF1 Marine #490
J.Herris - German Seaplanes of WWI /Centennial Perspective/ (15)
Sablatnig SF2 Marine #580
J.Herris - German Seaplanes of WWI /Centennial Perspective/ (15)
Sablatnig SF2 Marine #795
J.Herris - German Seaplanes of WWI /Centennial Perspective/ (15)
Sablatnig SF2 Marine #799
J.Herris - German Seaplanes of WWI /Centennial Perspective/ (15)
Sablatnig SF5 Marine #968
J.Herris - German Seaplanes of WWI /Centennial Perspective/ (15)
Sablatnig SF5 Marine #1021
J.Herris - German Seaplanes of WWI /Centennial Perspective/ (15)
Sablatnig SF5 Marine #1230
J.Herris - German Seaplanes of WWI /Centennial Perspective/ (15)
Sablatnig SF5 Marine #1361
J.Herris - German Seaplanes of WWI /Centennial Perspective/ (15)
Sablatnig SF5 captured and flown by the IRAS
J.Herris - German Seaplanes of WWI /Centennial Perspective/ (15)
This side view of the sole SF1 shows the very streamlined nose and rakish lines to advantage. The engine was a 160 hp Mercedes D.III.
O.Thetford, P.Gray - German Aircraft of the First World War /Putnam/
Sablatnig SF 1
J.Herris - German Seaplanes of WWI /Centennial Perspective/ (15)
The front view of the SF1 emphasizes the care taken in minimizing frontal area for minimum drag. Unfortunately, the myriad of bracing wires added significant drag to the airframe, negating much of the advantage of the streamlining.
J.Herris - German Seaplanes of WWI /Centennial Perspective/ (15)
The rear quarter view of the SF1 emphasizes its streamlined vertical tail surfaces - and the struts bracing it. As a mechanical engineer and pilot Sablatnig understood the need for streamlining but was unable to design a robust structure without excessive drag. In fact, the structural design was inadequate both in strength and aerodynamic cleanliness despite the well-shaped nose, as exemplified in the need for additional bracing struts and wires above the outer interplane struts.
J.Herris - German Seaplanes of WWI /Centennial Perspective/ (15)
This side view of the SF2 Marine #580, the first production SF2, shows the streamlined nose and rakish profile of the SF2 and its enlarged fin, the major change from the SF1. The engine was a 160 hp Mercedes D.III.
A starboard side view of Sablatnig SF 2, serial 580, photographed at Warnemunde on the Germany's Baltic coast. Employed as two seater advanced trainers, 580 was the first of 26 delivered to the German navy between June 1916 and May 1917. The SF 2's power was supplied by a 160hp Mercedes D III, giving the machine a top level speed of 81mph at sea level.
J.Herris - German Seaplanes of WWI /Centennial Perspective/ (15)
J.Herris - German Seaplanes of WWI /Centennial Perspective/ (15)
The first SF2, Marine #580, embodies the streamlined nose and rakish profile typical of early Sablatnig seaplanes, showing that Sablatnig understood the need for streamlining to achieve performance. The SF2 also exhibits the profusion of struts and bracing wires typical of Sablatnig seaplanes, revealing how difficult it was to design a sturdy yet low-drag airframe with the materials and design techniques of the time. Despite Sablatnig's advanced technical training, he was unable to advance the structural and aerodynamic state of the art for seaplanes. The result was the SF series had, at best, average performance and mediocre strength and durability.
J.Herris - German Seaplanes of WWI /Centennial Perspective/ (15)
More views of SF2 Marine #580, the first production SF2. It carries the Marine recognition pennants on the lower wingtips. A Brandenburg GW is in the right background.
J.Herris - German Seaplanes of WWI /Centennial Perspective/ (15)
This view of an SF2, likely Marine #580, depicts the attention taken to minimize frontal area to eliminate drag.
J.Herris - German Seaplanes of WWI /Centennial Perspective/ (15)
Marine #580 at the SVK facility at Warnemunde appears to be the heavily-photographed SF2
J.Herris - German Seaplanes of WWI /Centennial Perspective/ (15)
SF2 Marine #580, the first production SF2, carries the Marine recognition pennants on the lower wingtips.
J.Herris - German Seaplanes of WWI /Centennial Perspective/ (15)
More views of SF2 Marine #580, the first production SF2. Despite the struts and many bracing wires, the wing cellule was not overly robust.
J.Herris - German Seaplanes of WWI /Centennial Perspective/ (15)
More views of SF2 Marine #580, the first production SF2. It carries the Marine recognition pennants on the lower wingtips.
J.Herris - German Seaplanes of WWI /Centennial Perspective/ (15)
M.Schmeelke - "Torpedo Los!" /Aeronaut/
Sablatnig SF2 (612) was part of the Bomben-Flugzeug-Gruppe during a torpedo attack on September 12, 1916 of Courland. (KMF)
SF2 Marine #612 (at left) and another SF2 two-seat reconnaissance seaplanes warm their engines before departing on a patrol over the Baltic Sea, late 1916. Like most seaplanes used for this purpose during the first two years of the war, they carried no defensive armament. The observer occupied the front cockpit and the windmill generator for his WIT equipment can be seen at this location. Machines were operated in pairs so that one could assist the other in the event of engine or any trouble that necessitated a forced landing at sea.
M.Schmeelke - "Torpedo Los!" /Aeronaut/
Sablatnig SF2 (612), flown by Lt. v. Dewitz/Flugmaat Dettmering was severely damaged in rough seas off Courland on September 28. In spite of the damage, Lt. v. Dewitz managed to return to Angernsee. (KMF)
J.Herris - German Seaplanes of WWI /Centennial Perspective/ (15)
SF2 Marine #795 was part of the last SF2 production batch ordered. This batch was built by LVG, which enlarged the vertical tail surfaces for improved directional stability.
J.Herris - German Seaplanes of WWI /Centennial Perspective/ (15)
SF2 Marine #799 was also part of the last SF2 production batch built by LVG. In addition to the enlarged tail featured by LVG-built machines it carried banded camouflage on the fuselage and floats. SF2 floatplanes wore national insignia under the extended tips of the upper wings rather than under the lower wings as commonly done. A number of unarmed SF2 reconnaissance floatplanes were used in reconnaissance support of torpedo bomber attacks in the Baltic.
J.Herris - German Seaplanes of WWI /Centennial Perspective/ (15)
The little-known Sablatnig SF2 was built in small numbers to supplement the Friedrichshafen FF33 and FF49c reconnaissance floatplanes. It was powered by the 160 hp Mercedes D.III. The similar SF5 succeeded it in production and service.
J.Herris - German Seaplanes of WWI /Centennial Perspective/ (15)
SF2 Marine #799 was the next to last SF2 ordered. In addition to its banded camouflage on the fuselage and floats it also carries the Marine identification pennants attached to the lower wingtips.
J.Herris - German Seaplanes of WWI /Centennial Perspective/ (15)
This SF2 is running up its engine prior to flight.
J.Herris - German Seaplanes of WWI /Centennial Perspective/ (15)
Taken at Stralsund in May 1917, this photo shows a group of men attending a photography course. The bracket on the side of the SF2 fuselage is for the wind-driven generator for the wireless transmitter.
J.Herris - German Seaplanes of WWI /Centennial Perspective/ (15)
Kaiserin Augusta-Viktoria inspects an SF2 during her visit to the naval air station at Kiel-Holtenau with Prinz Heinrich. One of the guests was Kapitanleutnant Wolfgang Pluschow, the famous Flieger of Tsingtao.
J.Herris - German Seaplanes of WWI /Centennial Perspective/ (15)
SF2 Marine #612 at SFS Angersee is shown after suffering damage to the floats, struts, and airframe when the starboard landing gear collapsed during landing on September 28, 1916. The floats and struts had been weakened during the takeoff run following a rescue attempt of one of the Torpedostaffel's crew members from damaged Brandenburg GW T4, a twin-engine torpedo floatplane.
J.Herris - German Seaplanes of WWI /Centennial Perspective/ (15)
Tiger-striped Marine Number 968 was the first SF5. The SF5 was closely based on the earlier SF2, although minor structural modifications were made to reduce weight. The most obvious change was the revised wing struts; the overhead bracing of the upper wing was replaced by an additional pair of struts attached to the front, outboard interplane strut. The 160 hp Mercedes used in the SF2 was in great demand for fighters, so the SF5 used the 150 hp Benz Bz.III. The Sablatnigs were not as robust as the Friedrichshafens and did not have as good sea-keeping. Nor did they offer the exceptional performance and maneuverability of the Brandenburg W12 and its successors.
J.Herris - German Seaplanes of WWI /Centennial Perspective/ (15)
SF5 Marine Number 1021, from the second production batch built by LVG, shares duty as a photo background with Friedrichshafen FF33L Marine Number 941 at left. The SF5 wears the standard late-war naval camouflage.
J.Herris - Development of German Warplanes in WWI /Centennial Perspective/ (1)
Sablatnig SF5 seaplanes in operation at the Naval Air Station at Libau.
J.Herris - German Seaplanes of WWI /Centennial Perspective/ (15)
SF5 Marine Number 1230, from the fourth production batch, carried the standard late-war naval camouflage. The large radiator suspended from the upper wing created a lot of drag, as did the legion of struts and bracing wires. The additional pair of struts bracing the outer wingtips on the upper wing replaced the pylon struts over the outer bay of interplane struts used on the SF2, giving the SF5 a cleaner appearance. Aircraft of this type were used for maritime reconnaissance in the Baltic and Flanders.
J.Herris - German Seaplanes of WWI /Centennial Perspective/ (15)
SF5 Marine Number 1230 from the fourth production batch.
J.Herris - German Seaplanes of WWI /Centennial Perspective/ (15)
This SF5 Marine Number 1361 from the sixth production batch illustrates its revised wing and bracing. The wings were now more equal in span than earlier SF5 production aircraft and the cowling more completely encloses the engine. The tail has also been revised and the rudder has been enlarged with an aerodynamic balance.
Форум - Breguet's Aircraft Challenge /WWW/
Sablatnig SF5
J.Herris - German Seaplanes of WWI /Centennial Perspective/ (15)
This SF5 is one of two captured and used by the Russians. Russian cockades are visible under the upper wings.
J.Herris - German Seaplanes of WWI /Centennial Perspective/ (15)
J.Herris - German Seaplanes of WWI /Centennial Perspective/ (15)
The SF6 was a landplane derivative of the SF5 intended for training. Interestingly, standard late-war naval camouflage appears to have been applied, likely due to Sablatnig's familiarity with it and supply of printed fabric.
J.Herris - German Seaplanes of WWI /Centennial Perspective/ (15)
The SF6 was a landplane derivative of the SF5 intended for training. Apparently only one was built.
J.Herris - German Seaplanes of WWI /Centennial Perspective/ (15)
SF5 Marine Number 1019, from the second production batch built by LVG, having a bad day. The standard late-war naval camouflage is clearly seen on the upper surfaces of the wings and floats.
J.Herris - German Seaplanes of WWI /Centennial Perspective/ (15)
The painting The Seahawks by Steve Anderson illustrates an attack by Sablatnig SF5 Marine #1023 on a Russian steamer on August 29, 1917. On that day Oblt. dRMI Hermann Pohrt and Flgmr.d.R. Johannes Jensen, flying from Angersee, spotted two loaded Russian cargo steamers. They attacked the first steamer, about 1,000 tons, with six bombs from about 700 meters altitude. Three hits were seen that caused an explosion and fire amidships. The steamer immediately turned east and lowered a lifeboat with 12-14 crewmen. Several minutes later large portions of the mid and after section of the ship were seen to be burning.
J.Herris - German Seaplanes of WWI /Centennial Perspective/ (15)
Sablatnig SF2 SVK Drawing
J.Herris - German Seaplanes of WWI /Centennial Perspective/ (15)
Sablatnig SF5 SVK Drawing
J.Herris - German Seaplanes of WWI /Centennial Perspective/ (15)
Sablatnig SF5 SVK Drawing
J.Herris - German Seaplanes of WWI /Centennial Perspective/ (15)
Sablatnig SF5 SVK Drawing
J.Herris - German Seaplanes of WWI /Centennial Perspective/ (15)
Sablatnig SF5 SVK Drawing
J.Herris - German Seaplanes of WWI /Centennial Perspective/ (15)
Sablatnig SF5 SVK Drawing
J.Herris - German Seaplanes of WWI /Centennial Perspective/ (15)
Sablatnig SF2
J.Herris - German Seaplanes of WWI /Centennial Perspective/ (15)
Sablatnig SF2
J.Herris - German Seaplanes of WWI /Centennial Perspective/ (15)
Sablatnig SF2
J.Herris - German Seaplanes of WWI /Centennial Perspective/ (15)
Sablatnig SF2
J.Herris - German Seaplanes of WWI /Centennial Perspective/ (15)
Sablatnig SF5
J.Herris - German Seaplanes of WWI /Centennial Perspective/ (15)
Sablatnig SF5
J.Herris - German Seaplanes of WWI /Centennial Perspective/ (15)
Sablatnig SF5