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DFW Taube

Страна: Германия

Год: 1913

DFW - Pfeil Doppeldecker - 1913 - Германия<– –>DFW - B.I - 1914 - Германия


J.Herris DFW Aircraft of WWI (A Centennial Perspective on Great War Airplanes 29)


DFW Tauben

  The DFW Stahltaube (Iron Dove) was one of many derivatives of the Jeannin Taube (Dove) configuration. The DFW Military Taube was another that had its streamlined radiator mounted under the nose. Built in various versions in 1913-1914, these aircraft had a variety of six-cylinder engines like the 100 hp Mercedes. Empty weight was 820 kg.


Журнал Flight


Flight, August 28, 1914.

AIRCRAFT "MADE IN GERMANY"
WHICH MAY BE EMPLOYED AGAINST THE ALLIES.

9. The D.F.W. Taube
  is modelled on the lines of the Etrich Taube, at any rate as far as the shape and bracing of the wings is concerned. In addition to the usual cable bracing running to steel tube pylons above and beneath the fuselage the wings are further strengthened by a girder structure underneath. As these machines are now mostly used for school work, where strength to stand rough usage is of greater importance than low head resistance, this method of construction has much to recommend it, but for actual service they are somewhat slow and cumbersome.
  Inside the rectangular section fuselage are arranged the two seats, in tandem, the pilot occupying the front one. The tail planes are of the usual Taube type, and consist of a horizontal plane, the front part of which is fixed whilst the rear portion acts as an elevator by being flexed up and down. Small rudders and triangular fins are fitted above and below the tail plane. A single central skid carried on four steel tube struts, of which the rear pair form the lower wing bracing pylon, is bent upwards in front to meet the fuselage under the front engine bearer. The wheels are carried on stub axles pivoted on the centre skid, and springing is effected by coil springs on telescopic steel tubes running to the upper longerons of the fuselage. The radiators are mounted on each side of the body. With a 100 h.p. Mercedes engine the D.F.W. Taube develops a speed of about 68 m.p.h.

J.Herris - DFW Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
J.Herris - DFW Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
DFW Stahltaube (Steel Dove) ready for another sortie; it had a 100 hp Mercedes and a simpler undercarriage than most Taube designs. The exhaust pipe was directed downward to exhaust under the fuselage. (Peter M. Bowers Collection/Museum of Flight)
J.Herris - DFW Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
The DFW Stahltaube (Steel Dove) had a 100 hp Mercedes or 95 hp Daimler and a simpler undercarriage than most Taube designs.The exhaust pipe was directed downward to exhaust under the fuselage. (Peter M. Grosz Collection/SDTB)
J.Herris - DFW Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
DFW military Taube with radiator mounted under the engine. This low-drag radiator was unique to DFW Taubes. (Peter M. Bowers Collection/Museum of Flight)
J.Herris - DFW Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
DFW military Taube A.5/14 (DFW works number 84) with streamlined radiator mounted under the engine. The photos were taken in the summer of 1914 right after the pristine aircraft left the factory. (Peter M. Grosz Collection/SDTB)
J.Herris - DFW Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
DFW military Taube A.5/14 (DFW works number 84) with streamlined radiator mounted under the engine. The photos were taken in the summer of 1914 right after the pristine aircraft left the factory. (Peter M. Grosz Collection/SDTB)
J.Herris - DFW Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
DFW military Taube with radiator mounted under the engine. (Peter M. Grosz Collection/SDTB)
J.Herris - DFW Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
This DFW Stahltaube (Steel Dove) was photographed at the DFW factory with DFW Chief Pilot Heinrich Oelerich. (Peter M. Grosz Collection/SDTB)
J.Herris - DFW Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
DFW military Taube with iron cross national insignia. (Peter M. Grosz Collection/SDTB)
J.Herris - DFW Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
This DFW military Taube was photographed at the DFW factory. (Peter M. Grosz Collection/SDTB)
J.Herris - DFW Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Early DFW biplane at right with a Taube at left ready for another sortie early in the fighting. (Peter M. Grosz Collection/SDTB)
J.Herris - DFW Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
DFW trainers at the DFW flying school at Lubeck-Travemunde; a B.I at left with a lineup of Taubes. DFW also owned the Lubeck-Travemunde floatplane production factory; those floatplanes are covered in German Seaplanes of WWI.
J.Herris - DFW Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
DFW В-I на выставке трофейных вооружений в Париже, 1915 год
DFW B.I B.451/14 on display in Paris after being captured; a captured Taube is in the right background. The early national insignia on the rudder and both sides of all wings are well shown from this angle.
J.Herris - DFW Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
This refined DFW Taube with modernized tail design with elevators, rudder, and fixed fin was the next and final step in DFW Taube evolution, but the wings still used warping and not ailerons. The Taube configuration was obsolete. The fin and rudder design was similar to the Mars monoplanes and biplanes. (Peter M. Grosz Collection/SDTB)
J.Herris - DFW Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
J.Herris - DFW Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
In addition to the crashes, there were always taxi accidents, a particular hazard for these early aircraft without brakes. Here a DFW Mars biplane has experienced a close encounter of the worst kind with a Taube.
J.Herris - DFW Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Crash of DFW military Taube A.183/13. Early national insignia are carried. This aircraft was assigned to Flieger Bataillon 1 in March 1913. (Peter M. Grosz Collection/SDTB)