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Lloyd LK I / 40.08

Страна: Австро-Венгрия

Год: 1916

Lloyd - D.I / 40.04 / 40.05 - 1915 - Австро-Венгрия<– –>Lloyd - 40.06 / 40.07 - 1917 - Австро-Венгрия


P.Grosz, G.Haddow, P.Shiemer Austro-Hungarian Army Aircraft of World War One


Lloyd 40.08

  The LFT reacted swiftly to the appearance of the three-engined Caproni bomber in August 1915 by ordering that "the construction of new and more powerful bombers be pushed by all means at hand." Lloyd, Oeffag, and Phonix each received design and construction funds for two prototypes of triplane configuration with a central pilot's nacelle and two outer fuselages. By insisting on such a complex structure, Flars had saddled the manufacturers with engineering and aerodynamic problems that required a degree of design and technical proficiency which none of the firms possessed at that time. Powered by a 12-cylinder engine mounted in a central nacelle and two smaller engines in each side fuselage, the bomber was required to remain aloft on either the center or the outer engines and carry a 200 kg (442 lb) bomb load for a duration of six hours. Two gunners stationed in a large nose turret and two rear gunners provided defensive protection.
  In January 1916, Lloyd, the first company to respond, submitted drawings and specifications for two triplane bombers, known as the Luftkreuzer I and II (Type LK I and LK II - aerial cruiser). Construction of the Lloyd 40.08 (LK I) was well under way in April 1916. To meet the first week of June deadline, overtime and Sunday work was authorized. Furthermore, Flars hoped to speed progress by keeping Oeffag and Phonix abreast of the latest technical information gained by Lloyd. The 40.08 was powered by a centrally-mounted 300 hp Daimler V-12 pusher engine and two 160 hp Daimler tractor engines in the side fuselages. The tail consisted of four rudders mounted between an upper elevator and a lower stabilizer rather haphazardly suspended beneath the outer fuselages by a light tubing framework. Twin tail skids were fitted under the two center rudders. The veneer wings were constructed in typical Lloyd fashion and finished to a high gloss.
  The bomber, completed on 20 June 1916, was rolled out for engine thrust measurement on the Aszod airfield. In a horizontal, take-off position, the 40.08 appears nose-heavy and the center of gravity seems dangerously high. In fact the 40.08 did tip on its nose during ground tests, fortunately causing little damage. To avoid a repeat occurrence, a robust tricycle undercarriage was fitted. The modification work, performed at Aspern, began in July and ended late October 1916 when Oberleutnant Antal Lanyi-Lanczendorfer was assigned the task of performing the maiden flight. There is no direct proof that the 40.08 ever took to the air, although the possibility of a few ground hops can not be discounted. An official German source stated that, with the exception of taxi trials, no flight data was obtained. On 2 November 1916, Flars, reporting "great difficulties in flight testing," planned to cut the weapons load to reduce overall weight. Sporadic development work continued. A Flars recommendation, dated December 1916, to add an "extended tail skid" was approved on 13 February 1917. Flars engineers prepared the appropriate drawings which were also sent to Phonix. A proposal, dated 30 March 1917, to rebuild the 40.08 bomber in order "to gain information to decide the future of the remaining triplane bombers" (Lloyd 40.10, Oeffag 50.04 and Phonix 20.11) was rejected; all work was terminated and the airframes placed in storage. On 17 January 1918, the stripped 40.08 airframe was ordered shipped to the Eger Fliegermaterial-Depot IV for disposal.

Lloyd 40.08 Specifications
Engine: 300 hp Daimler & 2 x 160 hp Daimler
Wing: Span Upper 23.26 m (76.31 ft)
Span Middle 22.38 m (73.42 ft)
Span Lower 16.84 m (55.25 ft)
Chord Upper 2.40 m (7.87 ft)
Chord Middle 2.20 m (7.22 ft)
Chord Lower 2.00 m (6.56 ft)
Dihedral Lower 2 deg
Sweepback 8 deg
Gap Upper 2.1 m (6.89 ft)
Gap Lower 1.75 m (5.74 ft)
Stagger 0.20 m (0.66 ft)
Total Wing Area 110 sq tn (1184 sq ft)
General: Length 9.55 m (31.33 ft)
Height 5.01 m( 16.44 ft)
Loaded Weight 4840 kg (10,672 lb)


Lloyd 40.10

  The Lloyd 40.10 triplane bomber (Type LK II), ordered at the same time as the 40.08, differed in several important respects. By locating the side fuselages below the middle wing, the center of gravity was lowered but at the expense of a reduced field of fire. The center nacelle was simplified and a nose undercarriage was fitted. The general arrangement drawings were completed in January 1916 and construction was approved in February. Assembly of the wing and fuselage, halted in July to await the outcome of the 40.08 tests, was resumed in September and suspended in October 1916 to await airframe modifications with which the Lloyd design bureau was still engaged in January 1917. The 40.10 prototype was never completed. The airframe was shipped to Aspern for storage and on 17 January 1918 sent to the Eger Fliegermaterial-Depot IV for disposal.


E.Hauke, W.Schroeder, B.Totschinger Die Flugzeuge der k.u.k. Luftfahrtruppe und Seeflieger 1914-1918


40. Flugzeuge der Ungarischen Lloyd-Flugzeugfabrik Budapest
40.08 Lloyd Dr G-Typ mit Doppelrumpf 2 x Dm 160, 1 x Dm 300
40.10 Lloyd Dr G-Typ mit Doppelrumpf 2 x Dm 160, 1 x Dm 300

P.Grosz, G.Haddow, P.Shiemer - Austro-Hungarian Army Aircraft of World War One /Flying Machines/
The Lloyd 40.08 tied down for thrust measurement at Aszod in July 1916. The fragile tail skid structure appears incapable of withstanding anything but light landing forces.
E.Hauke, W.Schroeder, B.Totschinger - Die Flugzeuge der k.u.k. Luftfahrtruppe und Seeflieger 1914-1918
The Lloyd 40.08 bomber prototype was inspired by the Italian Caproni bomber; as such it had a similar configuration of two fuselage booms with a tractor-mounted 160 hp Daimler engine at the front of each together with a third engine mounted as a pusher at the back of the central nacelle, this engine being a Daimler V-12 of 300 hp. A triplane wing cellule was chosen for high lift with moderate span. It appeared nose heavy and dangerously high, and in fact did tip on its nose during ground tests. A nosewheel was fitted after this mishap, but as far as is known the 40.08 never flew.
Lloyd 40.08, Budapest, Zusammenbau am Flugfeld, Versuchsflugzeug in Doppelrumpfhauweise mit drei Motoren, Fourniertragflächen
Lloyd 40.08, Будапешт, сборка на аэродроме, экспериментальный самолет двухфюзеляжной конструкции с тремя двигателями, крылья имеют конструкцию Fourniertragflächen (вместо полотна использовались полосы шпона).
P.Grosz, G.Haddow, P.Shiemer - Austro-Hungarian Army Aircraft of World War One /Flying Machines/
The front turret had sufficient room for two gunners with a magnificent view in all directions, an advantage not shared by the pilot.
P.Grosz, G.Haddow, P.Shiemer - Austro-Hungarian Army Aircraft of World War One /Flying Machines/
The Lloyd 40.08 bomber in June 1916. The pilot’s cockpit was located behind a raised nose turret. The lower wing was connected to the center fuselage by a streamlined housing that, judging from the windows, contained the bombardier’s position.
E.Hauke, W.Schroeder, B.Totschinger - Die Flugzeuge der k.u.k. Luftfahrtruppe und Seeflieger 1914-1918
Lloyd 40.08. Frontansicht, fertiggestellt zum Start
Ллойд 08/40 Вид спереди, готовый к запуску
Форум - Breguet's Aircraft Challenge /WWW/
P.Grosz, G.Haddow, P.Shiemer - Austro-Hungarian Army Aircraft of World War One /Flying Machines/
To avoid nose-overs, the Lloyd 40.08 was converted to a tricycle configuration by fitting a four-wheeled nose gear. The robust undercarriage skids mounted behind the main wheels prevented the tail from touching. The fragile tail skids were removed.
P.Grosz, G.Haddow, P.Shiemer - Austro-Hungarian Army Aircraft of World War One /Flying Machines/
The Lloyd 40.08 bomber under construction at Aszod. The side fuselages were adapted from the Lloyd C.II biplane. The raised gun mount was removed for flight tests. The uncovered wings show the internal construction of the veneer-covered wing.
P.Grosz, G.Haddow, P.Shiemer - Austro-Hungarian Army Aircraft of World War One /Flying Machines/
Surprisingly, the Lloyd 40.08 suffered only minor damage once the restraining hawsers were removed for engine taxying trials.
P.Grosz, G.Haddow, P.Shiemer - Austro-Hungarian Army Aircraft of World War One /Flying Machines/
Lloyd 40.08
P.Grosz, G.Haddow, P.Shiemer - Austro-Hungarian Army Aircraft of World War One /Flying Machines/
In the Lloyd 40.10 bomber prototype, the side fuselages were re-located to lower the center of gravity. Construction was virtually complete when the project was stopped in early 1917.