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Hansa-Brandenburg LW

Страна: Германия

Год: 1915

Hansa-Brandenburg - FB - 1915 - Германия<– –>Hansa-Brandenburg - MLD - 1915 - Германия


O.Thetford, P.Gray German Aircraft of the First World War (Putnam)


Brandenburg LW
  Delivered in May 1916, the only LW built (No. 577) was claimed by Heinkel to be the first reconnaissance seaplane to be designed with a defensive gun, which statement is open to grave doubt. The redoubtable Heinkel claimed most of his designs as being the first, the best or the biggest! From the distinctive stagger and inward rake of the interplane struts, it is obvious the machine stemmed from the C I land machine built for Austro-Hungary. Engine, 160 h.p. Mercedes D III. Span, 12.4 m. (40 ft. 8 1/4 in.). Length, 9.5 m. (31 ft. 2 1/8 in.). Area, 42.6 sq.m. (460 sq.ft.). Weights: Empty, 994kg.(2.187lb.). Loaded, 1,555kg.(3,421 lb.). Speed, 130 km.hr. (81.25 m.p.h.). Climb, 1,000 m. (3,280 ft.) in 12 min. Armament, one Parabellum machine-gun.


C.Owers Hansa-Brandenburg Aircraft of WWI Vol.2: Biplane Seaplanes (A Centennial Perspective on Great War Airplanes 18)


Type LW

  The LW equi-span reconnaissance floatplane was constructed for the German Navy in 1915. Only three LW biplanes were built receiving Marine Numbers 477 (CBMG Class), 485 (B Class) and 571 (C Class), and were delivered in August 1916. The LW featured inward sloping interplane struts on its two-bay wings, a feature to be reproduced on many Heinkel designs, and bore a resemblance to the C.I reconnaissance biplane Heinkel designed for Austro-Hungary. This arrangement together with the float bracing struts enabled the first bay to be devoid of bracing cables. Heinkel states that the LW was a more simple machine than the NW in order to allow it to carry a machine gun. The floatplane was equipped with a single Parabellum machine gun with 500 rounds for the observer who sat behind the pilot.
  Although only three were commissioned in the Navy, Heinkel's statement that it served as a "reasonably satisfactory armed seaplane at the front" has elements of truth. LW MN 477 and two floatplanes, NW MNs 487 and 521, of SFA 1 attacked Britain on the night of 19/20 May 1916.(30) The British recorded 59 of the 90 10-kg bombs that the Germans claimed as having been dropped during the raid. NW 521 was attacked near Calais on the return flight but arrived back safely. One person was killed and two injured during the raid.
  LW MN 571, also from Zeebrugge, claimed a Short seaplane in flames and a second one forced to alight as well as driving off a Short Baby (possibly a Sopwith Baby escort) on 1 October 1916, but crashed on the 17th while on a test flight, injuring the crew.(31)

(30) According to Cole and Chessman the raid was carried out by three Friedrichshafen FF33, three Brandenburg NW, and the Gotha Ursinus UWD floatplanes.
(31) This section written mainly from "The Hornets of Zeebrugge," Cross & Cockade, Vol. 11, No.1,1970, PP. 9-12.

Brandenburg LW Specifications
Source Typenschau Gray & Thetford Branden. 3-View*
Dimensions in m
Span, Upper 12.40 12.4 12.400
Span, Lower 12.40 - 12.400
Length, m 9.50 9.5 9.500
Chord, m - - 1.800
Wing Area 42.60 m2 42.6 m2 -
Empty Wt., kg 994 994 994
Loaded Wt., kg 1,555 1,555 1,555
Performance
Speed in km/hr 131 130 -
Time to 1000 m - 12 min 12 min
Motor 160-hp Mercedes 160-hp Mercedes D.III -
* Marine Number 571

A.Imrie - German Naval Air Service /Arms & Armour/
Brandenburg W477, its 160hp Mercedes engine running, is lifted off its railway car by crane and swung out to clear the Zeebrugge Mole prior to being lowered into the water. The observer, who was responsible for the correctness of the lifting shackle, is standing on the edge of his cockpit ready to release the crane's hook when lowering is complete. The Rating (extreme right) walking away with the tail line prevents the aircraft from turning out of wind while suspended from the crane. Containers for fuel, oil and water can be seen on the railway car.
A.Imrie - German Naval Air Service /Arms & Armour/
Brandenburg W477 moving away from Zeebrugge Mole after having been lowered by crane to the water. Depending on the wind speed and direction, sometimes full deflection of the control surfaces was needed in order to 'sail' the seaplane in the desired direction, especially if taxiing downwind, as here. This machine was based at Zeebrugge from September 1915 and took part in several bombing raids against the United Kingdom, usually crewed by Leutnants Rolshoven (pilot) and von Frankenburg (observer).
C.Owers - Hansa-Brandenburg Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2 - Biplane Seaplanes /Centennial Perspective/ (2)
LW Marine Number 571. Note the machine gun mount in the rear cockpit and the slinging cable on the top wing center section.
O.Thetford, P.Gray - German Aircraft of the First World War /Putnam/
Brandenburg LW
C.Owers - Hansa-Brandenburg Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2 - Biplane Seaplanes /Centennial Perspective/ (2)
C.Owers - Hansa-Brandenburg Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2 - Biplane Seaplanes /Centennial Perspective/ (2)
LW MN 571. Note the machine gun mount in the rear cockpit and the slinging cable on the top wing centre section.
C.Owers - Hansa-Brandenburg Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2 - Biplane Seaplanes /Centennial Perspective/ (2)
C.Owers - Hansa-Brandenburg Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2 - Biplane Seaplanes /Centennial Perspective/ (2)
NW 571 leads this line-up of six floatplanes under construction.
C.Owers - Hansa-Brandenburg Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2 - Biplane Seaplanes /Centennial Perspective/ (2)
Brandenburg Type LW Factory Drawing