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Albatros WDD / W.1

Страна: Германия

Год: 1913

Albatros - Wahl - 1913 - Германия<– –>Albatros - B.II - 1914 - Германия


O.Thetford, P.Gray German Aircraft of the First World War (Putnam)


Albatros W 1
  Powered with 150 h.p. Benz III, the W I was basically an unarmed reconnaissance seaplane version of the three-bay Albatros B II land machine.


J.Herris Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Vol.3: Bombers, Seaplanes, J-types (A Centennial Perspective on Great War Airplanes 26)


Albatros WDD & W.1
  
  The Albatros WDD (Wasser Doppeldecker Doppelsitzer; water biplane two-seater) first flew in autumn 1913 and was the naval version of the Albatros biplanes that would be classified as B.I in army service. The WDD was a three-bay biplane with two main floats and a tail float. The first WDD was powered by a 100 hp Argus engine; later versions had the 125 hp Argus or contemporary Mercedes or Benz engines. Early aircraft used brow radiators, but later aircraft used side radiators for cooling.
After some success in the 1913 Bodensee Contest the Navy ordered additional aircraft. These became Marine Numbers 52-56.
MN Type Engine
52 Albatros Benz Bz.III
53 Albatros WDD Mercedes
54 Albatros WDD 200 Argus
55 Albatros WDD Mercedes
56 Albatros WDD Benz Bz.III
  Like many early aircraft, the WDD experienced running changes in production with little or no documentation about these changes surviving. These aircraft differed enough that had they been built later, at a time when designations were more formal and precise, they could have been given different designations. Changes in the vertical tail design and rear float were the most obvious of the changes made; other changes included the engine, radiators, and main floats.
  The WDD and W.1 are covered here in the same section because the W.1 designation was apparently applied retroactively to several developments of the Albatros WDD. Marine Number 52 is an example. Part of the WDD series noted above, it is shown as a W.1 in various references - painted with Marine Number 552, allegedly to deceive Allied intelligence. The other WDD's in the series also were painted with a '5' preceding their actual Marine Number.
  Marine Number 74 was another Albatros seaplane retroactively designated W.1, and others so redesignated are Marine Numbers 111, 221-230, 432, and 446.


Albatros Seaplane Specifications
Type W.1 W.2 W.3 W4 MN747 W4 (948-967) W.5 W.8
Engine 150 hp Benz Bz.III or 160 hp Mercedes D.III 150 hp Benz Bz.III 2x150 hp Benz Bz.III 160 hp Mercedes D.III 160 hp Mercedes D.III 2x150 hp Benz Bz.III 195 hp Benz Bz.IIIb
Span 14.3 m 10.0 m 22.7 m 9.50 m 9.50 m 22.7 m 11.46 m
Length 8.56 m 8.2 m 13.1 m 8.50 m 8.50 m 13.1 m 9.59 m
Wing Area 43.0 m2 31.4 m2 - 31.0 m2 - 100 m2 -
Empty Weight - 935 kg. - 709 kg 784 kg 2,263 kg -
Flying Weight - 1,215 kg - 989 kg 155 km/h 3,665 kg -
Maximum Speed - 176 km/h 133 km/h 155 km/h 160 km/h 133 km/h 150 km/h
Climb to 1,000m - - - - 5.5 min. 20.0 min. 6.5 min.
Climb to 2,000m - - - - 8.5 min. -
Climb to 3,000m - - - - 23 min. - 34 min.
Duration - - - - - 4 hours 3.5 hours
Guns None 1 gun 1 gun 1 gun 2 guns 1 gun 1-2 fixed guns + 1 flexible gun


Albatros W.1-W.8 Seaplane Production
Aircraft Number Built Marine Numbers
Albatros W.1 19 52-56, 74, 111, 221-230, 432, 446
Note: The early Albatros seaplanes are not clearly documented in the SVK tables. The Marine Numbers listed for the W.1 include those originally designated WDD (52-56 & 74) and those potentially W.1 (111, 221-230, 432, 446) with no type specified or specified as K.351 and K.361.


Журнал Flight


Flight, October 9, 1914.

AIRCRAFT "MADE IN GERMANY"
WHICH MAY BE EMPLOYED AGAINST THE ALLIES.

7. The Albatros Tractor Seaplane
  is practically identical with the land machines, with the exception of course that floats are fitted. These, which are of the non-stepped type, are sprung from the chassis struts by rubber shock absorbers which are enclosed in streamlined casings, partly to reduce head resistance and partly in order to protect them against the effect of salt water. The body, which is of rectangular section, is covered with three-ply wood in the same manner as the land machines flown by Thelen at Hendon some time ago. The seats are arranged in tandem, the pilot sitting at the rear, from where he obtains a good view in a downward direction further enhanced by leaving the inner portion of the trailing edge of the lower plane uncovered. In front of him, and protected by a mica wind-screen, is the passenger, situated immediately behind the 160 h.p. Mercedes engine, which is mounted in the nose of the body. Long exhaust pipes carry the exhaust gases away over the side of the body. The weight of the tail planes is taken when the machine is at rest by a peculiarly shaped float mounted underneath the rear portion of the body. The wheels shown in the illustration do not form part of the chassis, but are part of a transport trolley attached to the floats by strong steel straps.

J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Bombers, Seaplanes, J-types /Centennial Perspective/ (3)
This Albatros WDD competed in the 1913 Bodensee contest.
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Bombers, Seaplanes, J-types /Centennial Perspective/ (3)
This Albatros WDD with 120 hp Mercedes and brow radiator with enlarged rudder and fixed fin..
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Bombers, Seaplanes, J-types /Centennial Perspective/ (3)
Albatros WDD with yet another tail design and small national insignia on the fuselage. Side radiators have replaced the brow radiator used on earlier WDDs.
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Bombers, Seaplanes, J-types /Centennial Perspective/ (3)
Albatros W.1 Marine Number 52. WWDs 52-56 were retroactively designated W.1s and their Marine Numbers given a '5' prefix to deceive Allied intelligence. Design of the tail surfaces and floats of the WDD/W.1 were in constant evolution.
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Bombers, Seaplanes, J-types /Centennial Perspective/ (3)
Albatros W.1 Marine Number 55 assigned to the Kiel Naval Air Station.
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Bombers, Seaplanes, J-types /Centennial Perspective/ (3)
Albatros W.1 Marine Number 74 assigned to the Kiel Naval Air Station.
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Bombers, Seaplanes, J-types /Centennial Perspective/ (3)
Albatros W.1 Marine Number 226.
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Bombers, Seaplanes, J-types /Centennial Perspective/ (3)
Albatros W.1 Marine Number 228.
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Bombers, Seaplanes, J-types /Centennial Perspective/ (3)
Side view of the Albatros WDD flown in the 1913 Bodensee Contest shows the rudder shape more clearly. (Peter M. Grosz Collection/SDTB)
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Bombers, Seaplanes, J-types /Centennial Perspective/ (3)
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 1: Early Two-Seaters /Centennial Perspective/ (1)
The Albatros WDD was a floatplane derivative of the DD land plane and is shown here before the war. It had a Mercedes engine and 'brow' radiator.
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Bombers, Seaplanes, J-types /Centennial Perspective/ (3)
The Albatros WDD that competed in the 1913 Bodensee Contest had a smaller rudder than later aircraft.
A.Imrie - German Naval Air Service /Arms & Armour/
Albatros GmbH of Johannisthal were awarded a five-aircraft order, their Avro version being powered by either the 100hp Argus or Mercedes six-cylinder water-cooled engine. Three machines were to be fitted with wireless receiving equipment, and the weight of this plus the necessary 6 metres high aerial mast seen here, had to be carried during the acceptance trials. The contract stipulated that the machine's performance had to equal that of the Avro and that the two aircraft without wireless equipment were to be fitted with dual flying controls.
A.Imrie - German Naval Air Service /Arms & Armour/
Albatros seaplane on the Muggelsee near Berlin. Training new pilots to fly seaplanes was undertaken at Putzig Naval Air Station in West Prussia from October 1914, but eventually the bulk of initial water flying was done in special training sections of the operational air stations, since it was found that it was easier for pupils to appreciate the practical requirements of front-line seaplane handling and thus convert more readily to the operational types of seaplane in a front-line air station environment.
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Bombers, Seaplanes, J-types /Centennial Perspective/ (3)
Early Albatros WDD with brow radiator. (Peter M. Grosz Collection/SDTB)
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Bombers, Seaplanes, J-types /Centennial Perspective/ (3)
Originally known as the Albatros WDD (for Wasser Doppeldecker Doppelsitzer, water biplane two-seater), the WDD and its modifications were retroactively designated Albatros W.1. The WDD first flew in the autumn of 1913.
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Bombers, Seaplanes, J-types /Centennial Perspective/ (3)
This photo shows the next evolution of the Albatros WDD design with a revised rudder shape and larger tail float.
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Bombers, Seaplanes, J-types /Centennial Perspective/ (3)
This photo shows the next evolution of the Albatros WDD design with a revised rudder shape and larger tail float. The seaplane below carries an early national insignia. (Peter M. Grosz Collection/SDTB)
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Bombers, Seaplanes, J-types /Centennial Perspective/ (3)
This Albatros W.1 is seen just after take-off; it has no tail float but does have a leading edge radiator and carries national insignia and a naval pennant. (Peter M. Grosz Collection/SDTB)
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Bombers, Seaplanes, J-types /Centennial Perspective/ (3)
Early Albatros WDD Marine Number 20. (Peter M. Grosz Collection/SDTB)
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Bombers, Seaplanes, J-types /Centennial Perspective/ (3)
This Albatros WDD with enlarged tail surfaces and tail float retains the brow radiator. (Peter M. Grosz Collection/SDTB)
Журнал - Flight за 1914 г.
7. The New Albatros Tractor seaplane.
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Bombers, Seaplanes, J-types /Centennial Perspective/ (3)
Closeup of an Albatros W.1. (Peter M. Grosz Collection/SDTB)
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Bombers, Seaplanes, J-types /Centennial Perspective/ (3)
Later production Albatros WDD with side radiators and enlarged tail surfaces with horn-balanced rudder and tail float.
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Bombers, Seaplanes, J-types /Centennial Perspective/ (3)
Albatros WDD with side radiators and enlarged tail surfaces and tail float but no horn balance on rudder.
O.Thetford, P.Gray - German Aircraft of the First World War /Putnam/
Albatros W 1
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Bombers, Seaplanes, J-types /Centennial Perspective/ (3)
Marine Number 552 is a confusing aircraft. MN552 is identified as a Brandenburg built by Danzig in the list of marine numbers but is actually Albatros W.1 Marine Number 52. The Marine Numbers of Albatros W.1/WDD 52-56 were apparently prefixed with a '5' when painted to confuse Allied intelligence. However that worked, it did serve to confuse the author for a time! The W.1 has a redesigned tail compared to the WDD; the rudder was enlarged and the tail float was eliminated.
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Bombers, Seaplanes, J-types /Centennial Perspective/ (3)
Another view of Marine Number 552, identified as a Brandenburg built by Danzig in the list of marine numbers.
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Bombers, Seaplanes, J-types /Centennial Perspective/ (3)
This appears to be a front view of W.1 Marine Number 552. It has 3-bays of struts, is in similar pose as the other two photos, and has the navy ID pennants. The gravity tank under the upper wing is also present in all photos.
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Bombers, Seaplanes, J-types /Centennial Perspective/ (3)
Beached Albatros W.1.
A.Imrie - German Naval Air Service /Arms & Armour/
Despite the inscription on this contemporary postcard and the use of a Rumpler rudder, 'Kiel 55' was an early Albatros seaplane, and is shown being towed after retrieval in the Baltic. The crew have carried out the laid-down survival drill well. They have chopped off the outer wing panels to prevent them becoming waterlogged, thus reducing the risk of capsizing; and to 'lighten ship', heavy components from the engine have been detached and dumped overboard. This procedure enabled twin-float seaplanes to remain afloat for long periods in sea conditions well in excess of their seaworthiness rating. Many crews were saved as a result.
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Bombers, Seaplanes, J-types /Centennial Perspective/ (3)
Albatros W.1 Marine Number 55 was assigned to the Kiel naval air station. It has side radiators and tail float and the main floats are of revised design. The wings have been roughly cropped; likely as a result of a forced landing at sea with the crew chopping off the outer wings to make the aircraft more stable on the water while awaiting rescue. (Peter M. Grosz Collection/SDTB)
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Bombers, Seaplanes, J-types /Centennial Perspective/ (3)
Albatros W.1 Marine Number 74 was assigned to the Kiel naval air station. It has side radiators and tail float although the main floats are of revised design. It carries 1918 national insignia on its rudder and a naval pennant. (Peter M. Grosz Collection/SDTB)
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Bombers, Seaplanes, J-types /Centennial Perspective/ (3)
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Bombers, Seaplanes, J-types /Centennial Perspective/ (3)
Albatros W.1 Marine Number 74 was assigned to the Kiel naval air station. It has side radiators and tail float and the main floats are of original design. It carries 1918 national insignia on its rudder and naval pennants. The engine exhaust manifolds and float design differ from those shown on the facing page on this same aircraft. (Peter M. Grosz Collection/SDTB)
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Bombers, Seaplanes, J-types /Centennial Perspective/ (3)
This Albatros W.1 in its hangar has a later design of enlarged vertical tail surfaces without tail float. (Peter M. Bowers Collection/Museum of Flight)
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Bombers, Seaplanes, J-types /Centennial Perspective/ (3)
Albatros W.1 Marine Number 228 illustrate the final configuration of the Albatros W.1 with enlarged tail surfaces and no tail float. (Peter M. Grosz Collection/SDTB)
K.Delve - World War One in the Air /Crowood/
Albatros Type В at Wilhelmshafen in service with II. Seeflieger Abteilung, probably 1915. The German seaplanes were aggressively operated over the North Sea and carried out a wide range of roles, frequently in conjunction with either submarine or surface vessel operations.
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Bombers, Seaplanes, J-types /Centennial Perspective/ (3)
Albatros W.1 Marine Number 229 illustrate the final configuration of the Albatros W.1 with enlarged tail surfaces and no tail float. (Peter M. Grosz Collection/SDTB)
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Bombers, Seaplanes, J-types /Centennial Perspective/ (3)
Albatros W.1 Marine Number 229 being brought ashore after a flight. (Peter M. Grosz Collection/SDTB)
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Bombers, Seaplanes, J-types /Centennial Perspective/ (3)
Albatros W.1 Marine Number 230 afloat before a flight. (Peter M. Grosz Collection/SDTB)
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Bombers, Seaplanes, J-types /Centennial Perspective/ (3)
Late production Albatros W.1 taking off.
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Bombers, Seaplanes, J-types /Centennial Perspective/ (3)
Late production Albatros W.1 ready for take-off. (Peter M. Bowers Collection/Museum of Flight)
A.Imrie - German Naval Air Service /Arms & Armour/
Mobilization seaplanes on the ramp at Kiel-Holtenau in August 1914. Aircraft identified in this early wartime photograph include: Rumpler 4B11 (150hp Benz) from Warnemunde, Sopwith Bat-Boat 44 (which was never used operationally but merely for short local flights), Friedrichshafen FF19 23 and Albatros B I on floats, which was another machine taken over on the outbreak of war at Warnemunde. All aircraft are carrying red streamers from the bottom wings near the tips for identification purposes and are marked with the Iron Cross type of national insignia.
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Bombers, Seaplanes, J-types /Centennial Perspective/ (3)
Albatros W.1 Marine Number 223 being hoisted out of the water after an accident. (Peter M. Grosz Collection/SDTB)
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Bombers, Seaplanes, J-types /Centennial Perspective/ (3)
Albatros W.1 Marine Number 226 appears to be a total loss. Marine Number 512 in the background is a Brandenburg FB. (Peter M. Grosz Collection/SDTB)
Журнал - Flight за 1915 г.
FUSELAGE ECONOMY. - Four members of the Albatros family, all of which are fitted with the same size fuselage. In this manner three different types of land machines can be provided simply by substituting wings of various sizes, whilst the larger size machine is turned into a seaplane by fitting floats instead of the usual undercarriage.