Самолеты (сортировка по:)
Страна Конструктор Название Год Фото Текст

AEG N.I / C.IV N

Страна: Германия

Год: 1917

AEG - J.I / J.II - 1917 - Германия<– –>AEG - DJ I - 1918 - Германия


В.Кондратьев Самолеты первой мировой войны


C-IVN - легкий ночной бомбардировщик, трехстоечный биплан (размах крыльев увеличен на одну секцию). Двигатель "Бенц", 150 л.с. Самолет считался одним из лучших в своем классе.
Бомбовая нагрузка C-IVN - до 300 кг, синхронный пулемет не устанавливался.
  
  
ЛЕТНО-ТЕХНИЧЕСКИЕ ХАРАКТЕРИСТИКИ
  
   C-IVN
  Размах, м 15,30
  Длина, м 7,30
  Площадь крыла, кв.м 44,50
  Сухой вес, кг 820
  Взлетный вес, кг 1400
  Скорость максимальная, км/ч 143
  Время набора высоты, м/мин 3000/50
  Потолок, м 3900


O.Thetford, P.Gray German Aircraft of the First World War (Putnam)


A.E.G. C IV N
  The C IV N was produced as a night bomber in 1917. It was basically a C IV airframe with longer-span wings of three-bay format. Only one built. Engine, 150 h.p. Benz Bz III. Span, 15.3 m. (50 ft. 2 3/8 in.). Length, 7.3 m. (23 ft. 11 3/8 in.). Height, 3.3 m. (10 ft. 9 7/8 in.). Weights: Empty, 880 kg. (1,936 lb.). Loaded, 1,400 kg. (3,080 lb.). Speed, 143 km.hr. (89.4 m.p.h.). Climb, 3,000 m. (9.840 ft.) in 50 min. Duration, ca. 4 hours.

A.E.G. N I
  This type was used as civil aircraft after the war, in which guise it is shown here. Engine, 150 h.p. Benz (200 h.p. Benz, civil). Span, 15.30 m. (50 ft. 2 1/2 ins.). Length, 7.30 m. (23 ft. 10 3/4 in.). Height, 3.30 m. (10 ft. 9 1/2 in.). Weights: Empty, 880 kg. (1,936 lb.). Loaded, 1,400kg. (3,050 lb.). Ceiling, 4,000 m. (13,120 ft.). Duration, 4 hr. Speed, 143 km.hr.


J.Herris Development of German Warplanes in WWI (A Centennial Perspective on Great War Airplanes 1)


N-Types: Single-Engine Night Bombers

  Standard C-types were used throughout the war for light bombing both during the day and at night. However, resource-starved Germany wanted aircraft that could carry a heavier bomb load at night while using a less powerful engine that used less fuel. The desire for a single-engine night bomber of greater bomb load than standard C-types led to new designs and yet another category of two-seat warplane, the N-type, or Nachtflugzeug (night aircraft).
  A number of manufacturers submitted designs to this requirement, but only two reached production and operational service. First and most numerous was AEG. The AEG N.I was yet another design derived from its standard C.IV reconnaissance plane. The wingspan was extended for greater lifting capacity for the heavier bomb load desired, and the C.IV's 160 hp Mercedes D.III engine, which was in great demand for fighter production, was replaced with the less popular 150 hp Benz Bz.III. The longer-span wing failed repeated load tests due to bending; this was solved effectively if inelegantly by strengthening both upper wing spars by addition of external bracing trusses. Approximately 200 AEG N.I aircraft were built and served anonymously with standard two-seater units.


J.Herris AEG Aircraft of WWI (A Centennial Perspective on Great War Airplanes 16)


AEG N.I

  Like the General Electric Company in the United States, the Allgemeine Elektrizitats-Gesellschaft was one of the more powerful and progressive technology-based companies in Germany. As part of its forward thinking, AEG established a Flugtechnische Abteilung (aero-technical department) at Hennigsdorf (north of Berlin) in 1910 directed by Oberingenieur Paul Stumpf, who pioneered the use of autogeneous-welded steel tubing for aircraft, an advanced structural technology at a time when most airplanes were made of wood. All subsequent AEG aircraft used this technology.
  New assembly shops were opened in July 1915 in Nieder-Neuendorf to become the AEG Flugzeugfabrik led by Direktor Bassler. In the winter of 1915-1916, flight tests of an improved two-seat reconnaissance biplane, known as the AEG C.IV, were satisfactorily completed. Ordered in quantity, the C.IV was praised as a fast, rugged aircraft that stood up well during combat operations.
AEG responded to the N-type specification by modifying their successful AEG C.IV to lift a 300 kg bomb load by increasing the wingspan 2.24 meters (7.3 ft); changing the wing from a two-bay to a three-bay design. In September 1916, the AEG C.IVn prototype completed its initial flight trials, proving that it was stable and easy to fly, important criteria for night flying. AEG received a production order in December 1916 for 100 AEG C.IVn night bombers.
  The first AEG C.IVn production example (C.9323/16) was dispatched to Adlershof in April 1917 for type-testing. The C.IVn wing failed repeated load tests and it was not until 7 June 1917 that sufficient bending strength was achieved by the installation of triangular reinforcing trusses over both the forward and aft center section spars. This solution, structurally efficient but aerodynamically inelegant, sufficed for a slow aircraft not expected to engage in air-to-air combat.
  Timing of the initial deliveries of the AEG C.IVn and when it first reached the front are not known because it was counted among the regular AEG C.IV aircraft in the Frontbestand. However, by August-September 1917 the Nachtflugzeug (N = night aircraft) category had been established by Idflieg, and the first two AEG N.I bombers were recorded at the front in October 1917. Idflieg approved the second production order for 100 AEG N.I bombers in November 1917.
  A reliable, efficient aircraft, the AEG N.I was primarily assigned in ones or twos to divisional two-seater and bombing units to perform short-range raids behind the enemy lines. Later in the war, some N.I biplanes served as advanced trainers.


AEG N.I Specifications
Engine: 150 hp Benz Bz.III
Wing: Span Upper 15.24 m
Span Lower 14.62 m
Chord Upper 1.65 m
Chord Lower 1.65 m
Gap 1.95 m
Area 41.38 m2
General: Loaded Weight 1,609 kg
Maximum Speed: 143 kmh
Climb: 1000m 10 min
2000m 23 min
3000m 50 min


AEG N.I (C.IVn) Production Orders
Serial Numbers Qty Order Date
C.9321-9420/16 100 December 1916
N.110-209/17 100 November 1917
Note: Some or all of the first production order were given the N designation


J.Herris Nachtflugzeug! German N-types of WWI (A Centennial Perspective on Great War Airplanes 3)


AEG N.I
  
  Like the General Electric Company in the United States, the Allgemeine Elektrizitats-Gesellschaft was one of the more powerful and progressive technology-based companies in Germany. As part of its forward thinking, AEG established a Flugtechnische Abteilung (aero-technical department) at Hennigsdorf (north of Berlin) in 1910 directed by Oberingenieur Paul Stumpf, who pioneered the use of autogeneous-welded steel tubing for aircraft, an advanced structural technology at a time when most airplanes were made of wood. All subsequent AEG aircraft used this technology.
  New assembly shops were opened in July 1915 in Nieder-Neuendorf to become the AEG Flugzeugfabrik led by Direktor Bassler. In the winter of 1915-1916, flight tests of an improved two-seat reconnaissance biplane, known as the AEG C.IV, were satisfactorily completed. Ordered in quantity, the C.IV was praised as a fast, rugged aircraft that stood up well during combat operations.
  AEG responded to the N-type specification by modifying their successful AEG C.IV to lift a 300 kg bomb load by increasing the wingspan 2.24 meters (7.3 ft); changing the wing from a two-bay to a three-bay design. In September 1916, the AEG C.IVn prototype completed its initial flight trials, proving that it was stable and easy to fly, important criteria for night flying. AEG received a production order in December 1916 for 100 AEG C.IVn night bombers.
  The first AEG C.IVn production example (C.9323/16) was dispatched to Adlershof in April 1917 for type-testing. The C.IVn wing failed repeated load tests and it was not until 7 June 1917 that sufficient bending strength was achieved by the installation of triangular reinforcing trusses over both the forward and aft center section spars. This solution, structurally efficient but aerodynamically inelegant, sufficed for a slow aircraft not expected to engage in air-to-air combat.
  Timing of the initial deliveries of the AEG C.IVn and when it first reached the front are not known because it was counted among the regular AEG C.IV aircraft in the Frontbestand. However, by August-September 1917 the Nachtflugzeug (N = night aircraft) category had been established by Idflieg, and the first two AEG N.I bombers were recorded at the front in October 1917. The second production order for 100 AEG N.I bombers was approved in November 1917.
  A reliable, efficient aircraft, the AEG N.I was primarily assigned in ones or twos to divisional two-seater and bombing units to perform short-range raids behind the enemy lines. Later in the war, some N.I biplanes served as advanced trainers.

AEG N.I (C.IVn) Production Orders
Order Date Quantity Serial Numbers Notes
December 1916 100 C.9323-9422/16 Some (all?) given N designation
November 1917 100 N.110-209/17

J.Herris - AEG Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
AEG C.1042/16 may have been the AEG C.IVn/N.I prototype. It was sprayed in a two-color camouflage, probably in the typical green and mauve shown here.
J.Herris - AEG Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
AEG N.I N.9323/16 is virtually the only N.I for which we have a photograph showing both the serial number and a unit insignia. This aircraft was assigned to FA(A) 209.
J.Herris - AEG Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
AEG N.I N.9389/16. The reference photo shows a sprayed finish that appears to be in two colors. The two colors used here were based on the colors used by the AEG J.I and J.II that were contemporary with the N.I.
J.Herris - AEG Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
AEG N.I N.9417/16 is typical of many for which photographs are available. National insignia with little or no white borders are applied over the typical overall AEG dark, hexagonal night camouflage as seen on twin-engine AEG night bombers. The serial number is present in light paint and the AEG label is on the rudder below the cross.
J.Herris - Development of German Warplanes in WWI /Centennial Perspective/
A typical AEG N.I in standard AEG factory finish for night bombers. The national insignia are barely visible. Powered by the 150 hp Benz Bz.III, it carried six 50kg bombs are under the wings. This bomb load, substantially more than its ancestor the AEG C.IV could carry, was made possible by the larger, longer-span wing. Production was limited because both Idflieg and the crewmen preferred the AEG G.IV and other twin-engine bombers.
J.Herris - AEG Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
AEG N.I N.139/17.The reference photo shows a sprayed finish, but whether of two or three colors is uncertain. The two colors used here were based on the colors used by the contemporary AEG J.I and J.II and the pattern is representational.
J.Herris - AEG Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
AEG C.IV C.1042/16 with typical AEG sprayed camouflage is probably the prototype C.IVn because C.1042/16 is a normal C.IV number. This aircraft appears to lack the characteristic over-wing bracing used on C.IVn/N.I production aircraft and retains the 160 hp Mercedes D.III from the C.IV. Three 50 kg P.u.W. bombs are visible under the port lower wing.
O.Thetford, P.Gray - German Aircraft of the First World War /Putnam/
The AEG N.I was a long-span version of the AEG C.IV modified to carry more bombs, and this view clearly shows the key N.I recognition features. First, the N.I had a long wing with 3-bay bracing compared to the shorter, 2-bay wings of the C.IV. Next, the triangular bracing truss above the upper wing center section was required to strengthen the longer N.I wing against bending so it could pass the required load test. Unlike its daylight predecessor the AEG C.IV, the N.I did not have a fixed machine gun for the pilot; the observer's gun was thought sufficient for both strafing and defending the aircraft at night. The high exhaust stack directed the noise and flames away from the aircraft, which was important to maintain the pilot's night vision.Typical AEG sprayed camouflage on the upper surfaces is evident.
A.Imrie - German Bombers /Arms & Armour/
The good results achieved by C class two-seaters at night led to the development of night bombing versions with increased wing area and capable of carrying heavy loads on short-range operations. Although the AEG N 1 was slow and took 50 minutes to reach an altitude of 1,800m, it was capable of very short take-off and landing runs and could carry six 50kg P.u.W. bombs on its wing racks. Note external additional span-wise bracing on the top wing centre-section, the exhaust pipe extension flame-damper and landing lights in the top wing leading edge. Thirty-seven machines of this type were with the front-line units at the end of February 1918, but the ever-improving performance of the twin-engined G types caused further experiments with the N category to be abandoned in May 1918.
J.Herris - AEG Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
A unit portrait was taken in front of this AEG N.I; unfortunately, no further details are known. The landing lights in the leading edge of the upper wings are clearly visible.
J.Herris - Nachtflugzeug! German N-types of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
This view shows the N.I's characteristic triangular bracing trusses above the upper wing center section. The trusses strengthened both wing spars to handle the increased bending forces of the longer wing. Multicolor, hexagonal camouflage similar to that used by the AEG twin-engine night bombers was applied to many N.I aircraft. Given that the N.I shared the same operational role, it is not surprising that similar camouflage was used. "Franz" and "Emil" look less than enthused about their next night bombing mission. A Wolff propeller is fitted to this N.I.
J.Herris - AEG Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
This view shows the N.I's characteristic triangular bracing trusses above the upper wing center section. The trusses strengthened both wing spars to handle the increased bending forces of the longer wing. Multicolor, hexagonal camouflage similar to that used by the AEG twin-engine night bombers was applied to many N.I aircraft. Given that the N.I shared the same operational role, it is not surprising that similar camouflage was used. Few N-types were built; crews preferred the larger G-types for night bombing.
J.Herris - AEG Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
AEG N.I N.9323/16 carries air-droppable supply containers under its wings; the parachutes are wrapped around the front of the wicker containers. One of the few N.I bombers seen in unit markings, it is assigned to FA(A) 209. The night bomber hexagonal camouflage shows the wear from operational flying. A Wolff propeller is fitted, and the landing light in the leading edge of the upper left wing is visible.
J.Herris - AEG Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
AEG N.I N.9389/16 (possibly N.9399/16; the next to last digit is partly obscured) wears the two-color sprayed camouflage scheme and has lasted long enough for Balkan crosses to replace the original iron cross insignia. Wooden wheels are fitted due to the scarcity of rubber, and the landing light in the leading edge of the upper left wing is visible. The wood wheels indicate this machine may have been in training service when the photo was taken.
J.Herris - AEG Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
The versatile AEG C.IV was developed into the AEG N.I night bomber by enlarging its wingspan and fitting three bays of struts to support it. This rear view shows the two key AEG N.I recognition features; the long, 3-bay wing and the triangular braces for both front and rear spars above the center section. The hexagonal night camouflage typical for these aircraft is evident.
J.Herris - AEG Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Two AEG N.I bombers are seen in in this photo of FA(A) 209. The aircraft on the far right in the row nearest the camera is a Rumpler C.IV; to its left in the row nearest the camera are two AEG N.I night bombers.
J.Herris - AEG Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
AEG N.I 139/17, the only known photograph of an N.I from the second production series, shows the extended cabane section and the cowling panels that fold back to expose the engine for maintenance. This photograph was taken at the Bavarian training base in Lechfeld, and the aircraft is fitted with a 180 hp Argus As.III engine. National insignia is in the late style and the camouflage was sprayed on in two colors.
J.Herris - Nachtflugzeug! German N-types of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Some AEG N.Is were used briefly in a civilian capacity after the war. Civil N.I aircraft may have been given the 200 hp Benz Bz.IV engine, which could account for the different shape of the engine cowling and over-wing radiator. The wing structure appears to be modified.
J.Herris - AEG Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Two AEG N.I bombers wearing the hexagonal camouflage scheme have collided on the ground. N.9417/16 is nearest the camera and has the letters 'AEG' in a rectangle on the lower rudder.
J.Herris - Nachtflugzeug! German N-types of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Crash of an unknown AEG C.IVn/N.I showing the night camouflage and upper-wing bracing. The night bomber camouflage is so dark it is hard to see the national insignia. The two trusses bracing the upper wing spars are prominent.
J.Herris - Nachtflugzeug! German N-types of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
J.Herris - AEG Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Plan view of AEG N.I in typical AEG hexagonal night bomber finish.
J.Herris - Nachtflugzeug! German N-types of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
AEG N.I
J.Herris - Nachtflugzeug! German N-types of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
AEG N.I
J.Herris - Nachtflugzeug! German N-types of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
AEG N.I