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Gotha G.IX / G.X

Страна: Германия

Год: 1918

Gotha - WD.14/WD.20 - 1917 - Германия<– –>Gotha - GL.VII/GL.VIII - 1918 - Германия


O.Thetford, P.Gray German Aircraft of the First World War (Putnam)


Gotha G IX
  The Gotha G IX was not built by the parent firm, but by L.V.G. Little information is available, and it is doubtful if more than one or two machines were built before the war ended. Engines, two 245 h.p. Maybach Mb IV.

Gotha G X
  Apart from the fact that it was powered with two 180 h p B M W IIIa engines, no details are available of this small twin-engined machine although it is believed to have been intended as a faster photographic and reconnaissance aircraft.


J.Herris Gotha Aircraft of WWI (A Centennial Perspective on Great War Airplanes 6)


Gotha G.IX/GL.IX

  In February 1918 LVG was given a production contract to build 30 Gotha GL.VII reconnaissance airplanes (G.200-229/18) and 70 Gotha G.IX bombers (G.230-299/18). The 260 hp Maybach Mb.IVa was the normal powerplant. Apparently all of the GL.VII(LVG) aircraft were built but no photographs of this version have been found. The G.IX day bomber, given an increased wing-span and length, was equipped to carry five 50 kg PuW bombs under the fuselage. According to a French inspection report, some 96 Gotha G.IX bombers were stored at the LVG factory on 15 December 1918. After the armistice a number of these bombers were given to the Allies. For example, Belgium received 23 G.IX bombers that were flown operationally by the Belgian air service. A Gotha G.IX(LVG) 289/18, delivered to Japan post-war as reparations, was powered by two 260 hp Mercedes D.IVa engines.

Gotha G.IX/GL.IX Specifications
Engines: 2 x 240 hp Maybach Mb.IVa


Gotha G.X/GL.X

  On 16 August 1918, Idflieg ordered three Gotha GL.X prototypes (G.1725-1727/18), each powered by two 185 hp BMW.IIIa engines. Designed by Burkhardt, two GL.X versions were envisioned, one a fast, high-altitude reconnaissance machine and the second an armored ground-attack aircraft fitted with a single, forward-firing 20mm Becker cannon and five fixed machine guns. A gunner had a sixth, flexible machine gun for rear defense. The first two-bay GL.X, a more compact design than the G.IX bomber, was reported ready for flight testing on 1 January 1919, subject to clearance from Gotha management. It is difficult to understand how the same engine and airframe combination was expected to perform well at both extreme high and low altitudes.

Gotha G.X/GL.X Specifications
Engines: 2 x 185 hp BMW.IIIa


Gotha GL-Type Production Summary
Manufacturer Type Qty Serials Notes
LVG G.IX(LVG) 70 230/17-299/18 Bombers. Unknown number, perhaps all, completed.
Gotha G.X 3 1725/18- 1727/18 Prototypes. At least one completed.
Notes: According to a French inspection report 96 Gotha G.IX aircraft were stored at the LVG factory on 15 Dec. 1918. Many of these were transferred to the Allies postwar, especially Belgium.

J.Herris - Gotha Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Gotha G.IX(LVG) in Postwar Belgian Service
J.Herris - Gotha Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
This Gotha G.IX(LVG) illustrates the extended wing-span of this version of the GL series. A British crew attempted to fly this aircraft back to Britain, but it crashed when leaving Bickendorf and the crew was killed.
J.Herris - Gotha Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Gotha G.IX(LVG) G.263/18 displays the LVG-style markings and is armed with a PuW bomb under the fuselage.
J.Herris - Gotha Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Gotha G.IX(LVG) G.257/18 is covered in dark, printed camouflaged fabric.
J.Herris - Gotha Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
The Gotha G.IX(LVG) in this postwar view has no visible markings other than the Belgian colors on the rudders, but its hexagonal camouflage fabric is well illustrated.The aileron aerodynamic balances have slots, but the aerodynamic balances on the rudders do not. A DH.9 is visible in the background.
J.Herris - Gotha Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
This Gotha G.IX(LVG) illustrates the type's clean lines. It is serving in Belgium postwar.The number '250' on the nose may indicate it is serial G.250/18, but there is no confirmation. Roundels are being painted under the wings but are not yet complete. The aircraft is covered in dark, printed camouflage fabric.
J.Herris - Gotha Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Gotha G.IX(LVG) in Belgian service postwar. These views illustrate details and emphasize the aerodynamic lines of the GL series. Problems of propeller selection for maximum ceiling and speed at altitude, always a challenge with fixed-pitch propellers, prolonged development of the GL-series.
J.Herris - Gotha Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
The front gunner position was eliminated in the Gotha GL designs to save weight and drag; the bomber depending on speed and its rear gunner for protection. Put into limited production, the GL.IX (shown) was too late to reach operational units before the armistice. Twenty were delivered to Belgium after the war as reparations, where this one was photographed.
J.Herris - Gotha Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Gotha G.IX(LVG) in Belgian service postwar.
J.Herris - Gotha Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Gotha G.IX(LVG) in Belgian service postwar.
J.Herris - Gotha Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Gotha G.IX(LVG) in Belgian service postwar.
J.Herris - Gotha Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
This Gotha G.IX(LVG) 299/18 illustrates its LVG-style markings, its camouflage fabric, and the fairings over the radiators in the upper wing above the engines.
J.Herris - Gotha Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Gotha G.IX(LVG) serving in Belgium postwar illustrates the type's clean lines. It appears to be on public display. A Friedrichshafen bomber is in the background.
J.Herris - Gotha Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Gotha GL.IX in Belgium postwar.
J.Herris - Gotha Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
The Gotha G.X prototype had two-bay wings and was powered by two 185 hp BMW.IIIa engines. Somehow this airframe and engine combination was supposed to excel as both a high-altitude reconnaissance aircraft and a low-level ground-attack aircraft, seemingly contradictory requirements. The massive WD27 looms in the background.