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LVG G.I

Страна: Германия

Год: 1915

LVG - E.I - 1915 - Германия<– –>LVG - C.IV - 1916 - Германия


O.Thetford, P.Gray German Aircraft of the First World War (Putnam)


L.V.G. G I
   Although designated in the G series, this 1915 aircraft was more in the nature of a "Battleplane" (in common with the A.E.G. G I) than a bombing aircraft. As far as is known only a single machine was built. Engines, two 150 h.p. Benz Bz III driving handed airscrews.


J.Herris LVG Aircraft of WWI. Vol.3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters (A Centennial Perspective on Great War Airplanes 36)


LVG Bombers

  LVG was one of the most important aircraft production companies in Germany during the war. Virtually all LVG aircraft to reach production were two-seat reconnaissance airplanes, but LVG also built some experimental fighters and bombers, none of which were built in quantity for operational service.


LVG G.I

  The LVG G.I was designed to the 1914 Kampfflugzeug (battle plane) specification that lead to the AEG K.I and G.I among other designs. Featuring a forward gunner standing upright with a clear field of fire above the wings and propellers, the LVG G.I was clearly designed to attack other aircraft in the manner of naval combat, a concept quickly shown to be faulty once airplanes engaged in actual air combat.
  Made possible by the abbreviated nose, the two 150 hp Benz Bz.III engines were mounted close together. In addition, the engines rotated in opposite directions to cancel propeller torque on the aircraft. The direction of rotation was chosen to minimize asymmetric thrust in case of engine failure, assisted by the proximity of the engine to the aircraft centerline. While the design gave the forward gunner an exceptional field of fire, the profusion of struts and the gunner's upright position, fully exposed to the air stream, created excessive drag that certainly limited speed. Apparently only one example of the G.I was built in 1915. Performance was undoubtedly insufficient to intercept enemy aircraft and the design had too much drag for a successful bomber.



LVG G.II

  Almost nothing is known of the LVG G.II bomber. Apparently a single prototype was built, but even that is not confirmed. The design was for a two-engine biplane bomber, with each engine in its own fuselage with a central fuselage pod, a configuration similar to the Caproni bomber but without the center engine. This was a 1915 design and the G.II, if built, was built in 1915.

O.Thetford, P.Gray - German Aircraft of the First World War /Putnam/
L.V.G. G I
J.Herris - Weird Wings of WWI /Centennial Perspective/ (70)
The LVG G.I was designed as a Kampfflugzeug, and a single example was built in 1915. The arrangement enabled the gunner to fire in a 360° arc above the aircraft and gave a wide field of fire forward, but the standing gunner undoubtedly created a great deal of drag, limiting the aircraft's speed. The Kampfflugzeugs (battle planes) of all types soon proved failures as interceptors and air superiority aircraft because they were simply too slow and cumbersome to intercept and engage enemy aircraft. Operational experience soon demonstrated that bombing was the true role of these aircraft, and the early operational Kampfflugzeugs were the ancestors of German twin-engine bombers of WWI.
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
The LVG G.I had a large wingspan in addition to the significant drag of its gunner, who stood upright to use his weapon. The excessive drag ensured the LVG G.I could not be fast enough to successfully intercept enemy aircraft, the fatal flaw with the battle plane concept as a weapon. (Peter M. Grosz Collection/SDTB)
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
The LVG G.I in front of the LVG factory with the gunner still exploring the field of fire of his flexible machine gun. Many national insignia decorated the LVG G.I to identify it to friendly aircraft and avoid a 'friendly fire' accident. (Peter M. Grosz Collection/SDTB)
J.Herris - LVG Aircraft of WWI. Volume 3: Types C.VI-C.XI & Fighters /Centennial Perspective/ (36)
Two more views of the LVG G.I showing additional details and the enthusiastic gunner still exploring the wide field of fire available to him. The raised gun mount gave a 360° field of fire above the upper wing. (Peter M. Grosz Collection/SDTB)