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Barton, Rawson hydro-aeroplane

Страна: Великобритания

Год: 1905

Bartelt - ornithopter - 1911 - Великобритания<– –>Bass-Paterson - flying boat - 1914 - Великобритания


H.King Aeromarine Origins (Putnam)


September of the same year (1905) saw similar experiments in progress at St Helens, Isle of Wight, by Dr F. A. Barton and F. L. Rawson. I quote some observations made in later years by Dr Barton himself concerning the photograph (which is reproduced) showing 'one of the hydro-aeroplanes which I, in conjunction with Mr F. L. Rawson, made and experimented with at the Isle of Wight'. Dr Barton described the craft as having a 'triangular duct' between 'dihedral planes', adding:
  'The machine rested on the water on light pontoons 26 ft. long, and weighing only 20 lb. each, and in addition to the dihedral wings, had on each side two main horizontal planes in front and two at the rear, all moveable...
  'Two vertical fixed planes and a small flying jib were placed in the bows to assist the action of the rudder in the stern.'
  How vividly that 'flying jib' epitomizes 'air and water'.
  'The engine and 7 ft. propeller,' he went on, 'was arranged for on the steering deck, which was low down on the pontoons just behind the main planes.
  'The photo shows the machine just being lifted out of the water after a trial on the open sea on September 26th, 1905.'
  Towing tests behind a launch were unsuccessful, and the intended 35-h.p. engine was never installed.


M.Goodall, A.Tagg British Aircraft before the Great War (Schiffer)


Deleted by request of (c)Schiffer Publishing


P.Lewis British Aircraft 1809-1914 (Putnam)


Barton-Rawson Hydro-multiplane

  During 1905 Dr. F. A. Barton, his son Dudley and F. L. Rawson constructed at St. Helens. Isle of Wight, an all-bamboo floatplane with sets of multiple wings. The floats were 20 ft. long, 10 ins. wide and 4 ins. deep. The machine was scheduled to have a 7 ft. propeller driven by a 35 h.p. engine, but the designers were unable to obtain a power unit weighing less than 500 lbs.
  Tests were carried out without an engine by towing as a kite over the sea behind a launch on 26th September, 1905. The tow ropes kept breaking and the aircraft finally turned over in the water but was salvaged. Span, 34 ft. Length, 36 ft. Height, 9 ft. Wing area, 1,200 sq. ft. Weight empty without engine or propeller, 240 lb.


Журнал Flight


Flight, January 13, 1912.

Natural Stability.

  In view of the correspondence on the above subject, which has been recently appearing in your columns, the enclosed photograph may, perhaps, be of interest, as showing that the "triangular duct" was introduced between the dihedral planes on one of the hydro-aeroplanes, which I, in conjunction with Mr. F. L. Rawson, made and experimented with at the Isle of Wight.
  The machine rested on the water on light pontoons 26 ft. long, and weighing only 20 lbs. each, and in addition to the dihedral wings, had on each side two main horizontal planes in front and two at the rear, all moveable. Total lifting and bearing surface =1,200 sq. ft.
  Two vertical fixed planes and a small flying jib were placed in the bows to assist the action of the rudder in the stern.
  The engine and 7 ft. propeller was arranged for on the steering deck, which was low down on the pontoons just behind the main planes.
  The photo, which is somewhat faded, shows the machine just being lifted out of the water after a trial on the open sea on September 26th, 1905.
London Wall Buildings, E.C. F. ALEX. BARTON.

H.King - Aeromarine Origins /Putnam/
A little-known British experiment of 1915: the water-borne aircraft built by Dr F. A. Barton and Mr F. L. Rawson at St Helens, Isle of Wight. It was fitted with a 'flying jib'.
M.Goodall, A.Tagg - British Aircraft before the Great War /Schiffer/
Barton-Rawson multiplane of 1905 at St Helens Isle of Wight.