Книги

Putnam
O.Tapper
Armstrong Whitworth Aircraft since 1913
45

O.Tapper - Armstrong Whitworth Aircraft since 1913 /Putnam/

Another view of the one and only F.K.6 triplane No. 7838.
The final version of the quadruplane, the F.K.10.
An F.K.10 built by the Phoenix Dynamo Manufacturing Co of Bradford.
Two F.K.I0 quadruplanes and an F.K.8 biplane, with a Lorraine-Dietrich engine, at Duke's Meadow aerodrome at Gosforth.
The Armadillo with a strengthened undercarriage and other modifications made in the spring of 1918.
F.2B built by Armstrong Whitworth and fitted with Puma at Elswick Works, Newcastle-on-Tyne, in 1918. In 1918 the Bristol Fighter took the place of the F.K.8 in the Gosforth factory.
RAF R.E.7 в стандартной английской боевой окраске.
The R.E.7, No.2400, one of 100 built by The Siddeley Deasy Motor Car Co.
The crew positions were reversed in the second F.K.3 production batch so that the observer could use his gun to better effect.
The standard F.K.3 was similar in appearance to the B.E.2c but had a rather better performance. This picture was taken at Doncaster in 1916.
One of the first batch of fifty F.K.3s built by Hewlett and Blondeau Ltd.
An F.K.3 with an interesting example of dazzle painting; or was it just a light-hearted decorative scheme?
The F.K.3 was notable for its elaborate oleo undercarriage; on the right, an ingenious, but not altogether successful, attempt to provide a forward-firing gun.
Instructor, in front, with a pupil in an F.K.3 training aircraft.
One of a small number of F.K.3 aircraft that were fitted temporarily with the 120 hp Beardmore engine.
An early production Armstrong, Whitworth-built F.K.8, A2725, displaying the triple V-strut undercarriage, long vertical radiator blocks, angular nose cowling and short engine exhaust manifold.
An F.K.8 with the improved type of engine cowling, and, on the right, an experimental exhaust system devised by No.10 Squadron, RFC, in France to eliminate the distorting mirage effect from lhe open exhaust pipes.
Two F.K.I0 quadruplanes and an F.K.8 biplane, with a Lorraine-Dietrich engine, at Duke's Meadow aerodrome at Gosforth.
The F.K.8 used by Queensland and Northern Territory Aerial Services Ltd, later Qantas Empire Airways Ltd, to fiy Australia's first air mail service. The flight took place on 2 and 3 November, 1922, between Charleville and Cloncurry.
The F.K.8. G-AUDE. arrives with the mail at Winton on 3 November. 1922. The pilot was Wilmot Hudson Fysh, later Sir Wilmot. The date on the photograph is wrong.
F.K.8 biplanes under construction in the Newcastle factory of Angus Sanderson and Co. The site is now occupied by Durham University.
The prototype F.K.8, A411, undergoes a test to destruction at the Royal Aircraft Factory, Farnborough. The load was applied with loose sand heaped on the underside of the mainplanes.
RAF BE.2a. The first machine built by Armstrong Whitworth & Co. in the Gosforth factory in 1913-1914. One of many contractors which built BE types.
Armstrong Whitworth built B.E.2as in the converted skating rink at Gosforth. Just discernible, in the left-hand corner of the picture, behind the Armstrong Whitworth car, is the airship gondola built in 1914 to the order of the Admiralty for HMA No.2.
B.E.2c aircraft on the assembly line at Gosforth during the early months of 1915. On the left is the fuselage of the F.K.I single-seat biplane.
Siddeley Deasy built more than a thousand R.E.8 aircraft; E254 was one of them.
The second Murphy-designed fighter, the Ara, first flew after the Armistice in 1918. Its A.B.C. Dragonfly engine was a failure.
B.E.2c aircraft on the assembly line at Gosforth during the early months of 1915. On the left is the fuselage of the F.K.I single-seat biplane.
The first version of the Armstrong Whitworth triplane, probably known as the F.K.5. It is believed that this aircraft never flew.
The Siddeley R.T.I was a redesign of the R.E.8. This aircraft, 86626, had a 150 hp RAF 4A engine.
Another version of the R.T.I, with horn-balanced ailerons and a 200 hp Hispano engine.
The cockpits of the R.T.1. This was John Lloyd's first design for The Siddeley Deasy Motor Car Co.
The first Siskin, the S.R.2, designed by Lloyd and built in 1918 by the Siddeley Deasy company. The engine was a 320 hp A.B.C. Dragonfly.
The Siddeley Siskin S.R.2 fighter completed in Coventry in 1919.
The Siskin was considered to be among the best of the fighters fitted with the A.B.C. Dragonfly engine.
The unusual undercarriage design of the S.R.2 was to be a characteristic feature of all subsequent Siskin variants.
With the Dragonfl.y engine, the S.R.2 had a top speed of more than 145 mph.
In 1921 the S.R.2, C4541, now known as the Armstrong Whitworth Siskin, reappeared with an early example of the Jaguar engine.