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Siemens-Schuckert E.I/E.II/E.III

Страна: Германия

Год: 1915

Fighter

Siemens-Schuckert - DD 5 - 1915 - Германия<– –>Siemens-Schuckert - Forssman R - 1915 - Германия


O.Thetford, P.Gray German Aircraft of the First World War (Putnam)


Siemens-Schuckert E I
  Following its appearance in the autumn of 1915, a small batch of twenty of these aircraft was ordered. The prototype is illustrated. It was of conventional construction, with ply-covered fuselage and fabric-covered wings, with warp control instead of ailerons; production machines did not feature the pointed spinner of the prototype. Engine, 100 h.p. Siemens-Halske Sh I. Span, 100 m. (32 ft. 9 3/4 in.). Length, 7.1 m. (23 ft. 3 5/8 in.). Weights: Empty, 473 kg. (1,041 lb.). Loaded, 673 kg. (1,481 lb.). Duration, 1 1/2 hr. Armament, one Spandau machine-gun.
  The Siemens-Schuckert E III. built in 1916, was virtually an E I with a 100 h.p. Oberursel U I engine. One Spandau gun was fitted. Only six machines were built.

Siemens-Schuckert E II
  Only a single E II was built, similar in most respects to the E I, but with an in-line engine instead of a rotary. The machine was completed early in 1916, but destroyed in June of that year when being demonstrated at Doberitz by Franz Steffen, who was killed in the crash. Engine, 120 h.p. Argus As II. Armament, one Spandau machine-gun.


W.Green, G.Swanborough The Complete Book of Fighters


SIEMENS-SCHUCKERT (SSW) E I Germany

  The first single-seat fighter to be produced by the Siemens-Schuckert-Werke (SSW), the E I monoplane was designed by Franz Steffen and completed in October 1915. Of conventional shoulder-wing arrangement with warp control rather than ailerons, the E I had steel-tube wing spars, fabric-covered wings and plywood-covered fuselage, power being provided by a Siemens-Halske Sh I nine-cylinder rotary engine of 100 hp and armament comprising a single synchronised 7,9-mm LMG 08/15 machine gun. After completion of flight testing on 17 March 1916, the E I was recommended for service, and the Idflieg placed a contract for 20 aircraft with the SSW Nurnberg facility. Only five E Is were listed as being at the Front on 31 October 1916, by which time the type had been rendered obsolescent by the appearance during the Battle of the Somme of the Nieuport 11.

Max speed, 87 mph (140 km/h) at sea level.
Range, 130 mis (210 km).
Empty weight, 1,043 lb (473 kg).
Loaded weight, 1,484 lb (673 kg).
Span, 32 ft 9 2/3 in (10,00 m).
Length, 23 ft 3 1/2 in (7,10 m).
Height, 9 ft 2 1/4 in (2,80 m).
Wing area, 172.23 sqft (16,00 m2).


SIEMENS-SCHUCKERT (SSW) E II Germany

  Completed early in 1916, the E II was essentially similar to the E I apart from its power plant, the Sh I rotary being replaced by a six-cylinder inline Argus As II engine rated at 120 hp. Armament remained a single 7,9-mm LMG 08/15 machine gun. The sole prototype of the E II was destroyed on 26 June 1916 during a demonstration at Doberitz, its designer, Franz Steffen, who was flying the aircraft, losing his life. No details of the E II are available.


SIEMENS-SCHUCKERT (SSW) E III Germany

  Following the small production batch of E I monoplanes, the Siemens-Schuckert-Werke received an Idflieg contract for six additional aircraft designated E III. These differed from the E I only in power plant type. Powered by a 100 hp Oberursel UI nine-cylinder rotary engine, the E III retained the airframe and armament of the E I, a proposed development, the E IV, being similar apart from a circular-section fuselage. The dimensions and performance of the E III were similar to those of the E I.

Empty weight, 1,054 lb (478 kg).
Loaded weight, 1,495 lb (678 kg).


J.Herris Siemens-Schuckert Aircraft of WWI (A Centennial Perspective on Great War Airplanes 12)


SSW E.I

  The SSW E.I was completed in October 1915 and finished its tests on March 17, 1916. Of conventional wire-braced wood construction with fabric-covered wings and ply-covered fuselage, it was recommended for production and an order for 20 aircraft, 550-569/15, was placed by Idflieg. Production was undertaken by the SSW Transformer Works in Nurnberg. The E.I was fitted with one synchronized machine gun. Eight E.Is were powered by the 90 hp Sh.O and the remainder by the 110 hp Sh.I. An additional airframe was powered by a 120 hp Argus As.II, becoming the sole SSW E.II. Like the Fokker designs, it used wing-warping instead of conventional ailerons for roll control. Unfortunately, the SSW monoplanes arrived after the D.H.2 and Nieuport 11 had established technical superiority over the early monoplane designs and were too late to make an impact.

SSW E.I Specifications
Engine: 110 hp Siemens-Halske Sh.I
Wing: Span 10.00 m
Area 16.0 m2
General: Length 7.10 m
Height 2.80 m
Empty Weight 473 kg
Loaded Weight 673 kg
Maximum Speed: 140 km/h


SSW E.II

  The SSW E.II was essentially an E.I airframe powered by an in-line 120 hp Argus As.II engine; like the E.I it carried a single machine gun. The one prototype built first flew in early 1916. Its designer, Franz Steffen, suffered a fatal crash in the E.II while demonstrating it at Doberitz on June 26, 1916.


SSW E.III & E.IV

  Ordered in April 1916, the SSW E.III was an E.I airframe with a 100 hp Oberursel; again one synchronized gun was carried. Six aircraft, 620-625/16, were built. A derivative of the E.III was proposed with a circular fuselage; known as the E.IV, it remained a project.
  
Siemens-Schuckert Monoplane Fighter Specifications
E.I E.II E.III D.VI
Engine 110 hp Sh.I 120 hp As.II 100 hp Oberursel U.I 205 hp Sh.IIIa
Armament One MG One MG One MG Two MG *
Span 10.00 m — 7.10 m 9.37 m
Length 7.10 m — 7.10 m 6.50 m
Height 2.80 m — 2.80 m 2.72 m
Wing Area 16.0 m2 — 16.0 m2 12.46 m2
Empty Weight 473 kg — 478 kg 540 kg
Loaded Weight 673 kg — 678 kg 710 kg
Maximum Speed: 140 km/h — — 220 km/h (@ 2,000m)
Climb: 6,000m NA — — 16 minutes
7,000m NA — — 22 minutes
Ceiling: — — — 8,000m
Notes: 1. E.II dimensions similar to E.I except length.
2. SSW D.VI armament is that projected for production; the two prototypes were unarmed.

J.Herris - Siemens-Schuckert Aircraft of World War I /Centennial Perspective/
SSW E.I production model
J.Herris - Siemens-Schuckert Aircraft of World War I /Centennial Perspective/
SSW E.II prototype
J.Herris - Siemens-Schuckert Aircraft of World War I /Centennial Perspective/
The SSW E.I prototype designed by Franz Steffen featured a small spinner that was omitted from production aircraft. Like most Eindeckers one synchronized gun was carried and it was powered by a rotary engine, in this case either a 90 hp Sh.O (eight aircraft) or a 110 hp Siemens-Halske Sh.I counter-rotary engine (a dozen aircraft).
J.Herris - Siemens-Schuckert Aircraft of World War I /Centennial Perspective/
The SSW E.I prototype, identified by the small spinner, photographed at the SSW factory. By the time the SSW Eindeckers appeared the basic configuration and wing-warping instead of ailerons, was outdated. (The Peter M. Bowers Collection/The Museum of Flight)
J.Herris - Siemens-Schuckert Aircraft of World War I /Centennial Perspective/
J.Herris - Siemens-Schuckert Aircraft of World War I /Centennial Perspective/
The fuselage of the SSW E.I in front of the pilot was painted a dark color, probably to reduce glare.
J.Herris - Siemens-Schuckert Aircraft of World War I /Centennial Perspective/
The SSW E.I production aircraft dispensed with the small spinner fitted to the prototype. The E I achieved operational service in small numbers in the summer of 1916.
J.Herris - Siemens-Schuckert Aircraft of World War I /Centennial Perspective/
Another view of an SSW E.I production aircraft. The support structure for the front bearing needed by the Sh.I counter-rotary engine is clearly shown. (The Peter M. Bowers Collection/The Museum of Flight)
O.Thetford, P.Gray - German Aircraft of the First World War /Putnam/
The joint brainchild of the Steffen Brothers, Franz and Bruno, the Siemens-Schuckert Werke D 5 single seat fighter was completed in the autumn of 1915, but progressed no further than the prototype stage. Visible in the background is the same company's E I prototype, a developed version of which killed designer/pilot Franz Steffen in June 1916.
J.Herris - Siemens-Schuckert Aircraft of World War I /Centennial Perspective/
An SSW E.I production aircraft in flight. Although using the same configuration as the Fokker and Pfalz Eindeckers, the SSW E.I was much different in detail, and in particular the tail surfaces were distinctly different. Most of these airplanes were delivered directly to flying schools.
J.Herris - Siemens-Schuckert Aircraft of World War I /Centennial Perspective/
This close-up view of an SSW E.I fighter shows the gun installation in greater detail together with a closer view of the dark-painted anti-glare panel in front of the pilot.
J.Herris - Siemens-Schuckert Aircraft of World War I /Centennial Perspective/
SSW E.I fighters in production at the modern SSW factory. The SSW design was cleaner than the Fokker and Pfalz Eindeckers but was simply too late for important operational use at the front and most were delivered to single-seat flying schools.
A few SSW E.I fighters reached the front. These two are shown during construction in the factory, but by the time these reached the Front the Eindecker era was drawing to a close as higher-performance biplane fighters were appearing.
G.Haddow, P.Grosz - The German Giants /Putnam/
Mock-up of the R.VIII filled with an experimental enclosed revolving turret can be seen behind the SSW E.I in the foreground. Photo dated April 1917.
J.Herris - Siemens-Schuckert Aircraft of World War I /Centennial Perspective/
SSW E.I fighter airframe undergoing static load testing at the SSW factory. The load had to be distributed along the wing to simulate flight loads. The sandbag method was used widely throughout the aviation industry for many years.
J.Herris - Siemens-Schuckert Aircraft of World War I /Centennial Perspective/
The sole SSW E.II prototype is shown in side view. The large exhaust for its in-line Argus engine is prominent. The SSW E.II was one of two Eindeckers to feature an in-line engine, the other being the Pfalz E.V.
J.Herris - Siemens-Schuckert Aircraft of World War I /Centennial Perspective/
The SSW E.II prototype designed by Franz Steffen was powered by a 120 hp Argus As.II engine. Like most Eindeckers, one synchronized gun was carried. (The Peter M. Bowers Collection/The Museum of Flight)
J.Herris - Siemens-Schuckert Aircraft of World War I /Centennial Perspective/
Rearview of the SSW E.II fighter prototype at the SSW factory. For an Eindecker the E.II was quite streamlined.
J.Herris - Siemens-Schuckert Aircraft of World War I /Centennial Perspective/
The SSW E.II prototype under construction. This view clearly shows the well-streamlined installation of the in-line 120 hp Argus As.II engine. (The Peter M. Bowers Collection/The Museum of Flight)
J.Herris - Siemens-Schuckert Aircraft of World War I /Centennial Perspective/
The fatal crash of Franz Steffen in the SSW E.II prototype he designed. Steffen was demonstrating the E.II at Doberitz on June 26, 1916 when he crashed.
W.Green, G.Swanborough - The Complete Book of Fighters
The E I which achieved operational service in small numbers in the summer of 1916.
J.Herris - Siemens-Schuckert Aircraft of World War I /Centennial Perspective/
SSW E.I
J.Herris - Siemens-Schuckert Aircraft of World War I /Centennial Perspective/
SSW E.I
J.Herris - Siemens-Schuckert Aircraft of World War I /Centennial Perspective/
SSW E.I