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Pfalz D.VII/D.VIII

Страна: Германия

Год: 1917

Fighter

Pfalz - D.VI - 1917 - Германия<– –>Pfalz - Dr.I / Dr.II - 1917 - Германия


O.Thetford, P.Gray German Aircraft of the First World War (Putnam)


Pfalz D VII
  Two versions of the Pfalz D VII were built and differed only in engine installation and cowling arrangement and in that the second machine, with the Oberursel engine, had overhung, balanced ailerons.
  Engine, 160 h.p. Siemens-Halske Sh III geared rotary. Span, 7.52 m. (24 ft. 8 1/8 in.). Length, 5.65 m. (18 ft. 6 1/2 in.). Height, 2.85 m. (9 ft. 4 1/8 in.) Area, 17.2 sq.m. (186 sq.ft.). Weights: Empty, 520 kg. (1,144 lb.). Loaded, 715 kg. (1,573 lb.). Speed, 190 km.hr. (118.75 m.p.h.) at 4,000 m. Climb, 6,000 m. (19,680 ft.) in 25.25 min.
  Engine, 160 h.p. Oberursel U III rotary. Span, 8.1 m. (26 ft. 7 in.). Length, 5.55 m. (18 ft. 2 5/8 in.). Height, 2.7m. (8 ft. 10 1/4 in.). Area, 17.2 sq.m. (186 sq.ft.). Weights: Empty, 483.5 kg. (1,064 lb.). Loaded, 738 kg. (1,624 lb.). Duration, l 1/2 hr. (both types). Armament, twin Spandau machine-guns (both types).

Pfalz D VIII
  No less than three variants of the D VIII existed, powered with 160 h.p. Siemens-Halske, 160 h.p. Oberursel and 140 h.p. Goebel, the latter version differing in having horn-balanced ailerons and "N" format interplane struts. The machines were built early in 1918 and participated in the second D types Competition. A small production order was given for the Siemens-engined variant. A total of forty machines were completed; some nineteen were at the Front by August 1918 undergoing operational assessment with Jastas 29 and 56.
  Engine, 160 h.p. Siemens-Halske Sh III, 160 h.p. Oberursel U III, 140 h.p. Goebel Goe III. Span, 7.52 m. (24 ft. 8 1/8 in.). (8.1 m. 157/18). Length, 5.65 m. (18 ft. 6 1/2 in.). Height, 2.75 m. (9 ft. 0 1/8 in.). Area, 17.2 sq.m. (186 sq.ft.). Weights: Empty, 543 kg.(1,195 lb.); loaded,738 kg. (1,624 lb.), Sh III variant. Empty 495.6 kg. (1,090 lb.); Loaded, 685.6 kg. (1,508 lb.), U III variant. Empty, 552.7 kg. (1,216 lb.); Loaded, 722.7 kg. (1,590 lb.), Goe III variant. Climb, 1,000 m. (3,280 ft.) in 1.9 min., 6,000 m. (19,680 ft.) in 25 min., Sh III variant; 1,000 m. (3,280 ft.) in 21 min., 5,000 m. (16,400 ft.) in 25.5 min., U III variant. Duration, 1 1/2 hr. Armament, twin Spandau machine-guns.


W.Green, G.Swanborough The Complete Book of Fighters


PFALZ D VII Germany

  A further Pfalz contender in the first D-type Competition, the D VII single-bay staggered biplane passed its Typen-Prufung in February 1918, but was not the recipient of a production contract. The D VII was tested with both balanced and unbalanced ailerons, with two-bladed and four-bladed propellers, and with at least three engines: the 160 hp Siemens Halske Sh III, the 160 hp Goebel Goe III and the 145 hp Oberursel U III. Armament consisted of the standard twin LMG 08/15 machine guns. The following data relate to the Sh III-powered model.

Max speed, 118 mph (190 km/h) at 13,125 ft (4 000 m).
Time to 19,685 ft (6 000 m), 25.25 min.
Endurance, 1.5 hrs.
Empty weight, 1,146 lb (520 kg).
Loaded weight, 1,576 lb (715 kg).
Span, 24 ft 8 in (7,52 m).
Length, 18 ft 6 1/2 in (5,65m).
Height, 9 ft 4 1/4 in (2,85 m).
Wing area, 185.14 sqft (17,20 m2).


PFALZ D VIII Germany

  A contender in the second D-type Competition at Adlershof in May 1918, the D VIII was in all respects similar to the D VII apart from having two-bay wing bracing. The slightly raked wings were of equal parallel chord with slightly splayed interplane struts, and a standard Pfalz-type wooden structure was employed, with a semi-monocoque fuselage. The Typen-Prufung was performed in January 1918, with a D VIII powered by a 160 hp Siemens Halske Sh III 11-cylinder rotary, but one of two D VIIIs participating in the D-type Competition had N-type interplane struts, horn-balanced ailerons and a 160 hp Goebel Goe III engine. Limited production of the Sh III-powered D VIII was undertaken, this being introduced to squadron service in June 1918, but by the end of August only 19 fighters of this type were at the Front, a total of 40 having been built. A D VIII was tested with a 145 hp Oberursel U III engine and another with a Rhemag R II driving counter-rotating propellers, but only the Sh III version saw service. Armed with two LMG 08/15 machine guns, the D VIII possessed pleasant handling characteristics and offered a good standard of manoeuvrability and a high climb rate, but it suffered a weak undercarriage. Data relate to the Sh III-powered D VIII.

Max speed, 118 mph (190 km/h).
Time to 9,840 ft (3 000 m), 3.1 min.
Endurance, 1.5 hrs.
Empty weight, 1,197 lb (543 kg).
Loaded weight, 1,627 lb (738 kg).
Dimensions as for D VII.


J. Herris Pfalz Aircraft of WWI (A Centennial Perspective on Great War Airplanes 5)


Pfalz D.VII and Pfalz D.VIII

  The Pfalz D.VII and D.VIII biplanes were clearly evolved from the earlier Pfalz Dr.I triplane, and used the same 160 hp Siemens-Halske Sh.III counter-rotary engine. Despite the lack of structural problems with the lower wing of the Pfalz D.III, the D.VII and D.VIII finally abandoned the Nieuport wing configuration. The D.VII had a single-bay wing cellule, and for comparison the D.VIII had a two-bay wing, making it stronger but heavier and having more drag.
  Flight trials for the D.VII were flown in December 1917 and the type demonstrated exceptional climb performance in January 1918, reaching 6000 meters (19,685 feet) in 13.7 minutes. The slightly heavier D.VIII reached the same altitude in 16.5 minutes.
  There were two winners of the First Fighter Competition at Adlershof in February 1918, the Pfalz D.VII and the Fokker D.VII. Idflieg decided that the choice between the Pfalz D.VII and D.VIII for production would be determined by static load tests. The D.VIII was chosen because its twin-bay wing was stronger and better able to withstand violent combat maneuvers. Due to the scarcity of Siemens-Halske Sh.III engines, Pfalz was given a contract for only 120 Pfalz D.VIII fighters, serialed 100/18 to 219/18.
  The D.VIII finally reached the front in small numbers in April 1918 but these were not immediately released for combat, possibly due to engine problems. In June the first D.VIII fighters finally appeared in the frontline inventory, a few being sent to Jasta Boelcke, Jasta 29, and Jasta 56. Since no details are available of the D.VIII's combat record, evaluation of the type is based on its performance compared to other known types. It was regarded by combat pilots during the Second Fighter Competition (May 27 to July 28, 1918) as equal to the SSW D.IV in speed and climb, but inferior to the SSW D.IV in maneuverability. The pilots therefore recommended that the Pfalz be assigned to Rests (Kampfeinsitzer Staffeln - home defense flights) for interceptor duty, where its speed and superior climb were especially useful, and some were used that way. Development of the single-bay D.VII continued because any reduction in weight and drag would provide a welcome performance improvement. The D.VII was eventually placed into production, as 15 were found stored by the Germans after the war.


Pfalz D.VII Specifications
Engine: 160 hp Siemens-Halske Sh.III
145 hp Oberursel Ur.III 200 hp Goebel Goe.III
Data for Sh.III production version:
Wing: Span Upper 7.52 m
Span Lower 6.98 m
Chord Upper 1.30 m
Chord Lower 1.30 m
Gap 1.45 m
Stagger 0.25 m
Area 17.12 sq m
General: Length 5.65 m
Height 2.85 m
Empty Weight 520 kg
Loaded Weight 715 kg
Maximum Speed: 190 kmh
Climb: 1000m 1.8 min
2000m 4.0 min
3000m 6.6 min
4000m 9.8 min
5000m 13.8 min
6000m 21.3 min


Pfalz D.VIII Specifications
Engine: 160 hp Siemens-Halske Sh.III
145 hp Oberursel Ur.III 200 hp Goebel Goe.III
Data for Sh.III production version:
Wing: Span Upper 7.52 m
Span Lower 6.98 m
Chord Upper 1.30 m
Chord Lower 1.30 m
Gap 1.45 m
Stagger 0.25 m
Area 17.12 sq m
General: Length 5.65 m
Height 2.85 m
Empty Weight 542 kg
Loaded Weight 767 kg
Maximum Speed: 180 kmh
Climb: 1000m 1.5 min
2000m 3.5 min
3000m 5.8 min
4000m 8.4 min
5000m 11.1 min


Pfalz D.VIII Production Orders
Order Date Quantity Serial Numbers
February 1918 120 D.100-219/18

J.Herris - Pfalz Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
This Pfalz D.VII prototype was fitted with a 145 hp Oberursel Ur.III and an Anker propeller. It had balanced ailerons and a small tailskid fin. It was finished in basic Pfalz silver-gray overall, with simple Balkenkreuz insignia with no white outlines. The rudder was either clear-doped fabric or painted white.
J.Herris - Development of German Warplanes in WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Pfalz D.VIII flown by ace Paul Baumer while serving with Jasta Boelcke in May 1918. The white tail (black on the other side) and black and white nose stripes are the Jasta markings. The red/white/black chevron in German national colors is Baumer's personal marking. The silver-gray fuselage and wings covered with five-color printed camouflage fabric were the standard factory finish. Baumer, who became known as the Iron Knight, scored 43 victories, was awarded the Pour le Merite, and survived the war.
J.Herris - Pfalz Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Most Pfalz D.VIII fighters left the factory in a finish very similar to that which appeared on the last production D.IIIa types. The veneer-wrapped fuselage, fin and tailplane were aluminum-doped to produce the silver-gray finish. The wings and elevators were covered in five-color printed fabric, while the rudder was painted white. The struts and wheel covers were also silver-gray, the former having liberal stenciling and the circular Pfalz decals applied. Weights tables, serial numbers and other data were applied with stencils in black on the fuselage. There exists motion picture film showing Pfalz workers using these stencils, and applying the white borders to the fuselage Balkenkreuz insignia by hand, 'measuring' by sight alone in a rather nonchalant fashion. Photos show that the lower area of the forward fuselage behind the cowling was often overpainted a dark, glossy gray (?) color, probably to hide exhaust emissions and oil stains.
J.Herris - Pfalz Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Pfalz D.VIII of Oblt. Harald Auffarth of Jasta 29. The comet on the fuselage was his personal marking, known from photos of his other aircraft. The unit markings of dark green fuselage and yellow nose were applied, with five-color camouflage fabric on the wings. Wheel covers were probably yellow.
J.Herris - Pfalz Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
One of the few frontline Jagdstaffeln to be supplied with the Pfalz D.VIII was Jasta 29, and one photograph of the unit's pilots shows portions of this machine and one other. The fuselages of both aircraft were painted a single dark color, and the cowlings were apparently over-painted as well. There is considerable evidence from captured aircraft data and a pilot's combat report that the identifying markings of Jasta 29 in late 1918 consisted of dark green fuselages and yellow noses. These colors are thus illustrated on this machine, and the unknown pilot's emblem of a white fleur-de-lis (the depiction is a bit provisional, as the photo is none too clear) is seen on the fuselage. The wings retained their five-color printed camouflage finish, and the struts and wheel covers were probably silver-gray.
J.Herris - Pfalz Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Pfalz D.VIII 112/18 may have seen operational service, but the details are unknown. It had the usual silver-gray fuselage and white rudder, but the fuselage beneath the fin, and probably the tailplane/elevators, appear to have been painted white. The cowling also was seemingly white or off-white. A late Balkenkreuz with unusually thick white borders adorned the fuselage, probably the product of a field modification from the previous fully-bordered format. The wings were undoubtedly five-color lozenge fabric, and an unusual tail brace was fitted. This D.VIII was one of those fitted with a four-bladed prop made of two ordinary props bolted together.
J.Herris - Pfalz Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
A rather provisional illustration depicts Pfalz D.VIII 158/18 after the end of the war. This particular aircraft was transported by rail to the USAS collecting center in Koblenz (Coblenz) in December 1918 in accordance with the Armistice stipulations. It was later photographed at the USAS Production Center No. 2 at Romorantin; it was the only D.VIII handed over to the Americans and was sent to the US in April 1919. The photo reveals that the fuselage was camouflaged in alternating bands of dark and light colors, and these were likely the same colors that were applied to late-production examples of the contemporary Pfalz D.XII. Based on data derived from the D.XII, this tentative depiction of the camouflaged 158/18 provides one possible interpretation of its appearance, with factory-applied segments of purple, medium gray, dark and light green.
J.Herris - Pfalz Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Pfalz D.VIII of Jasta 14. The aircraft had striking bands (that appear to be black and white) around the fuselage for the unknown pilot's personal markings combined with the lengthwise black and white stripes on the fuselage that were the unit markings. Perhaps the number '172' on the rudder may have been part of its serial number of 172/18? The cowling and wheel covers are depicted as dark gray from the factory, with silbergrau fuselage and the wings in five-color camouflage fabric.
J.Herris - Pfalz Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Pfalz D.VIII of Jasta 14. The aircraft had a white band around the fuselage for the unknown pilot's personal marking combined with the lengthwise black and white stripes on the fuselage that were the unit markings. The cowling and wheel covers are depicted as dark gray from the factory, with silbergrau fuselage and the wings in five-color camouflage fabric.
J.Herris - Pfalz Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Pfalz D.VIII of Jasta 14. The aircraft had striking black bands around the fuselage for the unknown pilot's personal markings combined with the lengthwise black and white stripes on the fuselage that were the unit markings. The cowling and wheel covers are depicted as dark gray from the factory, with silbergrau fuselage and the wings in five-color camouflage fabric.
J.Herris - Pfalz Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Pfalz D.VIII 178/18 was the personal machine of Lt.d.R. Ludwig "Lutz" Beckmann, the Staffelfuhrer of Jasta 56. Aside from typical factory markings, this aircraft was clearly decorated with a dark nose and tail. Beckmann's own recollections and a Kofl. 4 document dated 14 August 1918 both record the unit colors of Jasta 56 as a blue-gray fuselage (or silver-gray in the case of the D.VIII) and a yellow nose and tail - the Kofl. 4 document even has a drawing of a Pfalz D.VIII in these markings. However, Beckmann also recalled that his own aircraft within the Staffel were distinguished by a red nose and tail (he was a Westphalian, and red and white were the Westphalian colors). Thus 178/18 is provisionally depicted here as having red markings, though yellow is also a possibility. It is very likely that other D.VIII aircraft of the unit had yellow markings, though no confirmed photos of such aircraft have yet been located.
J.Herris - Pfalz Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Several Pfalz D.VIII fighters served in the home defense unit Jasta 90 (previously Kampfeinsitzer Staffel, or Kest, 1a) in late 1918. Among them was this aircraft in which Vzfw. Heinrich Forstmann fatally crashed on 10 October. A white-bordered black (?) band was painted on the rear fuselage, obscuring the serial number. The cowling, wheel covers, and cabane struts seem to have been painted a dark color, perhaps gray. A slender auxiliary strut was fitted between the tailplane and the fin. This machine otherwise bore the factory finish described above.
J.Herris - Pfalz Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
The unarmed and unmarked Pfalz D.VII prototype was flight tested in December 1917 and demonstrated excellent performance, especially climb rate. Its fuselage was essentially that of the Pfalz Dr.I triplane, and it used the same 160 hp Siemens-Halske Sh.III counter-rotary engine. A massive, four-bladed propeller was fitted to absorb the full power of the slow-turning Sh.III. The oil-streaked cowling indicates the engine was still having development problems.
The D VII was another of the Pfalz entries in the January 1918 D-type Competition at Adlershof.
J.Herris - Pfalz Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Side view of the unarmed and unmarked Pfalz D.VII prototype flight tested in December 1917.
J.Herris - Pfalz Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
The unarmed Pfalz D.VII prototype powered by the 160 hp Siemens-Halske Sh.III rotary engine was photographed at the First Fighter Competition on 23 January 1918. Finish is typical Pfalz silver-gray with unbordered iron crosses, while the Pfalz logo has been applied to the rudder and fuselage, followed by "D.VII". The Nieuport-inspired sesquiplane wing configuration was finally abandoned for a typical single-bay biplane wing.
J.Herris - Pfalz Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Pfalz D.VII prototype.
J.Herris - Pfalz Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Pfalz D VII (with 160 h.p. Siemens-Halske)
J.Herris - Pfalz Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Another view of the unarmed Pfalz D.VII prototype during the Typenprufung at Adlershof in late February 1918. It is finished in Pfalz silver-gray with iron crosses. The buried tail control cables show the care taken to minimize drag.
J.Herris - Pfalz Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
The unarmed Pfalz D.VII prototype during the Typenprufung at Adlershof in late February 1918. The slow-turning 160 hp Siemens-Halske Sh.III engine required a larger propeller and extensive cooling holes and part of the cowling cut away to achieve sufficient cooling. A two-bladed propeller is fitted for performance tests. The rudder is balanced while the elevator and ailerons are not.
J.Herris - Pfalz Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
An armed Pfalz D.VII prototype with bulged engine cowling for a larger diameter rotary, probably the 200 hp Goebel Goe.III.
J.Herris - Pfalz Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
This armed Pfalz D.VII prototype was powered by an eleven-cylinder 145 hp Oberursel Ur.III rotary engine. The bottom of the cowling was cut awa for greater cooling. In addition to the different engine, the aircraft differs from earlier D.VII prototypes in having balanced ailerons and an integral tail skid support. The finish is typical Pfalz silver-gray, but now has a white rudder and Balkenkreuz.
J.Herris - Pfalz Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Pfalz D.VIII flown by Vzfw. Heinrich Forstmann of Kest 1a (later Jasta 90). The black fuselage band with white edging was his personal insignia. Forstmann scored one confirmed victory, a DH-4, on 7 September 1918. Forstmann was killed on 10 October 1918 in a fatal crash; the remains of his Pfalz D.VIII are shown in the inset.
J.Herris - Pfalz Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
An unarmed Pfalz D.VIII (probably 191/18), shipped to the Italians as war reparations on 21 June 1920, is shown here on Montecello airfield. Unlike most other D.VIIIs, it features a propeller spinner similar to those used on Siemens-Schuckert fighters. The four-bladed Wotan propeller was manufactured in one piece. An Sh.III engine and Wotan propeller are on display at the Swiss Transportation Museum in Lucerne.
J.Herris - Pfalz Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
The Pfalz D.VIII prototype, powered by a 160 hp Siemens-Halske Sh.III engine and armed with twin Spandau LMG 08/15 machine guns, photographed during the Typenprufung at Adlershof in January 1918. The airframe was identical to the D.VII except the wing cellule was strengthened by an additional pair of wing struts.
J.Herris - Pfalz Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Lt. Paul Baumer of Jasta Boelcke and his Pfalz D.VIII. He is wearing a captured RFC/RAF flying coat, prized by German pilots. Baumer scored three victories with Jasta 5, then transferred to Jasta Boelcke (Jasta 2) in August 1917 and scored 40 more victories to bring his total to 43. Baumer was injured in a crash of a Pfalz D.VIII on 29 May 1918 and did not return to his unit until September. He then scored 16 victories in 25 days! Known as Der Eiserne Adler (The Iron Eagle), he survived being shot down in September by taking to his parachute. He was awarded the Pour le Merite on 2 Nov. 1918. The red-white-black band on the fuselage was Baumer's personal marking.
J.Herris - Pfalz Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Pfalz D.VIII with spinner that looks like it came from an SSW D.III. This may be 191/18 on Montecello airfield.
R.Kosin - The German Fighter since 1915 /Putnam/
Pfalz D.VIII
J.Herris - Pfalz Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Lt. Paul Baumer and his Pfalz D.VIII
J.Herris - Pfalz Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Late-production Pfalz D.VII 1197/18 showing the cowl with reinforcing ribs, the Wotan propeller, and a rudder apparently lacking the customary Balkenkreuz. The large windscreen is unusual.
The compact Pfalz D VIII was completed in time for the second of the 1918 fighter competitions and showed sufficient promise to warrant a production contract. Powered by a 160hp Siemens-Halske Sh III rotary, the twin 7.92mm Spandau-armed D VIII had a top level speed of 120mph at sea level. Production was just getting underway at the time of the Armistice, with 40 or so completed. The example seen here was one of 20 that were undergoing operational evaluation at the front.
J.Herris - Pfalz Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Lt. Ludwig Beckmann, second from left, and his Pfalz D.VIII 178/18 in Jasta 56. Lt. Beckmann scored eight confirmed victories, all in Jasta 56, and became CO. Two of his victims were aces with 210 Squadron, RAF; Capt. H.T. Mellings (15 victories) and Capt. H.A. Patey (11 victories). Uffz. Ludwig Jeckert, second from right, scored four victories, all during his four months with Jasta 56.
J.Herris - Pfalz Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Pfalz D.VII 1112/18, an early production model, with an unusual tail brace. The Pfalz logo appears on the rudder and wheels. The four-bladed propeller consisted of two single-bladed ones bolted together, a design that saved production time, packing material, and shipping space but increased propeller weight slightly.
J.Herris - Pfalz Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Pfalz D.VIII 170/18 in immaculate factory finish. The weight table on the fuselage reads: Leergewicht 542 kg (empty weight), Nutzlast 195 kg (useful load), zulassiges Gesamtgewicht 767 kg (permissible total load).
J.Herris - Development of German Warplanes in WWI /Centennial Perspective/
The Pfalz D.VIII was a two-bay version of the D.VII. The extra struts made it stronger, so it was selected for production, but their additional weight and drag reduced performance compared to the D.VII. This early-production D.VIII was flown by ace Paul Baumer while serving with Jasta Boelcke.
J.Herris - Pfalz Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Pfalz D.VIII fighter at the Pfalz factory from Pfalz test pilot Gustav Bauer's personal photo album; he is in the cockpit in the photo.
J.Herris - Pfalz Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Entered in the First Fighter Competition at Adlershof, the Pfalz D.VIII prototype did not compete because of its defective Siemens-Halske engine. It is shown here on 23 January 1918. Like the D.VII prototype, it features typical Pfalz silver-gray finish with iron crosses.
J.Herris - Pfalz Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Pfalz D.VIII fighters of Kest 1b/Jasta 90 in standard factory finish of silvergrau fuselages and fins, white rudders, and printed, five-color camouflage fabric on wings.
J.Herris - Pfalz Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Pfalz D.VIII fighters of Jasta 14 display their colorful markings.
J.Herris - Pfalz Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Aircraft 172 (172/18?) is appears to be at the far right in the Jasta 14 lineup.
J.Herris - Pfalz Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Pfalz D.VIII 124/18 in standard factory markings, possibly at Jasta Boelcke in mid-1918. By this time the Balkenkreuz with white border and a white rudder was standard. A dark area is visible behind the cowling just above the lower wing; this may have been painted darker to conceal exhaust staining from the 160 hp Siemens-Halske Sh.III. This may be the D.VIII flown by Leutnant Paul Baumer of Jasta Boelcke shown on the following page before Jasta and personal markings were applied.
J.Herris - Pfalz Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Pfalz D.VIII 157/18 modified with N-struts and balanced ailerons and powered by the new 200 hp Goebel Goe.III rotary engine in the summer of 1918.
Jane's All The World Aircraft 1919 /Jane's/
The Siemens-Schuckert D.IV. (???)
J.Herris - Pfalz Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Pfalz D.VIII fighter at the Pfalz factory from Pfalz test pilot Gustav Bauer's personal photo album. The D.VIII has N-struts not seen on production aircraft.
J.Herris - Pfalz Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Pfalz D.VIII takes off from an unknown aerodrome.
J.Herris - Pfalz Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Lt. Paul Baumer of Jasta Boelcke (honor name for Jasta 2) poses next to his Pfalz D.VIII.
J.Herris - Pfalz Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Oblt. Harald Auffarth of Jasta 29 in front of a Pfalz D.VIII with one piece, four-bladed Wotan propeller. Auffarth flew as an observer with Feldflieger-Abteilung 27 and Flieger-Abteilung (A) 266 before becoming a fighter pilot. He joined Jasta 18 in September and after 5 quick victories the same month was posted to Jasta 29 as acting Staffelfuhrer, being confirmed as Staffelfuhrer a month later. On 28 September 1918 he was given command of Jagdgruppe Nr3 comprising Jastas 14, 16, 29, and 56. Auffarth scored 30 victories but in the confusion of war's end only 26 were confirmed. He was proposed for the Pour le Merite but the Kaiser abdicated before it could be approved, permanently ending such awards.
J.Herris - Pfalz Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Another photo of a Pfalz D.VIII at Kest 1a, April 1918 at Mannheim-Sanhofen. Lt. Dannenberg is sitting on the cowling. Uffz. Jahn is standing on the right wheel; Lt. Dembowski is standing on the left wheel. Standing, left to right: Lt. Wagener, Vzfw. Mohring, Vzfw. David, Oblt. Nebel (fuhrer), Lt. Klenker, Vzfw. Schendel. Mohring scored one confirmed victory. The propeller is composed of two two-bladed propellers bolted together.
J.Herris - Pfalz Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Pfalz D.VIII at Kest 1a, April 1918 at Mannheim-Sanhofen; fuhrer Oblt. Rudolf Nebel. Sitting on the cowl: Lt. Dembowski. Standing on wheel: left: Lt. Dannenberg; right: Lt. Wagener. In front, left to right: Vzfw. Schendel, Oblt. Nebel, Lt. Klenker, Vzfw. Mohring, Uffz. Jahn, Vzfw. David, Vzfw. Baumgard. Kest 1a later became Jasta 90. Oblt. Nebel scored 2 confirmed victories; Lt. Dannenberg scored 4 confirmed victories. Lt. Wagener scored 5 confirmed victories, 3 while serving on the Italian Front with Jasta 39. The propeller is composed of two two-bladed propellers bolted together.
J.Herris - Pfalz Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Pfalz D.VIII 193/18 of Jasta 29 with one piece, four-bladed Wotan propeller and another D.VIII in the background, late 1918. Second from left may be Lt. Karl Gregor, with a wooden leg. Fifth from left is Oblt. Harald Auffarth, seventh from left is Lt. August Burkhard, and ninth from left is Eugen.
J.Herris - Pfalz Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Fuselage of Pfalz D.VIII 158/18 at Romoratin, April 1919. The aircraft is spray painted like later production Pfalz D.XII fighters.
J.Herris - Development of German Warplanes in WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Pfalz D.VIII fuselage shells built by the Wickelrumpf technique are being assembled in the factory. The pattern of the narrow plywood strips is clearly visible. Plywood was abundant in Germany despite the Allied naval blockade.
J.Herris - Roland Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
J.Herris - Pfalz Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Metal Pfalz D.VIII rigging diagram courtesy of Dave Watts.
W.Green, G.Swanborough - The Complete Book of Fighters
The D VIII saw limited production and was tested at the Front in the summer of 1918.
J.Herris - Pfalz Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Pfalz D.VII
J.Herris - Pfalz Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Pfalz D.VII
J.Herris - Pfalz Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Pfalz D.VII
J.Herris - Pfalz Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Pfalz D.VIII
J.Herris - Pfalz Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Pfalz D.VIII
J.Herris - Pfalz Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Pfalz D.VIII
J.Herris - Pfalz Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Pfalz D.VIII of Lt. Paul Baumer, Jasta Boelcke