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AEG G.V

Страна: Германия

Год: 1918

AEG - G.IVk - 1918 - Германия<– –>AEG - PE - 1918 - Германия


O.Thetford, P.Gray German Aircraft of the First World War (Putnam)


A.E.G. G V
  Produced for longer-range work than the G IV, the prototype G V appeared in May 1918. None were completed in time for operational service. In 1919 some of these aircraft were used on the first German air line Deutsche Luftreederei, one machine flying from Berlin to Eskjo in Sweden in 4 hr. 7 min. Engines, two 260 h.p. Mercedes D IVa. Span, 27.24 m. (89 ft. 4 1/2 in.). Length, 10.8 m. (35 ft. 9 1/2 in.). Height, 4.5 m. (14 ft. 9 1/8 in.). Weights: Empty, 2,700 kg. (5,940 lb.). Loaded, 4,600 kg. (10,120 lb.). Speed, 145 km.hr. (90.625 m.p.h.). Climb, 1,000 m. (3,280 ft.) in 6 min. Duration, 5-6 hr. Armament, 2/3 manually operated machine-guns. 600 kg. (1,320 lb.) bombs.


J.Herris AEG Aircraft of WWI (A Centennial Perspective on Great War Airplanes 16)


AEG G.V

  In November 1917 AEG began work on a night bomber designed to carry a useful load of 2,100 kg, including a 1,000 kg P.u.W. bomb. The new bomber was based on the earlier AEG G.IVb-lang but with wingspan and area further increased for greater payload. The engines reverted to the 260 hp Mercedes D.IVa that powered production AEG G.IV bombers. The longer fuselage and box tail of the AEG G.IVb-lang were retained for improved engine-out handling.
  To further improve flying qualities, the G.V used the Flettner Hilfsruder (servo rudder) that aerodynamically reduced the control forces and made large bombing aircraft less tiring to fly. Developed as part of Anton Flettner's work on automatic guided-missile control, the Flettner servo rudder was an advanced design feature of all late-1918 German bombers. According to one historian "the British Air Ministry technical reports of 1919 indicate complete ignorance of the aerodynamic principles employed!"
  In May 1918 the AEG G.V prototype reached 4,000 meters in 70 minutes carrying a useful load of 2,100 kg. Idflieg held a competition between the AEG G.IV, AEG G.V, Friedrichshafen G.IV, and Gotha G.Vb bombers and found that, when carrying a useful load of 1,600 kg, the AEG G.V and Friedrichshafen G.IV were comparable in performance, and both were superior to the AEG G.IV and Gotha G.Vb in speed and climb. The first order for the G.V was placed in April 1918 and the first nine production G.V bombers were delivered in August. Between August and October 1918 a total of 37 G.V bombers were delivered from the 50 that were ordered.
  Postwar, AEG sold six AEG G.V bombers to Sweden on November 29, 1918, with AEG to deliver the aircraft by air. The first G.V, 1708/18, had already arrived at Eksjo on 23 November 1918. Three G.V bombers left Hennigsdorf on 29 March 1919 but two force landed before reaching Sweden and the third was destroyed on take-off in Vilemolla on 4 April 1919. In May-June 1919 two additional G.V bombers (including G. 1712/18) were flown to Kristianstad, followed by two further replacements (including G.1710/18) in August and September 1919.


Swedish Adventure by Colin Owers

  Five AEG G.V bombers were purchased by Sweden and received the Swedish Army serials: 8501 (that became 8502 as the army used odd numbers for single-seaters the original allocation was in error), 9504, 9506, 9508, 9510 and 9512. All were delivered and flown occasionally in 1919 by the Army Aviation Company as reconnaissance aircraft in their original lozenge fabric with Swedish markings painted over the German markings. They were delivered without any armament or radio equipment.
  G.V 1708/18 was the first aircraft delivered. It flew non-stop from Berlin to Eksjo in Southern Sweden, on 23 November 1918, on a "test flight". The Swedish Army was interested and purchased the machine and ordered five more. DLR was the intermediary and the order was placed with this concern. G.V 1708/28 was given the Swedish Army serial 8501 but this was replaced by 8502 in March 1919. This machine made 24 flights but only one long distance one before crashing on 14 May 1919.
  The first three of the order left Berlin for Sweden on 19 March.
  The next machine's original serial is unknown. It suffered at least two forced landings on the delivery flight. It was 9504 in Swedish service. This was the only G.V to crash after a five minute flight, its first in Swedish service, on 19 May 1919, the crew escaping without injury. The aircraft ended up on its nose and was the subject of many photographs.
  The third machine is also unknown. It crashed during landing at Warnemunde Harbour on 28 March 1919, killing the crew. The wreck was salvaged that evening.
  The fourth machine also suffered force landings. Oil failure caused a force landing at Vitemolla on 30th. When attempting to continue their journey the machine crashed on 4 April. The German crew were unhurt. AEG sold the remains to the Swedish Army as junk. The Swedes were interested in the motors that had come through the accident without damage. It is probable that this aircraft was repaired and became 9512. Aircraft 9512 was written off on 1 June 1920.
  AEG G.V No.5 was 1712/18 and left on 18 May 1919, and after two force landings arrived on 21st. As Army 9506 it had no recorded flights at Malmslatt, and was written off on 16 December 1919, and finally scrapped in 1920.
  AEG G.V No.6 is unknown. It arrived on 6 June 1919, suffering only one force landing on its delivery trip. Again, as 9508, no flights were recorded for this machine at Malmslatt. As 9508 it was written off on 3 April 1922.
  G.V 1710/18 was the next AEG delivered. It became 9510. It had suffered a forced landing and crash on its delivery flight due to a broken motor shaft. It arrived on 10 August 1919, and was handed over the following day. It crashed on 13 August 1919, three days after arrival while still wearing its German markings. It never wore its Swedish serial 9510. It was officially written off on 13 December.
  The last AEG G.V (erroneously recorded as 501/18) apparently had no problems on its delivery flight but was not accepted by the Swedish control officer due to its shoddy workmanship. It was destroyed on the ground on 24 November 1919 in a storm at Kristianstad.
  AEG G.Vs 8592 (sic), 9504, and 9512 were written-off on 13 December 1919, in order to clear up the paper work. The AEG bombers may have been too advanced for the Swedish pilots used to single-engined machines; however, it appears that there were problems with quality control at the AEG end. The 260 hp Mercedes engines proved useful and were used in the locally produced FVM S 18 reconnaissance aircraft.

Note: This section has benefited from the research of Lennart Andersson. Lennart and Ray Sanger have completed a book on the fate of the German aircraft post-WWI entitled Retribution and Recovery. German Aircraft and Aviation 1919-1923.


AEG G-Type Production Orders
Serial Numbers Qty Order Date & Notes
AEG G.V (50 Total)
G.620-644/18 25 April 1918
G.1700-1724/18 25 October 1918

J.Herris - AEG Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
AEG G.V G.625/18
J.Herris - AEG Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
AEG G.V G.644/18
J.Herris - AEG Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
AEG G.V 9504 in Swedish service postwar
J.Herris - Development of German Warplanes in WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Final member of the AEG bomber family was the AEG G.V, which was an extended-span, three-bay development of the G.IV. The additional wing area enabled it to carry a heavier bomb load; it used the same 260 hp Mercedes D.IVa engines as the earlier G.IV. Servo-tabs were added to the ailerons to reduce the heavy control forces for the pilot.
J.Herris - AEG Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
View of AEG G.V 301/18 showing its enlarged, three-bay wing with Flettner tabs to reduce the pilot's aileron control forces. The 'box' tail with twin rudders gave better engine-out handling.
J.Herris - AEG Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
J.Herris - AEG Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
AEG G.V anchors a display of late-war aircraft, perhaps postwar.
J.Herris - AEG Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Front view of AEG G.V 644/18 emphasizing the three-bay wings and distinctive Flettner tabs on the ailerons. The port engine has been removed, perhaps for maintenance.
J.Herris - AEG Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Additional view of AEG G.V 644/18 showing more detail of its ailerons with Flettner tabs to reduce the pilot's aileron control forces. The AEG G.V was the best two-engine German bomber in service at war's end. For some reason the port engine of this aircraft has been removed.
J.Herris - AEG Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Additional view of AEG G.V 644/18 showing more detail of its ailerons with Flettner tabs to reduce the pilot's aileron control forces.
J.Herris - AEG Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Side view of an AEG G.V 644/18; power was from a pair of 260 hp Mercedes D.IVb engines like the earlier G.IV.
J.Herris - AEG Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Side view of an AEG G.V of the second batch showing the Flettner tabs and 'box' tail with twin rudders.
J.Herris - AEG Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
AEG G.V undergoing adjustment of its ailerons and Flettner tabs.
J.Herris - AEG Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Rear view of an AEG G.V highlighting its massive wing span and 'box' tail.
J.Herris - AEG Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Rearview of an AEG G.V showing the 'box' tail with twin rudders to better advantage.
J.Herris - AEG Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
The Fokker V17 monoplane fighter prototype provides an interesting contrast to the AEG G.V and emphasizes the size of the G.V.
J.Herris - AEG Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
AEG built a wide variety of warplanes but is probably best known for its twin-engine bombers. Here is G.V G.625/18, an example of the final production AEG bomber. The G.V was based on the G.IV with its wing enlarged in span and area for more lift to carry the desired 1,000 kg bomb load, requiring an additional bay of struts. A 'box' tail gave better control during asymmetric thrust after loss of an engine, and the Flettner tabs on the ailerons reduced control forces, making the large bomber easier for the pilot to fly. The G.V was powered by two 260 hp Mercedes D.IVa engines.
The outrigger hinged aileron tab was attached by a rod to the aileron operating linkage. When the control surface was actuated, the tab moved in the opposite direction and partially balanced the aileron movement, making it easier to operate. It was thus not a true servo tab; its patented name was Flettner Hilfsruder (assisted rudder). It made the aircraft of the G class less tiring to fly and was in use in a variety of forms on the late models of twin-engined bombers. (British Air Ministry technical reports of 1919 indicate complete ignorance of the aerodynamic properties employed!)
A.Imrie - German Bombers /Arms & Armour/
There was disbelief about the relatively small numbers of machines in use when bombers of the Bogohl were handed over to the Allies after the war, and this is surely the highest tribute that could be paid to the devotion to duty of the Bogohl commanders and their crews. This AEG G V (635/18) is shown at Avere aerodrome after the Armistice with a Gotha G Vb in the background. All the machines at this aerodrome were of the latest types, having the aerodynamic refinements that have already been mentioned, but in a last defiant gesture all the bombers had been damaged in various ways to prevent them from flying again.
J.Herris - AEG Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
German bombers photographed postwar. The two aircraft at the top of the photo are AEG G.V bombers. A Gotha G.V is at bottom left and another AEG G.V is at bottom right.
J.Herris - AEG Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
AEG G.V 301/18 in American hands postwar.
J.Herris - AEG Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
AEG G.V in Sweden postwar. The snow indicates this may be the first aircraft 1708/18, delivered 23 November 1918 before the purchase contract was signed.
J.Herris - AEG Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
AEG G.V in Sweden postwar. The snow indicates this may be the first aircraft 1708/18, delivered 23 November 1918 before the purchase contract was signed.
J.Herris - AEG Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
On November 29, 1918, less than three weeks after the end of the war, AEG sold six AEG G.V bombers to Sweden. In fact, the first G.V, 1708/18, had already arrived at Eksjo on 23 November!
J.Herris - AEG Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
J.Herris - AEG Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
AEG G.V during its delivery flight to Sweden.
J.Herris - AEG Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
Crash of AEG G.V 1710/18 in Sweden Aug.13, 1919.
J.Herris - AEG Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
AEG G.V after its crash in Sweden in 1919 displays under-fuselage details not normally visible in photos. Swedish markings have already been applied over the German night-bomber printed camouflage fabric.
J.Herris - AEG Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
AEG G.V 9504 after its crash in Sweden in 1919.
J.Herris - AEG Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
AEG G.V
J.Herris - AEG Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
AEG G.V
J.Herris - AEG Aircraft of WWI /Centennial Perspective/
AEG G.V