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Fokker V1 / V2 / V3

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: 1916

Fighter

Fokker - D.V - 1916 - <– –>Fokker - Dr.I (Fokker Dreidecker) - 1917 -


O.Thetford, P.Gray German Aircraft of the First World War (Putnam)


Fokker V 1
  The system of designating experimental aircraft with a V prefix was begun in the autumn of 1916, and coincidentally the V 1 was the first aircraft to be completely designed by Reinhold Platz. This was a revolutionary machine with a stocky steel-tube fuselage rounded out to the full circle of the cowling and, although the empennage appeared an orthodox structure, surfaces were "all moving" and featured no fin surfaces. The deep-sectioned wings were fully cantilever and ply-covered: in place of conventional ailerons the whole of each wingtip for a distance of approximately a metre moved differentially for lateral control. Other characteristics, which persisted practically right through the remainder of the Fokkers built during the war, were the lifting surface fairing the axle and spreaders and the steel-tube, pylon type, centre-section struts. Power unit was no more than a 100 h.p. Oberursel U I rotary. Two Spandau machine-guns firing forward were fitted.

Fokker V 2
  In January 1917 the V 1 was re-designed with conventional tail surfaces and a 120 h.p. Mercedes water-cooled engine installed. The revolutionary moving wingtips for lateral control were retained.


W.Green, G.Swanborough The Complete Book of Fighters


FOKKER V 1 Germany

  The first Fokker fighter design to be ascribed solely to Reinhold Platz was a radical single-seat cantilever sesquiplane powered by a 110 hp Le Rhone nine-cylinder rotary engine. It was also the first of the Schwerin-built Versuchsmaschinen (experimental machines) to be assigned a V-series designation as the V 1. Flown in December 1916, and known unofficially as the Floh (Flea), the V 1 possessed wings of unusually thick aerofoil section, and consisting of wooden boxspars and ribs with plywood skinning. The incidence of the upper wing could be changed in flight and conventional trailing-edge ailerons gave place to rotatable wing tips. The vertical and horizontal tail surfaces were of what were later to become known as "all-moving type and were aerodynamically balanced. The steel-tube fuselage was faired to circular section by means of wooden hoops and stringers. Provision was made for the installation of two synchronised LMG 08/15 machine guns. Quite extensively flown, this highly innovatory fighter prototype, referred to as of Verspannungslos (literally without bracing, or cantilever) type, was inspected by the Idflieg, but considered too radical.

Max speed, 111 mph (178 km/h).
Span, 25 ft 9 7/8 in (7,87 m).
Length, 16 ft 4 1/2 in (4,99 m).
Height, 9 ft 0 in (2,74 m).
Wing area, 161.46 sq ft (15,00 m2).


FOKKER V 2 Germany

  Developed in parallel with the V1, the V 2 - which was also referred to contemporaneously as the D IV by Fokker despite Idflieg application of this designation to Kreutzers M 21 - differed essentially in having a 160 hp Mercedes D III six-cylinder water-cooled engine. The shift in cg resulting from introduction of the D III engine led Reinhold Platz to adopt modest sweepback on the outer upper wing panels attached to an abbreviated, unswept centre section. The vertical tail was modified to compensate for the increased side area forward provided by the D III engine, the fixed portion being increased in depth and faired into the aft fuselage. There was virtually no cabane between the engine cowling and the wing centre section, which was supported by splayed steel-tube tripods attached to the front spar. Like the V 1, the V 2 had a variable-incidence upper wing and rotatable wing tips. Although the V 2 allegedly proved fast and sensitive during flight test, there is no record of the V 2 having been inspected by the Idflieg.

Max speed, 118 mph (190 km/h) at 1,640 ft (500 m).
Time to 3,280 ft (1 000 m), 2.8 min.
Span, 25 ft 6 1/2 in (7,82 m).
Length, 17 ft 0 3/4 in (5,21 m).
Height, 8 ft 4 3/4 in (2,56 m).
Wing area, 165.77 sq ft (15,40 m2).


FOKKER V 3 Germany

  Difficulties experienced with the V1 and V 2 led to the construction of yet a third fighter prototype of Verspannungslos configuration. This, the V 3, retained the 160 hp Mercedes D III engine, but both wings were increased in area by a total of 38.75 sqft (3,60 m2), a deeper, more orthodox cabane was introduced to improve view from the cockpit and orthodox vertical tail surfaces were provided. The manually-variable wing incidence was discarded in favour of fixed incidence and a radiator for the D III was let into the leading edge of the wing centre section. The V 3 allegedly offered a rate of climb superior to that of the V 2, but handling characteristics were considered too difficult for the frontline pilot and this line of development was discarded. No data for the V 3 appear to have survived.

W.Green, G.Swanborough - The Complete Book of Fighters
The V 1 was a radical cantilever sesquiplane, designed by Reinhold Platz, which began its flight test programme in December 1916.
W.Green, G.Swanborough - The Complete Book of Fighters
Evolved in parallel with the V 1, the V 2 had a water-cooled engine and wing sweepback.
W.Green, G.Swanborough - The Complete Book of Fighters
Utilising experience gained with the V 1 and V 2, the V 3 allegedly possessed handling characteristics "too difficult" for frontline pilots.
- Breguet's Aircraft Challenge /WWW/
- Breguet's Aircraft Challenge /WWW/
- Breguet's Aircraft Challenge /WWW/
- Breguet's Aircraft Challenge /WWW/
Probably Fokker wanted to try another arrangement on this experimental plane, because the wing radiator was replaced by 2 narrow ear radiators athwart of the fuselage. Here you see a picture of this arrangement from behind.
- Breguet's Aircraft Challenge /WWW/
- Breguet's Aircraft Challenge /WWW/
This is (an enlarged) still of the start of a movie shot in the experimental section of the Schwerin works of Fokker. At the right can be seen the craftsmen, probably the best of the Fokker factory. At the left in front you see the uncovered nose of the Fokker V.2 with in the backgrond the covered fuselage of the Fokker V.1.
W.Green, G.Swanborough - The Complete Book of Fighters
The V 1 was a radical cantilever sesquiplane, designed by Reinhold Platz, which began its flight test programme in December 1916.
W.Green, G.Swanborough - The Complete Book of Fighters
Utilising experience gained with the V 1 and V 2, the V 3 allegedly possessed handling characteristics "too difficult" for frontline pilots.