Книги

Centennial Perspective
J.Herris
Fokker Aircraft of WWI. Vol.6: Foreign Service
212

J.Herris - Fokker Aircraft of WWI. Vol.6: Foreign Service /Centennial Perspective/ (56)

MAG 90.05 flys in to land; MAG 90.03 is at right. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Im Fluge Fokker V 22, am Boden Dreidecker 90.03, Aviatik-Berg D.I 92.14, Aviatik-Berg C.I-Baureihe 91, Ufag C.I-Flugzeug 161.01
MAG 90.05 flys in to land; MAG 90.03 is at right. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Im Fluge Fokker V 22, am Boden Dreidecker 90.03, Aviatik-Berg D.I 92.14, Aviatik-Berg C.I-Baureihe 91, Ufag C.I-Flugzeug 161.01
Fully-assembled airframe of a MAG-built Fokker D.VII at the MAG factory rolled out for inspection just before the end of the war. In the background mechanics are working on an Aviatik D.I(MAG).
Fokker D.VII (MAG), Flugzeugnummer 93.01, Rohbau bei MAG
MAG 90.05 flys in to land; MAG 90.03 is at right. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Im Fluge Fokker V 22, am Boden Dreidecker 90.03, Aviatik-Berg D.I 92.14, Aviatik-Berg C.I-Baureihe 91, Ufag C.I-Flugzeug 161.01
Austro-Hungarian Fokker M.5L & A.III
  
  Austria obtained a number of Fokker Eindeckers in various ways.
  Fokker M.5L 03.03 was ordered from Germany on 29 January 1915. The unarmed aircraft was initially assigned to Flek 6 as a "practice aircraft". Damaged on 30 August, it was repaired and later assigned to Flik 8 as a trainer. It was written off in March 1918. Unusually, its serial number was in the middle of a batch of Fokker B.I aircraft.
  Fokker M.5L 00.13 was most likely obtained from a German Army unit in the field. It served as a trainer with Flek 6 until it was written off in September 1916.
<...>
  In German service the designation A.III applied to the unarmed M.5L. However, the Austrians retained the A.III designation even for the armed M.5K MG, which received the military designation E.I when purchased by the German Army.
<...>


Fokker 03.03 (M.5L) Specifications
Engine: 80 hp Oberursel U.O
Wing: Span 11.0m
Chord 1.80 m
General: Length 6.90 m
Maximum Speed: 130 km/h
Climb: 1000m 4.5 min
2000m 15.0 min
Fokker M.5L 03.03 assigned to Flik 8, Aisovizza airfield, spring 1916. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Fokker M.5L 03.03 assigned to Flik 8, Aisovizza airfield, 25 December 1915. Feldpilot Lt. Wedige von Froreich is at left. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Fokker M.5L 03.03 assigned to Flik 8, Pergine airfield, spring 1916. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Austro-Hungarian Fokker M.5L & A.III
  
  Austria obtained a number of Fokker Eindeckers in various ways.
<...>
  Two Fokker E.I aircraft, E.I 64/15 and E.I 65/15, somehow ended up with Austrian Flik 4 on the Italian Front. These aircraft were accepted by the German Army on 4 November 1915 and were shipped from the Fokker factory the next day. The aircraft were flown in combat by Flik 4 as early as 12 November. Originally flown in German markings, they were soon designated as Fokker A.III 03.51 and 03.52 in Austrian service and marked accordingly.
  In German service the designation A.III applied to the unarmed M.5L. However, the Austrians retained the A.III designation even for the armed M.5K MG, which received the military designation E.I when purchased by the German Army.
  The first known batch of Eindecker fighters officially ordered by Austria were a dozen Eindeckers ordered on 7 June 1915. The great need for Eindecker fighters on the Western Front meant the German air service refused to allow the aircraft to be exported until late in 1915. By that time, the production aircraft was the E.III, and the fighters were delivered to Austria between February and July 1916. A comparison dated 10 August 1916 between the A.III and new Brandenburg C.I stated the C.I was faster and with better climb. When new biplane fighters were delivered the remaining A.III fighters were transferred to the less demanding Eastern Front.


Fokker A.III Series 03.51-52 Specifications
Engine: 80 hp Oberursel U.O
Wing: Span 8.95 m
Wing Area 16.0 m2
General: Length 6.75 m
Height 2.88 m
Empty Weight 358 kg
Loaded Weight 563 kg
Maximum Speed: 130 km/h
Climb: 1000m 7 min
2000m 20 min
3000m 40 min
Armament: 1 MG


Fokker A.III Series 03.4 Specifications
Engine: 100 hp Oberursel U.I
Wing: Span 7.190 m
Chord 1.80 m
Wing Area 16.0 m2
General: Length 7.2 m
Height 2.4 m
Empty Weight 400 kg
Loaded Weight 615 kg
Maximum Speed: 140 km/h
Climb: 1000m 5 min
2000m 15 min
3000m 30 min
Armament: 1 MG
Note: Fokker 03.51 and 03.52 were Fokker E.l fighters in the German designation system.
Fokker A.III serial A6 flown by Gottfried Banfield.
Fokker A.III 03.42 after it crashed.
Fokker A.III 03.43 was flown by pilots of Flik 8 and 19 on the Isonzo Front in May 1916. This machine was one of the few armed with a synchronized Schwarzlose M 7/12 machine gun.
Fokker M.5L 03.43 in the field.
Fokker A.III 03.43 in the field. 03.43 was flown by Flik 19 and Flik 8 pilots on the Isonzo Front in February and March 1916. In mid March 1916 the machine entered service with Flik 8 operating on the south Tyrol Front. In August 1916 the unit was deployed to Galicia. The Eindecker 03.43 was then attached to Flik 18 on the Eastern Front. Finally, it was passed to Flek 4 at Szombathely where it was used as a training machine. During its whole service life it was armed with an Austrian Schwarzlose machine gun. Here it is shown at Flik 8 at Pergine. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Fokker A.III 03.47, Flik 13, Stanislau airfield (in German language), today Ivano-Frankivsk, Ukraine. (Zdenek Cejka)
Fokker A.III 03.51 in flight. Pilot Jindrich Kostrba, Czech by nationality, (in German language sources his name is written as Heinrich Kostrba) achieved the first three of his total number of eight aerial victories on February 2, 1916 in the cockpit of the Eindecker when he downed two Italian Caproni Ca.1s and one Caudron G.IV. Here he is landing with 03.51.

and sitting in 03.51 and 03.52 on the following page. Those photos were taken in February 1916 at the airfield Aisovizza (today Ajdovscina). After the war Jindrich Kostrba was the first commander of the newly created Czechoslovak Air Forces
Pilot Jindrich Kostrba, Czech by nationality, (in German language sources his name is written as Heinrich Kostrba) achieved the first three of his total number of eight aerial victories on February 2, 1916 in the cockpit of the Eindecker when he downed two Italian Caproni Ca.1s and one Caudron G.IV. Here he is sitting in 03.51 and 03.52. Those photos were taken in February 1916 at the airfield Aisovizza (today Ajdovscina). After the war Jindrich Kostrba was the first commander of the newly created Czechoslovak Air Forces.
Fokker A.III fighters, from left 03.42, 03.41, 03.52, and 03.51 at Aisovizza field. Flik 2, 4, 8, 12, and 19 were stationed Aisovizza in February 1916. Aircraft 03.51 and 03.52 belonged to Flik 4, Fokkers 03.41 and 03.42 belonged to Flik 19.
Fokker A.III A IV. Roman numerals were used at first, then Arabic numerals.
Naval Fokker A IV (old marking style) clearly has the 9-cylinder 100 hp Oberursel. Although the Fokker Eindeckers were fairly maneuverable with good performance for 1915, their main strength as a fighter was their armament of a synchronized machine gun.
In addition to the Fokker A.III aircraft assigned to the Army, the Austro-Hungarian Navy also received some that were assigned Navy serial numbers A 4 through A 9. Here A 6 is shown; it was fitted with a 100 hp Oberursel U.I.
Fokker A.III, serial A 6., at Zaule airfield. This aircraft was assigned to famous aces Gottfried Banfield. The Austrians did not receive their first Fokker A.III fighters from the regular orders until early 1916, although two Fokkers were operational with Flik 4 as early as November 1915. The sources of these two fighters is unclear. By early 1916 the Fokker E.III, or A.III in Austrian service, was becoming obsolescent.
Banfield's Fokker A.III, serial A 6, at Zaule airfield. Banfield was not fond of the type as he felt it was underpowered.
Gottfried Banfield, the leading Austro-Hungarian naval ace, in the cockpit of Fokker A.III 'A 6'.
Naval Fokker A.III A 7 after being wrecked.
Wreckage of Naval Fokker A.III A 8 after a crash.
Fokker A.III serial A6 flown by Gottfried Banfield.
Austro-Hungarian Fokker B.I

  The Fokker B.I, Fokker types M.7 and M.10E, served the Austro-Hungarian Luftfahrtruppen first as reconnaissance aircraft and later as trainers. Crews liked it for its safe flying qualities. However, its modest performance meant that B.I aircraft flying missions in the mountains often could not fly high enough to avoid rifle and machine gun fire from enemy troops.
  A total of 39 Fokker B.Is were purchased. All B.I aircraft, both Fokker types M.7 and M.10, were powered by an 80 hp Oberursel U.O rotary engine.


Fokker B.I in Austro-Hungarian Service
Qty Type Series Numbers Order Date
11 M.7 03.01,02,04-12 20 Sep.1914
1 M.5L 03.03 29 Jan. 1915
12 M.10 03.13-24 17 Oct. 1914
4 M.7 03.25-28 6 May 1915
12 M.10 03.29-40 29 Jan. 1915
Notes:
  1. Last two orders were less engines.
  2. The M.7 aircraft 03.25-03.28 ordered in May 1915 were rebuilt, not new, aircraft.
  3. Source: Austro-Hungarian Army Aircraft of World War One by Peter M. Grosz, et. al.


Fokker B.I (M.7) Specifications
Engine: 80 hp Oberursel U.O
Wing: Span Upper 11.70 m
Span Lower 7.20 m
Chord Upper 1.50 m
Chord Lower 1.50 m
Wing Area 26.0 m2
General: Length 8.00 m
Height 2.95 m
Empty Weight 380 kg
Loaded Weight 679 kg
Maximum Speed: 130 km/h
Climb: 1000m 8.0 min
2000m 15.5 min


Fokker B.I (M.10) Specifications
Engine: 80 hp Oberursel U.O
Wing: Span Upper 11.30 m
Span Lower 7.77 m
Chord Upper 1.60 m
Chord Lower 1.60 m
Wing Area 28.0 m2
General: Length 7.50 m
Height 2.50 m
Empty Weight 409 kg
Loaded Weight 712 kg
Climb: 2000m 25.0 min
Fokker B.I (M10E) 03.19, Flek 6, Early Markings
Fokker B.I (M10E) 03.19, Flek 6 with early Austrian markings.
Fokker B.I (M10E) 03.19, Flek 6, Intermediate Markings
Fokker B.I (M10E) 03.19, Flek 6, Late Markings
Fokker B.I (M10E) 03.22, Flek 6, Late Markings
Fokker B.I (M10E) 03.24
Fokker B.I (M10E) 03.33, Late Markings
Fokker B.I (M10E) 03.37, Late Markings
Fokker B.I 03.XX was a type M7. It is most probably Fokker B.I with original German work number 86, it was later marked 03.01; early A-H national markings are shown. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Fokker B.I 03.02 was a type M7. 03.02 served with Flik 6, Balkan Front, Igalo airfield. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Fokker B.I 03.02, an M7, with crew preparing for a mission. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Fokker B.I 03.02 was a type M7 assigned to Flik 6. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Fokker B.I 03.04 assigned to Flik 8 was a type M7. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Fokker B.I 03.04 was a type M7. 03.04 is shown in late markings, probably airfield Graz Thalerhof, Fiek 3. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
The Fokker B.I 03.10 (M 7) of Flik 6 on the Igalo airfield (Montenegro Front) in August 1915. The old designation Fk 10 is barely visible below the new number.
Fokker B.I 03.10 was a type M7. Here it is at Flik 6, Igalo airfield. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Fokker B.I 03.10 was a Fokker type M.7. The wingtips were painted in white/red/white stripes for identification. 03.10 served with Flik 6, Balkan Front, Igalo airfield (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Fokker B.I 03.11 was a type M7. An iron cross has been applied to the rudder. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Fokker B.I 03.XX was a type M7. Note it was powered by a 7 cylinder, 80 hp Oberursel U.O. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Two Fokker B.I 03.XX type M7s from batch 03.01-03.12 ready for delivery in the winter of 1914-1915. The white-red-white stripes on the wingtips, elevator, and rudder indicate delivery to Austria-Hungary. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Closeup of a Fokker B.I 03.XX type M7 ready for delivery to Austria-Hungary in the winter of 1914-1915. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Four Fokker B.I 03.XX type M7s from batch 03.01-03.12 on the train ready for delivery to Austria-Hungary in the winter of 1914-1915. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Fokker B.I 03.15 after a crash. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Fokker B.I 03.19 was a type M10. Iron cross national insignia have been applied over the early white-red-white stripe insignia. The fuselage appears deeper than usual and it has wing skids. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Another view of Fokker B.I 03.19. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Fokker B.I 03.19, a type M10, in flight. Iron cross national insignia have been applied over white backgrounds on the wings and rudder; it retains the red and white elevators. It was assigned to Flek 6 at Wiener Neustadt. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Fokker B.I 03.19, a type M10, in winter flight. lt has wingtip skids (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Fokker B.I 03.22 (M 10) of Flik 8 on Haidenschaft airfield (Isonzo Front) in December 1915. The aircraft was still active as a trainer in October 1918.
Iron cross national insignia have been applied over white backgrounds on the wings and rudder. It is at Flik 8, Aisovizza airfield.
Fokker B.I 03.22, a type M10, was worknumber 243. Iron cross national insignia has been applied to the fuselage in addition to the wings and rudder. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Another image of Fokker B.I 03.22. A downed Caproni bomber is in the background. Fokker 03.22 of Flik 8 with crew consisting of pilot Oblt. Wedige von Froreich and observer Kadett i.d.Res. Richard Maurig Ritter von Sarfeld was one of eight aircraft sharing the victory over the Caproni, which was shot down during a raid on Laibach. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Fokker B.I 03.24, a type M10. Iron cross national insignia have been applied to the wings and rudder. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Lineup of aircraft at Fliegerersatzkompagnie 6 at Fischamend with Fokker B.I 03.30 at left and B.I 03.31 to its right.
Hptm. Josef Steiner in front of Fokker B.I 03.31, a type M10. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Fokker B.I 03.32 (M 10) of Flik 4 on the Aisovizza airfield (Isonzo Front) in November 1915. The rocky ground, typical of the conditions on the Italian Front, was tough on aircraft and aircrew alike.
Iron cross national insignia have been applied over white backgrounds on the wings and rudder.
Fokker B.I 03.33 was a type M10. Iron cross national insignia have been applied over white backgrounds on the wings and rudder. Here it was set on blocks for identification photos. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Fokker B.I 03.36, a type M10, was work number 238. Iron cross national insignia have been applied over white backgrounds on the wings and rudder. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
The end of Fokker B.I 03.36. By the time of this crash an iron cross national insignia had been applied to the fuselage as well as on the wings and rudder. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Fokker B.I 03.36 was a type M10. Crash details unknown. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Fokker B.I 03.37 was a type M10. Iron cross national insignia have been applied over white backgrounds on the wings and rudder. A carbine is fitted for the observer. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Fokker B.I 03.37 at Pergine airfield at Igalo airfield, Flik 6, in 1915. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Fokker B.I 03.40 at Igalo airfield, Flik 6, in 1915. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Unidentified Fokker 03.XX after collision with Aviatik biplane at a training unit (Flek). (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Fokker B.I 03.XX was a type M10. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Fokker B.I 03.XX was a type M10. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Fokker B.I 03.XX type M10. It has unusual wingtip skids like 03.19. These photos were taken on 16 July, 1916. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
This Fokker B.I (M 10) shows the wing skids that were mounted on some aircraft. Compared to the M 7, the M 10 had higher king-posts, lower cockpit fairing, and different wire bracing.
Iron cross national insignia have been applied over white backgrounds on the wings and rudder.
Fokker B.I with engine removed for maintenance. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Fokker B.I with engine removed for maintenance. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Fokker B.I 03.3X has a 7 cylinder engine and wingtip skids. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Fokker B.I (M10E) 03.19 & Others, Flek 6, Early Markings
Fokker B.I (M10E) 03.19 & Others, Flek 6, Intermediate Markings
Fokker B.I (M10E) 03.37, Late Markings
Austro-Hungarian Fokker M.16 Prototype (03.91)

  Fokker's M.16 prototype was a departure from his previous practice. First, it was a two-seat biplane fighter; Fokker's previous fighter designs were single-seat monoplanes. Second, the M.16 had an inline, water-cooled engine; previous Fokker fighters had used air-cooled rotary engines.
  The first M.16 originally had one-bay bracing; this was soon replaced by a 2-bay wing. The 160 hp Daimler engine for the second Fokker M.16 (w/n 435) was already dispatched to the Fokker factory in Schwerin on 24 December, 1915 when Fokker received the order for one M.16 prototype from the Austro-Hungarian authorities. The order included a provisional contract for 16 production aircraft depending on the results of flight trials. At the time, the Austrian authorities complained that modern and fast aircraft could only be obtained from Hansa-Brandenburg and Fokker. Domestic designs did not offer good performance.
  After designer Martin Kreutzer had demonstrated the aircraft for the Austrians, the M.16/II successfully completed trials at Schwerin and was eventually shipped to Aspern on 13 April 1916 for trials. Simultaneously with the evaluation of M.16/II at Schwerin, the Austro-Hungarian Aviatik company was instructed to built a prototype (30.06) along the lines of the M.16/II, in preparation for possible series manufacture at Aviatik, for which the designation series 36 had already been reserved. However, the evaluation of 03.91, as it was now numbered, was terminated after the crash of Aviatik 30.06 on 7 May 1916. The aircraft was then assigned as a trainer to Flek 6 in Wiener-Neustadt until written off in April 1918.


Fokker M.16 (03.91) Specifications
Engine: 160 hp Daimler
Wing: Span 11.60 m
Chord (Upper/Lower) 1.70 m
Gap 1.40 m
Wing Area 32.0 m2
General: Length 7.65 m
Height 2.85 m
Track 2.0 m
Empty Weight 620 kg
Loaded Weight 1,056 kg
Maximum Speed: 155 km/h
Climb: 1000m 5 min
2000m 13 min
3000m 26 min



Austro-Hungarian Fokker B.III

  In April 1916 the Fokker M.18 prototype (w/n 501 (arrived at Aspern "without prior knowledge or consent." Noted for their red tape, the Austro-Hungarian authorities were amazed at this demonstration of Fokker's aggressive sales tactics.
  The Fokker M.18 prototype was powered by a 120 hp Mercedes and had ailerons for roll control. The Austrians needed a transition trainer, and the M.18 prototype filled that requirement.
  Eighteen fighter trainers were formally ordered in December 1916. However, production actually began earlier, in April 1916. Production aircraft differed from the prototype by having wing-warping instead of ailerons. Delivered without engines, 100 hp Mercedes were fitted. Only 17 aircraft of the 18 ordered entered the inventory, assigned serial numbers 04.11 to 04.27. The prototype was originally numbered 03.92 but was re-designated number 04.11. Seven production aircraft were accepted in August 1916 and nine in September.
Some, but not all, of the B.III aircraft were fitted with a machine-gun mounted over the upper wing center section.
  In October 1916 Fliks 4, 12, 19, and 28 (on the Isonzo Front), 16 in Karten, and 17, 21, and 24 in South Tirol began to receive the B.III. In February 1917 the B.III was retired to training use with Flek 6.


Fokker B.III Series 04.1 Specifications
Engine: 100 hp Mercedes
Wing: Span 9.05 m
Chord 1.25 m
Span Lower 5.725 m
Wing Area 22.0 m2
General: Length 5.70 m
Height 2.69 m
Empty Weight 442 kg
Loaded Weight 700 kg
Maximum Speed: 150 km/h
Climb: 1000 m 6.2 min
2000 m 15.2 min
3000 m 25.4 min
4000 m 39.5 min



Fokker B.III(MAG) Series 04.3
  
  The first production contract for MAG aircraft was placed on 26 August 1916 for 50 aircraft, which included 8 Fokker B.III(MAG) trainers. These trainers were based on the Fokker M18 and were numbered 04.31 to 04.38 and powered by 100 hp Mercedes engines. Space was provided for a machine gun but none was fitted. The first aircraft was rolled out in September 1916 and the remaining seven aircraft were ready in October waiting for tires. These seven aircraft were not accepted until March-May 1917 and were assigned to Flek 6 in Wiener-Neustadt as unarmed trainers.
  Aircraft 04.36 was used by MAG for test purposes and was modified to use the experimental 11-cylinder 150 hp Steyr rotary and first flown on 26 February for engine development.


Fokker D.I(MAG) Series 04.3 Specifications
Engine: 100 hp Mercedes
Wing: Span (Upper Si Lower) 9.60 m
Chord (Upper/Lower) 1.25 m
Gap 1.25 m
Wing Area 21.4 m2
General: Length 6.70 m
Height 2.32 m
Track 1.69 m
Empty Weight 480 kg
Loaded Weight 730 kg
Maximum Speed: 135 km/h
Climb: 1000m 4.4 min
Fokker B.III 04.12 MADI, Lt. Stefan Laszlo, Flik 17
Fokker B.III 04.15, Oblt. Franz Cserich, Flik 24
Fokker B.III 04.22
The crankcase of the six-cylinder inline engine installed in the second M.16 prototype left visible oil stains on the bottom of the fabric-covered nose of the aircraft. One can only hope Fokker did not get too close and ruin his jacket while the photo was taken.
Built for the Austro-Hungarian LFT, the second M.16 (w/n 435) is shown here during evaluation at Schwerin around March 1916. Noteworthy improvements to the design had been made by then, including the fitting of much smaller and more compact radiators to the fuselage sides, made by the Windhoff company. The nose was given a more streamlined shape by the addition of three stringers. A large oval cutout in the center of the upper wing improved downward vision, and the balanced ailerons show well in both pictures. A Morell tachometer is mounted to the forward inner strut on the left side of the aircraft, a clear indication that speed trials were being conducted at the time. This was usually done only when favorable weather conditions prevailed.(Peter M. Grosz Collection/STDB)
Frontal view of the completed w/n 435 with pilot (most likely Fokker himself) in the cockpit illustrates the view forward offered by the cutout and streamlined shape of the forward fuselage.
The crankcase of the six-cylinder inline engine installed in the second M.16 prototype left visible oil stains on the bottom of the fabric-covered nose of the aircraft.
A flexible Austrian Schwarzlose MG-16 is being demonstrated for the benefit of the camera by Fokker mechanic Carl Henze. A fixed Schwarzlose machine-gun was mounted offset to the left side of the airframe. The thin, unpadded leather coaming around the cockpit area shows well in this view. (Peter M. Grosz Collection/STDB)
Fokker B.III (M.18) 04.11 (work number 501). This aircraft was sent to Fluggeschwader 1 on 24 February 1917. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
The Fokker M 18 (w/n 501) prototype as delivered to Aspern in April 1916. It now has the characteristic button-shaped rudder and was unarmed. The assigned designation was 03.92 (later 04.11).
Fokker B.III (M.18) 04.11 (work number 501), before application of the serial number. The aircraft can be identified by its ailerons; the rest of the batch used wing-warping.
Fokker B.III 04.11 without propeller in front of a hangar. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Fokker B.III (M.18) 04.11 (work number 501). It appears the new serial number, 04.11, was applied after scraping off the old serial, 03.92. This aircraft was sent to Fluggeschwader 1 on 24 February 1917. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Fokker B.III 04.11 being moved to the right spot on the field to take off. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Fokker B.III 04.11 in flight. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Fokker B.III 04.12 (work number 712) was accepted as a D.I in Schwerin on 28 August 1916 and was sent to Austria in October 1916. Armed and named Madi, it is shown in service with Flik 17 and flown by Lt. Stefan Laszlo. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
This view of Fokker B.III 04.12 shows that its Schwarzlose machine gun was mounted off center to the right above the upper wing. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
This view of Fokker B.III 04.13 with fixed fin for greater stability. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Fokker B.III 04.15 serving at Karnten airfield. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Fokker B.III 04.15 serving at Flik 24 at Pergine airfield in winter.
Hauptmann Raoul Stojsavljevic of Flik 16 with Fokker B.III 04.15 (w/n 715). Armament consisted of a Schwarzlose machine-gun mounted over the right center-section struts, angled to fire upwards at 15-degrees to clear the propeller arc. A few B.III were similarly armed with a center-mounted Spandau machine gun.
Fokker B.III 04.15, work number 715, with Oblt. Franz Cserich, Flik 24, Pergine.
Feldwebel Funk of Flik 16, based at Seebach near Villach, with Fokker B.III 04.16. He was not flying this aircraft when he downed a Caproni bomber on 25 May 1917 (as has often been claimed), but a Brandenburg D.I 28.30.
Fokker B.III 04.16, Flik 16, armed with a centrally-mounted Schwarzlose firing over the propeller arc. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Fokker B.III 04.17 was unarmed.
Unarmed Fokker B.III 04.21. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Unarmed Fokker B.III 04.21. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
An unarmed Fokker B.III 04.22 of the Fliegeroffiziersschule in Wiener-Neustadt. Production Fokker B.III biplanes were fitted with a large tail fin for added stability. Aircraft beginning with 04.18 had an extra longeron along the fuselage center line. It features wing-warping and a fixed fin.
Unarmed Fokker B.III 04.22. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Unarmed Fokker B.III 04.22 landing at Wiener Neustadt airfield. A Brandenburg C.I is at right. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Unarmed Fokker B.III 04.23 in flight. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Unarmed Fokker B.III 04.23 in its hangar. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
A crash of Fokker B.III 04.23; it was repaired. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Unarmed Fokker B.III 04.26. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Fokker B.III 04.27 on its nose after a rough landing. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Hptm. Raoul Stoisavljevic, Flik 16, in Fokker B.III 04.2X work number 801 armed with a Schwarzlose firing over the propeller arc. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Unarmed Fokker B.III 04.XX with heavily-lagged coolant and intake pipes. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Unarmed Fokker B.III 04.XX. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
The Fokker B.III(MAG) 04.31 at Aspern in November 1916. This machine was flown as an unarmed single-seat trainer with Flek 6.
Austro-Hungarian Fokker M.17 Two-Bay

  The Austro-Hungarian Air Service accepted the Fokker company's offer to substitute two-bay M.17 biplane fighters instead of the last six E.III fighters then on order in July 1916.
  The two-bay version of the Fokker M.17 was then in production for the German air service as the Fokker D.II fighter. These were powered by 100 hp Oberursel U.I engines. Wing-warping was used instead of ailerons.
  The first aircraft was accepted in September 1916 and the remaining five aircraft were accepted in October and November. Serial numbers assigned were 03.55-03.60. The aircraft were unarmed when received and no armament was fitted. No type designation was assigned to the two-bay aircraft in Austro-Hungarian records, although B.II would have been appropriate instead of D.II.
  The type's low speed and slow climb prevented it from being assigned to front-line service. Instead, the M.17 remained unarmed and were used as trainers with Fleks 6, 7, and 16 into mid-1918.


Fokker M.17 03.55 Specifications
Engine: 100 hp Oberursel U.I
Wing: Span 8.75 m
Chord 1.15 m
Gap 1.30 m
Wing Area 18.5 m2
General: Length 6.40 m
Height 2.76 m
Empty Weight 427 kg
Loaded Weight 643 kg
Maximum Speed: 145 km/h
Climb: 1000m 4.5 min
2000m 9.5 min
3000m 17 min
4000m 27 min



Austro-Hungarian Fokker B.II
  
  In February 1916 the Austro-Hungarian Air Service purchased 24 Fokker B.II (M.17 single-bay) fighter trainers instead of the 16 Fokker M.16 aircraft they had originally planned to buy because M.16 flight trials were still going on.
  The Fokker B.II trainers purchased were powered by 80 hp Oberursel U.O engines and featured wing-warping instead of ailerons. Only 23 of the 24 aircraft ordered were accepted and given Austrian serials 03.61 to 03.83.
  The first aircraft, 03.61, was accepted at Aspern, the aviation test center for Austria, in April 1916, 19 aircraft (less engines) were accepted in August, and the final three aircraft were accepted in September.
  Aircraft 03.61 was at Aspern until June 1916 when it was sent to Flik 11 on the Eastern Front for evaluation. Once it was returned to Aspern, it was tested with a number of machine-gun installations.
  The remaining B.II biplanes served as unarmed trainers at Fleks 4, 6, and 8 through 1918.


Fokker B.II (M.17) Specifications
Engine: 80 hp Oberursel U.O
Wing: Span Upper 7.20 m
Chord 1.25 m
Gap 1.30 m
Wing Area 16.0 m2
General: Length 6.20 m
Height 2.71 m
Empty Weight 274 kg
Loaded Weight 481 kg
Maximum Speed: 130 km/h
Fokker M17 03.58, July 1917
Fokker B.II (M.17) 03.61, Spring 1916
Fokker B.II (M.17) 03.61, Flik 11, Stanislau
Fokker B.II (M.17) 03.61, Flars
Fokker B.II (M.17) 03.61, operated by the Fliegerarsenal (Flars) at Aspern.
Fokker B.II (M.17) 03.64, Flek 6, Wiener Neustadt, Spring 1918
Fokker B.II (M.17) 03.77, Flek 8, Spring 1917
Fokker B.II (M.17) 03.82, Flek 4, Szombathely Aerodrome
At Schwerin Anthony Fokker poses with the armed Fokker B.II (M.17) single-bay prototype. The works number is clearly visible on the base of the rhomboid-shaped rudder and the forward lower fuselage, where it was applied just above the lower wing root. In order to demonstrate the lightness of the design, a single man lifts up the pointed tail by the tailskid just with his right hand. When the Austro-Hungarian air service purchased this aircraft and it was delivered in April 1916, it was given serial 03.61. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Fuselage of the prototype Fokker B.II armed with a Schwarzlose M7/12 above the cabane struts and a synchronized Bergmann machine gun at Schwerin before shipment to Austria. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Fokker B.II 03.61 seen with a Schwarzlose non-synchronized machine gun and synchronized Bergmann. In comparison with the German LMG 08 (Maxim) or Bergmann LMG 15nA machine guns, the Schwarzlose had a slower rate of fire and suffered from synchronization problems. Although several Fokker A.III (E.IIIs) had been fitted with the synchronized Schwarzlose machine gun during 1916, most Austro-hungarian single-seaters carried non-synchronized variants of the Schwarzlose on their upper wings until spring 1917. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Fokker B.II (M.17) single-bay prototype 03.61 with Flik 11 for evaluation at Stanislau. This first example of the Fokker B.II of the 03.6 series arrived in Austria in April 1916. It was work number 499. In June 1916 03.61 was deployed experimentally with Flik 11 on the Eastern Front. This photo reveals application of insignia of that period. It consisted of iron crosses on a white background. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Fokker B.II (M.17) 03.61 operated by the Fliegerarsenal (Flars) at Aspern, the plane left for the Front from Aspern and then returned there. The photo was probably taken after its return from the Front. From late 1916 the iron crosses on the wheel discs denoted affiliation to the Fliegerarsenal. Unlike other Fokkers of 03.6 series it retained its original prototype rudder. It also featured a different semi-conical metal cover of an instrument on the fuselage aft of the engine. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Fokker B.II (M.17) 03.61 with Flik 11 at Stanislau airfield. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Fokker B.II (M.17) 03.61 evaluating a synchronized gun mounting with Flik 11 at Stanislau airfield. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Sent to Flik 11 at Stanislau on the Eastern Front in June 1916 for evaluation, the B.II 03.61 was armed with a single Bergmann LMG 15nA machine gun. It was the only series 03.6 aircraft to carry armament. As a trainer, 03.61 was based at Flek 6 in Wiener-Neustadt in October 1918.
Fokker B.II (M.17) 03.61 evaluating a synchronized gun mounting with Flik 11 at Stanislau airfield.
Fokker B.II 03.61 with a synchronized machine gun with Flik 11 at Stanislau, Russian Front. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
The castor oil in the exhaust fumes has stained the fabric of this Fokker B.II 03.64 trainer of Flek 6. The characteristic Fokker “button" rudder was standard on production machines.
Well used Fokker B.II 03.64. This trainer served in winter 1917-1918 with Fliegerersatzkompagnie 6 at Wiener Neustadt. Flek 6 was the only unit in the Austro-Hungarian Empire which trained new pilots in single-seat aircraft until spring 1918. That is why the unit was also nicknamed the "Jagdfliegerschule". The typical 'button' Fokker rudder is used and this and later aircraft, not the angular rudder of 03.61, together with wing-warping.
Fokker B.II (M.17) 03.64 sports a primitive experimental gun mounting. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Fokker B.II (M.17) 03.65. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Fokker B.II (M.17) 03.67, work number 761. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Fokker B.II (M.17) 03.67. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Fokker B.II 03.68, work number 766. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Fokker B.II 03.68, work number 766, in flight. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Oberleutnant Leopold Urban poses in front of Fokker B.II 03.68, Flek 6, Wiener Neustadt. The same lucky charm, likely a monkey, appears on the left front strut. Urban served with Flik 16D from autumn 1916 to April 30, 1918 as a pilot of single-seat aircraft. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
The 80 hp single-bay production D II.
Flars test pilot Oblt. i.d.Res. Guido Prisel in Fokker B.II 03.68, Flek 6, Wiener Neustadt. Few B.IIs were camouflaged. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Fokker B.II 03.77. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Fokker B.II 03.77, work number 773, with Zugsfuhrer Adolf Kind of Flik 21. The photo was taken in spring 1917 at Flek 8. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Fokker B.II, "Baby-Fokker", Flugzeugnummer 03.77, Wiener Neustadt, Fliegerersatzkompanie 8, Flugzeugführer Zgsf Adolf Kind
Fokker B.II, "Baby-Fokker", самолет № 03.77, Винер-Нойштадт, рота замены пилотов 8, пилот Zgsf Адольф Кинд
Oberleutnant Fritz Bistrischan in B.II 03.77 performing a very low-level flying display for press photographers in Wiener-Neustadt, 1918.
Oblt. Fritz Bistritschan puts on a very low-level flying display in Fokker B.II 03.77. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Fokker B.II (M.17) 03.78 with engine removed. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Fokker B.II 03.80, seen probably with one of the Flek units in winter 1916/1917. After the war 03.80 was among the planes left over from the monarchy and taken over by the newly formed Czechoslovakia. However, it was never flown there and was officially written off in March 1920. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Oblt. Colard in Fokker B.II (M.17) 03.81. The wing upper surfaces wear dark camouflage. As the remainder of the upper and lateral surfaces was left unpainted, it is probable that the wings were taken from another Fokker B.II of the 03.6 series. Aircraft 03.81 served with one of the training Fliegerersatzkompagnies (probably Flek 4 at Szombathely or Flek 6 or Flek 8 at Wiener Neustadt). (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Hptm. Franz Blicharski, the CO of Flek 4 at Szombathely in Fokker B.II 03.82.
The unarmed Fokker B.II 03.82 fighter-trainer, last machine of the series, with Hauptmann Blischarsky at Flek 4 in Szombathely.
Fokker B.II 03.82 was used by Flek 4 at Szombathely as a trainer. The photo shows the aircraft probably after an overhaul and sporting new fabric. Note that number 03.82 is unusually divided, and there is no cross on the fuselage.
This was one of the 23 M.17E Fokker B.IIs that were purchased by the KuK Luftfahrtruppe for conversion training from two-seater pilots to single-seat fighter pilots. Many of these flew well in to 1918. Two were included in the aircraft purchased by the Czechoslovak Air Force in 1920, but were not flown. Some of the problems w/the lack of castor oil were sought to be resolved by trying other oil types, including corn oil... with bad results. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Fokker B.II 03.XX shows its 7 cylinder, 80 hp Oberursel U.O. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
A Fokker B.II trainer is the background for this group portrait. Its 7 cylinder, 80 hp Oberursel U.O is prominent. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Two Fokker B.II trainers form the background for this group portrait. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Fokker B.II 03.63 (?), work number 761. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Fokker 03.55 (M 17) coming in for a landing after a training flight. Delivered in September 1916, this machine was written-off in October 1918.
Unarmed Fokker M.17 03.58 was one of five similar aircraft ordered from Fokker in Germany. 03.58 was Fokker work number 923. At least photo was taken at Flek 7 Parndorf in July, 1917. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Based at Flek 7 in Parndorf in July 1917, Fokker 03.58 (M 17, w/n 923) was flown as an advanced, unarmed single-seat trainer.
Kpl. Walter Babel at Flek 7, Parndorf, with Fokker M.17 03.58, July 10, 1917. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Fokker D.I(MAG) Series 04.4

  The aircraft ordered from MAG on 26 August 1916 included 8 Fokker D.I(MAG) fighters, numbered 04.41 to 04.48, powered by a 160 hp Oberursel rotary engine. The MAG D.I was basically identical to the Fokker M19 (the D.III in Germany). Fokker shipped pattern airframe work number 972 to MAG on October 2, 1916. MAG completed two fighters in February and 04.41 was inspected at Aspern on March 24 by Flars engineers, who ordered minor modifications. Acceptance testing of the remaining seven airframes was delayed to October because MAG only had two engines for the type.
  One D.I(MAG) went to Flik 30 for evaluation; no other fighters of the type went to the front. The key problem was difficulty in servicing the two-row rotary engine, which kept flying to a minimum.
  Eventually all eight were stored at Flek 6 in Wiener-Neustadt.


Fokker D.I(MAG) Series 04.4 Specifications
Engine: 160 hp Oberursel U.III
Wing: Span (Upper St Lower) 9.60 m
Chord (Upper/Lower) 1.25 m
Gap 1.25 m
Wing Area 21.4 m2
General: Length 6.35 m
Height 2.40 m
Track 1.69 m
Empty Weight 480 kg
Loaded Weight 687 kg
Maximum Speed: 153 km/h
Climb: 1000m 2.7 min
2000m 7.3 min
3000m 16.5 min
A batch of ten "surplus" Fokker D.III fighters was delivered to Holland in October 1917. One of these was 379/16, which was actually the last example from the first D.III production batch that was ordered in July 1916. These were apparently used as unarmed trainers.
A late production Fok. D.III with ailerons. Apparently this aircraft was interned in Holland after a forced landing and was used by the Dutch Army.
A batch of ten "surplus" Fokker D.III fighters was delivered to Holland in October 1917. This aircraft appears to be was 1619/16, which was from the third D.III production batch that was ordered in August 1916. Interestingly, the motivation for the Germans to provide Fokker fighters to Holland was so Holland would supply horses to Germany for the German Army.
A batch of ten "surplus" Fokker D.III fighters was delivered to Holland in October 1917. This aircraft appears to be was 1619/16, which was from the third D.III production batch that was ordered in August 1916. Interestingly, the motivation for the Germans to provide Fokker fighters to Holland was so Holland would supply horses to Germany for the German Army.
Fokker D.III 1619/16, which was from the third D.III production batch ordered in August 1916.
Fokker D.III in Netherlands service.
The Dutch orange disc national markings were applied in the same position as the previous German Iron Crosses on identical white backgrounds. On black-and-white prints, these anticipate the national markings that would be employed the Imperial Japanese Army Air Force 27 years later in defense of the Japanese mainland.
Fokker D.III with black stripe on the fuselage. The D.IIIs supplied had ailerons, not wing warping.
A batch of ten "surplus" Fokker D.III fighters was delivered to Holland in October 1917. One of these was 379/16, which was actually the last example from the first D.III production batch that was ordered in July 1916. During the refurbishment at Schwerin, the original warping wings were replaced by a set with aileron control. The late "streaked" Fokker factory finish shows particularly well on the wing upper surfaces here.
Fokker D.III in Netherlands service now designated F.203.
This Fokker D.I(MAG) with 160 hp Oberursel U.III was photographed at the Flik 30 airfield at Czernowitz. It was the only D.I(MAG) that served at the front. Unfortunately, the fighter carried no serial number. Engine servicing difficulties eventually resorted in withdrawal of all the aircraft of this type from service. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Fokker D.II(MAG) 04.69 is the first aircraft in a lineup of MAG fighters at Matyasfold in October 1917. The first five aircraft are D.II(MAG) fighters, with the MAG 90.02 triplane prototype and a D.I(MAG) in the background. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Fokker D.III destroyed in a taxi accident.
Another view of the Fokker D.III destroyed in a taxi accident.
Fokker D.III in Netherlands service after the landing accident.
Fokker D.II (MAG) Series 04.5

  The aircraft ordered from MAG on 26 August 1916 included 34 Fokker D.II(MAG) fighters, increased to 42 aircraft on 19 April 1917. These fighters were numbered 04.51 to 04.92 and were powered by a 185 hp Daimler(MAG) engine. The MAG D.II was based on the Fokker M21 (the D.IV in Germany) but MAG made some small structural changes. Production started in January 1917 and 04.51, the first production machine, was inspected at Aspern on 24 March. Placement of the two Schwarzlose machine guns and radiator design delayed production. Deliveries began in June 1917 and ended in December 1917, four months later than planned. Prototype 04.51 was armed at Fischamend and returned to Matyasfold in July as an armament sample. Due to the gun shortage two aircraft were armed with only one gun and nine were delivered without guns. Flik 49 was assigned 04.52 as an "experimental fighter" in fall 1917 for testing on the Eastern Front. It was criticized for the weak undercarriage. A mid-1916 design, the D.II(MAG) was condemned as obsolete by five Fliks when it reached the Italian Front in January 1918. It was too slow and only useful as a fighter trainer. As a result it was used as a transition trainer on the Piave Front (Fliks 22/D, 37/D, 56/J, 57/Rb, 62/D, 65/D, and 66D), Albania (Flik 64/F), and the flying schools at Campoformido and Neumarkt.


Fokker D.II(MAG) Series 04.5 Specifications
Engine: 185 hp Daimler (MAG)
Wing: Span (Upper) 10.20 m
Span (Lower) 9.70 m
Chord (Upper/Lower) 1.23 m
Gap 1.30 m
Wing Area 21.4 m2
General: Length 6.70 m
Height 2.55 m
Track 1.70 m
Empty Weight 645 kg
Loaded Weight 865 kg
Maximum Speed: 175 km/h
Climb: 1000m 3.1 min
3000m 11.0 min
5000m 34.9 min



Swedish Fokker D.IV

  In January 1917 Sweden bought four Fokker D.IV fighters for the aerial defense of Stockholm. These were powered by the 150 hp Benz Bz.III engine instead of the standard 160 hp Mercedes D.III engine. The reason for this is unknown, but was likely due to German demand for the Mercedes for fighters. The German serial numbers were D.5850-5853/17 (work numbers 1662-1665). Prior to delivery, they were test flown at Schwerin by Swedish pilots.
  Arriving in Sweden on March 27, 1918, the aircraft retained their German camouflage and markings. Apparently none of these aircraft were flown in Sweden; they were held in reserve until struck off charge in April 1922.
Fokker D.II(MAG) 04.55
Four Fokker D.IV's were acquired in 1918, but were never flown by the AFK. This picture was taken at Malmen in the early 1920's. Via Swedish Aviation Historical Society
Front view of Fokker D.II(MAG) with 185 hp Daimler. The airframe was based on the German Fokker D.IV and had a more streamlined engine cowling.
Fokker D.II(MAG) 04.55. The D.II(MAG) had ailerons with aerodynamic horn balances and bulky, drag-producing side radiators.
Fokker D.II(MAG) closeup showing cowling detail.
Fokker D.II(MAG) 04.55. The D.II(MAG) had ailerons with aerodynamic horn balances and bulky, drag-producing side radiators.
Fokker D.II(MAG) 04.69 is the first aircraft in a lineup of MAG fighters at Matyasfold in October 1917. The first five aircraft are D.II(MAG) fighters, with the MAG 90.02 triplane prototype and a D.I(MAG) in the background. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Fokker D.II(MAG)
Fokker D.II(MAG)
Fokker D.II(MAG)
Fokker-MAG Fokker 90.04 Biplane

  By June 1918, Waffenfabrik Steyr had delivered about 30 of the experimental 150 hp Steyr rotary engines that were copies of the Le Rhone. This was determined to be a sufficient number of engines to evaluate the engines in service.
  Because there were no Austro-Hungarian designs that were suitable, Flars purchased 15 Fokker D.VI airframes. These included the 90.04 (V12) prototype and 14 production airframes without engines, propellers, or guns. Fokker shipped the first seven fighters (D.VI 1632-1635/18, 1641/18, 1642/18, and 1645/18) to the MAG factory at Matyasfold for engine and armament installation on August 27, 1918. On August 8 Fokker confirmed LFT's request to change the remaining 8 D.VI airframes on order to either Fokker D.VII or D.VIII fighters. War Ministry approval was still pending when the war ended.
  In late 1918 engine and armament installation was nearing completion at MAG. All seven D.VI fighters, still carrying the LFT designations 04.101 to 04.107, entered service with the Hungarian Red Airborne Corps in 1919. The last remaining Hungarian D.VI was written off in 1926.


Fokker D.VI Series 04.100 Specifications
Engine: 150 hp Steyr (Le Rhone)
Wing: Span Upper 7.70 m
Span Lower 5.81 m
Chord Upper 1.60 m
Chord Lower 1.20 m
Wing Area 17.1 m2
General: Length 5.78 m
Height 2.65 m
Empty Weight 393 kg
Loaded Weight 583 kg
Maximum Speed: 200 km/h
Climb: 1000m 2.4 min
2000m 5.1 min
3000m 9.3 min
4000m 14.2 min
5000m 22.2 min
Tony Fokker (seated) became a director of MAG as a result of his substantial investment in the company. Friedrich Seekatz, head of aircraft production at the MAG factory at Matyasfold, is standing. Fokker V12 (work number 1980) is in the background. V12 was purchased by Flars and given the Austrian serial 90.04. This aircraft was the first of 8 D.VI fighters supplied to Austria. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Fokker-Maschinen am MAG-Flugfeld, Fokker V 7 und Fokker V 22, im Fluge Fokker V 12
Fokker Triplane MAG 90.03 with 150 hp Steyr at center and MAG 90.05 at right.
Now designated 90.05, V22 it at right. In this photo it has Fokker 2-bladed propeller. Fokker triplane prototype 90.03 is at left.
In March 1919 three Fokker D.VI fighters, numbered 04.101 to 04.103 and powered by Steyr-built Le Rhone rotary engines, were attached to the Hungarian First Flying Group at Matyasfold. The original German air service designation is just visible under the LFT designation 04.102.
Fokker D.VI 04.10X at Matyasfold airfield adjacent to the MAG factory. One of the pilots, Lanyi Antal, is on the right. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Feldwebel Alexander Kasza, a former Flik 55/J pilot with 6 victories, flying a Fokker D.VI of the 8th Squadron, Hungarian Red Airborne Corps, in 1919.
Fokker-MAG 90.05
  
  The Fokker V11 and V18 won Germany's First Fighter Competition in February 1918, and the Fokker D.VII was the resulting production fighter.
  The D.VII featured a welded steel tube fuselage and tail assembly. Because wood was in greater supply, a D.VII with wood fuselage was built for comparison. This aircraft was intended for evaluation by the Austro-Hungarians, but was instead diverted to the Second Fighter Competition.
  The shortage of steel tubing in the Austro-Hungarian Empire motivated Flars to ask Fokker to build a second D.VII made of wood that was powered by a 200 hp Daimler engine. This prototype achieved climb rates comparable to the standard BMW-powered D.VII when tested on 8 and 14 August, 1918. This aircraft was shipped to Aspern on 27 August and was reported stored at Aspern on September 2. Meanwhile, Germany had guaranteed to supply enough steel tubing to support Austro-Hungarian production of the D.VII.
  After evaluating the Fokker V22 (90.05) in August, Flars chose the Fokker D.VII to replace the Aviatik D.I and Albatros D.III fighters starting in October 1918. The planned production program scheduled construction of 660 Fokker D.VII fighters starting in December 1918 and being completed in March 1919, with 255 built by Aviatik, 225 by Fokker, 150 by MAG, and 30 by Thone & Fiala. Production by WKF and Lohner was considered but not decided by the war's end.
  In August Flars awarded Fokker a contract for 75 Fokker D.VII airframes, less engines and armament, with a second order for 150 aircraft waiting for approval.
  Flars initially planned to install Hiero engines of 200 hp or 240 hp, but the 225 hp Daimler (MAG) was in production at MAG, so that engine was chosen for convenience. A standard production D.VII, 7805/18 (work number 3657), was powered by a 225 Daimler to investigate engine compatibility. It made is first flight at Schwerin on 11 October 1918. The first six production D.VII airframes, work numbers 3861 and 3863 to 3867, were shipped to MAG for installation of engine and armament on 23 October 1918. The Austro-Hungarian Empire was collapsing as the war was coming to an end, and the shipment was delayed at Cinkota-Nagyicce but eventually reached Matyasfold. On 12 March 1919 the six Fokker D.VII fighters were listed in the inventory of the Hungarian First Flying Group.
  Fokker stored 24 completed D.VII airframes at Schwerin for the LFT when the war ended, and further work on 38 sets of wings at Fokker's Perzina works was cancelled in December 1918.
  No solid speed and climb specifications are available for the production Austro-Hungarian D.VII with 225 hp Daimler, but the speed and climb below 2,000 m were likely somewhat superior to that of the 185 hp BMW-powered D.VII due to the higher power below 2,000 m, with speed and climb above 2,000 m comparable.


Fokker D.VII (Austro-Hungarian) Specifications
Engine: 225 hp Daimler
Wing: Span Upper 8.57 m
Span Lower 7.00 m
Chord Upper 1.60 m
Chord Lower 1.20 m
Gap 1.41 m
Stagger 0.65 m
Wing Area 20.8 m2
General: Length 7.00 m
Height 2.75 m
Track 1.80 m
Empty Weight 670 kg
Loaded Weight 874 kg


Fokker D.VII (Wooden Fuselage) Specifications
Engine: 200 hp Daimler
Climb: 1000m 2.0 min
2000m 4.0 min
3000m 7.0 min
4000m 10.1 min
5000m 14.1 min
Fokker-Maschinen am MAG-Flugfeld, Fokker V 7 und Fokker V 22, im Fluge Fokker V 12
Fokker Triplane MAG 90.03 with 150 hp Steyr at center and MAG 90.05 at right.
Now designated 90.05, V22 it at right. In this photo it has Fokker 2-bladed propeller. Fokker triplane prototype 90.03 is at left.
MAG 90.05 flys in to land; MAG 90.03 is at right. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Im Fluge Fokker V 22, am Boden Dreidecker 90.03, Aviatik-Berg D.I 92.14, Aviatik-Berg C.I-Baureihe 91, Ufag C.I-Flugzeug 161.01
Fully-assembled airframe of a MAG-built Fokker D.VII at the MAG factory rolled out for inspection just before the end of the war. In the background mechanics are working on an Aviatik D.I(MAG).
Fokker D.VII (MAG), Flugzeugnummer 93.01, Rohbau bei MAG
Fokker-built D.VII with 225 hp Daimler and Schwarzlose machine guns in original lozenge fabric. After MAG installed engines and armament, six Fokker D.VII fighters entered Hungarian service in 1919 and saw service against Czechoslovakian forces. The work number of this Fokker-built D.VII, captured by Czechoslovakian troops and photographed in Czech markings, is not known. This photo was taken in autumn 1919.
Fokker-built D.VII work number 3867, side number 16, with 225 hp Daimler and without its Schwarzlose machine guns is the third aircraft from left. The number '16' was its race number for the 1st National aviation meeting in September 1921, Prague-Kbely airfield.
Fokker-built D.VII with 225 hp Daimler and Schwarzlose machine guns, now in Czechoslovak camouflage and markings. It entered Hungarian service in 1919; captured by Czechoslovakian troops it was repainted in Czechoslovakian markings. Its serial number, 38.67, was an adaptation of its Fokker work number, 3867. The radiator is subtly different than D.VII aircraft with German engines. It is shown here in 1923 with Sigma propeller. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Fokker D.VI 90.04 in 1918 with 150 hp Steyr 11 cylinder rotary, a Le Rhone copy. (Peter M. Grosz collection/ STDB)
Fokker-MAG 90.02 & 90.03 Triplanes

  Fokker triplane V.7R, WN 1981, was designated for its Austrian-built, Steyr Le Rhone, 150 hp rotary engine. The Steyr Le Rhone was an eleven-cylinder, large-diameter, single-row rotary engine supported by a rear bearing only. The Steyr Le Rhone was virtually a direct copy of its French Le Rhone counterpart and displayed no Oberursel characteristics. This engine is described in various sources as having 145 hp, 150 hp, and 160 hp ratings, even for the same installation, but there was only one engine type.
  The Steyr Le Rhone was very similar to the 145 hp Oberursel Ur.III, but was much more successful and actually went into series production. The engine ran well using the castor oil replacement, T 50 synthetic lubricant, though shortages of even the synthetic castor oil plagued Austro-Hungarian operations until the end of the war. Production Fokker aircraft were shipped from Schwerin to the Austro-Hungarians with no guns, engines, or propellers. These indigenous components were then fitted by Fokker MAG (Magyar Atalanos Gepgyar) in Matyasfold, Hungary.
  To give some idea of the high regard in which the Germans held the Steyr Le Rhone, efforts were underway when the war ended to do an exchange for this outstanding rotary engine with the very successful 185 hp BMW IIIa inline six. Fokker V.7R, WN 1981 and a sister ship, the Fokker D.VI prototype, V.12, WN 1980, were sent to MAG on 3 January 1918 and may or may not have already had the Austro-Hungarian components fitted as the first prototypes for a possible production buy. In any event, it was the V. 12-based Fokker D.VI which was eventually chosen for purchase by the Austro- Hungarian government over the Dr.I-based V.7. Cost may also have been a factor in this decision since factory invoices show that the V.7R, WN 1981 cost DM 26,000 vs. DM 23,500 for both the engineless production Fokker D.VI and for later purchases of engineless Fokker D.VIIs.
  A relative bounty of photographs documents V.7R, WN 1981. Begun on 24 October 1917, V.7R had the V7 lengthened fuselage, standard Dr.I landing gear and a bulged cowl with three additional cooling holes above the normal pair of Dr.I cooling holes. In one photo of V.7R, "DRI 1981" can be seen on the bottom leading edge of the top wing. Given the serial number 90.03 more or less unofficially, V.7R eventually had "M.A.G. BUDAPEST?" painted on its side, the "?" referring to the fact the 90.03 serial number had not yet been allocated officially.
  This Triplane took part in the July 1918 Austro-Hungarian equivalent of the Adlershof fighter competitions, which were held at Aspern. Following the Fighter Evaluation competition, V.7R was badly damaged in a crash landing while being flown by MAG factory test pilot Feldwebel Josef Nemeth. During a test flight, the rudder cable broke and the resultant crash landing severely damaged the Triplane. By this time, Fokker was using double rudder cables in Germany to prevent such mishaps. Clearly visible in post-crash photos, the landing gear was destroyed, the starboard side wings and both ailerons were heavily damaged, the horizontal stabilizer and elevator and rudder were nearly destroyed, and the front of the fuselage and cowl were crushed. In all probability, V.7R, WN 1981 was written off after this accident, especially since the decision had already been made to go with the Steyr Le Rhone powered Fokker V.12/D.VI biplane instead.
Believed to be the Fokker V 4 (90.02) at Matyasfold. The wing struts have been removed and the strut attachment studs are clearly seen in the original photograph.
The Fokker V4 prototype (WN 1661 painted and after arrival and reassembly at MAG) was shipped to Austria without engine or propeller and the cowling was lost en route. There it was redesignated the MAG 90.02. Here it is shown after addition of an engine, new cowling, and rudder cross. It was tested with various Austro-Hungarian engines (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
The Fokker V.7R, work number 1981, fitted with its 150 hp Steyr engine under test in Austria, Aspern. The 11-cylinder Steyr engine was a copy of the Le Rhone. The additional holes in the cowling needed for cooling are evident. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
MAG-Fokker 90.03 (V7) photographed at the July Fighter Evaluation at Aspern. Mechanics painted a question mark on the fuselage, displaying a healthy sense of humor and the fact that the proper number designation had not yet been passed down official channels.
The Fokker V.7R, work number 1981, fitted with its 150 hp Steyr engine under test in Austria. The 11-cylinder Steyr engine was a copy of the Le Rhone. The additional holes in the cowling needed for cooling are evident. Its Austrian serial number, 90.03, was not yet applied. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Fokker V 7. Bewertungsfliegen am 9. Juli 1918 in Aspern
Fokker-Maschinen am MAG-Flugfeld, Fokker V 7 und Fokker V 22, im Fluge Fokker V 12
Fokker Triplane MAG 90.03 with 150 hp Steyr at center and MAG 90.05 at right.
Now designated 90.05, V22 it at right. In this photo it has Fokker 2-bladed propeller. Fokker triplane prototype 90.03 is at left.
The MAG-Fokker 90.03 (V7) in front of the MAG hangars at Matyasfold. The bulged cowling to accomodate the larger Le Rhone engine and lengthened fuselage are clearly in evidence.
The Fokker V.7R, work number 1981, fitted with its 150 hp Steyr engine under test in Austria. The 11-cylinder Steyr engine was a copy of the Le Rhone. The additional holes in the cowling needed for cooling are evident. Its Austrian serial number, 90.03, was not yet applied. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Fokker D.II(MAG) 04.69 is the first aircraft in a lineup of MAG fighters at Matyasfold in October 1917. The first five aircraft are D.II(MAG) fighters, with the MAG 90.02 triplane prototype and a D.I(MAG) in the background. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
MAG 90.05 flys in to land; MAG 90.03 is at right. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Im Fluge Fokker V 22, am Boden Dreidecker 90.03, Aviatik-Berg D.I 92.14, Aviatik-Berg C.I-Baureihe 91, Ufag C.I-Flugzeug 161.01
More images of the Fokker V.7R, work number 1981, fitted with its 150 hp Steyr engine during its evaluation in Austria. The 11-cylinder Steyr engine was a copy of the Le Rhone. The additional holes in the cowling needed for cooling are clearly evident. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
The Fokker V.7R after being crashed. After evaluation of the Triplane, the authorities chose to build a very limited number of the simpler, faster D.VI biplane. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Fokker V 7, Aspern, Bewertungsfliegen, Notlandung nach Bruch des Seitenstcuers, Feldpilot Fw Karl Nemeth unverletzt
Fokker V 7, Aspern, оценочные полеты, аварийная посадка после поломки системы управления, пилот Fw Карл Немет невредим
Austro-Hungarian Fokker D.VIII

  The Fokker V28, prototype of the production E.V/D.VIII, won Germany's Second Fighter Competition in June 1918. The LFT was interested in this development and Flars purchased a production E.V 113/18 without engine or armament.
  The E.V was fitted with a 150 hp Steyr rotary at MAG and was assembled at Aspern on 25 July. The next day Lt. Mallinkrodt of the German air service performed "the most daring maneuvers that earned enormous applause from the spectators present." Uzelac congratulated Mallinkrodt and ordered Leutnants Kasser and Gawel to fly the aircraft. "Kasser even made a few loops" and both pilots were enthusiastic about the E.V. Seekatz reported that the "colossal forces" encountered during Mallinkrodt's demonstration, which he performed "almost more upside-down than normal" had bent the rear wing struts. Stronger struts were ordered from Schwerin. Flight testing was almost completed when the E.V was irreparably damaged in a landing accident in August 1918.
  Austrian interest in the parasol fighter remained high and an order for 50 aircraft had been mentioned, but German production of Voltol, a substitute for castor oil rotary engine lubricant, was insufficient to supply both air services. Flars requested Fokker build a parasol powered by a 225 hp Daimler, but the war ended before the aircraft, reported under construction in September 1918, could be completed
The unarmed Fokker E.V 113/18 on the Aspern airfield in July 1918. The cowling was bulged to accommodate the greater diameter of the 11-cylinder, Steyr-built Le Rhone rotary engine. Although the E.V was extensively flight tested, a LFT designation was not assigned.
Fokker E.V 113/18, Anbotflugzeug von Fokker via MAG, für vorgesehene Serie 04.200
Fokker E.V 113/18, самолет, предложенный Fokker через MAG для предполагаемой серии 04.200
Fokker E.V 113/18, work number 2754, was fitted with a 150 hp Steyr. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Having almost completed its flight tests, the E.V was destroyed in a landing accident in August 1918. The accident demonstrates the protection given the pilot by the strength of the steel-tube fuselage, a feature lauded by German pilots.
Unarmed Fokker B.III 04.22 landing at Wiener Neustadt airfield. A Brandenburg C.I is at right. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)
Another image of Fokker B.I 03.22. A downed Caproni bomber is in the background. Fokker 03.22 of Flik 8 with crew consisting of pilot Oblt. Wedige von Froreich and observer Kadett i.d.Res. Richard Maurig Ritter von Sarfeld was one of eight aircraft sharing the victory over the Caproni, which was shot down during a raid on Laibach. (Peter M. Grosz collection/STDB)