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Albatros C.X

Страна: Германия

Год: 1917

Фронтовой самолет

Albatros - C.VIIIN - 1917 - Германия<– –>Albatros - C.XII - 1917 - Германия


В.Кондратьев Самолеты первой мировой войны


АЛЬБАТРОС C-X / ALBATROS C-X

  Как известно, модернизация боевых самолетов в первую очередь сопровождается повышением мощности двигателей. К началу 1917 года разработчики "Альбатроса" установили на машину новый 260-сильный мотор "Мерседес". Модификация получила обозначение C-X. Помимо силовой установки, она отличалась крыльями увеличенного размаха с измененной формой законцовок.
  Самолет выпускался серийно на фирмах Альбатрос, OAW, BFW, Роланд и Линке-Хоффман. До октября 1917-го не менее 300 C-X было отправлено на западный фронт. Большинство из них использовалось в качестве разведчиков.
  
  
ДВИГАТЕЛЬ
  
  "Мерседес", 260 л.с.
  
  
ВООРУЖЕНИЕ
  
  1 синхронный "Шпандау", 1 турельный "Парабеллум".


А.Александров, Г.Петров Крылатые пленники России


Фирма "Альбатрос" продолжала развивать свой класс Ц в течение всей войны. В 1917 г. возникла модель Ц.Х, оснащенная двигателем "Мерседес Д. IVa" 260 л. с, вооруженная синхронизированным и подвижным пулеметами, несущая кислородное и радиооборудование. Не менее 4 компаний производили "Ц-десятые" по лицензии, и в октябре около 300 машин летали во фронтовых подразделениях. На снимке, изображающем предположительно захваченный русскими "Альбатрос Ц.Х" (53), виден аппарат, выполненный в традициях "жанра": все тот же двухместный двухстоечный биплан-трактор с фанерным фюзеляжем и обшитыми полотном крыльями. Выхлопной коллектор мотора выведен наверх, радиатор спрятан в центроплан верхнего крыла, поставлен пропеллер "Аксиаль" (AXIAL). Что еще? Шансы пережить Великую войну у стоящих у аппарата германских авиаторов пока что увеличились...


O.Thetford, P.Gray German Aircraft of the First World War (Putnam)


Albatros C X

  The Albatros C X followed the C VII into service during 1917. The Albatros design team followed the established pattern, with modifications to provide for the much more powerful 260 h.p. Mercedes C IVa engine then becoming available. The result was an aeroplane of considerably larger proportions. Although not dissimilar, the C X was more majestic in appearance than its predecessors.
  The fuselage followed the previous formula in being slab sided and plywood covered, but it was wider, deeper and longer. The additional space permitted the installation of oxygen breathing equipment in the pilot's (forward) cockpit and a comprehensive collection of radio apparatus in the rear cockpit.
  Although still of two-bay cable-braced layout on two wooden box-spars, the wing structure was altered radically and was of noticeably greater span and area in an endeavour to extract the greatest ceiling from the additional engine power. The angular rake of the wingtips on the earlier machines was discontinued, and more attention was paid to a refined and aerodynamic tip profile.
  To maintain sensitive lateral control despite the increased wingspan, ailerons were provided at all four wingtips, those on the upper surfaces being designed with large rectangular inset, balance portions. Once again an aerofoil-type radiator was used and mounted in the root of the starboard upper wing panel. The degree of shutter opening was easily seen and adjusted by the pilot.
  There was no great alteration in the tail surfaces, which were of the same profile as the Albatros C V and C VII. The fixed fin surfaces were of wood with plywood skin, and the control surfaces of light gauge steel tube with fabric covering. The steel tube undercarriage was the same as that of the C V.
  Like its forerunner, the Albatros C X was used mainly on reconnaissance and artillery work during 1917, when, by October, some 300 of the type were serving at the Front. It was built by no less than four sub-contractors.

TECHNICAL DATA
  Purpose: Two-seat reconnaissance and artillery patrol.
  Manufacturers:
   Albatros Werke G.m.b.H.
   Ostdeutsche Albatros Werke (O.A.W.).
   Linke-Hofmann (Li.).
   Bayerische Flugzeug Werke (Bay.).
   L.F.G. (Roland) (Rol.).
  Power Plant: 260 h.p. Mercedes D IVa 6 cylinder in-line, water cooled
  Dimensions: Span, 14.360 m. (47 ft. 11 in.). Length, 9.150 m. (30 ft. 0 1/4 in) Height, 3 400 m. (11 ft. 1 7/8 in.). Wing area, 42.7 sq.m. (461.16 sq.ft.).
  Weights: Empty, 1,050 kg. (2,310 lb.). Loaded, 1,668 kg. (3,669 lb.).
  Performance: Maximum speed, 175 km.hr. (109.4 m.p.h.). Initial climb 1 000 m (3,280 ft.) in 5 min. 2,000 m. (6,560 ft.) in 11 min. Ceiling, 5,000 m. (16,400 ft.) in 55 min. Duration, 3 hr. 25 min.
  Armament: Two machine-guns. One, fixed, firing forward for pilot. One, free-firing for observer. Light bomb load according to tactical requirement.


J.Herris Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Vol 2: Late Two-Seaters (A Centennial Perspective on Great War Airplanes 25)


Albatros C.X

  The next generation of Albatros C-types, the C.X and C.XII, were characterized by their use of the newly available 260 hp Mercedes D.IVa six-cylinder engine. The C.X greatly resembled the earlier C.VII; the two types shared their configuration and typical Albatros structure. The prototype C.X aircraft even used ear radiators like the C.VII, but production C.X aircraft used an airfoil radiator in the upper center section.
  When the Mercedes D.IVa engine became available in the second half of 2016, Idflieg published technical requirements for a new long-range reconnaissance plane using the new engine. The Albatros C.X and Rumpler C.IV proposals were selected for prototyping, and construction of the C.X began in August or September 1916.
  The C.X used a larger wing than the C.V and C.VII, and for the first time Albatros used a new box spar design driven by the shortage of aircraft-quality lumber. Other than that, the C.X was basically an enlarged C.VII. Both the C.X and competing Rumpler C.IV had flown by 2 October 1916. Load tests on C.X airframe work number 2910 were performed at Adlershof during 10-14 October. The airframe passed four of the five load cases. A strengthened wing as tested on 21 October and again failed. Once the ribs behind the rear spar were strengthened the wing passed a third attempt on 21 November.
  Production C.X aircraft differed from the prototypes in having airfoil radiators and ailerons on all four wings. The lower wingtips were also rounded, perhaps as a result of observing the rounded lower wingtips on the Rumpler. However, the C.X adhered to the typical Albatros design and construction, and many C.X parts such as the tailplane, elevator, rudder, and parts of the landing gear and controls were common to the C.V and C.VII. The return line for the coolant from the wing radiator was led through the forward port center-section strut for improved streamlining, a detail copied from the LVG C.IV. Idflieg had prohibited this by the time the C.X was type-tested due to cooling problems caused by reduced water flow; regardless, many C.X aircraft had this feature, likely due to use of parts built before the prohibition. At least one C.X, C.6831/16, was fitted with an eight-cylinder Mercedes D.IV engine and lasted into 1918.
  During prototype evaluation it soon became clear that the Rumpler C.IV was far superior to the Albatros C.X. Despite that, 400 C.X aircraft were ordered from Albatros, Roland, BFW, and Linke-Hofmann, with OAW building most, and perhaps all, of the Albatros aircraft. At first C.X aircraft built by BFW and Roland were not rated highly by Idflieg, but the problems were resolved; Linke-Hofmann fared better.
  Initially the C.X was relegated to training use, hardly an effective use of the new Mercedes engine, but aircraft reached squadron service in March/April 1917 in parallel with the Rumpler C.IV. The C.X aircraft that saw combat were from the final OAW production batch, although it is not known why earlier production aircraft were not used at the front. The Rumpler C.IV quickly established itself as the premiere German long-range reconnaissance aircraft. In contrast, the C.X had inferior climb and ceiling compared to the Rumpler and was typically slower. Its disappointing performance caused the C.X to be relegated to general-purpose duties with regular two-seater units, where it showed no real advantage over the 200 hp DFW C.V despite supposedly being faster. The C.X was difficult to fly and disappointing in performance, and was soon withdrawn from the front and allocated to training units.


Albatros C-Type Specifications
Albatros C.VI Albatros C.VII Albatros C.VIIIN Albatros C.IX Albatros C.X
Engine 180 hp Argus As.Ill 200 hp Benz Bz.IV 160 hp Mercedes D.m 160 hp Mercedes D.m 260 hp Mercedes D.IVa
Span, Upper 11.7m 12.78 m 16.74 m 10.4 m 14.36 m
Span, Lower - 12.40 m - - 14.00 m
Chord, Upper - 1.80 m - - 1.8 m
Chord, Lower - 1.70 m - - 1.6 m
Gap - 1.83 m - - 1.86 m
Wing Area - 43.4 m2 - - 42.7 m2
Wing Dihedral - 2° (upper &. lower) - - 2° (upper & lower)
Length 7.9 m 8.71 m 7.34 m 8.22 m 9.15 m
Height 3.2 m 3.60 m - 2.735 m 3.40 m
Empty Weight 830 kg 1,030 kg - 790 kg 1,088-1,115 kg
Loaded Weight 1,343 kg 1,546 kg - 1,150 kg 1,668-1,695 kg
Maximum Speed 145 km/h 135 km/h 135 km/h 155 km/h 175 km/h
Climb to 1,000m - 5.5 minutes 5 minutes 5 minutes 3 minutes
Climb to 2,000m - 13 minutes - - 6.5 minutes
Climb to 3,000m 35 minutes 21 minutes - - 11 minutes
Climb to 4,000m - 34 minutes - 30 minutes 21 minutes
Climb to 5,000m 49 minutes
Duration 4.5 hours - - 2.5 hours 3/2 hours
Note: C.VII track 1.95 m


Albatros C.X Production Orders
Order Date Mfr Qty Serials
Oct. 1916 OAW 100 C.5975-6074/16
Oct. 1916 Rol 100 C.6825-6924/16
Oct. 1916 BFW 50 C.7725-7774/16
1916 Li 50 C.8303-8352/16
Nov. 1916 OAW 100 C.9206-9305/16


J.Herris Roland Aircraft of WWI (A Centennial Perspective on Great War Airplanes 9)


Roland C.IV

  There is no known information for the Roland C.IV. Because the Roland-built Albatros C.X was produced about the same time Idflieg rationalized the aircraft designation system, the Albatros C.X(Rol) could originally have been designated Roland C.IV, C.VI, or C.VII in company records. In any case, apparently there is no original Roland design built that was designated Roland C.IV. Later Roland produced other two-seaters under license, the Hannover CL.II(Rol) and Halberstadt CL.IV(Rol). These were too late to receive a confusing designation under the old system, but perhaps Roland management assigned a Roland designation to them, or, more likely, these remained unbuilt Roland projects.

J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: Late Two-Seaters /Centennial Perspective/ (2)
Albatros C.X prototype. It was flown by 4 October 1916 and passed its final load test on 21 November. Production C.X aircraft had an airfoil radiator in place of the ear radiators and also had ailerons on all four wings instead of just the upper wings.
В.Обухович, А.Никифоров - Самолеты Первой Мировой войны
Альбатрос C X
J.Herris - Development of German Warplanes in WWI /Centennial Perspective/
This Albatros C.X is in the standard factory finish. Not visible in this side view, the upper surfaces of the wings and tailplane normally had a two-color or three-color sprayed camouflage scheme depending on sub-contractor.
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: Late Two-Seaters /Centennial Perspective/ (2)
Albatros C.X(Bay) C.7760/16. Formerly of FliegerAbteilung 209 whose unit insignia it wears, it was photographed at Adlershof while being used by a Bavarian officer as his transport. The camouflage colors and pattern are speculative.
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: Late Two-Seaters /Centennial Perspective/ (2)
Albatros C.X(Bay) C.7760/16 of FliegerAbteilung 209
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: Late Two-Seaters /Centennial Perspective/ (2)
Albatros C.X(OAW) 9244/16 flown by Lt. Hugo Geiger and Lt. Theodor Rein of Flieger Abteilung 46b in mid 1917. The wings and tailplane are shown with plain under surfaces but they may have been painted blue.
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: Late Two-Seaters /Centennial Perspective/ (2)
Albatros C.X(OAW) C.9289/16 of FliegerAbteilung 19. Flown by Flieger Hans Boehme and Lt. Johannes Wollenhaupt, it was brought down on 12 July 1917 by Capt. Webb of 70 Sqdn.The camouflage was described as pink fading to dark gray upper surfaces and white lower surfaces to the wings, likely applied at the unit.
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: Late Two-Seaters /Centennial Perspective/ (2)
Albatros C.X(OAW) unit unknown painted in an overall light color for high-altitude photoreconnaissance, 1917. No serial visible.
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: Late Two-Seaters /Centennial Perspective/ (2)
Albatros C.X(Rol) unit unknown, painted in standard Roland color scheme, no serial visible, 1917.
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: Late Two-Seaters /Centennial Perspective/ (2)
Albatros C.X 5992/16 of the Dutch Air Service in late summer of 1917.This aircraft was interned on 28 August 1917; the original unit is unknown but was likely a training unit.
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: Late Two-Seaters /Centennial Perspective/ (2)
Albatros C.X 4.1 (ex-9259/16) of the Polish Air Service, 1919.
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: Late Two-Seaters /Centennial Perspective/ (2)
Albatros C.X 4.9 of 4 Eskadry, Polish Air Service, 1919.
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: Late Two-Seaters /Centennial Perspective/ (2)
Albatros C.X in post-war service with the Polish Air Service converted to a flying ambulance with hinged panel on the port side with view ports.
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: Late Two-Seaters /Centennial Perspective/ (2)
The Albatros C.X prototype retained the ear radiators of the earlier C.VII combined with the new, more powerful 260 hp Mercedes D.IVa engine. Like the preceding C.VII, prototypes had ailerons on the upper wings only.
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: Late Two-Seaters /Centennial Perspective/ (2)
Another view of the Albatros C.X prototype at Johannisthal with the airship hangar in the background. The prototype C.X had ear radiators like the C.VII, making it very difficult to distinguish between the two types. The lower wingtips were rounded but did not yet have the ailerons used by production aircraft. The C.X was larger than the C.VII and had a bigger wing. Built-up box spars were used due to a shortage of large, high-quality wood.
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: Late Two-Seaters /Centennial Perspective/ (2)
An Albatros C.X prototype.The prototype C.X had ear radiators and ailerons on the upper wing only like the C.VII.
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: Late Two-Seaters /Centennial Perspective/ (2)
Albatros C.X 9318/16 was a prototype as shown by its ear radiator. Its serial is not in any production series; however, it is near serials of C.XII prototypes 9312-9314/18. Serials of the other C.X prototypes are unknown but are likely in this sequence.
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: Late Two-Seaters /Centennial Perspective/ (2)
Albatros C.X(Rol) 6905/16 at a training unit; trainers usually lost their spinners as illustrated here.
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: Late Two-Seaters /Centennial Perspective/ (2)
Albatros C.X(Rol) at a training unit. No spinner is fitted.
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: Late Two-Seaters /Centennial Perspective/ (2)
Albatros C.X(Bay) 7760/16 at Adlershof. Although wearing the unit insignia of FliegerAbteilung (A) 209, it was flown to Adlershof by a Bavarian air service staff officer on official business.
Сайт - Pilots-and-planes /WWW/
Albatros C.X(Li) 8305/16 at Adlershof in early August 1917 for performance trials.
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: Late Two-Seaters /Centennial Perspective/ (2)
Albatros C.X(Li) 8306/16 was one of the first C.X aircraft built under license by Linke-Hofmann. Intended for aircraft training, the aircraft built by Linke-Hofmann had full operational equipment.
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: Late Two-Seaters /Centennial Perspective/ (2)
Albatros C.X(Li) 8306/16 at the Linke-Hofmann factory in Breslau.
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: Late Two-Seaters /Centennial Perspective/ (2)
Albatros C.X(Li) 8322/16.
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: Late Two-Seaters /Centennial Perspective/ (2)
Albatros C.X(OAW) 9244/16 that served with FliegerAbteilung 46b at Marrimbois Ferme. Lt. Hugo Geiger was the pilot and the lightning bolt was his personal insignia; the observer was Lt. Theodor Rein. The hatch for installation of a long focal-length camera is behind the observer's cockpit.
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: Late Two-Seaters /Centennial Perspective/ (2)
Albatros C.X(OAW) 9244/16 that served with FliegerAbteilung 46b at Marrimbois Ferme. Lt. Hugo Geiger was the pilot and the lightning bolt was his personal insignia; the observer was Lt. Theodor Rein. The camera is installed and can be seen protruding above the top of the fuselage. (Below photo courtesy Bruno Schmaling)
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: Late Two-Seaters /Centennial Perspective/ (2)
Crewmen Lt. Krohl and Lt. Kerp pose with their Albatros C.X(OAW) 9252/16 that served with FliegerAbteilung 46b at Marrimbois Ferme.The hatch for installation of a long focal-length camera is behind the observer's cockpit. Bullet holes in the tail and rear fuselage have circular patches painted with 'smiley faces' except the 'smiles' were straight, not curved.
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: Late Two-Seaters /Centennial Perspective/ (2)
Albatros C.X(OAW) 9289/16 of FliegerAbteilung 18 was brought down by Capt. Webb of No.70 Squadron RFC on 12 July 1917. Observer Lt. Johannes Wollenhaupt was taken POW and the pilot, Flieger Hans Boehme died of his wounds on the 13th. It was given captured German aircraft number G 51 by the British. These photographs show it without its propeller. This aircraft had no individual or unit markings to distinguish it. However, the report stated "It was painted pink in front shading off to a service grey in the rear portion... planes are painted dark grey on top and white underneath." This is an interesting camouflage scheme not recorded elsewhere and was likely applied at the unit.
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: Late Two-Seaters /Centennial Perspective/ (2)
An unidentified Albatros C.X displays its clean lines. As already noted, Albatros is notorious among historians for omitting the serial number required by Idflieg, often making individual aircraft, like this one, impossible to identify.
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: Late Two-Seaters /Centennial Perspective/ (2)
Albatros C.X of FliegerAbteilung (A) 290. The radiator cooling water flows through the forward left cabane strut, a design intended to minimize drag. However, this led to leakage problems and was soon banned by Idflieg. (Courtesy Bruno Schmaling)
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: Late Two-Seaters /Centennial Perspective/ (2)
Unidentified Albatros C.X(OAW) with unknown crew shows the streamlined shape of this mediocre aircraft.
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: Late Two-Seaters /Centennial Perspective/ (2)
Albatros C.X of FliegerAbteilung (A) 290 in dark finish. (Courtesy Bruno Schmaling)
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: Late Two-Seaters /Centennial Perspective/ (2)
Albatros C.XII 1057/17 was flown by pilot Lt. Hugo Geiger and observer Lt. Theodor Rein of FliegerAbteilung 46b. The red lightning bolt was Geiger's personal marking. The covered hatch behind the observer is for installation of a long focal-length camera. FA 46b flew from Marinbois Ferme in the late spring and summer of 1917 while equipped with the Albatros C.X (seen taxiing here) and C.XII. Geiger's C.XII 1057/17 was lost on 23 July 1917; engine failure caused an emergency landing that broke the fuselage in two, a common problem with the C.XII.
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: Late Two-Seaters /Centennial Perspective/ (2)
This unidentified Albatros C.X is darker colored. It has the factory three-color camouflage on their upper wing surfaces.
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: Late Two-Seaters /Centennial Perspective/ (2)
A camera is loaded aboard an unidentified Albatros C.X of FliegerAbteilung 210. Albatros is notorious among historians for omitting the serial number required by Idflieg, often making individual aircraft impossible to identify.
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: Late Two-Seaters /Centennial Perspective/ (2)
Pleasing view of an unidentified Albatros C.X devoid of unique markings. The varnished wood fuselage is notable.
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: Late Two-Seaters /Centennial Perspective/ (2)
Albatros C.X(Rol) photographed on 15 June 1917 in front of the automobile exhibition hall in Berlin that Roland was moved to after the Roland factory at Adlershof was destroyed by fire on 6 September 1916. The thick national insignia were typical of Roland and were also seen on Roland-built Pfalz D.III fighters.
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: Late Two-Seaters /Centennial Perspective/ (2)
An Albatros C.X assigned to FliegerAbteilung (A) 267. (Courtesy Bruno Schmaling)
Журнал - Flight за 1918 г.
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: Late Two-Seaters /Centennial Perspective/ (2)
The powerful Albatros C.X. This aircraft has markings on its spinner and is in a darker finish than that used for most aircraft of this type.
Форум - Breguet's Aircraft Challenge /WWW/
BFW-built Albatros C.X
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: Late Two-Seaters /Centennial Perspective/ (2)
Albatros C.X(Bay) of FliegerAbteilung 2. The radiator cooling water flows through the forward left cabane strut, a design intended to minimize drag. However, this led to leakage problems and was soon banned by Idflieg.
Powered by the 260 hp Mercedes D.IVa engine, the Albatros C.X was a larger, more powerful development of the C.VII. The ear radiators of the C.VII were used on the C.X prototype, but these had been troublesome and production C.X machines used an airfoil radiator in the upper wing.
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: Late Two-Seaters /Centennial Perspective/ (2)
Albatros C.X of FliegerAbteilung (A) 290 with bomb racks installed under the fuselage. (Courtesy Bruno Schmaling)
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: Late Two-Seaters /Centennial Perspective/ (2)
This Albatros C.X was photographed with a broken propeller, missing spinner, and missing lower cowling; perhaps the result of a nose-over on landing?
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 1: Early Two-Seaters /Centennial Perspective/ (1)
The nose of a C.X third generation Albatros C-type displays it powerful 260 hp Mercedes D.IVa six-cylinder engine.The C.X greatly resembled the C.VII from which it was derived and the types shared some of their components. The C.X did use a new, larger wing cellule to support the larger, heavier engine. While evolutionary design served Albatros well through the C.VII, something more innovative was needed for the third generation C-types using the 260 hp Mercedes.
Сайт - Pilots-and-planes /WWW/
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: Late Two-Seaters /Centennial Perspective/ (2)
Под фюзеляжем самолета Альбатрос С X крепились бомбодержатели для небольших авиабомб
C.X undercarriage - the claw brake bears the Linke Hoffmann logo and the serial C.8307/17 note bomb cradles and antennae weight.
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: Late Two-Seaters /Centennial Perspective/ (2)
Albatros C.X flying over the Eastern Front shows its planform that closely resembled the earlier C.VII but differed by the longer span wings with rounded wingtips on the lower wings. The airfoil radiator was also an identification feature.
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: Late Two-Seaters /Centennial Perspective/ (2)
Albatros C.X(Rol) 6831/16 was photographed on 16 March 1918 with the new national insignia on fuselage and tail but with the original insignia on the wings. This aircraft had been converted to use the 220 hp Mercedes D.IV eight-cylinder engine. In the process it lost its spinner and gained a new, streamlined metal engine cowling giving it a distinctively different look from the front. The rubber shortage has affected the aircraft by eliminating regular tires. The 260 hp Mercedes D.IVa engine used by the C.X and C.XII was in demand for other operational types and some of the C.X and C.XII aircraft used for training had their D.IVa engines replaced by the D.IV straight-eight. The last new aircraft using the D.IV engine, the rare Lubeck-Travemunde F.2, was delivered in February 1918 and other types using this rare engine had essentially disappeared from operational service, making limited numbers of the D.IV engine available.
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: Late Two-Seaters /Centennial Perspective/ (2)
Albatros C.X 5992/16 was interned in the Netherlands on 28 August 1917. It displays its three-color camouflage on the upper wing surfaces, but the German insignia has been painted over with a Dutch orange insignia. The ailerons on all four wings are clearly shown.This was the production configuration of the C.X, improving its roll rate.
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: Late Two-Seaters /Centennial Perspective/ (2)
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: Late Two-Seaters /Centennial Perspective/ (2)
Another view of Albatros C.X in Polish service, Polish serial number CWL 4.9 of 4 Eskadry, 1919. The Polish multicolor camouflage scheme shows up well.
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: Late Two-Seaters /Centennial Perspective/ (2)
Postwar Albatros C.X in Polish service; Polish CWL Number 4.9 of 4 Eskadry in 1919.
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: Late Two-Seaters /Centennial Perspective/ (2)
Postwar Albatros C.X in Polish service, Polish serial number CWL 4.3 of 4 Eskadry, 1919. A teddy bear mascot has been attached to the interplane bracing wires.
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: Late Two-Seaters /Centennial Perspective/ (2)
Albatros C.X Polish serial number 4.14 displays the Polish Eagle insignia aft of its Polish national insignia.
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: Late Two-Seaters /Centennial Perspective/ (2)
Albatros C.X in postwar Polish service, Polish serial number 4.18, displays its three-color camouflage on the upper surfaces of its wings.
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: Late Two-Seaters /Centennial Perspective/ (2)
Another view of Polish Albatros C.X serial number 4.18 after its landing accident.
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: Late Two-Seaters /Centennial Perspective/ (2)
Postwar the new Polish air service inherited a number of Albatros C.X aircraft. Here C.X 9259/16, Polish number 4.1, has suffered a rough landing in 1919.
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: Late Two-Seaters /Centennial Perspective/ (2)
This Albatros C.X in Polish service suffered a severe crash.
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: Late Two-Seaters /Centennial Perspective/ (2)
The Polish air service modified this Albatros C.X as an air ambulance. It carries red crosses on wings and rudder to indicate its ambulance role and the fuselage has been modified to carry a patient on a stretcher.
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: Late Two-Seaters /Centennial Perspective/ (2)
Additional view of the Albatros C.X the Polish air service modified into an air ambulance. The view shows its ability to carry a patient on a stretcher
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: Late Two-Seaters /Centennial Perspective/ (2)
Additional view of the Albatros C.X the Polish air service modified into an air ambulance. The view shows structural details of the modified fuselage and an alternate payload.
А.Александров, Г.Петров - Крылатые пленники России
(КПР 53)
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: Late Two-Seaters /Centennial Perspective/ (2)
Приборное оборудование пилотской кабины С X было минимальным, однако кресло обшивалось кожей
Pilot's cockpit of an Albatros C.X. (Peter M. Grosz Collection/SDTB)
Сайт - Pilots-and-planes /WWW/
A.Imrie - German Bombers /Arms & Armour/
Observer's cockpit of Albatros C X 6303/16 (licence-built by Linke-Hoffmann) showing the standard bomb release lever on the starboard cockpit wall. Linked via a ratchet free-wheel and cables to the camshaft on the P.u.W. bombrack, five pulls of the lever were needed to release the four bombs; the first pull was a safety measure that positioned the first cam to the release position. The lever operated over an angular segment and had to be moved forward between each selection. Other equipment includes the handpump for pressurizing fuel system, the trailing aerial reel and, in front of the bomb release, the lever for engaging and disengaging the clutch of the AC generator which supplied the power for the Telefunken wireless transmitter.
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: Late Two-Seaters /Centennial Perspective/ (2)
An Albatros C.X of FliegerAbteilung 46b was downed by French Escadrille 26 on 3 June 1917. Here pilot Lt. Paul Werner and observer Lt. Emil Kittel pose with their victors. They are clearly disgruntled, and they are also alive and appear uninjured. Perhaps they later came to appreciate they experienced a far better fate than awaited many aviators.
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: Late Two-Seaters /Centennial Perspective/ (2)
Crashed Albatros C.X(Rol) of an unknown unit. The presence of youngsters in the photo may indicate the location was in Germany, suggesting a training unit.
J.Herris - Albatros Aircraft of WWI. Volume 2: Late Two-Seaters /Centennial Perspective/ (2)
O.Thetford, P.Gray - German Aircraft of the First World War /Putnam/