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Журнал
Flight за 1910 г.
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Журнал - Flight за 1910 г.

BLERIOT'S CROSS-CHANNEL FLYER. - As a souvenir of M. Bleriot's historic feat in flying across the Channel, Messrs. Bleriot, Ltd., the London manufacturers of the famous lamps designed by M. Bleriot, have issued postcards, reproduced above, showing the flyer as it appeared when on exhibition in London afterwards. These can be obtained at the Company's stand at Olympia during the present Show.
THE SECOND CROSS-CHANNEL FLIGHT. - M. Jacques de Lesseps, on his Bleriot, passing over the cliffs at Dover on Saturday last. A good specimen of a "composite" photograph.
M. JACQUES DE LESSEPS' CHANNEL FLIGHT. - His Bleriot machine immediately after landing near Dover.
THE PRINCE AND PRINCESS OF WALES AT OLYMPIA. - Our photograph was secured during the inspection of the famous Louis Bleriot monoplane. On the stand are also Prince Francis of Teck, Mr. Roger W. Wallace, K.C., Chairman of the Royal Aero Club; the Hon. C. S. Rolls, who drove the Prince and Princess on his car from Marlborough House and back, and explained many points of interest in the exhibits during the Royal party's tour of Olympia; Mr. Edward Manville, President of the S.M.M.T.; and Mr. Norbet Chereau, manager for M. Bleriot.
The Bleriot monoplane, with its main planes folded up ready for housing or travelling.
Under the method of construction of his monoplanes M. Bleriot does away with the necessity of huge places for housing them. The main planes can be quite readily folded down to the sides, the whole being brought well within the compass of the main framework. In the above photograph a Bleriot is seen with its planes fully set after coming out of its dock, seen behind. In our other photo the same machine is seen folded up.
HOW AN AEROPLANE ARRIVES AT AN AERODROME. - Mr. Grahame-White superintending the unpacking of his monoplane; and, on the right, assisting in its erection.
GRAHAME-WHITE'S BLERIOT, SHOWING THE CENTRAL ARRANGEMENTS. - On the right, a view taken from the tail end shows the pilot's seat, control pillar and wheel warping arrangement and metal splash-board to protect the aviator from oil.
A Bleriot type machine just completed by Messrs. Hill and Co., of Bury, Lancashire.
Mr. Vivian V. D. Hewitt's Bleriot.
Last week the Bleriot monoplane which is being exploited by Mr. Albert House, Managing Director of the Northern Aero Syndicate at Bradford, was out for practice at the Company's Apperley Bridge flying ground, and some interesting short flights were obtained. Unfortunately, at the finish, when taking a turn to avoid a wall, the machine came to grief. Our photographs above show the machine before and after the mishap. In the left-hand photo is Mr. J. W. House, at the wheel, and standing behind the figure 5 is Mr. Albert House, junr. In the right-hand photograph, from left to right, are Mr. J. W. House, Mr. Albert House, junr., and Mr. Albert House.
AT THE BLERIOT SCHOOL, HENDON (LONDON AERODROME). - From left to right: Mr. P. Prier (instructor), Mr. E. A. Paul, Capt. Board, Mr. Bouwens, Mr. Petitpierre, Mr. Grabette.
KING EDWARD AT BIARRITZ AVIATION MEETING. - His Majesty questioning M. Bleriot upon details of his monoplane.
A Typical Incident in the Career of the Monarch, Counsellor, Sage, and Sportsman, whose Death has cast a gloom over Five Continents.
King Alfonso of Spain (in centre) takes intense Interest in the Bleriot of M. Morane at San Sebastian.
Mr. Claude Grahame-White bringing back his Bleriot to its dock at Brooklands after some short flights last Saturday. Mr. Grahame-Whlte is seen in front helping to pull by the chassis.
Competitors at the Starting Line at Lanark Meeting, as seen from the Members' Enclosure. - The machines, reading from the front, are: No. 6, Cattaneo's Bleriot; No. 12, Gilmour's Bleriot; 18, Grace's Henry Farman; 131, Ridley's Bierlot; 11, Capt. Dickson's Farman; 21, McArdle's Bleriot; 8, Blondeau's Henry Farman; 5, Champel's Voisin.
GRAHAME-WHITE IN FLIGHT ON HIS HENRY FARMAN AT BLACKPOOL AERODROME. - The machine at rest on the ground is Cecil Grace s Bleriot.
ONE, TWO AND THREE PLANES. - Grahame-White, in his Henry Farman biplane, flying over Drexel's Bleriot monoplane and Roe's triplane.
DREXEL OFF ON HIS BLERIOT FOR HIS SPLENDID SEA FLIGHT. - Beyond is Grahame-Whlte's Henry Farman also about to take the air.
RESTRAINING AN IMPATIENT MOUNT. - Cattaneo, at Blackpool, starting for the speed contest, in which he made three laps in 3m. 36s. = 50 m.p.h. Note the exhaust from engine and position of extra petrol tank. A general view of the aerodrome, with the Tower in the distance, is obtained in this picture.
M. Paul de Lesseps' Bleriot impatient to take the air at Doncaster Flight Meeting. - How the mechanics restrain her.
Mr. Radley in flight on his Bleriot monoplane over the Huntingdon Racecourse, now used as an aviation ground.
Mr. Claude Grahame-White, who has been flying at Pau, last week, during his visit to London, made some short flights at Brooklands preparatory to any attempt at his proposed long flight from the Valley of the Thames to some central point within two miles or so of Charing Cross. Our photograph shows Mr. Grahame-White in the air on his Bleriot monoplane.
The late M. Le Blon flying over the rocks and sea at San Sebastian last week. It was upon a later day that the disaster which ended fatally, occurred.
FLYING AT BROOKLANDS. - Mr. Astley is seen flying on his monoplane.
Louis Bleriot, who was a visitor at the Bournemouth Aerodrome, takes a turn in the air on one of his monoplanes.
Mr. James Radley flying at Brooklands Aviation Grounds at dusk on Wednesday of last week over one of the London and South-Western trains
FLYING IN SCOTLAND - FIRST PUBLIC FLIGHTS, - Mr. Radley giving exhibitions on his Bleriot monoplane at Pollok last week.
Mr. D. Graham Gilmour during one of his splendid flights on his Bleriot monoplane recently at Brooklands.
M. Pierre Prier, the Bleriot instructor, makes his first flight on the Bleriot School opening day at Hendon Aerodrome last Saturday. - His start, and, inset, well up in the air.
Drexel on Cecil Grace's Bleriot flying over the Club-house on Saturday last at the Blackpool meeting. For this achievement he was awarded the Daily Merit Prize of L100.
Major Kennedy and Mr. Hogarth taking Drexel's altitude at Lanark Meeting.
Mr. James Radley flying at Brooklands at the Spring Meeting on Wednesday last week on his Bleriot machine.
A vol plane by Radley on his Bleriot monoplane at Bournemouth Aviation Meeting.
HAVRE FLIGHT MEETING. - General view of the aerodrome and grand stands, looking towards the sea. Aubrun, on his Bleriot, is flying.
MILAN MEETING. - General view of the aviation grounds, showing the timekeeper's box, signalling arrangements hangars, &c. A Bleriot is in flight round the course.
Mr. A. Drexel flying high on a Bleriot over the McArdle and Drexel New Forest Aviation School grounds.
FLYING AT DUSK. - Mr. Cecil Grace, on his Bleriot recently making one of his high flights during the close of the day.
FLIGHT PHOTOGRAPHS - An impression of the future-flying in the clouds. A clever "faked" photograph, of which so many have been given currency. It is interesting to contrast this with the genuine pictures which have formed the last two frontispieces in FLIGHT.
Captain Dickson, on his Henry Farman, and Cattaneo, on his Bleriot, in the air at the same time at the Lanark Flight Meeting.
Mr. A. Rawlinson during one of his daring flights on his Henry Farman on the opening day of the Nice Meeting. - In the distance, exactly over the heads of the three men on the beach, Olieslagers, on his Bieriot monoplane, can be seen flying.
AT THE HAVRE FLIGHT MEETING. - Barra, on his Maurice Farman, circling the aerodrome. In the distance, on the left, is seen a Bleriot in flight.
A GROUP OF FOUR FLYERS IN THE AIR AT ONCE AT RHEIMS. - Above, an Antoinette and a Bleriot; below, a Henry Farman; and, to the left, a Wright machine.
M. Prier, chief instructor at the Bleriot Aviation School at Hendon, landing with a fine vol plane at the "Scrubbs" last week in connection with his flight on a Bleriot monoplane from the Hendon flying grounds to Wormwood Scrubbs and back, in order to give Mr. Willows greeting prior to his start on his airship for France and Paris.
COMING OR GOING? - J. Armstrong Drexel landing with his Bleriot in the Gordon-Bennett Contest at Belmont Park. As a New York reader writes, in sending us this photograph : "You can only tell whether the machine is coming or going by the size of the higher wing."
Another "passing" incident during the Midland National Meeting. - Mr. Grahame-White flying over one of the Bleriot monoplanes.
MESSRS. McARDLE AND DREXEL'S NEW FOREST AVIATION SCHOOL. - The flying grounds extend to 500 acres, and already there are seven Bleriots installed at the School.
The above illustration shows an Interesting portion of the Bleriot monoplane at close quarters. It is one of Mr. Claude Graham-White's machines that is now being experimented with by Mr. R. W. A. Brewer.
Mr. C. Grahame-White, after his 65 mins. flight on March 28th, and a couple of his pupils, Mr. Armstrong Drexel (left) and Mr. Charles Hubert (right). In the centre picture Mr. Grahame-White's mother, who has flown with her son, is standing in front of the Henry Farman machine.
M. Jacques de Lesseps (without hat) standing by his Bleriot monoplane, just after landing near Dover, at the finish of his cross-Channel flight.
Countess Fitzwilliam in the pilot's seat of her husband's Bleriot monoplane in the grounds of Wentworth Woodhouse, Earl Fitzwilliam's seat near Rotherham. Lady Fitzwilliam, who is a younger daughter of Lord and Lady Zetland, is Lady Mayoress of Sheffield for this year.
Olieslaegers, on his Bleriot, the Long Distance and Time World's Record Holder. - At Rheims Meeting last week he broke record by flying 255.25 kiloms. in 2h. 3 9 m . 28s., and on Sunday, the last day, he far surpassed this by remaining up for 5h. 3m. 5 2/5s., covering in that time 392.75 kiloms. (245 miles).
J. Armstrong Drexel (Bleriot).
THE FLYING MEN AT BOURNEMOUTH AND THEIR "MOUNTS." - J. Radley (Bleriot).
THE FLYING MEN AT BOURNEMOUTH AND THEIR "MOUNTS." - Leon F. Morane (Bleriot).
McArdle, on Grahame-White's Bleriot, just before starting on Saturday for the Altitude Prize at Blackpool Aerodrome.
Four of the great flyers at Blackpool. From left to right - Cecil Grace, Armstrong Drexel, Claude Grahame-White, and, in the Bleriot pilot's seat, McArdle.
Chavez reading the barograph after making his high flight of 5,887 1/2 ft. on his Bleriot at Blackpool.
Chavez handing over the barograph to Mr. Harry Delacombe after his British record high flight at Blackpool.
Graham Gilmour on his Bleriot with one of his passengers, Mr. Moorhouse.
Bartolomeo Cattaneo at Blackpool in the Blerlot which holds the British long-distance record.
M. Leblanc to the pilot's seat of his Bleriot on which he won the first place in the Circuit de l'Est last week.
M. Aubrun, who, on a Bleriot, obtained second prize in the Circuit de l'Est, he being the only aviator, besides the winner, Leblanc, to complete the entire circuit.
M. Mamet, who has been making such good flights at Doncaster and Burton.
AT THE BLERIOT SCHOOL, HENDON (LONDON AERODROME). - Mr. B. G. Bouwens, one of the pupils on the Blerlot school machine.
Capt. A. G. Board at the Bleriot School at Hendon, where he has just obtained his Royal Aero Club pilot's certificate.
BLERIOT'S ACCIDENT IN CONSTANTINOPLE. - The crazy houses in the Tetavia quarter against which M. Bleriot's monoplane was driven by the boisterous wind when he, to please the crowd, undertook his hazardous flight on December 12th on the Tuscum military field at Pera. Our photograph shows the machine as it fell across the centre palings of the two back yards.
Unique instantaneous photograph of an accident to Mamet on his monoplane during his exhibition flights in Spain.
What is it? A wreck thrown up by the sea? A collapsed house, or what? Just the aeroplane "hangar" provided at the Baltimore (U.S.A.) aviation grounds after a night's "weather." Mr. R. J. H. Hooper, in sending us this unique photograph, writes: "The wreck of Radley's Bleriot at the Baltimore Aviation Meeting. I took this on November 4-th, the morning after a gale and snowstorm had brought down the large tent. Underneath the same tent were Drexel's Bleriot, De Lesseps' Bleriot, and Latham's Antoinette. We were first on the field, and cut away the tent before taking this photo. The other machines were still uncovered. The engine end of Latham's Antoinette is just visible beyond Radley's machine. Little wonder there is a reported loss of L8,000 on the meeting."
WING SECTIONS. - The above diagrams afford an interesting comparison of the wing sections of aeroplanes exhibited at Olympia. They are all drawn to a common scale, but have been set at an arbitrary angle of incidence, which does not necessarily represent that of the aeroplane In actual flight.
Igo Etrich's monoplane, "Taube," with which he has been flying at the Steinfeld, Wiener-Neustadt. View from the front and from above.
Herr Igo Etrich, on his special monoplane, in flight over the Steinfeld, near Wiener-Neustadt, about an hour's train journey from Vienna.
Etrich and Illner flying on the "Taube" monoplane over the Steinfeld, near Wiener-Neustadt. On this machine Illner flew from Wiener-Neustadt, starting at 6.20 a.m. on Tuesday, to Vienna, a distance of 31 miles, arriving at the Semmeringer Helde at 7.30 . After a short stop, he flew back to his starting point.
The Etrich monoplane, with Austrian-Daimler engine, in flight at Wiener Neustadt. This is the aeroplane of which the German Government have ordered twenty replicas.
Bathiat flying on the new Breguet biplane at Rouen Meeting.
General view of the Farman biplane from behind, showing the hinged trailing edge of the upper tail-plane, which constitutes the principal new feature in the 1910 model.
The new tail on Legagneux's Henry Farman machine.
Mr. Henry Farman's biplane, as fitted with a 100-h.p. Gnome engine, at Rheims Meeting last week.
Mrs. Arthur adjusting the wire strainers on Gibbs' racing Henry Farman at Blackpool.
FLYING AT HALIFAX. - Mr. Claude Grahame-White's Henry Farman machine on the racecourse prior to his daring flight on Friday evening last week. The elevator of the machine is just visible outside the shed in the right-hand picture.
Competitors at the Starting Line at Lanark Meeting, as seen from the Members' Enclosure. - The machines, reading from the front, are: No. 6, Cattaneo's Bleriot; No. 12, Gilmour's Bleriot; 18, Grace's Henry Farman; 131, Ridley's Bierlot; 11, Capt. Dickson's Farman; 21, McArdle's Bleriot; 8, Blondeau's Henry Farman; 5, Champel's Voisin.
DREXEL OFF ON HIS BLERIOT FOR HIS SPLENDID SEA FLIGHT. - Beyond is Grahame-Whlte's Henry Farman also about to take the air.
One of the most interesting items on the programme of the Midland Meeting at Wolverhampton was the "Quick-rising" Competition. In our photograph Mr. Cockburn, the winner of this contest, is seen on his Henry Farman "toeing" the starting line for one of these trials.
Holding back Captain Dickson's Henry Farman machine for a start at Bournemouth Meeting.
"GETTING-OFF" CONTEST AT BLACKPOOL. - Grahame-White, on his Henry Farman, takes his turn. On the left the machine is ready, Mr. V. Ker Seymer marking the position of the axles; and on the right the Farman is in the air, the officials, Col. Grantham, Mr. Ker Seymer and Mr. Rutter being seen rushing to mark the exact spot of leaving the ground, Grahame-White's best of 20 ft. 9 ins only just missed the world's record.
Grahame-White, on his Henry Farman, just rising from the sands on the South Shore, Blackpool, on Sunday afternoon last, to which point he flew from the Aerodrome in order to visit the Lancashire Aero Club.
Robert Loraine ("Tones") on his Henry Farman, ready, with lifebelt on, for his sea flight to Alum Bay - and "en route." Note the lady "snappers."
THE FIRST MAN UP AT BLACKPOOL FLYING CARNIVAL. - Robert Loiaine circles the aerodrome on his Henry Farman Saturday afternoon last. On the left, McArdle and Loraine are discussing the prospects of being able to give some exhibitions on the day before, Friday.
Mr. Rawlinson during one of his flights at Wolverhampton last week on his Henry Farman machine.
Mr. A. Rawlinson during one of his daring flights on his Henry Farman on the opening day of the Nice Meeting. - In the distance, exactly over the heads of the three men on the beach, Olieslagers, on his Bieriot monoplane, can be seen flying.
Capt. Dickson beating the passenger-carrying record on his Henry Farman machine at the Anjou Aviation Meeting.
Captain Dickson, on his Henry Farman, making the opening flight at the Lanark International Flight Meeting on Saturday last. Rounding one of the mark towers.
Captain Dickson, who was badly injured by M. Thomas colliding with him in the air at Milan Meeting last week, flying over a camp on Salisbury Plain on his biplane.
Blondeau, on Mrs. Grace Bird's Farman biplane, in flight over the aviation grounds at Brooklands on Bank Holiday.
FLYING AT BROOKLANDS FOR THE NEILL CUP. - M. Blondeau making a good turn on Mrs. Grace Bird's Farman biplane.
Claude Grahame-Whlte, on Monday evening during his long evening flight on his Henry Farman, passing the Judges' box and signalling apparatus at Bournemouth Aerodrome,
Mr. Claude Grahame-White, on his Henry Farman biplane, giving exhibition flights over the Crystal Palace grounds last week.
Grahame-White rounding the Blackpool Tower on his Henry Farman during one of his recent remarkable cross-country flights.
MIDLAND NATIONAL MEETING. - Mr. Lancelot Gibbs making a fine flight on his Henry Farman during the gusty weather on Saturday evening last, the closing day of the meeting.
Christiaens travelling down the aerodrome on his Henry Farman biplane past the two-shilling enclosure at the Bournemouth Aerodrome. Note the mark-post in the distance for which Christiaens Is making.
A REMINISCENCE. - Mr. Claude Grahame-White, on his Henry Farman machine, flying from Ranelagh for a tour over Barnes Common and Putney.
Mr. Grahame-White paying a visit on his Henry Farman to the White House and the War and Navy Departments, Washington, during his recent trip to America. - This is probably the most daring and successful practical flight so far accomplished.
ACROSS THE SIMPLON PASS. - Weyman making a trial flight from Brigue plateau.
PARIS-BRUSSELS FLIGHT. - Legagneux leaves Issy for his journey to Brussels on his Henry Farman.
Robert Loraine coming down the aerodrome on his Henry Farman at Blackpool upon the occasion of his recent fine flight.
Robert Loraine's start from Blackpool grounds for his splendid and unrehearsed trip to Liverpool and back on Monday.
Henry Farman during his recent flight on his biplane with three passengers besides himself.
M. Blondeau flying at Brooklands with his French pupil, M. Ducrocq, on his Henry Farman.
The exciting incident at the Lyons Aviation Meeting when Paulban, on his Henry Farman machine, overtook Legagneux on his Sommer biplane.
Flying at Brookiands on Wednesday of last week when at one time there were no less than six machines in the air together. - Our photograph shows in full flight the Hon. Alan Boyle on his Avis monoplane (on the left) and Mr. Claude Grahame-White, with a passenger, on his Henry Farman biplane.
M. Christiaens on his Henry Farman during a long-distance flight, and above, the late Hon. C. S. Rolls going for the height prize on his Wright machine.
Captain Dickson, on his Henry Farman, and Cattaneo, on his Bleriot, in the air at the same time at the Lanark Flight Meeting.
AT BELMONT PARK (N.Y.) INTERNATIONAL MEETING. - Hubert Latham, on his Antoinette, passing directly over Grahame-White on his Henry Farman during one of the competitions.
AT BROOKLANDS AERODROME. - Mr. R. F. Macfie on a Macfie biplane flying low recently at Brooklands grounds, with M. Blondeau above on a Farman biplane.
AEROPLANE VERSUS MOTOR CYCLE AT THE A.C.U. BROOKLANDS MEETING. - M. Blondeau racing F. A. McNab, on a 3 1/2-h.p. Trump, round the Brooklands Track.
Mr. Claude Grahame-White, on his Henry Farman at Wolverhampton, flying over Mr. Ogilvie's Wright machine, which is being towed back to the starting place.
GRAHAME-WHITE IN FLIGHT ON HIS HENRY FARMAN AT BLACKPOOL AERODROME. - The machine at rest on the ground is Cecil Grace s Bleriot.
ONE, TWO AND THREE PLANES. - Grahame-White, in his Henry Farman biplane, flying over Drexel's Bleriot monoplane and Roe's triplane.
Another "passing" incident during the Midland National Meeting. - Mr. Grahame-White flying over one of the Bleriot monoplanes.
CORDONNIER'S MISHAP AT BROOKLANDS ON BANK HOLIDAY. - His Hanriot monoplane on the bank of the River Wey after his sudden descent. Overhead Blondeau is in full flight on his Henry Farman. Note the punting party ready to assist if necessary.
FLYING AT BROOKLANDS. - M. Blondeau flying over Mr. Macfie's biplane at rest below.
THE AGGREGATE TIME FLIGHT COMPETITION AT BROOKLANDS FOR THE NEILL CUP. - M. Blondeau making a flight. On the ground is Mr. Macfie's biplane, Mr. Macfle, without a hat, standing in the foreground.
GRAHAME-WHITE ON A DISTANCE FLIGHT. - At rest is Capt. Dickson's Farman.
A brace of Henry Farmans racing at Rheims Aviation Meeting on Sunday last.
A GROUP OF FOUR FLYERS IN THE AIR AT ONCE AT RHEIMS. - Above, an Antoinette and a Bleriot; below, a Henry Farman; and, to the left, a Wright machine.
Mr. George Barnes, on a Humber monoplane, flying last week at Brooklands close over Mr. Claude Grahame-White's Henry Farman machine.
View of Burton-on-Trent, as seen from M. Beaud's Henry Farman biplane when he flew over that town at the recent aviation meeting.
In England it is hardly realised yet the rate of aviation progress on the Continent. Already good flyers are abundant, and it is difficult to keep track of the new pupils who are daily completing their initiation into practical aviation. As a typical example of a French aviation school, the above photograph at Mourmelon grounds is very convincing.
Another view of the Mourmelon Aviation School, showing the ordinary business-like methods which pervade the routine of teaching the young idea how to fly.
General view of the Stands and Starting Place on the Johannisthal Aerodrome near Berlin. - The machines in the foreground are Baron de Caters' Voisin (No. 1) and Herr Jeannin's Henry Farman.
IN LINE FOR THE FIRST AERIAL "RACE." - MM. Martinet (H. Farman), Mumm (Antoinette), Legagneux (Sommer), and Capt. Dickson (H. Farman), ready for the start from the Anjou Aerodrome for the cross-country race to Saumur on June 6th.
A GROWING "STREET" AT BROOKLANDS AVIATION GROUNDS. - The machine in the shed is Mr. Claude Grahame-White's Henry Farman which he used on the Manchester flight. The next shed is the home of the first machine built by Sir George White's company - the British and Colonial Aeroplane Co., Ltd., of Bristol.
MR. CLAUDE GRAHAME-WHITE AT RANELAGH. - The habitues examining the Henry Farman biplane during the afternoon.
FLYING AT BROOKLANDS. - The scene at Brooklands on Saturday last was the occasion of the auction for the first passenger to ascend on that day with Mr. Grahame-White in his Henry Farman biplane, when Lady Abdy secured the right against Miss Pauline Chase by a bid of 120 guineas.
PARIS FLIGHT SALON. - General view of the centre of the Grand Palais. On the right is seen the Wright biplane, on the left the Maurice Farman biplane, just beyond being the Henry Farman machine, whilst in the foreground, in the centre, is the two-seater Antoinette monoplane.
FRENCH PICARDY ARMY MANOEUVRES AND AERONAUTICS. - General view of the dirigible sheds at Briot-Aviation. One of the Army biplanes will be noted in the centre of the picture.
AEROPLANES AT THE FRENCH PICARDY MANOEUVRES. - General view of the aeroplane sheds at Briot-Avlation during the getting ready of the aeroplanes.
AEROPLANES AT THE FRENCH PICARDY MANOEUVRES. - Adjutant Menard just about to start on his biplane from Briot-Aviation to rejoin his post at Formerie.
Mr. Claude Grahame-White and the Military Chiefs of the Government when he called at the White House, and the War and Navy Departments in an aeroplane. - Reading from left to right: Richard R. Sinclair, Capt. Barr, Major George O. Squiler, U.S.A., Brig.-Gen. James O. Murray, U.S.A., Capt. H. B. Wilson, U.S.N., Commisioner Johnston, Commodore Johm Barry Ryan, Brig.-Gen. A. W. Greeley, ret., Maj.-Gen. Leonard Wood, Gen. Oliver, Gen. James Ailen, C. Grahame-White, Admiral Dewey, Clifford B. Harmon, Sidney McDonald, Maj.-Gen. James A. Bell.
One of the Farman type of machines in course of construction by Messrs. A. V. Roe and Co., to be fitted with an Avro motor, for a Bolton gentleman.
A Gnome motor "set" for Henry Farman biplane, showing engine, propeller, oil and petrol tanks, pilot's seat, and foot control of vertical rudders.
Rear view of Gnome motor on Henry Farman machine, showing carburettor with air inlet and throttle control, position of magneto, petrol tank, and oil feed tube.
Henry Farman and his three passengers with whom he recently flew.
Claude Grahame-White (Henry Farman).
Grahame-White, ready with one of his lady passengers, before the word to let go. - Note the assistants behind holding the machine back from rising.
Claude Grahame-White, at Blackpool aerodrome, just about to start for a flight on his Henry Farman, with Miss Florence Parbury, the authoress, as passenger.
FLYING AT BROOKLANDS. - Mr. Claude Grahame-White, with Lady Abdy in the passenger's seat, just ready to start for his flight at Brooklands last Saturday, which unfortunately ended somewhat disastrously, but happily without any serious injury to either driver or passenger.
Cheuret, with Mdme. Branger as passenger, on a Henry Farman biplane, Thursday. May 19th, when a new cross-country passenger record was put up between Mourmelon and Chalons Cathedral and back.
THE FLYING MEN AT BOURNEMOUTH AND THEIR "MOUNTS." - Capt. Bertram Dickson (Henry Farman).
THE FLYING MEN AT BOURNEMOUTH AND THEIR "MOUNTS." - Robert Loraine ("Jones") (Henry Farman).
De Baeder, who is now recovering from his recent severe accident.
Lieut. Remy, seated in his Henry Farman machine on which he recently spent a week "touring" over the North of France. As we recorded in our last issue, he covered about 500 kiloms. in eight days.
Mr. Weymann, the record flyer, who last week, on his Henry Farman, flew from Paris to Volvlc, 420 kiloms., in his great attempt to win the big Michelln prize for flying with a passenger from Paris to the Puy de Dome mountain in 6 hours. With him is M. Faye, who accompanied him as passenger.
Sub-Lieut. Paulhan on "Le Gypaete," his Henry Farman machine, during the French Army Manoeuvres. - Owing to the accident to his right arm, it will be noted M. Paulhan has to use his left hand for working his levers.
AVIATORS AT DONCASTER MEETING. - Mdlle. Dutrieu, with M. Beau as passenger, ready for a flight on one of the Henry Farmans.
PARIS-BRUSSELS FLIGHT. - M. Legagneux and his passenger, M. Martinet, readv to start for Brussels from Issy on their Henry Farman.
PARIS-BRUSSELS AND BACK BY AEROPLANE. - M. L. Wynmalen and his passenger, M. Dufour, on the Henry Farman immediately before the start for Brussels from Issy.
Wynmalen and his passenger Dufour at Issy immediately after their return from the successful Brussels flight last week. Note the bouquets with which they have been presented, and the "mascot," immediately above their heads.
M. Michel Mahieu, with M. Gaston de Manthe as passenger, just before their start last week from Issy for Brussels in the Paris-Brussels 36-hour competition of the A.C.F.
AMERICAN FLYING MEN AT BELMONT PARK MEETING. - Clifford D. Harmon.
FLYING A T BROOKLANDS. - Mr. Grahame-White's machine, after the mishap at Brooklands, at the edge of the River Wey.
FIRST COLLISION IN THE AIR. - As the mishap to Capt. Bertram Dickson, on his Henry Farman, when M. Thomas, on his Antoinette, dashed Into him from above, at Milan, appeared to A. Beltrame, an Italian artist. This picture appeared in La Domenica del Corriere.
The scene at Milan immediately following the crash to earth of the Antoinette monoplane of M. Thomas and Capt. Dickson's Farman machine. The tail portion of the Farman biplane, showing No. 18, can be seen between the military, the main planes being mixed up completely with the planes of the Antoinette, the tail and body of which is seen standing straight up on end.
LAST WEEK'S STORMS AND THE CROSS-CHANNEL FLYERS. - The wreck of Mr. Loralne's hangar and aeroplane on Saturday last at Dover. "Inspecting" the debris.
GRAHAME WHITE'S HENRY FARMAN BIPLANE. - The above sketch shows the way in which the auxiliary tail plane on Mr. Claude Grahame-White's Henry Farman machine is inter-connected by means of crossed wires with the front elevator, while the elevator is directly connected to the control lever. In this machine a skid with an elastic buffer is fitted, instead of wheels, to the tail. During a practice flight one of the long front skids was damaged, and Mr. Grahame-White had them both shortened, the part dotted in the above sketch being sawn away.
In 1910 the Wrights began to experiment with doing away with the forward biplane elevator. This aircraft is being flown without it, though the booms which carried the surfaces are still evident. The skids have bungee-sprung twin wheels attached; the large simply positioned beneath the wings to facilitate ground-handling.
Hoxsey, in his new type Wright biplane, travelling well in his start for the high altitude contest at Belmont Park (N.Y.).
PARIS FLIGHT SALON. - General view of the centre of the Grand Palais. On the right is seen the Wright biplane, on the left the Maurice Farman biplane, just beyond being the Henry Farman machine, whilst in the foreground, in the centre, is the two-seater Antoinette monoplane.
Engineer Thelen, with Frau Direktor Worner as passenger, on his Wright biplane during the Berlin Aviation week this month.
Ex-President Colonel Roosevelt in the passenger seat with Hoxsey on the Wright biplane on which Mr. Roosevelt had his flight at St. Louis on October 11th last.
AMERICAN FLYING MEN AT BELMONT PARK MEETING. - Archie Hoxsey.
AMERICAN FLYING MEN AT BELMONT PARK MEETING. - Walter Brookins.
AMERICAN FLYING MEN AT BELMONT PARK MEETING. - Ralph Johnstone.
Getting the Bristol biplane of the British and Colonial Aeroplane Co. ready for M. Edmonds, who is in charge of this machine, at the Lanark Flight Meeting.
A British-built "Bristol" biplane in flight on Salisbury Plain, piloted by Edmond. This machine was built entirely at their Filton works, near Bristol, by the British and Colonial Aeroplane Co., of which Sir George White, Bart., is a director. Needless to say, it has aroused considerable interest at the Company's flying school on Salisbury Plain, where Edmond has, we understand, been very successful in carrying passengers with it. This type of machine is now being turned out as rapidly as possible, and the Company's proficiency may be judged from the fact that the machine is seen in flight above the very first day it was erected.
DURING THE BRITISH ARMY MANOEUVRES. - Captain Dickson, on his biplane, reconnoitring over the Somerset Yeomanry.
DURING THE BRITISH ARMY MANOEUVRES. - Captain Dickson's aeroplane retaken by the "Reds."
ON WYLYE DOWN IN THE EARLY MORNING MISTS DURING THE BRITISH ARMY MANOEUVRES. - Guarding Captain Dickson's biplane in Camp.
Capt. Dickson, at the British Army manoeuvres, with his British-built "Bristol" biplane, in consultation with some of the officers. Inset below is a general view of the "Bristol" machine in charge of the cavalry.
FLYING OVER THE AVON GORGE. - Monsieur Tetard flying a "Bristol" biplane over the Avon Gorge recently, as reported in these pages.
AVIATION ON SALISBURY PLAIN. - The school buildings of the British and Colonial Aeroplane Co., Ltd., the builders of the "Bristol" aeroplane, with which Capt. Bertram Dickson, during the recent Army manoeuvres, carried out some fine flights.
AFTER THE STORMS LAST WEEK. - Sorting out Mr. Greswell's aeroplane after the wreck of his hangar. Mr. Greswellt who had hoped to have started for the De Forest L4,000 Prize, is standing on the extreme right of the machine.
On the R.E.P. monoplane the propeller forms a four-bladed tractor-screw in front.
Madame Paulhan, in her aviation costume, about to mount on to her husband's Voisin biplane, with which he was flying at Issy last year. This is a very good sample of one of the many "faked" aviation photographs so prevalent in France.
"WOLSELEY No. I." - The above photograph of M. de Baeder flying at Chalons on the Voisin aeroplane, "Wolseley No. 1," fitted with a 50-60 h.p. Wolseley flight motor, is the subject of a charming postcard which is being issued by the Woiseley Co. The occasion of the picture was when de Baeder won his four prizes in one day for flying on this machine.
De Baeder, who secured several prizes at Mourmelon last week in a single day, on his Voisin machine, which is fitted with a 50-60-h.p. British-built Wolseley engine.
De Baeder, one of the latest successful flyers at Mourmelon, and his Wolseley-engined Voisin biplane.
A neat method of fixing a two-bladed propeller to the crankshaft is to use the shanks of the blades as bolts, and to fasten them by nuts to the boss, as is shown in the above illustration of the Voisin flyer.
HELIOPOLIS AVIATION MEETING. - An incident during the competitions. Latham, on his Antoinette, with Rougier, on his biplane, behind.
NICE FLIGHT MEETING. - Mr. A. Rawlinson, on the left, on his Henry Farman, and M. Rougier on his Voisin biplane, flying over the sea at Nice.
SEEN FROM ABOVE. - Striking photograph taken from an airship during the Rheims Aviation Meeting last year. On the left is a biplane in full flight, whilst the shadow of the dirigible itself from which the picture was snapped is seen on the right. Note also the pylone and the white guide marks on the ground, which were used for indicating the "course" for the flying men.
FLYING MACHINES AT BROOKLANDS ON EASTER MONDAY. - A trio of aeroplanes. From left to right: Mr. Astley's Lane monoplane, Mr. A. V. Roe's triplane, and Mr. Moreing's Voisln biplane.
General view of the Stands and Starting Place on the Johannisthal Aerodrome near Berlin. - The machines in the foreground are Baron de Caters' Voisin (No. 1) and Herr Jeannin's Henry Farman.
Some interesting views of the Swiss-built Dufaux biplane which has been constructed by the Dufaux Brothers of Geneva. In No. 3 M. Henry Dufaux is in the pilot's seat, in No. 4 M. Armand Dufaux is in charge, and in Fig. 6 the machine is in flight. No. 1 is a Voisin machine, with M. Nigg at the wheel. The photographs, which are from the Suisse Sportive, were taken at the Viry Aerodrome, near Geneva.
Mr. Colin Defries just starting for the first aeroplane flight in Australia, on his Wright flyer, from the Victoria Park racecourse, Sydney, N.S.W., on December 9th last.
BRITISH FLYERS AT SHEPPEY. - Mr. Cecil S. Grace during one of his numerous flights on his Short-Wright machine at Eastchurch.
Mr. Stuart Ogilvie flying on his Short-Wright biplane over Camber Sands.
A STUDY AT JOHANNISTHAL. - Capt. Engelhardt, on his Wright biplane, fiying at the Johannisthal Aerodrome.
A GROUP OF FOUR FLYERS IN THE AIR AT ONCE AT RHEIMS. - Above, an Antoinette and a Bleriot; below, a Henry Farman; and, to the left, a Wright machine.
Mr. Claude Grahame-White, on his Henry Farman at Wolverhampton, flying over Mr. Ogilvie's Wright machine, which is being towed back to the starting place.
Captain Engelhardt flying over the snows on his Wright machine at Saint Moritz.
The Hon. C. S. Rolls has his lifebelt adjusted prior to his attempt to fly the Channel on his Wright machine.
The Hon. C. S. Rolls' Epoch-making Flight, on his Short-Wright type Biplane, across the Channel and back last week. - A "composite" photograph, giving a vivid impression of the flight as seen from the water.
As announced last week, the Hon. C. S. Rolls has been giving helpful instruction to the officers at Aldershot in connection with the Wright biplane which has now its home there with the Army. Our picture shows Mr. Rolls (with the cap and muffler) explaining the working of the machine. Mr. Mervyn O'Gorman is standing to his left.
The late Hon. C. S. Rolls, on his Wright flyer, starting for his trial in the Slow Competition at Bournemouth.
M. Christiaens on his Henry Farman during a long-distance flight, and above, the late Hon. C. S. Rolls going for the height prize on his Wright machine.
The late Hon. C. S. Rolls after his first official flight on Monday last at the Bournemouth Meeting.
Towing back Ogilvie's machine after he was driven down to earth by a sudden storm. Note engine, &c, protected with tarpaulin.
How the Hon. C. S. Rolls, with his 6-cyl. Rolls-Royce car, towed his Short-Wright flyer from Eastchurch to Olympia. The car and "trailer" on the road. When travelling during the night, lanterns were hung round the aeroplane, with some rather amusing results amongst the sleepy waggoners and other traffic met en route.
Detail view of the new automatically-controlled tail-planes evolved by Capt. Eteve for his Wright biplane, with which he has been making such successful flights.
WRIGHT FLYER IN AMERICA. - Our photograph above, taken at the Wright school at Montgomery, Ala., shows the form of tail which the Wright Brothers are fitting to their own machines. It will be noticed this consists of a horizontal plane and one vertical rudder only.
WITH THE WRIGHT BROS. - Ready for a flight. On the right the Wright machine in the air is an instance of this biplane flying with one elevator and one "blinker."
GERMAN FLYERS - (3) Thaddaus Robl; (4) Paul Lange; (5) Engineer Thelen in his Wright machine; (6) Fridolin Keidel, the instructor at the German Wright Company.
A VICTIM OF MOB CLAMOUR. - Herr Thaddeus Robl and his wife. Herr Robl met his death on Saturday last at Stettin, when, to appease the unreasoning clamour of the public who had assembled to witness some flying exhibitions, he ascended In very treacherous winds. This incident should be a warning to the British public at the coming exhibitions and meetings, that at the present stage of aviation it is hardly up to the standard of their sporting instincts to insist upon the flying men risking death merely to gratify their pleasure at the moment.
Mr. Colin Defries in the pilot's seat of his Wright machine. This shows the way in which Mr. Defries covered one of the supporting wires to prevent himself getting damaged in the event of an accident.
Hoxsey, in the pilot's seat of his Wright biplane, in America, accompanied by Governor Fort.
The late Hon. C. S. Rolls' machine at Bournemouth after the fatal accident last week.
The human "fence" instantly formed round the wreckage, at Bournemouth, of the machine of the late Hon. C. S. Rolls, to keep back the public from interfering with the doctors and others who were dealing with the accident
R. E. M. Ferry's Wright model.
Sketches showing the details of mounting the rails and joining the sleepers.
Side elevation of starting derrick and rail for full-size Wright glider.
Sketch showing the bracing of the rudder on the Wright biplane.
Sketch showing how the radius-rods that form struts between the chain-brackets on the Wright biplane are supported by ball-bearings on the crank-shaft of the engine.
Sketch showing how the vertical struts between the main decks of the Wright biplane are attached to the main spars.
WING SECTIONS. - The above diagrams afford an interesting comparison of the wing sections of aeroplanes exhibited at Olympia. They are all drawn to a common scale, but have been set at an arbitrary angle of incidence, which does not necessarily represent that of the aeroplane In actual flight.
THE WRIGHT BIPLANE. - Side elevation and plan.
A curious feature of the propeller on the Pischoff biplane is the lip formed on the periphery of the blade, which thereby somewhat resembles a big wooden spoon.
Hubert Latham at the wheel of his Antoinette before his start for his record high flying and trip over Rheims Cathedral during the Aviation Meeting last week.
Messrs. Clement-Bayard, who are constructing the Santos Dumont "Demoiselle" machines, have devised the above ingenious apparatus for the better teaching of novices in the handling of these small flyers. Several ladies are already learning the art of flight in connection with these machines, and an extensive output is likely to result very shortly.
Two of the lady novices who are learning to fly on the Santos Dumont "Demoiselles.'' On the left is Mdlle. Dutrieux, in her special aviation costume, standing by the side of the Clement-Bayard novices' apparatus, and on the right are Mdlle. Aboukaia and Mr. Tod Lane in front of a complete "Demoiselle" flyer. Mdlle. Aboukaia is well known professionally in Paris and other cities for her daring feats In the past in connection with "looping" on a bicycle (1904) and taking a plunging leap "en automobile" (1906).
A genuine Santos-Dumont "Demoiselle" exhibited on the Clement-Bayard stand.
Audemars starting for one of his trips on the "Demoiselle," alias "Angry Wasp."
A characteristic turning swoop of Audemars on his "Demoiselle," alias the "Angry Wasp," during the Bournemouth Aviation week.
THE FLYING MEN AT BOURNEMOUTH AND THEIR "MOUNTS." - E. Audemars (Demoiselle).
WING SECTIONS. - The above diagrams afford an interesting comparison of the wing sections of aeroplanes exhibited at Olympia. They are all drawn to a common scale, but have been set at an arbitrary angle of incidence, which does not necessarily represent that of the aeroplane In actual flight.
The Short propeller is constructed entirely of wood, and consists of six separate layers which are joined together to form a solid piece.
Although apparently a single four-bladed propeller, the mechanism illustrated above, which is a photograph of the Howard Wright machine, consists of a pair of two-bladed propellers which revolve in opposite directions. The blades nearest the engine are larger than the others, and do two-thirds of the work.
The Louis Breguet biplane, upon which he last week made his sensational flight, leaving the aerodrome at Douai and flying over the streets and buildings of the town, then returning to his starting point, after covering about 12 1/2 miles in about 13 mins.
The early Breguet machine, referred to in Mr. J. R, Blum's letter.
In the Lamplough propeller the blades are each made from a single piece of wood, and are hollowed out from the root towards the tip. They are mounted in a hollow copper stamping which forms the boss.
Mr. A. Rawlinson flying at Eastchurch this last week-end on his Henry Farman machine.
MR. CLAUDE GRAHAME-WHITE'S BIG CROSS-COUNTRY FLIGHT. - Below, trying the Henry Farman machine at Park Royal prior to the start on Saturday last; and above, Mr. Grahame-White re-starts from Rugby for Crewe.
In the year, when Paulhan arrives on a Henry Farman aeroplane in London, and calls at the offices of FLIGHT and the AUTO, at 44, St. Martin's Lane, near by St. Martin's Church, Trafalgar Square, the National Gallery, and Coliseum. Another FLIGHT "fake."
Two Genuine, not "faked" photos of Paulhan flying high at Brooklands (see Mrs. Halford's letter).
NICE FLIGHT MEETING. - Mr. A. Rawlinson, on the left, on his Henry Farman, and M. Rougier on his Voisin biplane, flying over the sea at Nice.
AT CANNES AVIATION MEETING. - Crochon flying on a Henry Farman biplane, and passing over Christiaens' machine at rest. The latter, on March 31st, on his Henry Farman, covered 2.2 kiloms., one tour of the aerodrome, in 1m. 34 3/5s., a speed of 84.25 k.p.h., which it is sought to have established as an official speed record.
THE GREAT LONDON-MANCHESTER FLIGHT. - General view of the scene on Wormwood Scrubbs prior to Mr. Grahame-White's start for his second attempt on April 27th. Bringing the Henry Farman machine out for the flight.
THE GREAT LONDON-MANCHESTER FLIGHT. - Remarkable photograph of the scene on Wormwood Scrubbs on Wednesday, April 27th, when Mr. Grahame-White's Henry Farman machine was brought out for a few trial tests after the repairs had been completed.
THE GREAT LONDON-MANCHESTER FLIGHT. - Mr. Claude Grahame-White at Polesworth, where he came down after his night flight on Thursday morning, April 28tb, calling for three cheers for Mons. Paulhan upon the receipt of the news of his having won the L10,000 prize.
The tail of the Henry Farman machine used by Mr. Claude Grahame-White for his London to Manchester flight, which it will be seen differs from the Farman machine which was last year dealt with in detail by us. On the very latest Farman a monoplane type tail has been adopted.
THE GREAT LONDON-MANCHESTER FLIGHT. - Flashlight photograph at Lichfield of Paulhan's Henry Farman machine before his start for finishing the race on Wednesday morning, April 27th.
THE GREAT LONDON-MANCHESTER FLIGHT. - M. Paulhan winning the L10,000 prize by landing in the pre-arranged field at Didsbury, near Manchester, on his Henry Farman machine.
THE GREAT LONDON-MANCHESTER FLIGHT. - Immediately after the prize was won. The crowd gathering round the Henry Farman machine immediately after Paulhan had landed at Didsbury. The white sheet in the foreground was used for marking the spot for the descent.
Paulhan's biplane dismantled at the Manchester works of Hans Renold, Ltd., and ready for its return to France, after the completion of the London to Manchester flight. This shows clearly the unit system of construction utilised by Mr. Henry Farman in his machines.
Mr. A. Rawlinson and his Henry Farman Biplane at Messrs. Handley-Page's Grounds at Barking. - Bringing out the machine, and, on the right, getting tha aeroplane over a dyke to the flying grounds.
Mr. A. Rawlinson tuning up his Darracq engine on his Henry Farman machine.
Mr. C. Grahame-White, after his 65 mins. flight on March 28th, and a couple of his pupils, Mr. Armstrong Drexel (left) and Mr. Charles Hubert (right). In the centre picture Mr. Grahame-White's mother, who has flown with her son, is standing in front of the Henry Farman machine.
Mr. Claude Grahame-White in his place on the Henry Farman biplane ready for starting his big flight on Saturday last.
Master J. F. Miller with his model Farman outside Miss Height's shop, and on the right the model is seen upon a larger scale in the bands of its constructor.
H ALLEY'S COMET. - Oh, lord that's the third one that's passed me! (But it was only Paulhan.)
TAIL OF PAULHAN'S HENRY FARMAN BIPLANE. - The main differences between Paulhan's and Grahame-White's biplanes are that in the former the lower main plane is shorter than the upper one, while twin rudders are fitted instead of a single one as in the Grahame-White machine. These twin rudders are smaller, and placed a little further back, as shown in the above sketch.
WING SECTIONS. - The above diagrams afford an interesting comparison of the wing sections of aeroplanes exhibited at Olympia. They are all drawn to a common scale, but have been set at an arbitrary angle of incidence, which does not necessarily represent that of the aeroplane In actual flight.
Mr. A. V. Roe, on his triplane, flying at Wembley on Friday of last week. - Our photograph was taken during the first flight.
Mr. Roe, at Wembley on Friday of last week, in full flight immediately before the mishap.
Mr. A. V. Roe and his successful triplane flyer at Wembley. - On the left Mr. Roe is standing by the four-bladed propeller of his machine, and the picture on the right shows the machine immediately after the accident on Friday of last week.
FLYING MACHINES AT BROOKLANDS ON EASTER MONDAY. - Mr. A. V. Roe starting away on his triplane.
FLYING MACHINES AT BROOKLANDS ON EASTER MONDAY. - A trio of aeroplanes. From left to right: Mr. Astley's Lane monoplane, Mr. A. V. Roe's triplane, and Mr. Moreing's Voisln biplane.
WING SECTIONS. - The above diagrams afford an interesting comparison of the wing sections of aeroplanes exhibited at Olympia. They are all drawn to a common scale, but have been set at an arbitrary angle of incidence, which does not necessarily represent that of the aeroplane In actual flight.
The Goupy biplane, piloted by Ladougne, at the Rheims Meeting.
HAVRE FLIGHT MEETING. - Ladougne, on his Goupy biplane, in flight with a passenger.
M. Ladougne flying on a stormy day on his Goupy biplane at Doncaster Flight Meeting.
DOWN THE STRAIGHT AT DONCASTER MEETING. - Ladougne giving an exhibition flight on his Goupy.
View of the Pilcher glider from in front, showing the method of staying the wings. One hundred wires were employed for this purpose. In the centre of the machine will be noticed two short posts capped with small bolsters marked B. In use they came beneath the arm-pits of the pilot and supported his weight, whilst his fore-arms rested along the frame, and his hands grasped a pair of small handles which are also visible in the sketch.
Method of attaching the ribs to the wing standards on the Pilcher glider.
Head of a wing standard on the Pilcher glider, showing radiating tie-wires.
One of the ribs of the Pilcher glider.
Glenn Curtiss, on his biplane, during an exhibition flight over the sea at Atlantic City.
LOS ANGELES FLIGHT MEETING. - Remarkable photograph of Curtiss in flight, on his biplane, over the Grand Stands, taken from a captive balloon.
A fine flight by Reimsdyck on his Curtiss biplane during the successful Cannes Flight Meeting.
AEROPLANES FOR MILITARY SCOUTING. - Glenn Curtiss on his biplane with Lieut. Fickle, of Governor's Island, U.S.A., target practising with a rifle from the machine while in flight.
C. K. Hamilton on his biplane, racing Kjelson on an S.P.O. car at Atlanta Speedway (U.S.A.).
Mars and Glenn Curtiss on Curtlss machines circling round each other over Sheepshead Track, U.S.A.
Mr. Charles K. Hamilton at Hempstead (U.S.A.) executing one of his sensational "trick" flights. The lower machine is Captain Baldwin's biplane.
LAUNCHING AN AEROPLANE FROM THE DECK OF A LINER. - McCurdy's biplane on the special launching stage prepared on the Hamburg-American liner "Pennsylvania" for the proposed test which had to be postponed, as referred to in FLIGHT.
Chas. F. Willard, in his Curtiss machine on which he carried in America, at Albany Park meeting, three passengers. Both he and his sister, Miss Emily T. Willard, are given as competitors at the Harvard aviation meeting.
Mars, who on his Curtiss machine has been making good flights in America, amongst other trips, flying from Coney Island to Staten Island, and his wife.
AMERICAN FLYING MEN AT BELMONT PARK MEETING. - Charles K. Hamilton.
NEW CURTISS BIPLANE. - General arrangement and constructional details.
Maurice Clement flying at Lamotte-Breuil on his Clement-Bayard biplane.
Short S.2 the final version with extended tail.
Mr. Moore-Brabazon's "No. 5," being his all-British "Short" biplane, in which the most noticeable alteration since we published a photograph of this machine, on October 9th last, is the tail.
SHORT (1910). The first machine to Short's own design. (The tail here shown is a specially large one fitted by Moore-Brabazon).
General view from above of the new Short biplane, with fixed tail, front rudder, and balancing-planes among the special features.
View of the elevator and rudder on the Short biplane.
View of the tail on the Short biplane.
View of the pilot's seat on the Short biplane. The lever on the pilot's right controls the balancing-planes, that on his left the elevator; the pedals control the rudder.
View of the chassis on the Short biplane; the wheels are suspended on helical springs that are wound up by a ratchet-pawl device. The pilot releases a catch when he has ascended in the air and the wheels are drawn up above the level of the skis, upon which the machine therefore lands direct.
View of one of the balancing planes on the Short biplane. The fabric is stretched between the leading and trailing edges by a series of springs, which allow it to take its own camber from the wind pressure.
View of the rudder, which is situated in front, on the Short biplane.
View of the engine and propeller on the Short biplane. The engine is mounted high up in the gap
Diagram illustrating the comparative movement caused by a cant at equal angular displacement when the centre of gravity is on the lower deck and midway in the gap.
Sketch illustrating the action of the balancing planes on the Short biplane. The method of mounting the fabric so that it automatically cambers under the air pressure is one of the most important of the patented devices on this new machine.
Sketch illustrating the jointing of the main spars on the Short biplane.
Sketch illustrating the method of attaching the struts to the spars in the Short biplane. The manganese-steel socket-brackets are fixed to the spars and not to the struts.
Diagrammatic sketch illustrating the suspension of the Short biplane, and the method of mounting the "disappearing" wheels so that the machine will land on the skis if the driver releases the ratchet pawl device by which the spring tension is maintained.
Diagrammatic sketch illustrating the control of the elevator and the rudder on the Short biplane. The elevator planes flex from the front edge by the manipulation of a lever. The rudder pivots on a vertical column by the action of pedals. Both are normally held in their neutral position by elastic springs.
Sketch illustrating the mounting of the horizontal tail plane on the Short biplane. The tail is fixed in flight, but its angle of incidence is adjustable within a small range by means of the slotted bracket illustrated above.
WING SECTIONS. - The above diagrams afford an interesting comparison of the wing sections of aeroplanes exhibited at Olympia. They are all drawn to a common scale, but have been set at an arbitrary angle of incidence, which does not necessarily represent that of the aeroplane In actual flight.
THE NEW "SHORT" BIPLANE. - Elevation and plan.
FLYING AT BROOKLANDS ON BANK HOLIDAY. - Starting Cordonnier's Hanriot monoplane for the flight in which he landed his machine in the river Wey.
Wagner just getting away for a trial on his Hanriot monoplane.
A breezy "snap" at dusk of Wagner on the large Hanriot monoplane, "No. 4," during one of his long flights on the Champagne Aerodrome. The effect of the fleet aeroplane, as seen, upon the military horses, was somewhat disconcerting to the riders.
Mr. Davies, one of the new flyers at Brooklands, on the Hanriot monoplane,
MR. A. C. THOMAS IN HIS MOTOBLOC CAR AT BROOKLANDS AVIATION GROUND. Behind is Mr. Thomas' Hanriot monoplane fitted with E.N.V. engine.
Mr. Graham Gilmour's Bleriot flying over the Hanriot monoplane at Brooklands.
Front view of the Hanriot monoplane, showing the "A" type chassis frame that was introduced by this firm last year.
Rear view of the Hanriot monoplane, showing the bird-like tail and the dihedral angle of the wings.
Side view of the Hanriot monoplane. The disposition of the parts is such that the machine is practically in equilibrium when balanced on its supporting wheels. There is very little weight on the trailing skid witb the aeroplane in the above position.
Two views of the Hanriot tail. In the side view the deflected trailing portion can be distinctly observed.
View showing the method of mounting the axle on the Hanriot monoplane. The axle is carried between vertical guides, and the machine is suspended on the rubber springs that are anchored to the skids.
View of the 8-cyl. E.N.V. engine in place on the Hanriot monoplane.
View of the pilot's seat on the Hanriot monoplane. The lever on the left warps the wings, that on the right operates the tail-elevator. There is a pivoted foot-rest in front controlling the rudder. The switch is mounted on the warping-lever, and a rubber bulb for maintaining pressure in the petrol tank is attached to the elevator-lever. The hinging of the rear spars to the body can just be distinguished in the above illustration.
Marcel Hanriot, the "Boy Aviator," at Rheims Aviation Meeting on his Hanriot monoplane.
THE FLYING MEN AT BOURNEMOUTH AND THEIR "MOUNTS." - L. Wagner (Hanriot).
Vidart in the pilot's seat of his Hanriot monoplane at Lanark Meeting.
CORDONNIER'S MISHAP AT BROOKLANDS ON BANK HOLIDAY. - His Hanriot monoplane on the bank of the River Wey after his sudden descent. Overhead Blondeau is in full flight on his Henry Farman. Note the punting party ready to assist if necessary.
Diagrammatic sketch illustrating the system of hand control on the Hanriot monoplane. A pivoted foot-bar, not shown, operates the rudder.
Sketch illustrating the attachment of the front spars to the body of the Hanriot monoplane and the method of carrying the body itself in a cradle of steel straps.
The Hanriot monoplane, 1910.
OLYMPIA, 1910. - The E.N.V. monoplane constructed by Howard Wright for Warwick Wright combines timber and steel in the construction of the chassis and frame. The chassis is an interesting example of the "A" type.
WING SECTIONS. - The above diagrams afford an interesting comparison of the wing sections of aeroplanes exhibited at Olympia. They are all drawn to a common scale, but have been set at an arbitrary angle of incidence, which does not necessarily represent that of the aeroplane In actual flight.
Front view of the aeroplane with which Mr. Eugene Gratze is expert menting at Canewdon, near Southend, to which reference has been made rn these columns recently. This shows the general arrangement of the machine. The balancing flaps on the main planes are shown in their raised position.
GLIDING EXPERIMENTS. - Mr. A. Sim, who has been making some successful gliding flights, has sent us some valuable hints, in a letter which appears in our correspondence columns, as a result of his experience, accompanied by some interesting photographs, reproduced above. The upper pictures show the glider rising off the ground. On the left, below, a good flight is in progress without the elevator, and, on the right, one of the troubles from which lessons are learnt.
Method of attaching the supplementary stiffening ribs on the Lilienthal glider.
BRUSSELS AUTO AND FLIGHT EXHIBITION. - General view of the main hall taken from the aviation section of the building, the cars being seen at the further half of the hall. The dirigible suspended from the roof is the "Belgica." This is equipped with wireless telegraphy, and the staircase seen in the centre of the building leads up to a platform from which visitors can examine this and the aeronaut's car and the motor. The monoplane seen immediately in the foreground is the "Goffaux" machine.
GERMAN FLYERS - The Gebr: Timm monoplane;
GERMAN FLYERS - the Hanuschke biplane;
The "C.R." biplane, designed and built by the J. P. CHITTENDEN and L. H. ROBINSON.
View of the experimental monoplane with which numerous practical experiments were carried out before the large machine now building was commenced. This model, with its elastic motor, used to rise under its own power off its starting-rail, and travel a considerable distance in the air.
Diagrammatic sketch indicating the principle of the hollow rhomboidal construction as applied to a biplane.
Details showing the wood and steel wire construction of the main girders.
Internal wood and steel wire construction of the transverse spars.
Side elevation and plan of the large all-British rhomboidal aeroplane now nearing completion.
OLYMPIA, 1910. - On the Star monoplane the trailing edges of the wings are flexible, and the four similar pivoted planes forming the rudder and elevator - which comprise the moving members of the tail - can be so manipulated in flight as to produce a torque on the frame for the purposes of maintaining lateral equilibrium.
WING SECTIONS. - The above diagrams afford an interesting comparison of the wing sections of aeroplanes exhibited at Olympia. They are all drawn to a common scale, but have been set at an arbitrary angle of incidence, which does not necessarily represent that of the aeroplane In actual flight.
Miss Lilian E. Bland's biplane, "Mayfly," the owner up in the left-hand photograph. On the right S. Girvany, Ballymore, who has made the metal fittings and helped throughout its construction, is in the pilot's seat. The biplane has a span of 27 ft. 7 ins., area 260 sq. ft., weight with skids 200 lbs., aspect ratio 5.5, angle on skids 6 degs.
The "Mayfly," with its 20-h.p. Avro engine in place. Miss Lilian Bland, Its designer and owner, is seen in her businesslike working overalls in the left-hand photograph.
Bland Mayfly powered version of 1910. - This side view shows the machine as she now is, but in the new tail Miss Bland contemplates fitting, the fin in front of the rudder will not be used.
THE "MAYFLY" - View of the front of the biplane, showing how one elevator rises and the other lowers. In this photograph also the wiring of the wings to the skids is noticeable. The angle of the machine on the skids is 6 degrees.
THE "MAYFLY." - Sketch showing the general arrangements of the detachable framework containing the power plant, &c.
The "Mayfly." - Detailed sketch of the outrigger pivot.
THE "MAYFLY." - Plan view and side elevation to scale.
A SCOTTISH-BUILT BIPLANE. - This is the work of "Gibson's Aeroplanes" of Lelth. Mr. John Gibson, its designer, in sending us the photographs, writes: "The machine which we are at present practising with promises well, rising readily, but none of us are capable of handling her efficiently as yet. Of course, we have had our engine troubles and a few smashes, but all the fault is either with the engine or with our own inexperienced handling, which time will remedy. The machine itself is all right, and I believe the first Scottish-built aeroplane to leave the ground. My son, age 19, can handle her best; he appears in photos.
THE PFITZNER FLYER. - The first American monoplane to fly. Note the sliding wing "tips."
THE PFITZNER MONOPLANE. - Mr. Pfitzner at the wheel. In this view the general arrangement of the centre of the machine is clearly shown.
Front view, showing the trussing of the wings, of the Pfitzner monoplane.
Diagram of the controlling arrangements on the Pfitzner monoplane.
"La Fregate" monoplane, fitted with 30-h.p. 3-cyl. Anzani motor, and piloted by M. Robert De Lesseps.
Mr. H. A. W. Candler's "Monofoil."
View of the Macfie monoplane from in front.
Side view of the Macfie monoplane.
Two views of the tail on the Macfie monoplane. The tail consists of an elevating plane and a rudder.
View of the two-wheeled chassis that supports the fore part of the Macfie monoplane.
View of the Macfie monoplane, showing the position of the pilot's seat and the overhead frame used in the trussing of the main wings.
View of the 35-h.p. 8-cyl. air-cooled Jap engine on the Macfie monoplane.
Sketch showing the mounting of the skid that supports the tail end of the Macfie monoplane.
Sketch showing how the joints are made on the Macfie monoplane.
Sketch showing the mounting of the elevator on the Macfie monoplane.
View showing a portion of the skeleton framework of the elevator on the Macfie monoplane.
Sketch showing the construction and dimensions of the ribs employed in the main wings of the Macfie monoplane.
Diagrammatic sketch showing the crossing ol the wires employed for warping the wings of the Macfie monoplane.
Sketch showing the pilot's seat and control lever; also illustrating the hinged attachment of the rear spars of the Macfie monoplane.
AVIS MONOPLANE. - View from behind.
The Hon. Alan Boyle flying at Brooklands on his Bleriot monoplane. On Wednesday Mr. Boyle was out for sport, and made an excellent flight at a height of about 70 feet.
The Hon. Alan Boyle was last week seen in a photograph, published on page 306, flying on the "Avis" monoplane - obviously not a Bleriot, as appeared by a slip in the inscription. Above we are now able to give two much clearer pictures of this successful British-built machine in full flight at Brooklands under the direction of Mr. Boyle, The builders of the "Avis" are the Scottish Aeroplane Syndicate, of 166, Piccadilly.
Flying at Brookiands on Wednesday of last week when at one time there were no less than six machines in the air together. - Our photograph shows in full flight the Hon. Alan Boyle on his Avis monoplane (on the left) and Mr. Claude Grahame-White, with a passenger, on his Henry Farman biplane.
IN FRONT OF THE BOURNEMOUTH AEROPLANE SHEDS. - The Humber and Avis monoplanes are standing in the foreground,
THE FLYING MEN AT BOURNEMOUTH AND THEIR "MOUNTS." - Hon. Alan Boyle (Avis).
Mr. Wickham, who is flying the Channel in connection with the De Forest L4,000 prize, at the wheel of his Avis monoplane.
WING SECTIONS. - The above diagrams afford an interesting comparison of the wing sections of aeroplanes exhibited at Olympia. They are all drawn to a common scale, but have been set at an arbitrary angle of incidence, which does not necessarily represent that of the aeroplane In actual flight.
Avis Monoplane. - Plan, side and front elevation.
The new A.S.L. all-British Monoplane undergoing its trials in Wiltshire.
A.S.L. Monoplane No.2.
A close view of the A.S.L. Monoplane, showing the chassis and part of the main frame. The wings have a maximum thickness of 8 ins. at the root.
Sketch illustrating an ingenious method of fastening the rudder-hinge to the rudder-post on the Mulliner monoplane.
OLYMPIA, 1910. - The Humber monoplane designed by Le Blon is characterised by its dragon-fly body, which consists of a hollow wood boom of tapering circular section. The exterior of the boom is bound with tape.
WING SECTIONS. - The above diagrams afford an interesting comparison of the wing sections of aeroplanes exhibited at Olympia. They are all drawn to a common scale, but have been set at an arbitrary angle of incidence, which does not necessarily represent that of the aeroplane In actual flight.
WING SECTIONS. - The above diagrams afford an interesting comparison of the wing sections of aeroplanes exhibited at Olympia. They are all drawn to a common scale, but have been set at an arbitrary angle of incidence, which does not necessarily represent that of the aeroplane In actual flight.
View of the very simple chassis employed on the Handley Page monoplane. The natural flexibility of the ash axle constitutes the suspension.
WING SECTIONS. - The above diagrams afford an interesting comparison of the wing sections of aeroplanes exhibited at Olympia. They are all drawn to a common scale, but have been set at an arbitrary angle of incidence, which does not necessarily represent that of the aeroplane In actual flight.
View from above and behind of the Lane monoplane. This is the single-seater; on the left will be noticed part of the skeleton framework of the two-seater.
FLYING MACHINES AT BROOKLANDS ON EASTER MONDAY. - A trio of aeroplanes. From left to right: Mr. Astley's Lane monoplane, Mr. A. V. Roe's triplane, and Mr. Moreing's Voisln biplane.
FLYING MACHINES AT BROOKLANDS ON EASTER MONDAY. - Mr. Astley's monoplane taking a run across the aerodrome.
FLYING AT BROOKLANDS. - Mr. Lane on his monoplane giving an exhibition flight on Saturday last. In the distance Mr. Morison on his machine can also be seen well up in the air.
WING SECTIONS. - The above diagrams afford an interesting comparison of the wing sections of aeroplanes exhibited at Olympia. They are all drawn to a common scale, but have been set at an arbitrary angle of incidence, which does not necessarily represent that of the aeroplane In actual flight.
The Nicholson monoplane, which has been constructed by the well-known coachbuilders, Messrs. Holland and Holland, and follows the lines of the Bleriot machine.
WING SECTIONS. - The above diagrams afford an interesting comparison of the wing sections of aeroplanes exhibited at Olympia. They are all drawn to a common scale, but have been set at an arbitrary angle of incidence, which does not necessarily represent that of the aeroplane In actual flight.
General view of the Spencer-Stirling monoplane, exhibited on the Berliet stand. This is the only monoplane fitted with twin screws.
WING SECTIONS. - The above diagrams afford an interesting comparison of the wing sections of aeroplanes exhibited at Olympia. They are all drawn to a common scale, but have been set at an arbitrary angle of incidence, which does not necessarily represent that of the aeroplane In actual flight.
OLYMPIA, 1910. - George and Jobling's biplane. This machine has a monoplane tail and a monoplane elevator. The spars and struts are hollow.
Sketch illustrating how the end skids are mounted on the planes of the George and Jobling biplane.
WING SECTIONS. - The above diagrams afford an interesting comparison of the wing sections of aeroplanes exhibited at Olympia. They are all drawn to a common scale, but have been set at an arbitrary angle of incidence, which does not necessarily represent that of the aeroplane In actual flight.
WING SECTIONS. - The above diagrams afford an interesting comparison of the wing sections of aeroplanes exhibited at Olympia. They are all drawn to a common scale, but have been set at an arbitrary angle of incidence, which does not necessarily represent that of the aeroplane In actual flight.
Sketch illustrating the cantilever method of mounting the wheels on the Zodiac biplane.
WING SECTIONS. - The above diagrams afford an interesting comparison of the wing sections of aeroplanes exhibited at Olympia. They are all drawn to a common scale, but have been set at an arbitrary angle of incidence, which does not necessarily represent that of the aeroplane In actual flight.
FOUR IN AN AEROPLANE. - Mons. Sommer on his Sommer biplane upon the occasion when he carried three passengers, including Mdlle. Dutrieux, in addition to himself, for a flight. It will be t remembered we gave the particulars of this Flight in last week's issue, the weight of the machine complete with its passengers totalling to no less than 1,060 lbs.
One of the most successful flyers of the day is the new Roger Sommer machine seen above, which was purchased and shown by the Hon. C. S. Rolls as one of the exhibits in the Royal Aero Club's section.
Legagneux in full flight on his Sommer biplane at the Lyons Aviation Meeting.
The exciting incident at the Lyons Aviation Meeting when Paulban, on his Henry Farman machine, overtook Legagneux on his Sommer biplane.
IN LINE FOR THE FIRST AERIAL "RACE." - MM. Martinet (H. Farman), Mumm (Antoinette), Legagneux (Sommer), and Capt. Dickson (H, Farman), ready for the start from the Anjou Aerodrome for the cross-country race to Saumur on June 6th.
Mr. Roger Sommer's own biplane with which he made a successful flight at the Rheims Flying Grounds on June 13th. This remarkable machine, as will be noticed, is fitted with one of the Humber Co's 4-cyl. 45-h.p. motors.
Tetard, one of the flyers who did well at the Blackpool Aviation Meeting last week.
Lindpaintner, the winner of the German Minister of War's prize at the Berlin Aviation Week this month.
WING SECTIONS. - The above diagrams afford an interesting comparison of the wing sections of aeroplanes exhibited at Olympia. They are all drawn to a common scale, but have been set at an arbitrary angle of incidence, which does not necessarily represent that of the aeroplane In actual flight.
General view of the framework of the Petre monoplane, exhibited by Leo Ripault and Co. A characteristic feature of this machine is the position of the propeller behind the tail.
WING SECTIONS. - The above diagrams afford an interesting comparison of the wing sections of aeroplanes exhibited at Olympia. They are all drawn to a common scale, but have been set at an arbitrary angle of incidence, which does not necessarily represent that of the aeroplane In actual flight.
From the above side view of the latest biplane built by Mr. Maurice Farman it will be seen that the design has been considerably simplified. A noticeable feature is the boat arrangement which shields the aviator from the wind.
AT THE HAVRE FLIGHT MEETING. - Barra, on his Maurice Farman, circling the aerodrome. In the distance, on the left, is seen a Bleriot in flight.
PARIS FLIGHT SALON. - General view of the centre of the Grand Palais. On the right is seen the Wright biplane, on the left the Maurice Farman biplane, just beyond being the Henry Farman machine, whilst in the foreground, in the centre, is the two-seater Antoinette monoplane.
Maurice Farman control at the Paris Flight Salon. - The pedals are used to actuate the ailerons, the wheel is turned for steering and moved backwards and forwards for elevating and depressing.
M. Tabuteau, who last week at Etampes, on a Maurice Farman machine, made the magnificent new world's record distance and duration flight in his flight for the Michelin 1910 Prize.
M. Tabuteau, the winner of the French Michelin Aviation Cup for 1910. - He covered approximately 365 miles in 7 hrs. 4.8 mins. on his Maurice Farman biplane, Renault motor.
WING SECTIONS. - The above diagrams afford an interesting comparison of the wing sections of aeroplanes exhibited at Olympia. They are all drawn to a common scale, but have been set at an arbitrary angle of incidence, which does not necessarily represent that of the aeroplane In actual flight.
View from the rear of a monoplane which has been built by the Tellier Co., the famous builders of French racing boats. The arrangement of the tail and rudder presents some novel features. It is being tested by M. Dubonnet, another well-known name in motor boating circles.
LATEST TELLIER MONOPLANE, SEEN FROM IN FRONT AND FROM BEHIND. - Mr. D. L. Santoni is in the pilot's seat.
AT THE TELLIER SCHOOL AT ETAMPES - SOME OF THE PUPILS. - (1) Prince de Nissole; (2) Le Maire; (3) Hammersley; (4) Becue; (5) D. L. Santoni.
The Panhard motor fitted to the Tellier monoplane. It will be noticed that the engine is carried on a wooden framework, which has all its edges carefully rounded off.
The front chassis section of the Tellier monoplane, showing the very strong construction of the fusellage and simple fitting of the 6-cyl. Panhard aviation motor.
The latest Tellier racing monoplane, fitted with a 45-h.p. Panhard engine, which will be used at the big International-meeting at Lanark by Audemars. The weight is 350 kilogs., span, 9 metres; length, 9 metres and surface, 20.2 square metres.
Mr. C. D'Angelis' Indian biplane.
Sketches illustrating two interesting details on the Hornstein biplane. The rib is solid, and steam bent to the required curvature. Each skid is made of two strips of wood, trussed by cork pads.
The wreck of "Havilland I," denoting the inadequacy, as regards strength, of this 850-lb. machine.
View looking down on the Havilland engine, as it appeared within the main girder after the smash.
Section through one of the main planes, indicating the dimensions of the wooden spars.
Sketch showing the neat strut joint for the main girder.
Two views of the Havilland adjustable propeller, indicating the extent to which the pitch and the twist of the blades can be changed to suit requirements.
Sketches showing details of the Havilland propeller.
Front elevation and plan of Mr. G. de Haviliarid's first biplane.
Two views of "Baddeck No. 2" the biplane with which Messrs. McCurdy and Baldwin have been experimenting at Baddeck, Nova Scotia.
Lieut. Dunn's Blair Athol Aeroplane, "No.5," at Eastchurch, the Royal Aero Club's Flying Grounds. - View from the front. At first glance the above photograph conveys the impression that the machine has the planes set at an inverted dihedral angle, but this elfect is only due to the fact that the planes on either side of the body slope backwards. The Dunn biplane is the most remarkable and interesting machine yet constructed, for it is tailless and without an elevator, being designed to have natural stability. Steering is effected by hinged flaps behind the extremities of the main planes.
The Dunne Biplane. View from in front, showing the machine in its natural position on the ground. The perspective caused by the slope back of the wings gives an erroneous impression in this view that the planes are greatly arched.
Another view ot the Dunne aeroplane taken from behind. In this photograph the rear wheel is resting on the ground. The supplementary camber that is given to the central portion of the trailing edge is very noticeable in this view.
View of the Dunne biplane taken from behind. In this view the trailing wheel has been raised to bring the machine into its flying position. The twist of the decks and the diverging gap are quite noticeable in this view.
General view of the Dunne aeroplane taken from behind. This illustration also shows the twist on the main decks in a very marked manner.
Three-quarter view of the Dunne aeroplane from behind. This is the best general view of the machine that it was possible to obtain, since it alone gives the correct impression of the slope back of the main planes. The twist of the surfaces caused by their peculiar camber is very noticeable in the right-hand upper deck, which also indicates the diverging gap.
Another side view of the Dunne biplane looking down one of the leading edges from the wing extremity. Careful study of the shape of the vertical panel in the foreground reveals the negative angle of incidence at the extremity of the upper deck, and also the diverging gap.
Side view of the Dunne biplane taken from in front and looking down one of the leading edges, The supplementary camber in the central portion of the trailing edge is illustrated in the above photograph.
Side view of the Dunne aeroplane. Careful inspection of this photograph will convey an accurate conception of the varying camber of the planes. It is comparatively easy to grasp the position of the imaginary cone on which the camber is laid off by studying the upper deck in the above photograph.
View of one of the wing extremities on the Dunne biplane showing the arrangement of the steering flaps.
View of the chassis on the Dunne aeroplane. It should be observed that the principal members, A., are in tension. Each wheel can rise independently of the other.
General view of the beam that supports the propellers on the Dunne biplane.
Another view of the propellers on the Dunne aeroplane.
Detail view of the mounting of one of the propellers on the Dunne biplane.
View of one of the propellers on the Dunne biplane showing its general shape.
BRITISH FLYERS AT SHEPPEY. - Mr. Dunne in full flight on his Dunne biplane. The machine is travelling towards the spectators.
BRITISH FLYERS AT SHEPPEY. - A side view of Mr. Dunne in flight.
Diagrammatic sketch illustrating the varying curvature of the ribs in the wings of the Dunne biplane. The dotted line represents the line of contact with the imaginary cone upon which the wings are drawn out. Aft of this line the wing surfaces are flat.
Sketch illustrating the use of a paper model in order to explain the shape of the wings on the Dunne aeroplane.
The 1910 Dunne biplane, "D5." Plan and side elevation.
WING SECTIONS. - The above diagrams afford an interesting comparison of the wing sections of aeroplanes exhibited at Olympia. They are all drawn to a common scale, but have been set at an arbitrary angle of incidence, which does not necessarily represent that of the aeroplane In actual flight.
NEW VOISIN RACING BIPLANE. - View from in front.
Side view of the new Voisin biplane, racing type.
Competitors at the Starting Line at Lanark Meeting, as seen from the Members' Enclosure. - The machines, reading from the front, are: No. 6, Cattaneo's Bleriot; No. 12, Gilmour's Bleriot; 18, Grace's Henry Farman; 131, Ridley's Bierlot; 11, Capt. Dickson's Farman; 21, McArdle's Bleriot; 8, Blondeau's Henry Farman; 5, Champel's Voisin.
The tail of Champel's Volsin biplane at Lanark Meeting.
Voisin new type two-seater biplane, without elevator, fitted with 50-h.p. Gnome motor and French service mitrailleuse in front of passenger's seat.
The Baronne de Laroche, whose unfortunate accident on her Voisin somewhat marred last Friday's doings at the Rheims Meeting. - Latest accounts report the Baroness as out of danger.
Svendson, the Swedish aviator, who, on his Voisin, flew across the Sound recently, starting from Copenhagen (Denmark) at 4.3 p.m., reached Sweden (Melmo) at 4.34 p.m., a distance of 28 kiloms. as the crow files.
Bielovucie, who has just flown from Paris to Bordeaux, at the wheel of his Voisin biplane.
Champel's Voisin biplane after its fall into the fir plantation at Lanark Aviation Meeting.
A new monoplane built in Hungary, built by a member of the newly-formed Aero Club of Hungary at Budapest.
A STRANGE CRAFT IN THE HARBOUR AT MONACO LAST WEEK. - This novel aero-hydroplane is fitted with a 50-h,p. 3-cyl. Anzani motor.
The Gabardini flying boat of early 1910, with its catamaran hull, variable-incidence wing, rear elevator and tractor propeller.
The new Herring biplane, a special feature of which is the series of six triangular fins on the top plane for maintaining lateral stability.
The Herring-Burgess biplane in its latest form. It will be noticed that two additional fins have been fitted since the machine was described in this journal on April 23rd last.
THE HERRING-BURGESS BIPLANE. - Diagrammatic sketch, showing the fins from in front.
THE HERRING-BURGESS BIPLANE. - Side elevation and plan.
Mr. H. G. Ferguson and his monoplane, with a lady passenger, the first to be carried in Ireland.
FLYING IN IRELAND. - Mr. H. G. Ferguson at Lough Foyle. On the left just away for a flight over the water, and on the right a good start.
Side view of the Maxim biplane, showing very clearly the arrangement of the two principal fore and aft spars that carry the elevator, tail and propellers.
Front view of the Maxim biplane, showing the dihedral angle formed between the central section and -the aiched outer sections.
Rear view of the Maxim biplane, showing the disposition of the three propellers. The small propeller runs in the wake of the principal masses.
Photograph illustrating the arrangement of seats on the Maxim biplane. On the left is T. Jackson, who assisted Sir Hiram Maxim in the construction of his original machine, and was a passenger thereon during its accidental free flight in Baldwyn's Park.
View of the chassis of the Maxim biplane, showing the landing wheels and fenders. The shock is resisted by pneumatic springs.
Detail view of the chassis suspension on the Maxim biplane.
View illustrating the rope drive to the propellers on the Maxim biplane.
Photograph of one of the propellers for the Maxim biplane, with Sir Hiram Maxim standing alongside, which gives some idea of the size of these screws. The trussing of the very thin blades to the tubular sleeve is a special feature of the design.
Views of the elevator and tall on the Maxim biplane. The tail, which carries the rudder, acts in unison with the elevator.
View showing the construction of the framework of the main planes of the Maxim biplane.
Views of the Maxim engine on the Maxim biplane. The cylinders are made of steel, and have detachable heads and detachable German silver water-jackets. The vertical water-pipe on the extreme left forms a main strut in the framework of the machine.
View of the gyroscopic control mechanism constructed for attachment to the Maxim biplane after the preliminary tests.
General view of the aerodrome at Crayford where the Maxim biplane is to be tested on a circular track by running it on a lead attached to the wind tower in the centre.
Sketch illustrating the arrangement of the jockey-pulleys, which are used to tighten the rope drive of the propellers on the Maxim biplane.
Diagrammatic sketch illustrating the connections in the control of the Maxim biplane. The elevator and tail work in unison, being interconnected by cross wires. The chassis wheels and the rudder also work in unison. The main planes are warped by a pedal.
Sketches showing details of the strut-joints, tie-strips, and wire guides on the Maxim biplane.
Sectional sketch of a rib in the main decks of the Maxim biplane.
Sketch illustrating the steering-wheel and elevator-lever on the Maxim biplane.
THE MAXIM BIPLANE. - Plan and elevation to scale.
Dunne-Huntington triplane still with Wolseley engine but with modified chassis and side curtains.
BRITISH FLYERS AT SHEPPEY. - Professor A. K. Huntington's biplane seen from the front.
BRITISH FLYERS AT SHEPPEY. - Professor A. K. Huntington' s biplane in flight.
THE BRITISH-BUILT "GROSE" MONOPLANE. - View from in front and behind. The general dimensions are :- Span, 26 ft.; length, 25 ft.; surface, main planes, 160 sq. ft.; engine, 20-25 h.p. In the photographs sent us by Mr. A. M. Grose, of Oakington, Cambs., the wings are set temporarily at a greater angle than is correct for flying, as at the time of photographing the engine and propeller were being tested by running freely over the ground. Mr. Grose is desirous of arranging for a suitable engine to complete his equipment.
Mr. Charles H. Parkes' monoplane of 1910 was built by coachbuilders at Monmouth.
A Monoplane, built by Master Dhoual Cameron, aged 16, of Castlewood College, Rathmines, Dublin. - He was born deaf, and has been educated on the pure oral system under Mr. Newburn, having been successful in passing several competitive examinations. He enters for Trinity College next year, and is building two models for the exhibition at Ballsbridge in June.
View of the framework of the Piggott biplane, showing the general arrangement of the suspension and the larger of the two propellers in situ.
Another view of the chassis of the Piggott biplane, taken while the engine was being dismantled.
Detail view of the chain drive on the Piggott biplane, showing the multiple-disc clutch between the crank-shaft and the chain-sprocket, and the differential gear between the chain wheel and the propeller-shafts.
Sectional drawing of the differential gear oh the Piggott biplane.
Sectional sketch of the flexible coupling of the propeller shaft of the Piggott biplane.
Sketch of one of the ribs in the main plane of the Piggott biplane.
THE PIGGOTT BIPLANE. - Plan and side elevation to scale.
THE NEW BLERIOT MONOPLANE. - This is modified in several respects. The main body is 1 metre shorter, viz. 6.6m., whilst the elevators, as will be seen from the above side view from behind, have been considerably altered.
THE NEW BLERIOT MONOPLANE. - View from behind.
M. BLERIOT'S LATEST MONOPLANE. - M. Bleriot has now evolved a new model monoplane which bears the designation "No. 13." It differs from the Cross-Channel type in having a long and wide tail shaped like that of a bird, and ending in two hinged flaps.
BLERIOT TWO-SEATER MONOPLANE. - View from the side.
BLERIOT TWO-SEATER MONOPLANE. - View showing the outrigger and tail portion of the machine.
BLERIOT TWO-SEATER MONOPLANE. - View from behind.
Mr. D. Graham Gilmour just before his start, on his Gnome-engined Bleriot, for his second flight last week for the Neill Cup.
Start of M. Leon Morane and his brother from Issy last week on the 100-h.p. Gnome-englned Bleriot for the Michelin Prize, which ended in the serious accident soon after the start. Note the four assistants on the ground helping to hold back this very powerful flyer.
Morane, on his passenger-carrying Bleriot, leaving terra firma for one of his passenger trials.
Mr. Moisant circling round the Folkestone Racecourse on his Bleriot.
Drexel flying at Blackpool on the two-seater Bleriot, with Cecil Grace as passenger.
Mr. Graham Gilmour, on his "Big Bat" flying at Brooklands with a passenger at dusk.
Mr. Graham Gilmour's Bleriot flying over the Hanriot monoplane at Brooklands.
"NECK AND NECK" DOWN BROOKLANDS STRAIGHT. - An incident at the Season-End Meeting during the finish of the 76-m.p.h. Handicap. Overhead is Mr. Graham-Gilmour racing on his Gnome-engined Bleriot.
HOME BY AEROPLANE. - Mr. J. Armstrong Drexel and his 2-seated Bleriot just before his start last week for home at Beaulleu after the Bournemouth Aviation Week. On the right Mr. Delacombe, his companion on this cross-sea flight, is standing waiting to take his seat on the machine.
Photographs of the original leaves from Mr. Delacombe's note-book.
PARIS TO LONDON. -Mr. John B. Moisant's Bleriot at Tilmanstone, where he alighted after crossing the Channel with his mechanician Fileux.
PARIS TO LONDON. - Moisant's Bleriot in the brickfield at Upchurch, near Rainham, ready for the finishing stage to London.
Military two-seated type of Bleriot monoplane at the Paris Salon, showing details of the landing chassis and body construction.
BLERIOT TWO-SEATER MONOPLANE. - Detail view of the Gnome engine and propeller, and the method of mounting.
BLERIOT TWO-SEATER MONOPLANE. - The front portion of the chassis.
M. Morane at Rouen Meeting with his two passengers (not "Three Men in a Boat"), whom he took up in his new Bleriot monoplane, "No.1." Both man and machine will be seen at Bournemouth Aviation Meeting this month.
M. Leon Morane (on right) and his brother, who accompanied him as passenger in connection with the unsuccessful attempt last week to win the Michelin Prize for the flight from Paris to the Puy-de-Dome.
Mr. Armstrong Drexel and his passenger, Mr. Delacombe (who travelled without hat or coat), just before leaving terra firma for the homeward journey from Bournemouth to Beaulieu flying school.
PARIS TO LONDON. - Mr. John B. Moisant and his mechanician, Fileux, on the Bleriot two-seater with which he made his remarkable flight from Paris across the Channel last week.
Section through floor showing the special "cloche" control system in the Bleriot two-seater monoplane.
Sketch showing mounting and control of the elevator of the Bleriot two-seater monoplane.
BLERlOT TWO-SEATER MONOPLANE. - Elevation and plan to scale.
General side view of Mr. C. C. Paterson's biplane just about to rise off the Freshfield sands near Liverpool.
Method of conveying the Paterson biplane from place to place. - It will be noted that the extensions on both sides of the main planes are detached for this purpose.
MR. H. H. PIFFARD'S ALL-BRITISH BIPLANE ON THE SHOREHAM FLYING GROUND. - Driven by an 8-cyl. 40-h.p. E.N.V. engine and 7-ft. propeller, the span is 31 ft. The Shoreham grounds are controlled by Aviators' Finance, Ltd.
WOLVERHAMPTON FLIGHT MEETING. - General view of the aerodrome looking towards the hangars. Mr. Cecil Grace in flight on his Short biplane.
Cecil Grace, on his "Short" biplane, gets up for the Altitude Contest.
FLYING IN THE FACE OF THE SETTING SUN. - A "November setting," by Dr. William J. S. Lockyer, to Mr. Frank K. McClean and his Short biplane at the Royal Aero Club's ground, Eastchurch. This picture is a fine example of a Genuine photograph, and was secured by Dr. Lockyer on the evening of November 6th just before sunset. It was on this machine that Mr. McClean has recently been making his long cross-country flights.
Mr. Cecil Grace ready in the pilot's seat prior to his start for the De Forest Cross-Channel Prize,
THE FLYING MEN AT BOURNEMOUTH AND THEIR "MOUNTS." - Cecil Grace (Short).
Mr. Frank K. McClean and his first passenger, Dr. William J. S. Lockyer, with whom, on his Short biplane, he flew on October 22nd at the Royal Aero Club grounds at East' church, Sheppay. Mr. McClean has been, as we record, making some splendid cross-country flights, one lasting for 1 hr. 6 mins.
Mr. Rowland Moon's "Moonbeam," after Santos Dumont.
Mr. Claude Grahame-White's new British-built Biplane on which he hopes to fly from London to Paris. - This photograph was secured in Messrs. Gamage's show-rooms, where the machine has been on exhibition recently.
This Sommer-type biplane was built for Grahame-White in 1910 by Windham's motor body company.
THE HENRY FARMAN MONOPLANE. - Views, from in front and of the side, of this new machine, the advent of which we announced a few weeks ago.
Mr. S. F. Cody, as we have recorded, is once more doing practical work with his new biplane, our photograph shows Mr. Cody in flight passing over the Basingstoke Canal.
BRITISH ARMY AND AERONAUTICS. - Unique photograph of the Army airship "Beta" and Mr. S. F. Cody's new biplane in flight at Aldershot at 7 p.m. on Thursday the week before last. It is gratifying to know that both these craft are equipped with British-built Green engines.
Mr. S. F. Cody, on his biplane, competing for the British Michelin Cup at Farnborough Friday of last week. Mr. Cody made a magnificent flight, remaining up for 2 hrs. 24 mins. Mr. Cody also intends to put in a journey for the Baron de Forest Cross-Channel Distance Prize in good time before the worst of the winter weather sets in.
MR. S. F. CODY'S FINE FLIGHT FOR THE BRITISH MICHELIN CUP. - Taking a corner of the course at a fine angle.
Mr. S. F. Cody and Lieut. A . E. Fox, R.E., the official observer on behalf of the Royal Aero Club of Mr. Cody's fine flight for the British Michelin Cup last week. Mr. Cody's biplane is in the background.
Front view of the Cody biplane, showing the inverted dihedral of the main planes, the extremities of which drop nine inches below the centre.
Rear view of the Cody biplane.
Side view of the Cody biplane, showing the arrangement of the under-carriage. Guard wheels are fitted to the extremities of the main plane.
General view of the elevator on the Cody biplane.
On the left one of the balancing planes on the Cody biplane, and on the right the tail of the Cody biplane. The horizontal tail plane is rigidly fixed to the rudder, and moves with it.
View of the engine and propeller on the Cody biplane.
Detail view of the under-carriage on the Cody biplane.
View of the steering-wheel on the Cody biplane.
Front view of the pilot's seat on the Cody biplane, showing Mr. Cody at the wheel. This photograph is taken through the radiator, which protects the pilot to a certain extent in cold weather. That the radiator is no obstruction to the view in this position maybe judged from the above picture.
Diagrammatic sketch illustrating the use of the elevators as balancers on the Cody biplane, and also the simultaneous action of one of the main balancing planes.
Sketch illustrating how the vertical struts are fastened by a ball-socket joint to the main spars in the Cody biplane. Inset is an illustration of the bolt.
Sketch illustrating how the steering column simultaneously operates the balancing-planes and the rudder when moved sideways.
Sketch illustrating how the main ribs are fastened to the main spars by a steel strap on the Cody biplane.
The Cody rib. Sketch illustrating the peculiar camber of the ribs employed on the Cody biplane. The top surface has its entering edge tangential to the line of flight so that the under surface has a dipping front edge.
Both the Grand Duke and the Grand Duchess Augusta of Austria at Budapest Meeting were taken for flights by Adolf Warchalowski on his biplane. In our picture a general view of the Royal passenger is seen prior to the start.
Warchalowski and the Grand Duchess Augusta after the flight at Budapest.
Front View of Mr. Batchelor's Monoplane.
The new French monoplane, "Montgolfier," with Lieut. Bier in the pilot's seat, who has recently been making some successful flights with this 25-30-h.p. Anzani-englned machine.
SAVARY BIPLANE PILOTED BY FREY AT RHEIMS MEETING. - Two tractor screws are employed, and a chain-driven 8-cyl. E.N.V. engine. Inset Frey is seen in the air on the Savary biplane.
M. Poillot, who was last week killed at Chartres.
The Nieuport monoplane, which was successfully flown by its constructor at Rheims Meeting. - It is fitted with a 20-h.p. 2-cyl. Darracq engine. Inset the Nieuport monoplane in flight.
De Pischoff in flight on the Werner monoplane during the Rheims Meeting.
M. Henri Fabre's marine-aeroplane skimming over the sea.
Harding in the pilot's seat of his J.A.P. monoplane at Blackpool.
Front and side views of the Blackburn heavy type monoplane.
View of the car beneath the planes on the Blackburn heavy type monoplane.
Two views of the Blackburn aeroplane control mechanism.
Diagrammatic sketch of the Blackburn aeroplane control.
THE BLACKBURN LIGHT MONOPLANE WHICH ARRIVED AT BLACKPOOL LAST WEEK. - On the left the machine, showing details of the landing chassis and propeller, is seen in its shed; and on the right is the 35-40-h.p. Isaacson engine with which it is fitted, showing reduction gear (2 to 1) and internally cut gear-wheel attached to propeller.
Some interesting views of the Swiss-built Dufaux biplane which has been constructed by the Dufaux Brothers of Geneva. In No. 3 M. Henry Dufaux is in the pilot's seat, in No. 4 M. Armand Dufaux is in charge, and in Fig. 6 the machine is in flight. No. 1 is a Voisin machine, with M. Nigg at the wheel. The photographs, which are from the Suisse Sportive, were taken at the Viry Aerodrome, near Geneva.
AMERICAN FLYING MEN AT BELMONT PARK MEETING. - Capt. T . S. Baldwin.
Capt. Baldwin's biplane. - American Aeronautics.
Side view of the Seddon aeroplane.
M. HENRY JACQUES AT THE WHEEL OF THE NEW RAOUL VENDOME MONOPLANE. - The wing span is 9.5 metres, length 7 metres, motor 3-cyl. 25-h.p. Anzani, and Vendome propeller.
Biplane of the Soc. Anom. Francais d'Aviation constructed by MM. Caudron Freres, which last week was flying at a high rate of speed at Issy. M. Rene Caudron is in the pilot's seat.
Delabrosse and Christolet's variable monoplane with its wing extensions closed, giving 7 metres span.
DELABROSSE AND CHRISTOLET'S VARIABLE SURFACE MONOPLANE. - The machine with its "wings" fully extended, giving 9 metres span.
"VALKYRIE I." - General view of the Aeronautical Syndicate's monoplane, photographs of which machine in flight appeared in our last issue.
VALKYRIE (1910). This was one of the first "tail first" machines to be designed. The experimental machine (also known as the A.S.L.), was completed in Feb., 1910.
"VALKYRIE I" SEEN FROM IN FRONT. - The plane on which the name is written is a fixed leading plane; beneath it is a small elevator.
The new 3-seater "Valkyrie" at Hendon flying grounds, from the front.
A NEW BRITISH FLYER. - The above photographs show "Valkyrie I" in flight on Tuesday, September 13th, prior to dismantlement for removal to the new works and schosl that the Aeronautical Syndicate, Ltd., have established at Wendon. This machine is the fifth of a series of experimental models with which trials have been carried out on Salisbury Plain during the past 17 months. It is a monoplane, and is characterised by several interesting features both in design and construction. There is no tail, and the pilot sits in front of the engine, which is in front of the main planes; he thus has a clear outlook in every direction. In front of the pilot is a leading plane, baneath which is the elevator.
The "Valkyrie" takes a trip at the Hendon flying grounds last Saturday.
"Valkyrie II," the three-seater machine, during one of its long flights at the London Aerodrome on Sunday week, referred to in last week's FLIGHT.
Detail view showing the method of attaching the tie wires for bracing the spars of the main planes.
Where the "Valkyrie" Aeroplanes of the Aeronautical Syndicate, Ltd., live at the London Aerodrome, near Hendon. These machines, our readers will remember, are doing daily, when the elements permit, some very fine flying work.
"VALKYRIE I." - Sketch illustrating the position of the pilot's seat and the arrangement of the control.
"VALKYRIE I." - Sketches illustrating various special features of construction.
"VALKYRIE I." - The Aeronautical Syndicate's monoplane, 1910.
FLYING AT BROOKLANDS. - Mr. Macfie preparing his biplane for a flight.
Mr. Macfie in flight on his biplane at Brooklands.
AT BROOKLANDS AERODROME. - Mr. R. F. Macfie on a Macfie biplane flying low recently at Brooklands grounds, with M. Blondeau above on a Farman biplane.
FLYING AT BROOKLANDS. - M. Blondeau flying over Mr. Macfie's biplane at rest below.
THE AGGREGATE TIME FLIGHT COMPETITION AT BROOKLANDS FOR THE NEILL CUP. - M. Blondeau making a flight. On the ground is Mr. Macfie's biplane, Mr. Macfle, without a hat, standing in the foreground.
AT BROOKLANDS. - Mr. Rippen, one of the Neale pupils, making a good flight on "Neale VII" after its new propeller had been fixed, and before the little mishap.
Two views of the screen rudders on the Neale biplane. These members are used for steering and lateral control, the horizontal balancers having been entirely discarded.
Detail view of the wheel and skid chassis un the Neale biplane.
Two views of the tail on the Neale biplane. The trailing portion of the tail forms the rear elevator.
View of the pilot's seat and control mechanism on the Neale biplane. One of the pedals lifts the exhaust-valve of the engine.
View of the Green engine, propeller, and Lamplough radiator on the Neale biplane.
Diagrams illustrating the principle of control on the Neale biplane. Fig. 1 shows a slight deflection of one of the screen rudders for steering. Fig, 2 illustrates the screen put hard over for balancing.
Back view of a model of the Crucifer aeroplane, showing the tapering conical tail and the twin propellers.
Sectional elevation of the Crucifer aeroplane.
Front elevation of the Crucifer aeroplane.
PAULHAN'S NEW BIPLANE. - View from in front.
PAULHAN'S NEW BIPLANE. - General view from behind. The surface area of the planes can be altered in a few minutes.
In this view ot the Paulhan biplane the girder construction details ol the front of the planes and the leather attachments employed for all joints can be seen.
Detail view of the wooden rudder on the new Paulhan biplane.
The skids, elevator, pilot's seat and steering-gear of the new Paulhan biplane are seen in this photograph.
The new Paulhan biplane making a flight at St. Cyr last week.
Paulhan biplane flying well at St. Cyr.
M. Caille, the first pilot to fly the new Paulhan biplane.
The biplane exhibited at the Paris Salon on the stand of Messrs. Sloan and Co.
Last week we published a view, from behind, of the Sloan biplane, and above we now give a view, as seen from the front, at the Paris Flight Salon.
The latest Odier-Vendome monoplane which is to be used by Rougier. It is fitted with a 60-h.p. 8-cyl. E.N.V. engine.
The Turcat-Mery-Rougier biplane, showing the chassis and landing skids and the four-bladed propeller, at the Paris Flight Salon.
General view, down the centre, of the Paris Flight Salon. - In the foreground is seen the Turcat Mery-Rougier machine and the Compagnie-Aerienne stand also, prominent aloft being the small spherical balloon over the "Continental" exhibit, the Hutchinson "Astra" balloon, and on the left the nose of "Zodiac III."
Details of the landing-skid and chassis, engine and propeller of the R.E.P. monoplane at the Paris Flight Salon.
M. Laurens and his wife, who, as recorded in FLIGHT last week, put up a new record on his R.E.P. monoplane by flying with his passenger a distance just under 80 kiloms. in the hour.
Side view of the Coanda aeroplane, upon the turbine-propulsion system and without propellers, at the Paris Flight Salon. This machine has been purchased by Mr. Weymann.
View from In front of the Deperdussin monoplane, fitted with Its six-bladed propeller, and showing the chassis and skid arrangement, at the Paris Flight Salon.
The Clerget tandem three-seated monoplane, military type, fitted with 200-h.p. Clerget motor, at the Paris Flight Salon. The distance from tip to tip of front wings is 10 metres and the back wings 7 metres, the intervening distance between these being 6 metres. Total surface 37 square metres, total length 14 metres, and weight 650 kilogs. The propeller is 3 metres in diameter.
Mr. J. B. Passat's ornithopter, fitted with a small motor-bicycle motor, with which he has raised himself off the ground.
Sippe monoplane was constructed by the brothers and a friend at Beckenham in 1910 and was tested at Addington.
Major Baden-Powell's monoplane at the Stanley Show, as seen from the side.
Plan View of Major Baden-Powell's Monoplane at the Stanley Show. - Above the exhibit, it will be noticed, is placed a model of a bird.
AT THE STANLEY SHOW. - The Steward monoplane, which, it will be noticed, has hinged ailerons fitted to the trailing edges of the main plane.
Glenn Curtiss' new racing biplane at the Belmont Park (U.S.A.) Meeting.
The new "Baby Wright" which made its first appearance at the Belmont Park (U.S.A.) International Meeting - and, it will be remembered, came to grief.
Mr. Sopwith, on his E.N.V. engined Howard Wright biplane, after his record flight.
Half-side view of the Howard Wright biplane.
THE HOWARD WRIGHT BIPLANE. - Side view of Mr. Sopwith's E.N.V. engined machine, on which he flew from the Royal Aero Club's Eastchurch grounds to Belgium on Sunday.
Front view of the Howard Wright biplane, with Mr. Sopwith in the pilot's seat.
Mr. Sopwith in flight in the mist on his Howard Wright biplane.
BRITISH RECORD FLIGHT. - Mr. Thomas Sopwith, on his Howard Wright biplane, completing his 90th mile at Brooklands. Note the score board which conveyed to the flyer, mile by mile, his distance traversed.
Lieut. Watkins, on his Howard Wright biplane, flying over the troops at Shorncliffe during his trips preparatory to trying for the Baron de Forest L4,000 Cross-Channel Prize.
View from behind of the central portion of the Howard Wright biplane, showing the propeller, E.N.V. engine, Spiral Tube.Co.'s radiators, &c.
Tail details of the Howard Wright biplane.
Mr. Thomas Sopwith in the pilot's seat of his Howard Wright biplane, fitted with E.N.V. engine, after creating a new British record for distance and duration by his flight at Brooklands Aerodrome on Saturday of 107 3/4 miles in 3h. 12m. 55s.
Mr. Sopwith takes up his sister, Miss May Sopwith, for a flight at Brooklands on his Howard Wright machine.
Lieut. Hugh E. Watkins, who is flying his E.N.V.-engined Howard Wright biplane in the Baron de Forest L4,000 Cross-Channel Prize contest.
Sketch of the tail of the Howard Wright biplane showing elevator and rudder.
THE HOWARD WRIGHT BIPLANE. - Elevation and plan to scale.
Mr. Pixton, on an Avro triplane, making a fine high flight at Brooklands this week.
Prince Henry of Prussia in his aviator's dress, after qualifying for his pilot's certificate at Frankfurt on the Euler biplane. Reading from left to right are: Prince Henry, von Hammacher, von Hiddessen, and August Euler, the Prlnce's instructor.
Last week in the correspondence columns a photograph of the biplane of Planes, Ltd., was published. Above is a photograph of the same machine in flight on Formby Sands. This was secured before a serious smash last week, entirely wrecking the machine, due, we are informed, to the passing over it, when about 70 feet from the ground, of another biplane.
Mr. Henry Farman at the wheel of his special machine referred to by us last week, upon which he will try to beat the record flight for the Michelln Cup before December 31st. It will be noticed that the machine has three rudders.
Mr. Henry Farman starting from his works at Chalons Camp for Etampes with his new biplane, with which he proposes to compete for the Michelin Cup. This little road journey was referred to last week.
Mr, Henry Farman and the stock of fuel for which he has made provision to carry in his long-distance attempt for the Micheltn Cup.
AEROPLANES IN JAPAN. - Captain Narohara and the aeroplane of his own construction in Japan, which is being tested with a view to its adoption for the Japanese forces. His brother officers, it will be noted, are interested members of the crowd.
A view from In front of the Glider of the Bristol and West of England Aero Club.
Brunnhuber, the German aviator, on his "Albatross" biplane, with his four passengers, whom, on December 7th, he carried twice round the Johannisthal flying grounds.
Herr Etrich, the successful Austrian aviator, whose machine we illustrated last week in full flight.
HELIOPOLIS AVIATION MEETING. - An incident during the competitions. Latham, on his Antoinette, with Rougier, on his biplane, behind.
AT LE CRAU AERODROME. - An Antoinette machine ready for flight. In front are Mdlle. Linda Venderbar, a lady flyer, and MM. des Jardins and Barthes, engineers.
Latham, on his Antoinette, rounding one of the mark posts during his winning flight for the Grand Prize for the best circuit at the Nice Aviation Meeting.
IN LINE FOR THE FIRST AERIAL "RACE." - MM. Martinet (H. Farman), Mumm (Antoinette), Legagneux (Sommer), and Capt. Dickson (H, Farman), ready for the start from the Anjou Aerodrome for the cross-country race to Saumur on June 6th.
A GROUP OF FOUR FLYERS IN THE AIR AT ONCE AT RHEIMS. - Above, an Antoinette and a Bleriot; below, a Henry Farman; and, to the left, a Wright machine.
REAL RACING IN THE AIR. - A "neck and neck" race at Rheims Meeting on Sunday last, the opening day, between 'Wachter, who unfortunately was killed later, and Thomas.
THE "CIRCUIT DE L'EST." - Starting for the first stage on Sunday last from Issy for Troyes, 135 kiloms. M. Latham, has just arrived at Issy ground on his Antoinette machine, having flown over from Chalons, a distance of 169 kiioms., passing over Paris en route.
THE GREAT HAVRE-TROUVILLE-DEAUVILLE MEETING. - Latham on his Antoinette arriving at Trouville upon one of his many oversea journeys at this aviation meeting.
AN INCIDENT DURING THE FRENCH ARMY MANOEUVRES. - M. Latham, just about to start on his Antoinette lor a scouting expedition with a French officer, taking instructions as to the work to be carried out. Note the military assistants holding down the impatient flyer.
M. Latham flying at Chalons on the monoplane fitted with a 16-cyl. 100-h.p. Antoinette motor, and specially built for the Gordon-Bennett Aviation Cup Race. With this M. Latham is credited with having attained a speed of 110 k.p.h.
PARIS FLIGHT SALON. - General view of the centre of the Grand Palais. On the right is seen the Wright biplane, on the left the Maurice Farman biplane, just beyond being the Henry Farman machine, whilst in the foreground, in the centre, is the two-seater Antoinette monoplane.
AT BELMONT PARK (N.Y.) INTERNATIONAL MEETING. - Hubert Latham, on his Antoinette, passing directly over Grahame-White on his Henry Farman during one of the competitions.
A CLOSE THING. - Hubert Latham blown out of his course at Belmont Park (N.Y.) Meeting during the contest for the Gordon-Bennett Cup.
Mdlle. Marvingt at the wheel of the Antoinette monoplane upon which she made a new record for a woman at Mourmelon, by flying 30 miles in 53 minutes, incidentally qualifying for her pilot's certificate.
FIRST COLLISION IN THE AIR. - As the mishap to Capt. Bertram Dickson, on his Henry Farman, when M. Thomas, on his Antoinette, dashed Into him from above, at Milan, appeared to A. Beltrame, an Italian artist. This picture appeared in La Domenica del Corriere.
The scene at Milan immediately following the crash to earth of the Antoinette monoplane of M. Thomas and Capt. Dickson's Farman machine. The tail portion of the Farman biplane, showing No. 18, can be seen between the military, the main planes being mixed up completely with the planes of the Antoinette, the tail and body of which is seen standing straight up on end.
Mr. R. M. H. Clemson's Antoinette.
THE LATEST FARMAN MACHINE IN FULL FLIGHT. - The "Henry-Maurice Farman." The curious rounding of the ends of the planes will be noticed, whilst the combination of the best features in the Henry and in the Maurice models is apparent in the ailerons and the tail. Numerous pictures of the Henry Farman machines have been published in FLIGHT, and on March 19th, p. 219, the more recent model of the Maurice Farman machine.
View from behind of the Gregoire-Gyp monoplane, exhibited by Fiat Motors, Ltd. The system of steering is very similar to that on the Antoinette machine.
WING SECTIONS. - The above diagrams afford an interesting comparison of the wing sections of aeroplanes exhibited at Olympia. They are all drawn to a common scale, but have been set at an arbitrary angle of incidence, which does not necessarily represent that of the aeroplane In actual flight.
THE FLECHE MONOPLANE. - This novel machine has been constructed at Levallois to the designs of MM. Lanzi and Billard. It has two propellers, one in front and one behind, driven by a 25-h.p. motor. It is 8 metres long, 6 metres span, and weighs 290 kilogs. in running order. The chassis has 4 wheels and skids. The wings have stabilising flaps.
IN FRONT OF THE BOURNEMOUTH AEROPLANE SHEDS. - The Humber and Avis monoplanes are standing in the foreground,
Mr. George Barnes, on a Humber monoplane, flying last week at Brooklands close over Mr. Claude Grahame-White's Henry Farman machine.
Mr. A. G. Barnes in flight at Folkestone Meeting ten seconds before his accident last week.
STOPPING A MONOPLANE AFTER FLIGHT. - G. A. Barnes bringing his Humber to rest after being in the air.
How Mr. Barnes packs up the wings of his Humber monoplane on a Humber car for transporting from place to place - a reminiscence of Bournemouth.
The two first British-built Humber-Bleriot monoplanes at Cannes, where Mr. Ballin Hinde took them with the intention of proceeding on to the Heliopolis Aviation Meeting opening next week.
THE FLYING MEN AT BOURNEMOUTH AND THEIR "MOUNTS." - G. A. Barnes (Humber).
AFTER THE TUMBLE. - Mr. Barnes' monoplane upon its back at Folkestone after his bad fall last week.
HUMBER BIPLANES IN INDIA AT THE ALLAHABAD EXHIBITION. - Unshipping the cases, of which there were sixteen, measuring end on 170 feet. These machines have been taken out by Mr. Windham, who is in charge of the flying exhibitions under arrangement with the Exhibition authorities. Note the yoked oxen to the native land vehicle.
THE SANDERS AEROPLANE MISHAP. - Two views of the biplane taken immediately after the fall.
THE SANDERS AEROPLANE MISHAP. - A few moments after the crash, Capt. Sanders standing by the machine. Note the splintered spar which passed through Capt. Sanders' clothing, fortunately without injuring him.
A. V . Roe starting, on his triplane, for a flight at Blackpool Aerodrome. Inset he is seen In full flight round the course.
ONE, TWO AND THREE PLANES. - Grahame-White, in his Henry Farman biplane, flying over Drexel's Bleriot monoplane and Roe's triplane.