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Журнал
Flight за 1913 г.
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Журнал - Flight за 1913 г.

THE 80 H.P. AVRO BIPLANE. - Three-quarter view from the front.
Avro 504 in its earliest production form in August 1914 after receiving constant-chord aileron in 1913. This was the original machine fitted with an 80 h.p. Gnome. It was on similar machines that a raid was carried out on the Zeppelin factories at Friedrichshafen, in which Commander Briggs was brought down and captured.
THE 80 H.P. AVRO BIPLANE. - Three-quarter view from behind.
The founder of a dynasty, the original Avro 504. Powered by an 80hp Gnome rotary, this machine made its first flight in July 1913, piloted by F.P. 'Fred' Raynham. Destined to carve itself a prominent place in the annals of aviation, the redoubtable Avro 504 first served as both a bomber and a fighter during the first year of war, prior to being selected to serve as the RAF's standard basic training machine for most of the next two decades. The first military interest in the 504 manifested itself in a War Office order for twelve RFC machines, placed in the summer of 1913. No further orders were received until after the outbreak of war. The 504's top level speed was 82mph.
THE 80 H.P. AVRO BIPLANE. - View from the front.
THE 80 H.P. AVRO BIPLANE. - As seen from behind.
THE YORKSHIRE AIR RACE. - The Avro biplane and the Blackburn monoplane in line just at the moment of getting away.
A couple of snaps of the Blackburn monoplane, taken by Mr. H. V. Roe from the Avro biplane, piloted by Mr. F. P. Raynham in the Yorkshire Air Race between York and Doncaster on October 2nd. Both competitors were well up, and by the photographs it will be seen the weather was extremely wretched with a haze over everything.
Mr. F. P. Raynham on the remarkable new Avro biplane on which he made such splendid speed flights in the competition at Hendon on Saturday. Our picture shows Mr. Raynham at sunset, in the final for the Shell Trophy, which he only missed winning by a "head."
Mr. Gordon Bell having a turn on the Avro at Hendon.
Sketch showing the neat engine housing and the chassis of the 80 h.p. Avro biplane.
The tall skid, one of the shock absorbers, and an aileron hinge on the Avro biplane.
Attachment of inter-plane struts to spar on the Avro biplane, and on the right attachment of lower plane to fuselage.
A fuselage joint on the Avro biplane.
THE 80 H.P. AVRO BIPLANE. - Plan, side and front elevation to scale.
BE 2, the Army biplane, at Olympia Show, being one of the first arrivals at the Aero Exhibition.
Capt. Longcroft, whose splendid record flight is recorded this week, starting off from Montrose for his non-stop run to Portsmouth and Farnborough on one of the B.E. biplanes, built by the Bristol Co.
This photograph depicts a famous pre-war event when Capt. Charles Longcroft of 2 Squadron, RFC flew a record-breaking trip in BE2a '218 with an additional fifty-four-gallon petrol tank in its faired-over front cockpit. In August 1913 he flew from Farnborough to Montrose in 7 hours 40 minutes with only one stop. Endurance and reliability were key elements for the reconnaissance role.
AIRCRAFT ON LAFFAN'S PLAIN FOR THE "FLY PAST" ON THE KING'S BIRTHDAY THIS WEEK. - In the parade there were four BE type (from the left, B.E.3, B.E.4, B.E.2 and B.E.1), six Maurice Farmans, and two Henry Farmans. (Summer of 1913)
Elevations and plan of the R.A.F. biplane BE 2a, from the Technical Report of the Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, 1911-12.
Mr. Vincent Fill and the Anzani-Bleriot built by himself.
THE AERIAL FETE AT HENDON. - A couple of the decorated aeroplanes. Above, Mr. Cheeseman's Blerlot which secured first prize, and, below, Mr. J. L. Hall's Bleriot.
AERIAL FETE AT HENDON. - Mrs. Cecil Baker, Lady Levinge, Mrs. and Miss Grahame-White, who assisted in the decoration of the winning aeroplane.
MR. JOHN GUY GILPATRIC, PILOT No. 171 OF THE AERO CLUB OF AMERICA. - Mr. Gilpatric is the holder of the American altitude record with passenger, which he secured at Los Angeles, California, in November last. When he made this record he was only sixteen years of age, and flies one of the French-built Deperdussin monoplanes with very great effect. He holds the position of chief pilot for one of the largest aeroplane companies in America. Many of our readers will be interested to learn, and will remember, that a few years ago Mr. Gilpatric used to correspond with FLIGHT, at that time he being only a youngster in "shorts".
The latest Caudron Biplane, twelve of which have been ordered by the Chinese Government. It will be noticed that a cowl is now fitted over the engine, while the rudders are slightly different in shape. With 50-h.p. Gnome and 4 1/2 hours' supply of fuel and oil, the machine climbs 500 metres in 5 mins., and a speed of 100 k.p.h. is guaranteed. The dimensions are: Span, top plane, 9.80 metres; bottom plane, 5.70 metres; length, 6.90 metres.
Chassis and fuselage of the Caudron military biplane.
The Caudron stand at the Paris Salon.
WITH THE ROAR OF 80-H.P. - Lieut. Malone carries a passenger on a Caudron at Hendon Aerodrome. From sketch by Roderic Hill.
Sketch of the Morane monoplane built to the order of M. Santos-Dumont, who is again taking up flying. - Evidently M. Santos-Dumont is still in favour of a comparatively low centre of gravity as, it will be noticed, he has had the wings raised a considerable distance above the fuselage, so that the pilot sits under instead of between the wings. It will be interesting to see how this machine compares with the usual Morane monoplane as regards stability, as the only alteration appears to be the raising of the wings.
One of Chevillard's marvellous banks, with passenger, on the Farman biplane at Hendon Aerodrome.
The week before last we gave a photograph showing the remarkable banking of Chevillard on the Farman machine, as seen when approaching the spectator. Above, another bank is seen during one of his dives, and in this the view shows the tops of the planes and the inside of the nacelle, with pilot and passenger.
Chevillard, on his Farman, in the air at the Mirafiore Racecourse, Turin, commencing one of his steep banks, being watched by the spectators below.
CHEVILLARD IN ITALY. - At Pordenone Chevillard repeated his wonderful banking exhibitions on the Henry Farman, and the above sample of his work there, with Mr. Santoni as a passenger, has been sent us from Italy.
Not a swallow chasing a fly, but the Handley Page and a Henry Farman over the sheds at Hendon.
A group of Italian officers at Pordenone, with M. Chevlllard and Mr. Lawrence Santoni, Managing Director of the "Savoia" Co. who are the Farman licensees in Italy, alter the reception of the Farman machines for the Government.
AIRCRAFT ON LAFFAN'S PLAIN FOR THE "FLY PAST" ON THE KING'S BIRTHDAY THIS WEEK. - In the parade there were four BE type, six Maurice Farmans, and two Henry Farmans.
M. Chevillard, who has been making such sensational flights on the Farman machines at Hendon.
Capt. C. E. Risk, R.M.L.I., and Artificer Frank Susans, with the Farman biplane, landed in a ploughed field at Sanderstead last Friday. Capt. Risk afterwards rose easily. It being subsequent to this that, through engine trouble, the machine was wrecked at Queenborough.
LORD MAYOR'S DAY AT HENDON AERODROME. - A race impression of Chevillard and Verrier by Roderick Hill.
Chassis details of the Henry Farman biplane. Notice the ball joint for the radius-rods and the simple manner in which the rubber cored shock-absorbers are fitted.
Plane strut fitting, showing the warping wire pulleys on the H. Farman biplane.
How oblique stay wires are carried past struts on the H. Farman biplane.
How the tail control wires are guided at the side of a strut on the Henry Farman biplane.
The Henry Farman tail-skid.
The 80-h.p. Henry Farman biplane.
AT OLYMPIA. - A study in tail-skids.
A STRANGER WITHIN OUR GATES. - The gathering of the pilots and others immediatelly after the arrival from France of the Etrich monoplane at Hendon on Saturday.
THE ETRICH MONOPLANE AT HENDON. - From left to right: Herr Friedrich (pilot) Mr. Claude Grahame-White and Herr Igo Etrich.
A plan view of the Etrich monoplane as seen from beneath.
AT HENDON AERODROME. - Arrival of the Etrich-Taube monoplane at Hendon during the progress of a race on Saturday.
The 100 h.p. Avro hydro-biplane on the sea, as seen from in front.
Side view of the 100 h.p. Avro hydro-biplane.
The 100 h.p. Avro hydro-biplane in flight.
THE 100 H.P. AVRO HYDRO-BIPLANE. - Plan, side and front elevations to scale.
Bristol Coanda Type TB 8 prototype converted from Coanda Monoplane at Larkhill in 1913. - ONE OF THE NEW 80 H.P. BRISTOL TRACTOR BIPLANES ON SALISBURY PLAIN. - In the machine are Messrs. Pixton and Tullerot, who are just off for a trip.
The Bristol stand at the Paris Salon.
Half-tone sketch of chassis and engine of Bristol biplane. Inset: the bomb-dropping device.
The new Handley Page biplane, as seen from the front.
THE NEW HANDLEY PAGE BIPLANE. - A view from the back.
THE NEW HANDLEY PAGE BIPLANE. - A three-quarter view from the back.
DIAGRAMMATIC SKETCH OF CONTROLS ON THE H.P. BIPLANE. - On the right, sketch showing method of attachment of aileron-wires to control cables.
One of the strut sockets on the H.P. biplane showing pulley for aileron cable, and on the right a fuselage joint.
Sketch showing the neat steel clip by means of which a joint is formed for the tail fin, rudder post, tail plane and fuselage on the H.P. biplane.
One of the elevator crank levers on the H.P. biplane.
Diagrammatic sketch of the fuselage, and on the right the tail planes on the H.P. biplane.
THE NEW HANDLEY PAGE BIPLANE. - Plan, side and front elevation to scale.
50-h.p. Short S.38 No. S.62 with modified landing-gear.
Short S.38 after many improvements became the prototype of a standard biplane for the RNAS which was produced by Short and other manufacturers in wartime. This is S.62 which became RFC 446. On March 22nd last Mr. Gordon Bell, accompanied by his mechanic, flew this machine from Eastchurch to Hendon in a very high wind.
The new under-carriage of the Short biplane.
Sketch of the controls on the Short biplane.
Sketch showing the detail of the tail of the Short biplane.
Sketch showing the detail of the forward part of the nacelle with front elevator.
One of the tail skids of the Short biplane, and, on the right, detail of the left side of the landing chassis.
Method of changing direction of control wires on the Short biplane.
A wire attachment on the Short biplane.
THE 70-H.P. SHORT BIPLANE. - Plan, side and front elevations to scale.
THE 80 H.P. SOPWITH BIPLANE. - Side view.
THE 80 H.P. SOPWITH BIPLANE. - View from the front.
The landing chassis and engine housing of the new 80-h.p. Sopwith biplane.
View of the cockpit of the new 80 h.p. Sopwith biplane.
The simple and strong tail skid of the new 80 h.p. Sopwith biplane.
Detailed view of the Sopwith hinged axle and radius-rod on the landing chassis.
The combined back rest and fuselage cross-member of the 80 h.p. Sopwith biplane.
The new type of rudder-bar on the 80 h.p. Sopwith biplane; note the shortness and inclined position of the same. On the right detailed sketch showing the attachment of the rear spar to the fuselage.
THE 80 H.P. SOP WITH BIPLANE. - Plan, side and front elevations.
The 80-h.p. Sopwith tractor biplane.
The penalty of popularity. Mr. Hawker on the Sopwith-Tractor having his picture taken at Hendon.
THE BRITISH HEIGHT RECORD. - Mr. Hawker on the Sopwith tractor at Brooklands.
Brooklands track - familiar in so many views of Sopwith and Hawker aeroplanes - stretches ribbon-like across this study of a Three-seater.
The Sopwith tractor coming straight ahead at Brooklands with Mr. Hawker, who has just made a new height record, at the wheel.
SUNDAY FLYING AT BROOKLANDS. - Mr. H. Hawker giving a fine exhibition of his skill on the 80 h.p. Sopwith tractor.
Arrival, during the Model Flying Competition at Hendon, of Lieut. Spencer Grey on the Sopwith biplane.
AN EVENING FLIGHT AT BROOKLANDS. - A turn on the Sopwith tractor.
Biplane versus monoplane in the Easter Aeroplane Handicap for the Shell prize at Brooklands on Easter Monday. - Mr. Barnwell, on the Vickers monoplane, passes Mr. Hawker, on the Sopwith, in the first lap.
The 80-h.p. Sopwith tractor biplane.
The 80-h.p. Gnome-Sopwith tractor biplane.
Details ol the Sopwith wing construction,
Mounting of the skid tip wheels of the Sopwith tractor biplane.
Sketch showing the hollow construction of a Sopwith strut.
A bent steel fitting on the Sopwith tractor biplane assembling a fuselage longitudinal, the vertical cross member, the rear wing spar and chassis strut.
The warping pulley of the Sopwith tractor biplane, showing how the same fitting is combined with the rear spar hinge.
Details of the chassis suspension of the Sopwith biplane as seen from above.
Diagram illustrating how stranded cable terminals are made on the Sopwith biplane.
AT OLYMPIA. - A study in tail-skids.
The 160-h.p. Samuel White hydro-biplane.
The 180-h.p. Samuel White Navy-plane.
Details of the floats fitted to the J. Samuel White hydro-biplane.
Mr. H. M. Brock on the Dep. off for a flight on Farnborough Common.
Mr. G. M. Dyott explaining to President Madero of the Mexican Republic, how the controls of his monoplane work. Shortly afterwards the President went for a trip with Mr. Dyott, remaining up for about 16 mins.
Capt. Tyrer explaining some points of the Deperdussin monoplane to the King's Indian Orderly Officers at Hendon.
Mr. G. M. Dyott, on his 60-h.p. Aazani-Deperdussin, flying over forest fires in Central America.
"And all the air a solemn stillness holds, Save where the beetle wheels his droning flight." Flying by moonlight in the tropics on a 60-h.p. Deperdussin.
Mr. Brock on the 35 h.p. Deperdussin, entering the last lap - heat one - in the speed handicap at Hendon.
Jules Nardini "steeplechasing" over some of the machines at Hendon on Saturday on the Deperdussin.
MR. N. SPRATT FLYING THE 60 H.P. DEP. IN THE SPEED HANDICAP AT HENDON ON SATURDAY. - This very unique photograph was taken from No. 1 pylon on the race course.
READY FOR THE NEXT RACE AT HENDON AERODROME. - In the air is Spratt on the Deperdussin.
A close finish for second place between Verrier and Nardini in last Saturday's speed handicap at Hendon Aerodrome. Nardini overtook and passed Verrier almost upon the finishing line.
Lieut. L. C. Hordern, Lancashire Fusiliers, who has just passed for his brevet on a Deperdussln monoplane at Hendon.
Some pupils and pilots at the British Deperdussin Monoplane School at Hendon. Reading from left to right: (seated) Messrs. R. Jaques, N. C Spratt (pilot). J. G. Barron, Capt. J. C. Halahan (School Manager) E. B Bauman, Col. N. M. Smyth, V. C., E. R. Whitehouse; (standing) Lieut. H. le M. Brock (R. Warwickshire Regt), Messrs Denis Ware, D. G. Murray, W. D. Thompson (Sec, British Dep. Co. ), and in the pilot's seat Mr. W. Breck (pilot).
THE RESULT OF FLYING AFTER SUNSET AT MEXICO CITY. - The machine turned completely over and vol planed down on its back. Everything was smashed except the wheels and the pilot # the unfortunate Capt. Patrick Hamilton, who met his death not long since during the Army manoeuvres.
THE DEPERDUSSIN STAND AT THE PARIS SALON. - In the left-hand corner is Prevost's small monocoque.
Prevost's Deperdussin, the winner of the Gordon-Bennett Trophy, competed for this year at Rheims. Prevost's average speed was over 124 miles per hour.
Another close-range photograph of a machine in flight taken from Pylon No. 1 at the Hendon Aerodrome. - The monoplane is a 100 h.p. "Dep.," which has been flown with such effect by Lieut. J. C. Porte, R.N. In the Speed Handicap on a recent Saturday, his winning finish, after a neck-to-neck race with the Morane monoplane, was one of the finest sights that the Hendon Aerodrome has ever provided its enthusiastic spectators. The Dep. was flying so low that twice its wing-tip scraped the grass at the corners. These photographs form quite an unique study of aeroplanes in flight, for they show the pilot at very close quarters and under perfectly normal conditions. The above machine is travelling at about 80 m.p.h., and the wing-tip is within about 12 ft. of the camera.
A close finish for second place in the "Shell" Handicap at Hendon on Saturday between Lieut. Porte on the Deperdussin and Mr. R. Slack on the Blerlot.
AERIAL FLORAL FETE AT HENDON AERODROME. - The first heat of the Speed Handicap. Manton, on the Grahame-White biplane, completing his first lap, with Brock and Verrier still waiting to take up their start in the race.
BROCK FLIES THE 110 H.P. ANZANI DEPERDUSSIN AT HENDON IN A RAINSTORM. - From an original drawing by Roderic Hill.
The front portion of the Deperdussin racer.
The warping crank of the 80-h.p. Deperdussin monoplane.
The 50-h.p. Deperdussin monocoque.
Sketch showing the racing Deperdussin from the side.
AT OLYMPIA. - A study in tail-skids.
The start at Brooklands for the Easter Aero Handicap, which was secured by Mr. T. Alcock on Mr. Ducrocq's H. Farman biplane.
Mr. J. Alcock winning the Easter Aeroplane Handicap at Brooklands on Monday on Mr. Ducrocq's H. Farman.
SHOREHAM HARBOUR AS SEEN FROM ABOVE. - From a photograph taken by Mr. Clarence Winchester from Mr. Eric Pashley's biplane.
WEST BRIGHTON AND THE WEST PIER, BRIGHTON. - Photographs by Mr. Clarence Winchester from Mr. Eric Pashley's biplane.
Mr. H. Macandrew, who, at the Maurice Ducrocq School at Brooklands, on the 14th instant, passed for his brevet on the little Farman belonging to the Ducrocq School.
Mr. John Alcock, who has been doing so much good flying work at the Maurice Ducrocq flying school at Brooklands. Mr. Alcock has put up a lot of cross-country work, both with and without passengers, and has secured several wins in the competitions at the Weybridge aerodrome.
Mr. Pemberton Billing, in the pilot's seat, receiving instructions fromlhis tutor and passenger, Mr. Barnwell.
MR. PASHLEY FLYING THE FARMAN MACHINE AT SHOREHAM AERODROME. - From an original drawing by Roderic Hill.
AT THE PARIS SALON. - The F.B.A. flying boat.
The 100 h.p. Gnome-engined flying boat of the Franco-British Aviation Co.
The F.B.A. flying boat - type Deauville - fitted with 130 h.p. Salmson engine.
Tail of the F.B.A. flying boat.
THE 80-H.P. MORANE-SAULNIER MONOPLANE. - A three-quarter view from the front.
THE 80-H.P. MORANE-SAULNIER MONOPLANE. - A three-quarter view from the back.
GUSTAV HAMEL'S MORANE-SAULNIER ON THE STARTING LINE FOR THE AERIAL DERBY ON SATURDAY. - In this photograph the small wing span of this racing machine can be appreciated.
Brindejonc des Moulinais and his lady passenger on the Morane-Saulnier just starting for his attempt to beat the English altitude record at Hendon on Saturday last.
Hamel, the winner of the Aerial Derby, just getting away from Hendon Aerodrome.
M. Brindejonc des Moulinais giving an exhibition flight riendon on Saturday on the Moraoe-Saulnier.
A couple of snaps at the Audemars, Brindejinc and Guillaux match at Juvicy, showing some banking by Brindejonc des Moulinais.
Gustav Hamel finishing and winning the Second Aerial Derby at Hendon on Saturday, Sept. 20th, 1913, on his Morane-Saulnier monoplane.
ROUND PYLON ONE. - Verrier, on the Maurice Farman biplane, and Slack, above, on the Morane-Saulnier.
A remarkable photographic record of an incident in the International contest at Hendon on Saturday. - Brock on the Bleriot winning by a few feet only from Marty on the Morane-Saulnier, who flew underneath him as they crossed the line.
A FINE FINISH AT HENDON. - Marty, Verrier and Manton finishing in the order given in the first heat of the Speed Handicap on "Motor Cycle Day."
Mr. Robert Slack arriving at the London Aerodrome on the Morane-Saulnler after his magnificent flight from Paris.
PARIS TO LONDON FLIGHT. - Mr. Robert Slack being escorted across the aerodrome immediately after his arrival at Hendon, by Capt. Tyrer and Mr. R. T. Gates.
Mr. Robert Slack flying the Morane-Saulnier at Hendon after his flight from Paris last week.
Gilbert just taking his seat in the Morane-Saulnier monoplane, ready for his start back to Paris on Sunday last.
Mr. George Grossmith at the Aerial Fete at Hendon last week, showing his little son the Morane-Saulnier in which Robert Slack flew from Paris.
Mr. Gustav Hamel, the winner of the Aerial Derby, in his Morane-Saulnier. Standing by the machine is Mr. "Shell" Cates, through whom the splendid cup and prizes were given for the sealed handicap.
Lord Carbery and his 80 h.p. Gnome Morane-Saulnier at Le Crotoy, where he landed, having lost his bearings, upon the occasion of his recent flight across the Channel. Mr. Oddey, to whom we are indebted for these snaps, proved of considerable value to Lord Carbery, he being the only Englishman on the spot conversant with the journey, he having, it will be remembered, made the Cross-Channel journey with Mr. Sydney Pickles, as recorded in these pages. On the left Lord Carbery is seen filling up at Crotoy prior to his restart for England.
The tail of the Morane-Saulnier monoplane, showing the very neat arrangements of the rudder and elevator wires and levers.
The Morane-Saulnier stand at the Paris Salon.
Pilot: Mr. Robert B. Slack.
M. Brindejonc des Moulinais and Capt. Tyrer on the Morane-Sauinier machine at Hendon on Saturday, just about to start for a flight after M. Brindejonc des Moulinais' arrival from the Continent.
Mr. Robert Slack, who brought the Paris Daily Mails from Paris to Hendon last week.
"AGAINST THE REGULATIONS." - An impression of Brindejonc des Moulinais' Morane-Saulnier crossing the City - St. Paul's in the foreground. Time about 2,50 p.m. Sunday. Note: The unusual prospective is caused by the spectator looking upwards at the monoplane.
"LADIES DAY" AT HENDON AERODROME. - The Morane-Saulnier and Bleriot circling round each other. From an original drawing by Roderlc Hill.
An impression of Mr. Claude Grahame-White flying a Morane-Saulnier monoplane at Hendon in the first week of this month. From an original drawing by Mr. Roderic Hill.
The extremely simple landing chassis of the Morane-Saulnier monoplane. On the right, sketch of the tail planes.
Sketch showing the very neat attachment of the shock absorbers to chassis members.
The cockpit and dash. Note the method of pivoting the top pylon to upper longerons.
The rather unusual seating arrangement.
Lower pylon and its fittings, and on the right, sketch showing method of anchoring lift cables to the chassis members.
Detail of top pylon. The forward bracing wires are carried round a pulley.
THE 80-H.P. MORANE-SAULNIER MONOPLANE. - Plan and side and front elevation to scale.
Fig. 4. - Cuitiss's first machine.
HYDRO-AEROPLANES. - Fig. 5. - Types of Aeroplanes.
The new Curtiss-Paulhan hydro-biplane on which Paulhan has been making some very successful flights on the Seine at Bezons.
The Curtiss Flying Boat, which has just been awarded the Collier Trophy for 1913. - This machine, it is claimed, will carry six passengers at a speed of 60 m.p.h. The Collier Trophy is awarded annually for the greatest contribution to the advance of aviation, and last year also it was awarded to Mr. Glenn Curtis.
Curtiss's flying boat in flight alter leaving the water.
THE LATEST CURTISS FLYING BOAT. - In full flight over the Lake Keuka at Hammondsport, N.Y. Inset is a view of the machine during banked turn.
HYDRO-AEROPLANES. - Fig. 5. - Types of Aeroplanes.
A "plan view" from beneath of Beatty, on his Wright, during one of his banked turns at Hendon.
Mr. Beatty making one of his banked turns on his Wright over the sheds at Hendon.
TEA AT HENDON AERODROME WHILST WATCHING THE FLYING. - In the air is Beatty descending on his Wright machine.
What terra firma looks like from an aeroplane with a 45 deg. bank on. From a photograph by C. M. Vought, when flying in a Lillie-Wright at Cicero, Ill., U.S.A.
Mr. Beatty's Wright biplane, with Gyro motor, at Hendon.
Abramovitch, the famous Russian aviator, and Princess Schakowskaja, who, on a German-built Wright biplane, last week met with an accident at Johannisthal, Abramovitch being so badly injured that he afterwards succumbed. Princess Schakowskaja herself, also a well-known pilot and a pupil of Abramovitch, was at the time acting as pilot. She was not seriously hurt.
Captain Tyrer, who probably holds the record for passenger flights in various aeroplanes, starting for a flight at Hendon with Mr. Beatty in his Wright flyer. Note the position of the Gyro motor.
Sketches illustrating the position of the string as used on the Wright biplane, and as it can be used on a tractor monoplane. A piece of worsted about 12 ins. in length will serve the purpose.
THE SIKORSKY AEROPLANE. - An all Russian machine, both design and construction.
Mr. F. Warren Merriam, with Lieut. Picton Warlow - a pupil - as passenger, making a flight in one of the Bristol biplanes at Brooklands. Mr. Merriam is descending from 2,000 ft. with engine off, the propeller, it will be noted, having stopped.
Lieut. E. Peirse, R.N.R., one of the recent successful pupils for his brevet at the Bristol Flying School at Brooklands.
Lieut. M. R. Chidson, R.G.A., one of the recent Bristol pupils at Lark Hill to secure his R.Ae.C. certificate.
Mr. H. C. Tower who took his brevet at the Bristol School, Salisbury Plain on April 23rd, when he made an excellent flight at 500 ft high.
SOME AVIATORS AND PUPILS AT THE EASTBOURNE AERODROME. - From left to right: (seated) Messrs. H. Fill, F. Hucks, F. B. Fowler; (standing) B. Roberts, L. Fry, E. L. Gassier, W. Morkill, and in the pilot's seat, T. A. Rainey.
A bird's-eye view of the new Handley Page monoplane, showing the ailerons now used in place of wing warping.
Mr. E. Whitehoouse, with Mr. Ware as passenger, on the Handley Page at Hendon.
AT THE BURTON FLYING MEETING. - Whitehouse flying the Handley Page monoplane.
The front section of the Handley Page monoplane.
Handley Page Monoplane. - Sketch of the interior of the pilot's cockpit, as seen when standing up in the passenger's seat.
Ader's Avion, a steam-driven bat-like monoplane built by the famous electrical engineer, and tried in 1897. It is said to have lifted itself off the ground for a brief period during a test in the presence of the French Army authorities.
The Voisin biplane with which Henry Farman won the Deutsch-Archdeacon prize of 50,000 francs on January 13th, 1908, by being the first to fly, under official observation, a circular course of 1 kilom. in length.
Henson's idea of a monoplane about 1842, as commonly depicted in old prints of that date.
Pilcher's glider, built on somewhat similar lines to the Lilienthal machine, but having among other differences a light-wheeled undercarriage in order to relieve the pilot of its weight when landing and while on the ground.
Sketch from a photograph of a Wright glider in ilight. - The first of these machines was built in 1900, and it had wing warping control. When first used the vertical rear plane was fixed, but later it became a pivoted rudder, and then the power-driven aeroplane was arranged for convenient simultaneous control with the warp.
Lilienthal's glider, one of a series built in Germany between 1890 and 1896. With the introduction of these machines real practice in the art of flying first commenced.
Fig. 3. - Fabre's machine.
HYDRO-AEROPLANES. - Fig. 5. - Types of Aeroplanes.
Mr Blackburn on the Blackburn monoplane, flying in Saturday's race, for the Aero Show Trophy.
MR. BLACKBURN FLYING THE BLACKBURN MONOPLANE AT HENDON. - A curious optical illusion is produced, it being difficult, without knowledge, to say whether the machine is travelling towards or away from the spectator.
HYDRO-AEROPLANES. - Fig. 5. - Types of Aeroplanes.
Merriam, during the motor racing at Brooklands on Eister Monday, flying over the course on his Bristol biplane.
THE LONGEST DAY. - The annual pilgrimage to the sun temple at Stonehenge to witness the rising of the sun when it casts the shadow of the Heel Stone directly on to the altar stone - a moment of great significance to the sun-worshippers. Above is seen a Bristol biplane flying over the ruins upon the occasion.
AT EVENTIDE. - A Bristol in Germany under the pilotage of Mr. Pixton.
CROSS-COUNTRY RACE AT BROOKLANDS ON SATURDAY LAST. - Mr. W. S. S. Mitchell on the Vickers biplane (No. 8); Mr. W. Bendall, Bristol biplane (No. 10); Mr. F. W. Merriam, Bristol biplane (No. 7), rounding the sheds on the first circuit.
Mr. F. Warren Merriam flying over the Army airship "Delta" on one of the Bristol biplanes on April 23rd at Brooklands.
Col. Seely, the British Minister for War, just before his flight at the military aviation ground at Madrid with Capt. Barron in a Bristol biplane.
AT THE AVRO FLYING SCHOOL, SHOREHAM. - From left to right, Messrs. Geere (Instructor,) Elliot, Mellersh, England, Rolshoven, and (under fuselage) Shaw.
WAR AEROPLANES IN GREECE. - The above photograph has been received from M. Kimon Stratigopoulos (No. 2 in photo), who is at present under flying orders with Lieut. Moutoussis (No. 1 in photo).
AIRCRAFT ON LAFFAN'S PLAIN FOR THE "FLY PAST" ON THE KING'S BIRTHDAY THIS WEEK. - In the parade there were four BE type, six Maurice Farmans, and two Henry Farmans.
AT HENDON AERODROME. - Machines about to start for the military cross-country race. On the line are the biplanes and, ranged behind, the monoplanes waiting to take their place on the starting line after the biplanes have got away.
Mrs. Moore, one of the Daily Express free lady passengers, getting Verrier's Farman biplane for her joy ride.
Mr. Claude Grahame-White makes a trial flight on his new Maurice Farman at Hendon Aerodrome.
Prince Axel of Denmark, who is a certified pilot, explaining the controls of the Maurice Farman biplane to King Christian X of Denmark.
Lieut Waldron with Lieut. Bowden Smith as passenger, in the Army Maurice Farman No. 216, about to start from Hounslow Heath for Farnborough recently. In the right-hand photograph, it will be noticed, the propeller is just being swung.
A fine piece of banking by Pierre Verrier, with a passenger, on a Maurice Farman at Hendon Aerodrome.
Another line bank by Pierre Verrier, with a passenger on board, on the Maurice Farman at Hendon.
A demonstration of the stability of the Maurice Farman biplane at Hendon Aerodrome. - Pierre Verrier and his passenger standing up and holding their hands above their heads, meantime the machine being entirely uncontrolled.
A banked turn with a passenger round No. 1 Pylon at Hendon by Pierre Verrier on the Maurice Farman.
AN EXHIBITION OF VERRIER'S EXPERT STEERING. - Seeing how close he can fly his Maurice Farman to No. 1 pylon at Hendon Aerodrome. Upon one occasion recently his extension support actually touched and moved the disc race indicator at the top. Note the habiyues watching the performance.
Pierre Verrier flying low, on the Aircraft Co.'s Maurice Farman, past the enclosure at Hendon.
SPEED. - Pierre Verrier, well under the windscreen, flying past No. 1 pylon at Hendon on his Maurice Farman.
Pierre Verrier making a passenger flight at sunset on the Maurice Farman biplane at Hendon Aerodrome.
THE FINISH OF THE HENDON-BRIGHTON-HENDON RACE, NOVEMBER 8th. - Pierre Verrier, the winner, returning to Hendon late in the evening.
ROUND PYLON ONE. - Verrier, on the Maurice Farman biplane, and Slack, above, on the Morane-Saulnier.
A speed handicap, with four in it, at Hendon aerodrome on Saturday, showing Turner's Caudron and Verrier's Maurice Farman, in front, during the first heat.
A DEAD HEAT AT HENDON. - An exciting finish at the Easter Monday Meeting, when Verrier, on a Maurice Farman, and Collardeau, on a Breguet, crossed the line at the same time in the Grand Speed Handicap, Verrier being on the right quite low.
A close finish for second place between Verrier and Nardini in last Saturday's speed handicap at Hendon Aerodrome. Nardini overtook and passed Verrier almost upon the finishing line.
A FINE FINISH AT HENDON. - Marty, Verrier and Manton finishing in the order given in the first heat of the Speed Handicap on "Motor Cycle Day."
The camp of the 3rd Gordons at Montrose, taken from a Maurice Farman machine.
FOURNY'S GREAT FLIGHT OF 15.990 KILOMS. - On the left, fixing up his engine with oil and petrol at the completion of one of the circuits, and on the right, Fourny crossing the finishing line on his Maurice Farman at the end of one of his circuits for the Coupe Michelin.
AERIAL FLORAL FETE AT HENDON AERODROME. - The first heat of the Speed Handicap. Manton, on the Grahame-White biplane, completing his first lap, with Brock and Verrier still waiting to take up their start in the race.
The new tail of the Maurice Farman biplane.
MONS. PIERRE VERRIER. - The popular Maurice Farman pilot.
"I've won a flight!" A breezy snap at the London Aerodrome, Hendon, on Theatrical Aviation Sunday, when a ballot was taken for two flights by members of the theatrical profession. The passenger is Miss Margaret Swallow, who is about to take her flight with M. Verrier on the Maurice Farman.
Mr. H. A. Vernon, President of the National Association of Millers, about to have a flight at Hendon with Verrier in a Maurice Farman.
AN INCIDENT AT HENDON LAST WEEK-END. - Two little children, aged 5 and 8 years respectively, were so fascinated with the flying that their parents arranged to gratify their wish for a practical experience - something under "half-price" being charged. Our photo shows Mr. Louis Noel on the M. Farman 'bus just about to start with his precious freight.
LORD MAYOR'S DAY AT HENDON AERODROME. - A race impression of Chevillard and Verrier by Roderick Hill.
STEAM AND PETROL. - Pierre Verrier and a passenger pass a Midland express on the Maurice Farman at Hendon Aerodrome, May 3rd, 1913. From a sketch by Roderic Hill.
NIGHT FLYING, NOVEMBER 5TH, AT HENDON. - Claude Grahame-White flying a Maurice Farman biplane. From a drawing by Mr. Roderic Hill.
The 70-h.p. Maurice Farman biplane.
AT OLYMPIA. - A study in tail-skids.
THE BRISTOL MONOPLANE IN ITALY. - A remarkable photograph of Mr. C. H. Pixton, piloting one of these well-known monoplanes, gliding down to earth at sunset at Mirafiori, near Turin. On the left of the picture can be remarked the rising full moon.
THE BRISTOLS IN TURKEY. - A gathering of several high personages of State after inspection of a couple of Bristols supplied to the Turkish Government.
Mr. W. H. S. Garnett, who has just successfully taken his ticket on a 50 h.p. tandem Bristol monoplane at Salisbury Plain.
Mr. S. F. Cody, whose biplane secured the first prize, open to the world, in the Military Trials, and the first of the prizes open to British subjects.
S. F. CODY. - A characteristic portrait of this famous aviator who-was killed last week.
HYDRO-AEROPLANES. - Fig. 5. - Types of Aeroplanes.
The R.E.P. at the Paris Salon.
Two views of the Breguet biplane, fitted with a 90-h.p. Canton Unne engine, on which M. Richet has been making some successful flights up at the Hendon Aerodrome.
One of the latest Breguet biplanes which differs from its predecessors in the central steel tube being replaced by a framework of steel tubes tapering to the tail. It is also fitted with a brake operated by a lever under the pilot's seat. The engine is a 110 h.p. 9 cyl. Canton-Unne.
M. A. Debussy flying the Breguet biplane at Hendon prior to his cross-country flight to Farnborough on Saturday last.
Mr. Norman Spratt flying the Breguet biplane at Hendon aerodrome.
Gustav Hamel, on his Bleriot, and M. Richet, on the Breguet, during the race at Hendon for the Aero Show Trophy.
M. A. Debussy on the Breguet, overtaking Carr (below), on the Grahame-White biplane, in a speed handicap at Hendon.
Mr. Norman Spratt on the Breguet (below) and Mr. Marcus D. Manton on the Grahame-White biplane, flying for the Shell Trophy at Hendon on Saturday last.
A DEAD HEAT AT HENDON. - An exciting finish at the Easter Monday Meeting, when Verrier, on a Maurice Farman, and Collardeau, on a Breguet, crossed the line at the same time in the Grand Speed Handicap, Verrier being on the right quite low.
M. A. Debussy in the pilot's seat of the Breguet biplane with which he came to grief on Saturday last.
The 85-h.p. Breguet biplane.
Flexible suspension of the front pair of steerable wheels of the Breguet biplane.
A BEAUTIFUL SUNSET PICTURE AT THE HENDON AERODROME. - Mr. W. L. Brock passing No. 1 pylon on his Bleriot during a race.
ANOTHER CLOSE-RANGE PHOTOGRAPH OF A MACHINE IN FLIGHT. - Mr. Brock, on the Bleriot, passing No. 1 pylon at the Hedon Aefodrome.
Mr. Gustav Hamel making one of his banked turns at the Hendon Aerodrome.
MARCEL DESOUTTER FLYING AT HENDON ON SUNDAY. - At an altitude of 2,000 ft. the oil pipe of his engine broke away, and a dive, heading a 45-mile wind, resulted in a parachute-like dessent in perfect safety, but taking several minutes to finish. Our picture shows Desoutter on his Bleriot starting to climb.
FROM PAU TO MADRID BY AEROPLANE. - The journey of Bider on his Bleriot on Friday last week, when he flew from Pont Long Aerodrome, starting at 7.19 a.m., crossed the Pyrenees, arriving at Guadalajara, where he alighted at 12 o'clock noon, re-starting from there at 1 p.m., and reaching the Quatre-Vents Aerodrome, Madrid, at 130 p.m., a distance of about 500 kiloms. in 5 hrs. 11 mins. Our picture shows M. Bider over the Pyrenees in the vicinity of the Pic du Midi d'Ossan.
AT THE BURTON FLYING MEETING. - Sydney Pickles, in his Bieriot
A good picture of B. C. Hucks giving exhibition flights at Hendon on Saturday.
Mr. S. Summerfield, flying at Melton Mowbray during the past season on his Bleriot machine, with which he has done a lot of work in the district.
LOOPING THE LOOP. - Mr. B. C. Hucks just off on his Bleriot for his looping demonstrations. Inset on the left he is seen going up on the first part of the loop. On the right, inset, he is seen actually upside down during the looping.
THE PARADE AT LAFFAN'S PLAIN ON THE KING'S BIRTHDAY. - The "Gamma" and "Beta" in the air together, and the I.C.S. Bleriot circling round them.
AN AIR GREETING AT HENDON ON SATURDAY AFTERNOON. - Desoutter, on a Blerlot, passing under and waving his hand to Manton on the Grahame-White biplane.
A Hanriot monoplane arriving at Hendon from Brooklands to take part in a competition while one of its future competltors - a Bleriot - is in the air.
Gustav Hamel, on his Bleriot, and M. Richet, on the Breguet, during the race at Hendon for the Aero Show Trophy.
A close finish for second place in the "Shell" Handicap at Hendon on Saturday between Lieut. Porte on the Deperdussin and Mr. R. Slack on the Blerlot.
A remarkable photographic record of an incident in the International contest at Hendon on Saturday. - Brock on the Bleriot winning by a few feet only from Marty on the Morane-Saulnier, who flew underneath him as they crossed the line.
FLYING AT RANELAGH. - M. Gustav Hamel just before landing at Ranelagh last Week, after one of his exhibition flights.
THE FINISH OF A FINE FLIGHT AT HENDON. - Mr. B.C. Hucks descending after his attempt to beat the British altitude record, when he reached 9,800 ft.
MR. CORBETT WILSON IN SWITZERLAND. - Above are three views of (1) Ouchy, (2) Lausanne Station, (3) general view of Lausanne taken by Capt. Friedrich when passenger with Mr. Wilson; below (4) some of the Swiss officers who went as passengers with Mr. Wilson in conversation with him; and on the right (5) Capt. Instructor Lederry just about to take a flight with Mr. Wilson. - Suisse Sportive.
Some snaps from M. Salmet's Bleriot at Scarborough from about 2,000 ft. up, taken by Mr. A. J. A. Wallace Barr recently. The centre photograph and the left show the Grand Hotel and foreshore from different points, and on the right is seen the railway station.
Two of the monoplanes on the Bleriot stand at the Paris Salon.
THE BLERIOT MONOPLANE TRANSPORTER. - The top picture shows the transporter folded up and in tow on a pair of its own wheels behind a car; that on the left illustrates the transporter in action, carrying a Bieriot tandem two-seater monoplane. An idea of its construction can be gathered from the right-hand photograph, which shows how the transporter, which can be towed by means of horses or automobile, can be driven over obstacles without upsetting; the balance of the monoplane on board.
The military Bleriot machine, which Mr. Gustav Hamel flew from Dover to Cologne last week, arriving in its packing case at Dover from France, prior to the achievement.
Two views of Mr. Vivian Hewitt's Bleriot in its latest form.
On the left the top cabane, and on the fight showing the engine shield and doors removed. They can be taken off and replaced very quickly.
On the left Mr. Hewitt's method of attaching the four ribbons to the bracket is shown, while on the right is the new warping cabane. Note the bracing and steel wheels and the thick wires to the cloche.
A back view of Pegoud in his Bleriot just at the moment of starting at Brooklands for one of his flights showing him strapped in to his seat, and also the tail as fitted to his Bleriot.
PEGOU'S EXTRAORDINARY FLIGHTS. - Three untouched photographs of bis upside down flying. In the centre: diving for the turn. On the left: turning over. On the rights upside down.
A LOVELY SUNSET AT BROOKLANDS. - In the air, M. Pegoud returning from one of his remarkable flights.
Gustav Hamel takes Sir Joseph Ward for a flight in the "Britannia" at Hendon after its christening.
Mr. Gustav Hamel just about to start for a flight with Miss Teddie Gerrard, on the Hippodrome, at Brooklands on Sunday last. Mr. Hamel climbed to nearly 9,000 ft., and in descending stopped his propeller at 6,000 ft.
SUNDAY FLYING A T BROOKLANDS. - Mr. Gustav Hamel gives our photographic artist a "sitting" whilst Miss Teddie Gerrard looks on innocent of the fact that she is included on the plate.
Mr. B. C. Hucks before looping the loop at Hendon having his shoulder-straps fixed safely by his Manager, Mr. J. C. Savage.
Mr. D. W. Clappen, who took his brevet at the Bleriot School, Hendon, on August 15th.
Capt. Geoffrey Cox, 3rd North Staffordshire Regiment (Special Reserve), who has recently taken his certificate at the Bleriot School at Hendon.
A remarkable incident which occurred to Taddeoli on June 6th when flying from Berne to Bienne in Switzerland. One of the chassis wheels came off without his knowing anything about it, but Bider, who was at the aerodrome, at once started after him on his Bleriot, and by means of energetic dumb show managed to apprise Taddeoli of his danger, so that Taddeoli was able to land so carefully that no further damage of any sort occurred. - Suisse Sportiue.
The solid silver model of the Bleriot monoplane used by Mr. Gustav Hamel in his splendid flight from London to Cologne. This artistic work was designed and manufactured by Messrs. Mappin and Webb, and presented to Mr. Hamel by the British Petroleum Company ("Shell" motor spirit) at a banquet on June 5th.
PEGOUD'S RECENT FLIGHTS. - The above plates have been prepared by FLIGHT for the purpose of more graphically showing the evolutions which are performed by M. Pegoud when looping the loop and doing his "S" shaped upside down flight, and how he actually recovers his normal position. The diagrams are prepared by photography from a small model of the Bleriot.
Spiral vol plane by Hamel on 80-h.p. Blerlot, with Miss Trehawke Davies as passenger, May 3rd, on his return from a flight to Windsor, reaching an altitude of 7,000 ft. From a sketch by Roderic Hill.
LORD MAYOR'S DAY AT HENDON AERODROME. - An impression of Hamel by Roderick Hill.
LORD MAYOR'S DAY AT HENDON AERODROME. - Up aloft. Another impression of Hamel by Roderick
Hill.
"LADIES DAY" AT HENDON AERODROME. - The Morane-Saulnier and Bleriot circling round each other. From an original drawing by Roderlc Hill.
THE FIRST ENGLISHMAN TO LOOP THE LOOP. - An impression of Mr. B. C. Hucks flying in an inverted position at Hendon Aerodrome on Saturday, November 29th, on a 50 h.p. Bleriot with reinforced wing bracing. From an original drawing by Mr. Roderic Hill.
The 80-h.p. Bleriot monoplane.
The 80-h.p. Bleriot tandem monoplane.
DETAILS OF THE BLERIOT MONOPLANE. - The sketch on the left shows the method of strengthening the bottom cross-plank of the landing chassis and the application of stranded cable. The middle sketch shows the upper wing staywire attachment. That on the right illustrates how the double control-wires are fastened to the rudder lever.
AT OLYMPIA. - A study in tail-skids.
Commandant Felix testing the 80 h.p. Gnome Dunne D.8 at Hendon.
THE DUNNE BIPLANE. - View from the rear.
THE DUNNE BIPLANE. - As seen from behind.
The Gnome engine in place on the Dunne biplane.
Commander Felix in the pilot's seat of the Dunne aeroplane at Hendon on Saturday. Our photograph shows very clearly the chassis and the arrow front section of the Dunne biplane.
AT DEAUVILLE. - Commandant Felix flying on the Dunne biplane over the sands. Below in the foreground is a Henry Farman waterplane. and in the distance other waterplanes taking part in the French Government Waterplane Trials.
The Dunne machine on the Nieuport stand at the Paris Salon.
The front (wood) portion of the chassis, and on right the upper part of the shock-absorbing spring, together with the smaller spring designed to prevent excessive recoil on landing.
Sketch of the steel portion of the Dunne landing chassis. On the right a detail of the landing chassis, including one of the six universal-joints incorporated in the chassis.
Shows the connection of one of the front steel tubes of the chassis to the fuselage,
The petrol pressure-pump seen from behind.
One of the side curtains and wing tip skids, and on right a closer view of the wing tip skid universal-joint.
One of the universal-joints, and an analysis of same.
Sketch showing the wing construction of the Dunne biplane.
Diagram to illustrate how steering is effected.
THE DUNNE BIPLANE. - Plan, front and side elevations to scale.
Mr. Compton Paterson on his hydro-biplane flying over Table Bay with Table Mountain in the background.
Mr. Compton Paterson in the biplane with which he did such good work in South Africa. Observe the double-handed control that is a feature of this machine.
AT THE SOUTH AFRICAN FLYING SCHOOL, KIMBERLEY. - Mr. C. Compton Paterson, Managing Director, and the late Mr. E. W. Cheeseman.
AVIATION IN SOUTH AFRICA. - South African Flying School, Kimberley. Reading from left to right: (kneeling) Messrs. Williams, Van Coller, Creed; (standing) Messrs. A. Turner (chief mechanic), Cleasdale, Van der Spev, Turner, Carpenter, Emmet, Salamon; seated in machine. Chief Instructor the late E. W. Cheeseman.
Montgomery's tandem monoplane glider piloted by Maloney. The experiments were made in California about 1905, and were noteworthy on account of the automatic stability of the machine as demonstrated by the fact that several successful glides were accomplished after preliminary ascents in a balloon.
THE 45-H.P. CAUDRON BIPLANE. - Three-quarter back view of the new British built Caudron biplane, which the W. H. Ewen Aviation Co., Ltd., have sold to the War Office. The machine has been constructed for Mr. Ewen by Messrs. Hewlett and Blondeau at their Clapham works. The workmanship is extremely good and the machine is very neatly finished. A new type of cowl has been fitted, and several improvements have been effected in the 45-h.p- Anzani engine. The auxillary exhaust ports have been done away with and a new form of exhaust pipe fitted. The result is that the engine may now be throttled down to run very slowly indeed. Another advantage is that all the oil thrown off by the engine passes through the exhaust pipes and is carried away underneath the body.
AT HENDON AERODROME. - Machines about to start for the military cross-country race. On the line are the biplanes and, ranged behind, the monoplanes waiting to take their place on the starting line after the biplanes have got away.
Mr. Sydney Pickles, on the British-built Caudron, over the "battleship" at Hendon.
Mr. Sydney Pickles, on the British-built 45 h.p. Caudron, making a fine straight vol plane over the sheds at Hendon.
A speed handicap, with four in it, at Hendon aerodrome on Saturday, showing Turner's Caudron and Verrier's Maurice Farman, in front, during the first heat.
A REMINISCENCE OF HENDON FLYING MEETING. - A good race between Lewis Turner on the Grahame-White biplane and W. H. Ewen on the Caudron.
Mr. E. H. Lawford, who has just qualified at the W. H. Ewen School at Hendon on a 35-h.p. Caudron biplane. Mr. Lawford has been practising on a monoplane as well as a biplane.
Mr. Lewis Turner explains the controls of the Caudron biplane to a new pupil.
The 35-h.p. Caudron biplane.
The 35-h.p. Anzani-Caudron biplane.
Tail of the Caudron biplane.
Sketch illustrating the control and its attachments on the Caudron biplane.
How control wires are led to the various tail organs through flexible guide tubes on the Caudron biplane.
The Caudron monoplane.
Pilot: Mr. J. Nardini.
The 45-h.p. Caudron monoplane.
AT OLYMPIA. - A study in tail-skids.
AIRCRAFT ON LAFFAN'S PLAIN FOR THE "FLY PAST" ON THE KING'S BIRTHDAY THIS WEEK. - In the parade there were four BE type (from the left, B.E.3, B.E.4, B.E.2 and B.E.1), six Maurice Farmans, and two Henry Farmans. (Summer of 1913)
With the Lancashire Branch of the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders at Lake Windermere. - On the left Sir Kenneth Crossley just taking his seat in the Waterhen as a passenger, and on the right in flight over Lake Windermere.
THE WATER BIPLANE OF THE LAKES FLYING CO. A T WINDERMERE. - On the right the machine is just seen before being taken back into the shed. These photographs were taken by Geoffrey Sleath, of Ukley, Yorks, a little cripple-boy of twelve, who is able to hold a camera. The lad is a keen follower of the model section of FLIGHT, the photographs being taken with a "Brownie" camera.
Commander Samson flying a Short biplane at Eastchurch.
A Hanriot monoplane arriving at Hendon from Brooklands to take part in a competition while one of its future competltors - a Bleriot - is in the air.
BIELOVUCIC AND HIS ALPINE FLIGHT. - The aviator in the air, with his machine, over the Reidberg, in the distance being seen the Simplon.
BIELOVUCIC AND HIS ALPINE FLIGHT. - In the centre Bielovucic ready for the start; on the left the aviator and M. Brisset testing the air currents by free ballonettes; and on the right Bielovucic landing in the snow after one of his preliminary trials.
General view of Caudron Flying School at Le Crotoy showing their 200 h.p. Anzani hydroplane specially built for the Deauville competition. - On the left is a closer view of the machine, giving some idea of the size of the propeller and the situation of the cylinders on the 200 h.p. Anzani. This engine has a forced oil feed which is worked by two miniature propellers fixed on the lower plane. Our view is taken from the tail of the machine, and it should be noted that this machine is of the engine behind or pusher type.
The 100-h.p. Coventry Ordnance biplane, designed by Mr. W. O. Manning, has, since it has undergone general alterations and been fitted with more supporting surface, done quite a lot of flying at Brooklands of late. Mr. P. Raynham has been its pilot, and he flies it, most often, with a passenger up. The biplane has an unusually wide speed range, it being possible to land the machine at a less speed than 20 miles per hour.
Mr. Barnwell, on the Vickers mono, gilding down into Brooklands Aerodrome after his non-stop flight to Hendon and back on Sunday.
Biplane versus monoplane in the Easter Aeroplane Handicap for the Shell prize at Brooklands on Easter Monday. - Mr. Barnwell, on the Vickers monoplane, passes Mr. Hawker, on the Sopwith, in the first lap.
Ready for the day's work at the Vlckers Flying School at Brooklands Aerodrome.
AT THE VICKERS SCHOOL, BROOKLANDS. - On the left, Chief Pilot and School Manager, Mr. R. H. Barnwell, in the seat of Vickers No. 5 monoplane. On the right, Mr. T . W. Elsdon, who has been appointed assistant pilot at the Vickers School.
TWO PUPILS AT THE VICKERS FLYING SCHOOL, BROOKLANDS. - On the left in the pilot's seat of Vickers No. 5 monoplane, Mr. A. E. Morgan; on the right, Mr. Henry Webb.
HYDRO-AEROPLANES. - Fig. 5. - Types of Aeroplanes.
Three-quarter rear view of a D.F W. monoplane, school type. It will be noticed that this machine is almost exactly similar to the military type, except for the steel bridge girder underneath the wings.
Three-quarter rear view of the D.F.W. military monoplane.
The D.F.W, monoplane on which Lieut, von Hiddesen secured the first prize in the Prince Henry Reliability Trials some time ago.
Lieut, von Hiddessen on hts D.F.W. monoplane on which he won the three days' "Prince Henry Reliability Trials." The machine is constructed by the "German Aircraft Works" at Leipzig.
General view of one of the three erecting shops of the German Aircraft Works, Ltd. (D.F.W.), at Lindenthal, near Leipzig, Germany.
THE D.F.W. MONOPLANE. - Plan, side and front elevation to scale.
Mr. F. P. Raynham flying the Flanders biplane at Brooklands.
THE ISAACSON ENGINED FLANDERS BIPLANE. - Three-quarter view from behind.
THE ISAACSON ENGINED FLANDERS BIPLANE. - Three-quarter view from the front.
THE ISAACSON ENGINED FLANDERS BIPLANE. - View from behind.
THE ISAACSON ENGINED FLANDERS BIPLANE. - View showing the chassis and engine mounting.
View from above of the pilot's and passenger's seats in the Flanders biplane.
Method of springing the landing wheels.
The tail planes on the Flanders biplane.
Sketch showing method of carrying warping cables through one of the plane struts.
THE FLANDERS BIPLANE. - Plan, side and front elevations to scale.
THE ITALIAN GOVERNMENT ORDER FOR BRITISH AEROPLANES. - One of the 80-h.p. Bristol monoplanes on the Mirafiori ground at Turin. On the extreme left is Mr. White Smith, Secretary of the British and Colonial Aeroplane Co., Ltd.; next to him, with muffler on, is the Chief of the Aviation Department in Milan; Pixton is just getting into the pilot's seat, and one of the Bristol mechanics is standing by the propeller.
Mr. C. H. Pixton just ready to start from the Four Winds Aerodrome, Madrid, for a flight on his Bristol monoplane, with the Infanta of Spain, who occupies the front seat, and is wearing a fine wire mask for protection against the wind.
AT THE SETTING OF THE SUN. - A fine glide, the actual angle being 1 in 7.9, into the Cuatro Vientos Aerodrome, Madrid, by Mr. C. H. Pixton on a Bristol monoplane. This was the conclusion of a fifteen minutes' flight with the Infanta of Spain.
Mr. F. Warren Merriam making a fine high flight on the Bristol tandem monoplane at Salisbury Plain on October 10th.
Mr. Henry M. Jullerot, the Manager and Chief Pilot of the Bristol School at Salisbury Plain, on one of the 80-h.p. school monoplanes, with Capt. Landon, a very promising pupil, as passenger.
BRISTOL MACHINE DETAILS. - The tail on the left is a standartised unit, it being identical on both the monoplane and the biplane. The sketch on the right shows the flexible suspensioon of one of the main landing-wheels, with its band-brake and torque-rod.
The original method of cane suspension of the seats of the Bristol machine.
The laminated rear end of the Bristol monoplane skid.
THE BRISTOL MONOPLANE. - Plan, side and front elevation to scale.
THE MARTIN HANDASYDE, as seen from different points around the machine.
The new Martinsyde monoplane fitted with 120-h.p. Austro-Daimler engine. Mr. Gordon Bell is in the pilot's cabin.
Mr. Barnwell, who secured second place, with only a couple of minutes' interval, on the Martinsyde machine in the Aerial Derby.
The 80-h.p. Laviator-Martin-Handasyde monoplane.
The Martin-Handasyde landing gear and wing-warplng mechanism.
DETAILS OF THE MARTIN-HANDASYDE MONOPLANE. - (1.) The tail skid. (2.) The front skid. (3.) The construction of the wing spars. (4.) The landing gear and wing-warping mechanism. (5.) The anchorage of the chassis-staying cables. (6.) The fitting accommodating the cable which braces the wings against drift. It passes round the nose of the body. (7.) The klng-post tip. (8.) One of the strong cable fastenings that are used on the cables taking the main lift.
Wing section, to scale, of the Martin-Handasyde monoplane.
THE MARTIN-HANDASYDE MONOPLANE. - Front and side elevations and plan to scale.
THE PARIS-DEAUVILLE WATERPLANE RACE. - General scene at the start from Paris.
The Donnet-Leveque hydro-biplane.
HYDRO-AEROPLANES. - Fig. 5. - Types of Aeroplanes.
The Avro all-enclosed biplane.
AIRCRAFT ON LAFFAN'S PLAIN FOR THE "FLY PAST" ON THE KING'S BIRTHDAY THIS WEEK. - In the parade there were four BE type (from the left, B.E.3, B.E.4, B.E.2 and B.E.1), six Maurice Farmans, and two Henry Farmans. (Summer of 1913)
The ubiquitous pilot, Gordon Bell, when he was flying one of the BE's with Capt. Dawes.
Mr. Barnwell In flight, with a passenger, on Vlckers No. 8 before his recent mishap down Weybrldge way.
Ready for the day's work at the Vlckers Flying School at Brooklands Aerodrome.
A chassis detail of the Vickers monoplane.
VICKERS MONOPLANE DETAILS. - The sketch on the left illustrates the fitting by which the two front V-set chassis struts are assembled to the central skid. It also shows how the wing cables are attached. That on the right shows the tail.
The 70-h.p. Gnome-Vickers monoplane.
AT OLYMPIA. - A study in tail-skids.
Three-quarter front view of the Borel Hydro-Monoplane showing main floats and chassis.
Side view of Borel Hydro-Monoplane.
THE ADMIRALTY'S BOREL HYDRO-MONO. No. 83. - Gordon Bell in pilot's seat (back), with Lieut. Travers as passenger, after passing reception tests at Calshot.
THE PARIS-DEAUVILLE WATERPLANE RACE. - Chemet and his Borel machine immediately after arrival at the control on the beach at Deauville.
The Borel exhibited at the Paris Salon.
The 80-h.p. Borel hydro-monoplane.
Sketch showing the two main floats, the chassis and the engine mounting of the Borel hydro-monoplane.
The lower pylon of the Borel hydromonoplane, showing warping gear.
One of the main floats and the small tall float of the Borel hydro-monoplane.
The tail float of the Borel hydro-monoplane, which is rigidly connected to the rudder and moves with it, thus acting as a water rudder when the machine is "taxying.''
HYDRO-AEROPLANES. - Fig. 5. - Types of Aeroplanes.
BOREL HYDRO-MONOPLANE. - Plan, side and front elevations to scale.
AT DEAUVILLE. - Commandant Felix flying on the Dunne biplane over the sands. Below in the foreground is a Henry Farman waterplane. and in the distance other waterplanes taking part in the French Government Waterplane Trials.
HYDRO-AEROPLANES. - Fig. 5. - Types of Aeroplanes.
As the flying is seen at Hendon Aerodrome from the Press Club Window. - Mr. Manton is just passing across the line of sight.
M. D. Manton flying the single-rudder Grahame-White Boxkite, with which he was second in the Speed Handicap at Hendon on 19 July, 1913.
The big crowd watching the flying at Hendon Aerodrome. - Manton is seen in the air.
A REMINISCENCE OF HENDON FLYING MEETING. - A good race between Lewis Turner on the Grahame-White biplane and W. H. Ewen on the Caudron.
AN AIR GREETING AT HENDON ON SATURDAY AFTERNOON. - Desoutter, on a Bleriot, passing under and waving his hand to Manton on the Grahame-White biplane.
M. A. Debussy on the Breguet, overtaking Carr (below), on the Grahame-White biplane, in a speed handicap at Hendon.
AERIAL FLORAL FETE AT HENDON AERODROME. - The first heat of the Speed Handicap. Manton, on the Grahame-White biplane, completing his first lap, with Brock and Verrier still waiting to take up their start in the race.
Mr. Carr winning his first race at Hendon Aerodrome in the Speed Handicap on Saturday.
A FINE FINISH AT HENDON. - Marty, Verrier and Manton finishing in the order given in the first heat of the Speed Handicap on "Motor Cycle Day."
The Clement-Bayard stand at the Paris Salon.
Chassis and engine housing of Clement-Bayard monoplane.
HYDRO-AEROPLANES. - Fig. 5. - Types of Aeroplanes.
The Nieuport hydro-monoplane showing its paces at Monaco during the recent meeting.
M. LEVASSEUR'S NIEUPORT "IN CUSTODY" AT THE THAMES POLICE STATION, BLACKWALL. - On the pier are the pilot, M. Levasseur, his passenger, M. Rougerie, Mr. Harold E. Perrio, Secretary of the Royal Aero Club, &c.
M, Levasseur (on the right), and his passenger, M. Rougerie, on the pier of the Thames Police Station at Blackwall, cogitating over their fate for having infringed the British air regulations.
THE PARIS-DEAUVILLE WATERPLANE RACE. - General scene at the start from Paris.
The 100-h.p. Nieuport hydro-monoplane.
The tail of the 100-h.p. Nieuport Hydravion.
Details of the front of the Nieuport float, showing the peculiar fin-like projections in front which prevent the float from burying itself in rough water.
Side elevation of the Nieuport float.
Attachment of main floats (on right) and (on left) the tail float on the Nieuport hydro-aeroplane which was at the last Olympia Show. The machines at Monaco have a three stepped keel float.
HYDRO-AEROPLANES. - Fig. 5. - Types of Aeroplanes.
M. Moreau's monoplane, on which the stability tests took place last week.
The Moreau Aerostable at the Paris Salon on the Emaillite stand.
The new 70-h.p. Blerlot "canard" monoplane, with which Bleriot's chief pilot. Pereyon, has been experimenting at Buc, France, for some weeks past. The little inset picture shows the monoplane in flight.
A plan view of the D.F.W, biplane now at Brooklands.
THE D.F.W. BIPLANE AT BROOKLANDS. - Side view.
Harry Oelerich, chief pilot of the D.F.W. Flying School, after beating the German duration record by 6 hrs. 8 mins. a few weeks back.
General view of the new 35-h.p. Grahame-White "Popular" biplane.
TWO DETAILS OF THE NEW GRAHAME-WHITE "POPULAR" BIPLANE. - On the left, the mounting of the 35-h.p. Y-type Anzani motor, on the right the tail unit.
THE 35.h.p. GRAHAME-WHITE "POPULAR" BIPLANE. - Front and side elevations and plan to scale.
Mr. J. Welby Madeley, M.A.M. Inst C.E., who passed for his pilot's certificate on August 22nd at the Farman School, Etampes, France. The Maurice Farman, with Mr. Madeley in the pilot's seat, is also seen above. He intends continuing his training, and is taking back in September a Maurice Farman to Madras where Mr. Madeley is Special Engineer to the Corporation of that city.
The British-built Deperdussin war hydro-aeroplane.
View of the front floats and mounting of the "Seagull."
British Deperdussin Seagull of 1913 on test on the River Blackwater, as seen on the water from behind.
The "Seagull" just about to rise from the water.
1. Getting aboard for Osea Island. 2. In tow. 3. All hands down the beach. 4. Launching the "Seagull."
THE DEPERDUSSIN STAND AT THE PARIS SALON. - In the left-hand corner is Prevost's small monocoque.
The 100-h.p. Anzani-Deperdussin hydro-monoplane.
Sketch showing how the movement of the wing-tips is geared up by means of a bell-crank, inspection door in the streamline casing.
Three-quarter back view of the Empennage.
Sketch of the wing bracing on the "Seagull." Inset is shown the method of attaching bracing wires. On the right is the tall float.
HYDRO-AEROPLANES. - Fig. 5. - Types of Aeroplanes.
THE "SEAGULL." - Plan, side and front elevation to scale.
The 90-h.p. Grahame White military biplane.
The 90-h.p. Grahame-Whlte military biplane.
The propeller mounting of the 90-h.p. Grahame-White biplane. Notice the manner in which the control wires are taken through the top member of the tail outrigger construction which passes through the propeller boss.
The tail of the 90-h.p. Grahame-White military biplane.
Details of the landing chassis of the 90-h.p. Grahame-White biplane, showing how the double-tyred wheels are sprung in the wide built-up landing skids.
The 60-h.p. Anzani-Grahame-White hydro-biplane.
The Grahame-White float, as seen from underneath. Notice that the front section is flat on the underside, while the rear portion is concave.
The air vents in the float of the Grahame-White hydro-biplane.
Diagram of the air inlet pipe of the Grahame-White floats.
Sketch showing how the chassis struts are attached to the interior float construction on the Grahame-White hydro-biplane.
The tail of the Grahame-White hydro-biplane.
The Sopwith hydro-biplane in course of construction at the firm's Kingston-on-Thames works.
The 90-h.p. Austro-Daimler-Sopwith hydro-biplane.
The 90-h.p. Sopwith hydro-biplane.
Diagram showing how the landing wheels of the Sopwith hydrobiplane may be drawn up clear of the water.
Diagrammatic sketch of the float of the Sopwith hydro-biplane.
Front view of the Sopwith hydroplane hull.
Rear view of the Sopwith hydroplane hull.
The tail of the Sopwith hydro-biplane.
The front of the cockpit of the Vickers biplane, showing the mounting of the automatic gun.
The Vickers biplane tail-skid, which rotates with the rudder, allowing the machine to be steered when running along the ground.
DETAILS OF THE VICKERS BIPLANE. - On the left, quick detachable strut fitting. In the centre, the details of the flexible suspension. The sketch on the right shows how the tail controlling cables are guided round one of the plane struts.
AT OLYMPIA. - A study in tail-skids.
The 60-80-h.p. Wolseley-eriglned Vickers biplane.
The 60-80-h.p. Vickers biplane.
The new Bleriot hydro-monoplane returning to its slipway after an experimental flight by Perryon. M. Bleriot, its designer, may be seen holding on to the machine's left wing tip.
The Bleriot hydro-monoplane in flight over the Seine.
The new 80 h.p. Rhone-Bleriot seaplane showing its paces on the water.
A front view of the floats and chassis, &c, on the new Rhone-engined Bieriot seaplane.
The Bleriot biplane and the Bleriot waterplane at the Paris Salon.
Chassis and floats of Bleriot hydro.
F. P. Raynham flying the Avro biplane at Hendon.
An impression of the Avro at Hendon. From an original drawing by Roderic Hill.
The 50-h.p. Gnome-Avro biplane.
The 50-h.p. Avro tractor biplane.
The front section of the Avro biplane, showing the mounting of the 50-h.p. Gnome motor and the inspection doors.
The cleverly sprung skid tip of the Avro biplane.
The tail of the Avro biplane.
AT OLYMPIA. - A study in tail-skids.
THE LATEST CURTISS BIPLANE. - It will be noticed that, as distinct from former Curtiss practice, this machine, which has chefly designed for military scouting, has a three-bladed tractor.
LIEUT. CALDERARA'S "HYDROVOL" ALIGHTING ON THE SURFACE OF THE WATER. - This is one of the largest monoplanes in existence, having 770 sq. ft. of wing surface. It is of singularly interesting construction, for the hydroplane floats are no less than 21 ft. apart, and the centre of gravity is only 4 ft. 6 ins. above the water line, so that the machine possesses great lateral stability when afloat. In emergency it is possible for the occupants to leave the body of the machine and take refuge on the under structure which serves as a raft. In emergency sail can also be rigged, and facilities have been made for cutting adrift the wings if the machine gets caught at sea in a high wind and is disabled.
Lieut. Calderara's "hydrovol" in flight.
Lieut. Mario Calderara, of the Italian Navy, who pioneered service aviation in his own country, and who trained several of the pilots who flew in the Tripoli campaign.
Diagram illustrating the general nature of the substructure ot the Calderara hydrovol.
Plan elevation and section of the Calderara floats.
Diagram Illustrating the disposition of the engine, passengers and pilot in the body of the Calderara hydrovol.
A NEW SWISS-BUILT MONOPLANE - THE 60-H.P. OERLIKON-ROSSIER. - This machine has been under the pilotage of Kunkler, who has been flying at the Dubendorf Aerodrome. It is now to be fitted with floats and tested for water work.
Mr. A. W. Schaef's hydroaeroplane.
Mr. Harold Blackburn on the Stray, at Harrogate, after his flight from Yorkshire Aerodrome. Starting on the return journey.
HYDRO-AEROPLANES FOR MONACO. - The enormous double monoplane built by Jeansson and Colliex. The span is 24 metres, length 16 metres. It is mounted upon a 7-metre Despujols hull, and in flying order weighs 4,300 kilogs. Two 6-cyl. 230-h.p. Chenu motors are fitted, giving a speed of over 100 k.p.h.
THE NEW ARMOURED BLERIOT. - View from in front, showing the elevator and the general arrangement of the body, with the window for the observer.
View of the new armoured Bleriot from the back, showing the rudder, the long ailerons, and the fish tail fins on the main plane.
Side view of the Radley-England waterplane.
Front view of the Radley-England waterplane.
The power plant, consisting of three 50-hp. Gnome engines, on the Radley-England waterplane.
Diagrammatic sketch of the pilot's and passengers' seats in one of the floats of the Radley-England waterplane.
Tail planes of the 150-h.p. Radley-England waterplane.
Three-quarter rear view of the Radley-England float.
Wing section, to scale, of the Radley-England waterplane.
THE RADLEY-ENGLAND WATERPLANE. - Plan, side and front elevation to scale.
Three views of the Dyott monoplane which is now flying so well in America, as described in a recent issue of FLIGHT.
Mr. Dyott flying his monoplane at Hendon Aerodrome on Saturday last.
THE DYOTT MONOPLANE. - A view showing the aluminium covering of the front part of the fuselage removed, allowing a thorough inspection of engine and controls.
Sketch of the dashboard, showing the different instruments.
Sketch of the special compass used on the Dyott monoplane.
The locker and auxiliary fuel tank behind the pilot's seat.
Diagrammatic sketch of the Dyott controls.
The landing chassis; the wheels have been omitted for the sake of clearness.
Details of the Dyott monoplane: the sketches on the left and in the centre show the lower and upper pylons with their fittings. On the right is seen one of the shock absorbers on the chassis.
The wheel retaining axle cap on the landing chassis.
Wing section, to scale, of the Dyott monoplane.
DYOTT MONOPLANE. - Plan, side and front elevation to scale.
Eastbourne Aviation Company monoplane constructed in 1913.
The E.A.C. monoplane, as seen from behind.
Sketch showing landing chassis and lower pylon with its fittings.
Empennage and tail skid of the E.A.C. mono.
Wing section, to scale, of the E.A.C. monoplane.
THE E.A.C MONOPLANE. - Plan, side and front elevation to scale.
THE LATEST BURGESS HYDRO-AEROPLANE. - The hydro-aeroplane which has been built by the Burgess Co. to meet the U.S. Navy requirements. It will be noticed that the planes are staggered, and although the upper and lower wing surfaces are permanently attached to each other they can be folded together. The power plant is arranged so that it is easily detachable.
THE BURGESS FLYING BOAT. - Plan, side and front elevation to scale.
THE "TONG-MEI" TRACTOR BIPLANE, MINUS FABRIC, IN COURSE OF ERECTION. - Mr. Wong in pilot's seat.
THE "TONG-MEI" TRACTOR BIPLANE. - Plan, side and front elevations to scale.
PRINCE HENRY PRIZE. - The start at Wiesbaden in front of the grand stands. Lieut. Joly, on the Gothaer mono, is just getting away.
On the left is shown the method of securing the strands of a control cable by soldering a long copper ferrule round them. In the centre is the top of warp operating lever, showing how wire is protected against wear by copper bushes; and on the right a sketch of the attachment of warp operating lever to rear spar.
Pilot's seat of Parsons biplane, and on the right arrangement of tail planes.
The biplane built by Champel, and with which he has been doing so much flying with passengers at Juvisy and elsewhere, and on which he made four new world's records for pilot and four passengers at Cercottes a little time back. The motive power, it may be recalled, is a 100-110 h.p. 10-cyl. Anzani engine.
The arrival of the Champel biplane flown by Mr. Sydney Pickles, with Mr. Lawford as passenger, at the Hendon Aerodrome, on Saturday, whilst the competitors in the Aerial Derby were absent on their race round the circuit. On the left is seen the Grahame-White 5-seater biplane, with a mechanic sitting on each wing tip.
CROSS-COUNTRY RACE AT BROOKLANDS ON SATURDAY LAST. - Mr. W. S. S. Mitchell on the Vickers biplane (No. 8); Mr. W. Bendall, Bristol biplane (No. 10); Mr. F. W. Merriam, Bristol biplane (No. 7), rounding the sheds on the first circuit.
Sketch from a photograph of an early Wright biplane. - The Wrights built their first successful power-driven machine in 1903, and first flew on December 17th of that year. By the end of 1905 they had flown several single journeys exceeding 20 miles in length.
Chanute's glider, piloted by A. M. Herring. - This machine was the prototype of the modern biplane. It was built in America about 1896, and tried on the shores of Lake Michigan near St. Joseph.
Santos Dumont's tall-first biplane, with which he won the first flight prize on October 23rd, 1906, by flying a distance exceeding 25 metres.
Maxim's large steam-driven aeroplane on its rail track in Baldwin's Park, Kent. During a trial in 1893 it broke through the top guard rail and made a short free flight.
Phillips' aeroplane tested on a circular track at Harrow in 1893. - The supporting surface was divided into numerous lath-like cambered planes, arranged somewhat in the manner of a Venetian blind.
Hargrave's wing-propelled model built in Australia in 1885. - The wings were for propulsion only, the weight in flight being supported by the aeroplane surfaces fore and aft. Several successful flights were made. Elastic provided the motive power.
Langley's steam-driven model tandem monoplane, built in America about 1895, and successfully flown over the Potomac River.
THE CURTISS FOUR-SEATER FLYING BOAT. - What is claimed to be the largest and heaviest hydro-aeroplane ever made has been recently tested on Lake Keuka, near Hammondsport, N.Y. The machine has been built for Mr. Harold F. McCormack by Mr. Glenn H. Curtiss, and follows the general design of his two-seater machine. The wings are of 40 ft. spread, and the machine is equipped with a 90-100 h.p. Curtiss engine. At the hands of Mr. Curtlss it showed a speed of 60 miles an hour along the water and over 60m.p.h. in the air!
Another view of the four-seater Curtlss flying boat, showing the arrangement of the engine, &c., and the disposition of the seating accommodation.
The Lakes Flying Company's tractor hydro-biplane, just getting away with a passenger.
Sketch of the cockpits and mounting of fuel and oil tanks.
Sketch showing how the main float is sprung from chassis by means of rubber shock-absorbers.
One of the pneumatic floats on wing tip.
THE LAKES FLYING CO.'S WATERPLANE. - Plan, side and front elevations to scale.
RESTRAINING AN AERIAL SEA MONSTER. - The Morane-Saulnier just getting away for the water.
Mr. Claude Grahame-White, on a Morane-Saulnier waterplane, flying off Newhaven Harbour towards Brighton during the past summer. From an original drawing by Roderic Hill.
One of the new 80-h.p. Gnome-Caudron hydro biplanes supplied to the French Navy. The target-like devices painted below the lower plane are distinctive of machines belonging to the French maritime service.
AT DEAUVILLE. - The Caudron biplane just getting away from the starting stage in the French Government Waterplane tests.
Three-quarter front view of the Caudron hydro-biplane.
On left side, view of Caudron hydro, and on right the machine is just getting off.
Four views of the latest Caudron seaplane, taken at Leysdown on the occasion when Mr. Ewen himself delivered the machine at Grain Island some little time back. It is the same machine that Sydney Pickles flew across the Channel accompanied by his mother, and is fitted with the new 9-cyI. 100 h.p. Gnome.
Sketch of one of the main floats, showing method of springing.
View from underneath of main float, showing the protective keel.
One of the tail floats.
CAUDRON HYDRO-BIPLANE. - Plan, side and front elevation to scale.
An S.I.A. monoplane constructed by La Societa Italiana degli Aeroplani, of Milan, one of the first really original machines built in Italy. It was on one of these machines that Deroye flew from Milan to Brindisi a few days ago.
Another view of the S.I.A. monoplane.
THE COLUMBIA FLYING BOAT FITTED WITH 80 H.P. GYRO MOTOR. - This American-built waterplane is said to get off the water in 200 ft. with a passenger.
A Breguet waterplane of the same type that Bregi has been flying at Brighton daily. This machine is fitted with a 130 h.p. Canton-Unne motor and with compressed air self-starting arrangement. Bregi has been taking up two and three passengers at a time.
A Breguet getting ready to rise.
The Breguet biplane at the Paris Salon.
The Breguet hydro-biplane.
Observer's seat and wireless installation on the Breguet.
Main float of Breguet hydro.
The nacelle of the Cody aeroplane, as seen from above.
THE CODY WATERPLANE. - 1. A typical strut socket and swiwel joint of skid to main plane. 2. Attachment of elevator to central outriggers. 3. Sketch showing method of carrying warp wires through struts. 4. Analytical sketch of joint between tail boom and strut. 5. Universal joint and pedals operating engine control. 6. A novel form of wing skid.
THE CODY WATERPLANE. - 1. One of the side floats. 2. Diagrammatic sketch of main float. 3. Attachment of tubular strut to side float.
THE CODY WATERPLANE. - Plan, side and front elevations, &c, to scale.
Radley-England Waterplane No.2 was built to compete in the Seaplane Circuit of Britain of 1913 but engine trouble on test caused withdrawal of the machine.
THE RADLEY-ENGLAND WATERPLANE. - A side view.
The Radley-England waterplane as seen from behind
MESSRS. RADLEY AND ENGLAND PUNTING AT SHOREHAM. - This punt is one of the original floats, fitted to their waterplane, converted into a punt.
Sketch showing arrangement of tail planes of Radley-England waterplane.
Sketch of one of the main floats of the Radley-England waterplane.
THE RADLEY-ENGLAND WATERPLANE. - Plan, front and side elevations to scale.
View from in front of the new Borel.
The new Borel military type monoplane.
The nacelle and the landing chassis of the new Borel.
Sketch showing method of joining struts to tail boom of Borel without piercing either.
Small sprung rear skid on heel of Borel main skids.
THE BOREL MILITARY TYPE MONOPLANE. - Plan, side and front elevation to scale.
Mr. and Mrs. James V. Martin, with their aeroplane at Fairbanks, Alaska, under the midnight sun. The photograph was taken at 10,30 p.m. on July 3rd.
Two views of the new Wright hydro-biplane on the Miami River, Orville Wright being seen in the pilot's seat.
The float of the new 60 h.p. Wright hydro-biplane
THE 60 H.P. WRIGHT HYDRO-BIPLANE. - Plan, side and front elevations to scale.
The first Danish hydro-aeroplane constructed by the young aviator, B. Rom (1) to the order of Mr. Loewenstein (2). It has been tested by the well-known Danish aviator, U. Birch, who is seen sitting in the pilot's seat. The biplane is equipped with a 65-h.p. E.N.V. motor, and the two main floats are built of wood, and are divided into nine watertight compartments.
Plan view of the Westlake monoplane.
Side view of the Westlake monoplane.
Diagrammatic sketch of the Westlake control arrangements for increasing or decreasing the angle of incidence on both wings simultaneously or independently. In the sketch only two pairs of cables are shown running to each wing. By interposing suitable compensating devices, such as pulleys, any number of cables can of course be used.
THE WESTLAKE MONOPLANE. - Plan, side and front elevations, to scale.
Baierlein in the pilot's seat of the Otto monoplane, the winner in the Round Berlin flight.
The new Maurice Farman biplane without front elevator which arrived at Hendon Aerodrome last week.
The Marquis LarientyTholozan a nephew of the Marquis De Dion and a well-known aviator in France, was flying on Saturday last at the Hendon Aerodrome on his new Farman biplane fitted with a 120 h.p. 8-cyl. De Dion Bouton engine. Although the Marquis had never previously taken his seat in this machine, without a hitch, after the propeller had been given its usual spin, he was up in the air and made two circuits of the aerodrome.
WELL MATCHED. - A Maurice Farman avion versus motor boat.
A Maurice Farman Navyplane in the air.
THE GRAHAME-WHITE CHAR-A-BANCS. - A three-quarter view from the front.
THE GRAHAME-WHITE CHAR-A-BANCS. - View from behind.
THE GRAHAME-WHITE CHAR-A-BANCS. - A view showing the mounting of the Austro-Daimler engine.
The arrival of the Champel biplane flown by Mr. Sydney Pickles, with Mr. Lawford as passenger, at the Hendon Aerodrome, on Saturday, whilst the competitors in the Aerial Derby were absent on their race round the circuit. On the left is seen the Grahame-White 5-seater biplane, with a mechanic sitting on each wing tip.
Sketch of the nacelle, showing seating accommodation for pilot and four passengers.
R. H. Carr, the Hendon aviator, at the wheel of the Grahame-White all-British "aero-'bus," with which he has just won the British Michelin Trophy and L500. The passenger, seated behind, is the engineer who accompanied him on his flight. Mr. Carr is making an attempt this week for the Michelin Cross-Country Speed Competition, the trophy for which carries with it a prize of L800.
An Impression of the Grahame-White charabancs flying at Hendon. From an original drawing by Roderic Hill.
How crank-lever is attached to leading edge of aileron.
Another neat fitting - the universally-jointed pulley for aileron cable.
Sketch of quickly detachable fitting of tubular extension struts to main plane struts.
GRAHAME-WHITE 5-SEATER BIPLANE. - Plan, side and front elevations to scale.
Mr. Manton with a passenger in the underslung seat of his Grahame-White biplane at the London Aerodrome, Hendon. - A strange optical illusion may be noticed in this picture. Whilst looking at it the picture appears to change. Sometimes you seem to be viewing the planes from above and somettmes from beneath.
A LABOUR OF LOVE. - Manton flying at sunset, with his mother as a passenger, at Hendon Aerodrome.
Mr. Norman Spratt on the Breguet (below) and Mr. Marcus D. Manton on the Grahame-White biplane, flying for the Shell Trophy at Hendon on Saturday last.
Trying the new Lewis automatic gun on a Grahame-White biplane at Bisley last week. The biplane, piloted by Mr. Marcus Manton, with Lieut. Stillingwerf in the seat underneath, manipulating the gun, is just passing over the Clock Tower at Bisley before firing at the target just beyond.
The monoplane which have been designed and constructed by Prince Friedrich Sigismund, son of Prince Friedrich Leopold of Prussia. In the left-hand picture Prince Friedrich Sigismund is standing by his Adler car, which he also drives himself. On the right is a closer view of the chassis and engine mounting, Prince Friedrich being in the pilot's seat attending to the turning of the motor.
Three views of the Eggleton No.3 biplane glider of 1913.
Sketch of wing construction of Eggleton glider.
M. E. Vedrines' 160 h.p. Gnome-Ponnier racing monoplane.
Sketch from the side of the Ponnier Racer.
The front portion of the Ponnier racing monoplane.
THE PONNIER RACING MONOPLANE. - Plan, front and side elevations to scale.
Mr. Louis Noel racing on the new Grahame-White tractor biplane, known down Hendon way as "Lizzie." He created a record by winning, on a new type of machine the first time out, the race in which he took part.
The Bleriot biplane and the Bleriot waterplane at the Paris Salon.
Three-quarter rear view of the new Bleriot biplane. Nearer view of the tall planes.
One half of chassis of new Bleriot biplane.
Nacelle and chassis of the Bathiat-Sanchez biplane.
The Bathiat-Sanchez stand at the Paris Salon.
Rear portion of the Sanchez-Besa chassis.
Two of the monoplanes on the Bleriot stand at the Paris Salon.
Chassis and engine mounting of the Bleriot monocoque. On the right a view of the armoured nose.
THE BATHIAT-SANCHEZ MONOPLANE. - On the fight the chassis and engine mounting.
The Bathiat-Sanchez stand at the Paris Salon.
DETAIL OF THE SPRINGING OF THE BATHIAT-SANCHEZ MONOPLANE.
The Caudron stand at the Paris Salon.
The Caudron hydro-biplane, and a view of the rudder and tall float.
The nacelle of the Caudron hydro.
The Ratmanoff (in the foreground) and the De Beer monoplanes at the Paris Salon.
The Ratmanoff (in the foreground) and the De Beer monoplanes at the Paris Salon.
AT THE PARIS SALON. - The Paul Schmitt biplane.
The Henry Farman military machine.
The Farman machines at the Paris Salon.
Tail planes of the Henry Farman.
Maurice and Henry Farman nacelles.
The Farman machines at the Paris Salon.
Nacelle and floats of the M. Farman hydro-biplane.
One of the main floats of the M. Farman hydro.
Maurice and Henry Farman nacelles.
Attachment of main float on M. Farman hydro. On the right one of the tall floats.
The propeller and tall planes of the Borel "Ruby."
The Borel military monoplane.
The Borel exhibited at the Paris Salon.
The Nieuport machines at the Paris Salon.
The latest Henry Farman hydro-aeroplane in flight at the Monaco Meeting.
Front and side elevations of the new 80-h.p. Gnome-engined military Bleriot two-seater, which is at present going through its tests at Buc, in France.
Chassis and engine mounting of the Bleriot monocoque. On the right a view of the armoured nose.
Guillaux just getting away on his military all-metal Clement-Bayard monoplane in his successful try for the Coupe Pommery, when he covered approximately 1,400 kiloms. by flying from Biarritz to Kollum in the day.
The new Cody Army 'bus at Farnborough, after it was taken over by the Government recently, and before its transference to Olympia for exhibition.
DETAILS OF THE CODY BIPLANE. - The sketch on the left shows the covered-in pilot's cockpit and control wheel, that on the right the mounting of the wing-tip wheels.
AT OLYMPIA. - A study in tail-skids.
Not a swallow chasing a fly, but the Handley Page and a Henry Farman over the sheds at Hendon.
The 80-h.p. Short hydro-biplane.
The 80-h,p. Short tractor hydro-biplane.
The floats of the 80-h.p. Short hydro-biplane.
The Stringlellow models. - The monoplane was built in 1848 by Stringfellow after collaboration with Henson, and was the first self-propelled aeroplane of any kind to support itself by its own power. The triplane was built in 1868 bv Strlngfellow, and was demonstrated at the Crystal Palace Exhibition in that year. It was subsequently bought by Prof. Langley, and is now in the Smithsonian Museum at Washington, D.C. The monoplane is in the Victoria and Albert Museum, London.
AT OLYMPIA SHOW. - The 70.h.p. Bristol biplane, as seen from the side.
The new 70-h.p. Bristol biplane, one of the features of the Olympia Show.
Lieut. Roger Marshall, R.F.A. (Reserve), another pupil who passed his brevet tests at the Bristol, Lark Hill, School, in a 15-m.p.h. wind.
A school group at the Bristol Flying School, Amesbury, Wilts., showing just a few pupils grouped round one of the two-seater biplanes. Reading from left to right: Mr. Jullerot, pilot; Mr. David Tod, pupil, who is flying the monoplane excellently; Lieut. Marshall, pupil; Lieut. Chidson, pupil; Mr. C. H. Platon; Herr Paschen, a pilot of the German Bristol School; Mr. Fellows, of the Bristol Co.; Mr. Harrison, pilot; and Lieut Bromet, R.N., pupil.
The 70-h.p. Renault-Bristol biplane.
Front view of the 80 h.p. Blackburn monoplane.
Side view of the 80 h.p. Blackburn monoplane.
An 80 h.p. two-seater Blackburn monoplane which has just been built for and supplied to Dr. M. G. Christie for touring purpases. On its test flight Mr. Blackburn climbed to about 7,000 ft. in 10 mins., and since its delivery about a couple of weeks ago it has made a number of cross-country flights, and is at present making a tour of the Yorkshire towns piloted by Mr. H. Blackburn, with its owner, Dr. Christie, as passenger. The machine has a fine gliding angle, and ranges in speed from about 40 to 70 m.p.h. In the side view the simplified chassis, the turtle back on the fuselage, and the new tall planes should be noted.
View from behind of the 80 h.p. Blackburn monoplane.
TWO MORE SNAPS OF MR. H. BLACKBURN AND HIS MONOPLANE AT BRIDLINGTON. - On the left "swinging" the propeller, and on the right just away.
MR H. BLACKBURN AT BRIDLINGTON WITH HIS MONOPLANE. - A couple of snaps taken by Mr. C. S. Burney, of Berkhamsted. On the right is a picture of Mr. H. Blackburn taken from the passenger seat.
THE YORKSHIRE AIR RACE. - The Avro biplane and the Blackburn monoplane in line just at the moment of getting away.
A couple of snaps of the Blackburn monoplane, taken by Mr. H. V. Roe from the Avro biplane, piloted by Mr. F. P. Raynham in the Yorkshire Air Race between York and Doncaster on October 2nd. Both competitors were well up, and by the photographs it will be seen the weather was extremely wretched with a haze over everything.
Rib construction on the Blackburn monoplane.
Attachment of bracing cables to main spar.
THE 80 H.P. BLACKBURN MONOPLANE. - Plan, side and front elevations to scale.
A fine bit of banking by Mr. Claude Grahame-White on the Henry Farman at the Hendon Aerodrome.
The 80-h.p. Henry Farman biplane.
THE SOPWITH WATERPLANE. - A view of the machine taken at the works before being dismantled for transport to Southampton for the Daily Mail Race.
ROUND BRITAIN FLIGHT. - The Green-engined Sopwith waterplane immediately alter arriving at the Yarmouth control. Mr. Hawker and his passenger, Mr. Kauper, are seen on the floats.
ROUND BRITAIN FLIGHT. - The Green-engined Sopwith waterplane "in control" at Ramsgate on Monday.
THE ROUND BRITAIN WATERPLANE RACE. - Mr. Hawker starting on the Sopwith machine on Saturday morning, August 16th, from Southampton Water.
ROUND BRITAIN FLIGHT. - Arrival of the Sopwith machine at Scarborough, and on the right, Royal Aero Club officials - Messrs. Wallace Barr, B. M. Dodds and W. E. Nicoll - escorting Hawker to the official yacht.
The beautiful silver scale model of the Sopwith waterplane used in the Daily Mail Circuit of the United Kingdom which was presented to Mr. Hawker by the distributors of Shell Motor Spirit. This delightful specimen of the silversmith's art was manufactured by Messrs. Mappin and Webb, Ltd.
"SIX KNOTS AND SIXTY." - Mr. Hawker, on the Sopwith waterplane, shortly after leaving Southampton on Saturday morning, August 16th, in the Daily Mail Round Britain Race, passing over a tramp. - From a drawing by Roderic Hill.
THE SOPWITH WATERPLANE. - 1. Analytical sketch, showing method of joining engine-bearer to fuselage strut. 2. Three-quarter front view of fuselage, showing engine housing and radiators. 3. One of the main floats. 4. The tail float. 5. Petrol pump.
THE SOPWITH WATERPLANE. - Plan, side and front elevations to scale.
The Wight Seaplane, piloted by Mr. Gordon England, in flight.