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Журнал
Flight за 1911 г.
754

Журнал - Flight за 1911 г.

Mrs. Asquith, Miss Asquith, and Master Asquith watching Mr. Gustav Hamel preparing his Bleriot monoplane on Saturday at Brooklands, in readiness for the flight to Brighton.
SAN FRANCISCO AVIATION MEETING. - On the left general view of the flying grounds in front of the Grand Stand, with T. Radley's Bleriot and Brookins' Wright biplane ready for flying. On the right Radley at the wheel of his car, with Hubert Latham by his side and U.S. Army officers in the tonneau.
Holding back Mr. Hamel on a Grahame-White Bleriot at the London Aerodrome upon the occasion when Mr. Hamel flew across country, as reported last week, losing himself in the fog, and having to descend in a field at the top of Mill Hill to ascertain his whereabouts.
INCIDENTS AT HENDON. - The impatient Bleriot monoplane before flight, and returning to its hangar after work.
STARTING FOR THE BRIGHTON RACE. - Hamel just off on his Bleriot.
Mr. Morison and his Bleriot at the moment before starting from Brooklands Aerodrome last Saturday for his flight to Hurst Park and back.
THE FIRST AERIAL POST OF THE U.K. - Hamel leaving the Hendon Aerodrome on his Bleriot for his 108-m.p.h. journey to Windsor on Saturday last.
BROOKLANDS TO BRIGHTON RACE. - Hamel, the winner, after one circuit of the aerodrome, passing away for his trip to Brighton.
BROOKLANDS-BRIGHTON RACE. - Gustav Hamel, the winner, crossing the pier at Brighton and winning the race on Saturday last.
Mr. O. C. Morison making a graceful turn at Brooklands on a Bleriot monoplane prior to his 6,000-ft. altitude flight.
"INTERNATIONAL AVIATORS" IN AMERICA. - Rene Simon is seen at El Paso returning from his trip over the Mexican insurgents' camp.
Mr. Gustav Hamel arriving last week at Bushey Hall Golf Club on his Bleriot monoplane. He is seen just descending on the fifth green after having flown the seven miles from Hendon intabout 5 1/2 mins.
HENDON-BROOKLANDS-HENDON. - Mr. Hamel, who made best times, arrives at Brooklands from Hendon on Saturday. His Bleriot is seen on the ground, and inset he is seen in the centre immediately after landing.
The two hangars erected by the Liverpool Aviation School at Sandheys Avenue, Waterloo, showing the School machine and the two-seater Bleriot on which Mr. Henry G. Melly, the Principal of the School, recently accomplished the circuit of Liverpool and Birkenhead, as recorded in FLIGHT.
Mdlle. Herveu being "chaired" by her admirers at Pau after her fine flights on a Bleriot for the Coupe Femina, when she was flying for 1 hr. 15 mins. and 2 hrs. 2 mins., having in the end, however, to cede first place to Mdlle. Dutrieu with her 167.2 kiloms. in 2 hrs. 35 mins.
Mr. Morison's machine after a sudden descent at Brooklands recently prior to a contemplated surprise visit by aeroplane to Brighton.
Hamel (to the right) bringing In a Grahame-White School Bieriot after a cross-country flight from the London Aerodrome at Hendon.
A 100 TO 1 REDUCTION IN HORSE POWER. - Grahame-White's Gordon-Bennett racer leaving the London Aerodrome en route for the Royal Aero Club's stand at Olympia.
ERECTING AND DISMANTLING TEST. - The Bleriot military monoplane with which this item of the programme was carried out at the Hendon Demonstration. Below, the Bleriot on its transport wagon; and above, immediately after the order for erection had been issued.
THE WOMEN'S AERIAL LEAGUE AT HENDON. - The recent visit of the members of the Women's Aerial League to the London Aerodrome at Hendon. Though great disappointment was experienced in it not being possible to give any flights owing to the strong wind, the visitors were kept thoroughly interested in studying different points of the machines. Mr. Grahame-White is seen in the lower picture giving a practical lecture upon the Bleriot monoplane, whilst above, Mr. Compton Paterson is explaining the working of the Gnome engine.
Mr. Morrison, who, on his Bleriot last Saturday, made such fine flights from Brooklands over Weybridge, reaching an altitude of about 1,000 ft.
Mr. B. G. Bouwens. Lt. G. B. Hynes, R.G.A. Mr. St. Croix Johnstone.
Above we give three pupils of the Bleriot School, who, at the London Aerodrome, near Hendon, on the same day - December 28th - successfully qualified for their Royal Aero Club's pilot certificates. Easily a record for Great Britain.
Mr. Hamel on one of the Grahame-White Bleriot machines at the London Aerodrome.
Signor Quinto Poggioli, who has iust obtained his pilot's certificate from the Royal Aero Club, having qualified at the New Forest Aviation School at Beaulieu on a Blerlot monoplane.
AT THE GLASGOW BARRHEAD FLYING GROUNDS. - Mr. James Clinkskill about to start for a spin on his Bleriot.
CAPTAIN J. D. B. FULTON, R.F.A., The first and, up to the present, the only British officer to secure the Special Flying Certificate of the Royal Aero Club, for which the tests consist of a 100-mile cross-country flight, a 1,000-ft. altitude flight, and a vol plane, with engine completely stopped, from 500 ft.
IN THE WAR OFFICE AND PARLIAMENTARY ENCLOSURE AT THE HENDON DEMONSTRATION LAST WEEK, SHOWING ALL THE MACHINES IN LINE IN FRONT OF THE HANGARS. - In the distance, on the left of the photograph, is Mr. Armstrong Drexel's monoplane just had come to grief owing to a mechanic having wrongly crossed the wires of the elevating plane.
Two views of a scale model Bleriot built by Willyboldt Birkinger, which gained second place for construction.
Mr. Archie Allan in his flight costume with which he secured first prize at Tynemouth Palace Skating Carnival. It represents a Bleriot C.C. monoplane (one-sixth full size).
PARIS-MADRID RACE. - Diagrammatic sketches of some of the machines entered in the race.
THE LATEST TYPE OF MILITARY DEPERDUSSIN MONOPLANE. - This is one of the machines which has been participating in the Military Competition at Rheims, and is engined with a 100-h.p. Gnome.
Vedrines, on a Deperdussin monoplane, just receiving the signal to depart for the long flight test in connection with the military competition at Rheims.
Latest model of the Etrich Monoplane, which has just been acquired by the Austrian Army. - These machines are constructed by the Motor-Luftfahrzeug-Gesellschaft of Hutteldorferstrasse, Vienna. In our photograph Oberlieutenant Miller, who has charge of the machine, is in the pilot's seat; in front the Army delegates, Rittmeister Schmidl, Captain von Petroczy, First Lieutenant Blaschke, First Lieutenant Stohanzl, the Managing Directors of the Motor-Luftfahrzeug-Gesellschaft, Kommerzialrat Castiglioni, Director of the Austro-American India-Rubber Manufacturing Co., Ltd., of Vienna, and Director Fischer of the Oesterreichische Daimler Motoren A . G .; and next to the propeller Mr. Illner, the Etrich pilot.
THE DAILY MAIL CIRCUIT OF BRITAIN. - General panoramic view of the scene at the Brooklands aerodrome for the start on Saturday last, taken from the new bridge over the track to the flying ground. Note the extraordinary concourse of motor cars parked round the entire track and the thouthands of the public who have secured positions on the top of the banking. The machine to the left surrounded by the crowd is Lieut. Bier's Etrich monoplane.
Lieut. Bier, with his passenger, starts away on the Etrich.
AN INCIDENT DURING THE RECENT JOHANNISTHAL FLYING WEEK. - Photograph taken from Pietschker's aeroplane, before he met with his death, of the Johanntsthal aerodrome and of Miss Melli Beese flying on her aeroplane.
The 130-h.p. Etrich monoplane photographed from the front.
Rear view of the Etrich monoplane.
The cockpit of the Etrich monoplane, showing accommodation for mechanic, pilot and passenger.
The motor employed on the 3-seater Etrich monoplane - a 6-cyl. Austro-Daimler of 130-h.p.
MONOPLANES AND BIPLANES IN THE DAILY MAIL CIRCUIT ROUND GREAT BRITAIN. - From these every machine can be readily identified either in flight or on the ground.
DETAILS OF THE ETRICH MONOPLANE. - On the left the landing carriage, somewhat reminiscent of Henry Farman practice; on the right the details of the wing tip, showing a portion of the steel bridge-like structure which strengthens the wings, and the fitting of the small wheel which prevents damage occurring to the tip of the wing.
Diagram illustrating the arrangement of spars and ribs in the wing construction. The shaded portion indicates the rigid portion of the wings; the trailing edge, unshaded, is flexible.
THE ETRICH MONOPLANE. - Plan and elevation to scale.
Front elevation of the Etrich monoplane.
General view of the Bregnet biplane from in front.
The military-type Breguet biplane upon which M. Louis Breguet, accompanied by M. Pierre Chaussier, recently put up a fine record for 50 kiloms. in 34m. 54 4/5s. and 100 kiloms. in 1h. 9 m. 28 4/5s. This machine is now being introduced into Great Britain by Mr. Arthur Turner of 173, Piccadilly.
View from behind of one of the new Military Breguet Biplanes which have been employed during the French Manoeuvres. - The three officers on board are able to dispose themselves quite comfortably in the body of this machine.
The Breguet biplane, an example of the monoplane-type body applied to biplane construction. The engine is in front, and the entire body is enclosed from head to tail. The passenger sits in front of the pilot, and being approximately on the centre of pressure, his presence does not seriously affect the balance of the machine.
UNDERCARRIAGES AT OLYMPIA. - The Breguet mechanism.
Close view of the prow of the Breguet biplane, showing the very characteristic armour-plated appearance of the body. The entire framework of this machine is made of steel.
THE LATEST BREGUET. - View showing the bows of one of these machines fitted with a Breguet flexible propeller gear-driven at slow speed from a Gnome rotary engine.
GEAR DRIVING A PROPELLER FROM A GNOME ROTSRY ENGINE. - Detail view of the latest Breguet, showing how a Gnome rotary engine is used to drive a Breguet flexible propeller at reduced speed. The blades of the Breguet flexible propeller are hinged to the boss, and are anchored by springs so arranged as to allow the blades to fold back a little towards the engine under exessive pressure. The purpose of this mechanism is to diminish the stress due to gyroscopic and centrifugal force resulting from sudden changes of the attitude of the machine in flight.
Undercarriage of the Breguet biplane.
One of the results of the French aviation tests has been the increase ia popularity of the four-bladed propeller. The above photograph illustrates a four-bladed propeller fitted to a Breguet biplane, and driven by a 100-h.p. Gnome engine through reduction gearing. Use is also made of a similar propeller on a 100-h.p. Nieuport monoplane.
AT THE PARIS AERO SALON. - The current trend of design towards the torpedo type of body is well illustrated by these photographs: the Aero Torpedo on the left is the two-seater Breguet, with Chenu motor, and on the right is the unfinished Morane-Saulnier war monoplane; it is constructed entirely of steel, including the wing skeletons.
AT DOUAI. - A Breguet biplane in the air.
A souvenir from Henri Bregi, dated from Rabat, Morocco, where be arrived with his Breguet triplane recently, and remained for about five days owing to the violent sand-storms.
Henri Bregi's Breguet machine in Morocco.
Tail of the Breguet biplane.
The Breguet military biplane packed for conveyance by road by car. - On the right the machine is seen with wings closed for easy transport for short distances.
The Breguet biplane with its wings folded for transport.
AVIATION AT THE FRENCH ARMY MANOEUVRES. - Some of the Bessonneau hangars at Vesoul, and the military aeroplanes which are giving such a splendid account of themselves.
The pilot's seat and the passenger accommodation on the Breguiet biplane.
M. Henri Bregi, one of the chief pilots of Breguet machines, taking instructions as a sapper from Lieut. Ludmann, aviation officer in command at Douai, in connection with a military aerial reconnaissance.
Sapper Henri Bregi, who has recently flown with a passenger and spares and tools from Cassablanca to Fez on a Breguet machine.
MONOPLANES AND BIPLANES IN THE DAILY MAIL CIRCUIT ROUND GREAT BRITAIN. - From these every machine can be readily identified either in flight or on the ground.
PARIS-MADRID RACE. - Diagrammatic sketches of some of the machines entered in the race.
Swivelling fore part of the under-carriage on the Breguet biplane.
Diagram illustrating the suspension of the undercarriage on the Breguet biplane.
On the left is a view of the knuckle-joint attachment of the wings to the body; in the centre is the universal-joint supporting the tail, and on the right is shown the method of anchoring the tie-wires to the base of a strut on the main plane.
Sketch illustrating the attachment of the rudder control wire to the elevating-plane of the tail on the Breguet biplane.
THE BREGUET BIPLANE. - Plan and Elevation to Scale.
General view of the Deperdussin monoplane.
Valentine making his rapid rise and turn on the Deperdussin.
EUROPEAN AVIATION CIRCUIT. - Valentine, the only British aviator, arriving at Hendon on his Deperdussin machine.
THE FLYING WEEK IN THE ISLE OF WIGHT. - Mr. Valentine making a high flight over the sea on his Deperdussin monoplane at Ventnor.
A fine bit of banking by Aubrun on a single-seater 80-h.p. Anzani-engined Deperdussin racer during the Rheims Military Aeroplane Competition.
Mr. Valentine, on his Deperdussin machine, tuning up his Gnome engine for a flight at Ventnor in the Isle of Wight. On the right Mr. Valentine is just landing after an exhibition trip in the air.
FLYING IN THE ISLE OF WIGHT. - Mr. Valentine and his Deperdussin when landing at Ventnor came down on some very rough ground, and he is seen in our photograph having the machine lifted over a wall into a more suitable field for recommencing flying.
AVIATION IN THE ISLE OF WIGHT. - Mr. Valentine, who has been flying his Deperdussin monoplane, is seen arriving by car on the left at the Ventnor grounds; and on the right, waiting in the shade of his machine for a pair of mislaid goggles before starting his flight.
Disc wheels, which were originated by the Short Bros., have made their appearance on many of the machines entered for the French Military Tests. They have been fitted to the Paulhan and Astra triplanes and to the Deperdussin monoplane. The above photograph shows the fitting of a new 80-h.p. Anzanl to a machine of the latter type. It is evident that the front upturned extensions of the skids have proved of little use beyond contributing to the machine's gracefulness of outline, for in this machine they have been done away with.
MESSRS. D. LAWRENCE SANTONI and LIEUT. J. CYRIL PORTE, R.N., Two pilots who are the first to establish and operate a British factory for a foreign aeroplane, viz., the Deperdussin.
Mr. G. M. Dyott and Capt. Patrick Hamilton of the Worcestershire Regiment, who have been flying so well in America after learning to fly in England.
A memento of the late Capt. Hamilton, who was killed whilst flying near Hitchin with Lieut. Wyness-Stuart. This card was sent us by Capt. Hamilton and Mr. G. M. Dyott from America last year, where the two were flying at the time. Capt. Hamilton was one of the old pupils of the late M. Petitpierre at the Hendon Bleriot School, and both he and Mr. Dyott, who was also a pupil of Petitpierre, had the greatest admiration for their helpful instructor, to whom they jointly presented a mark of their appreciation last August twelvemonth. By Capt. Hamilton's death the Army has indeed lost a valuable officer.
GENERAL VIEW OF THE THIRD PARIS AERO SALON. - The machine at the bottom of the photograph is the Bleriot 100-h.p. "Aeronef," built to the order of M. Henri Deutsch de la Meurthe. On the same side, but towards the centre of the Exhibition, may be seen the Zodiac biplane and the Borel and Deperdussin monoplanes, while opposite are the Train and H. Farman monoplanes and Savary and M. Farman biplanes.
Prevost, who, on a Deperdussin monoplane, made second best time in the final cross-country test for the French Military Competition.
The Deperdussin Monoplane. Sketch illustrating method of attaching rear landing carriage strut and stranded wire "belly-band."
Method of cross-bracing the main body adopted in the Deperdussin monoplane.
The 50-h.p. Deperdussin racer.
THE DEPERDUSSIN MONOPLANE. - Plan and elevation to scale.
FROM MECHANIC TO LEGION OF HONOUR. - The above interesting photograph reaches us from Mr. E. J. Crisp, of Market Harborough, and serves as a memento of M. Vedrines when he was acting as mechanic to Mr. Robert Loraine. The occasion was Mr. Loraine's visit to Colwyn Bay last summer, the two being seen standing together manipulating the Gnome engine.
STARTING FOR THE BRIGHON RACE. - Lieut. Snowden-Smith just released for his start on his British-built Farman biplane for Brighton.
Mr. Maurice Ducrocq flying on a Henry Farman at Brooklands in an attempt upon the 100 Miles Passenger-carrying Record. Note the boy scout in charge of one of the lantern-bedecked "mark-posts" of the course.
Capt. Burke in flight at Aldershot on the British Army Farman biplane during the first successful flight and before the mishap to the machine.
FLYING ROUND THE LEANING TOWER OF PISA. - Mario Cobianchi circling the famous tower recently. Note the cheering spectators on the two galleries at the top of the tower.
FLYING OVER VENICE. - Cagno, the chief pilot of the Italian School of Aviation at Pordenone, on his H. Farman, flying over Venice on March 2nd. Immense enthusiasm was evinced at the performance, and the band at the foot of St. Mark's Tower, which is now 78 metres high, played the Royal Italian Hymn in honour of the event. Note the agitation amongst the pigeons round the church spires occasioned by this visit.
AVIATION AT THE FRENCH MILITARY MANOEUVRES ROUND ABOUT VERDUN. - Lieut. Blard and Capt. Lebeau in their Farman biplane passing over the Kellermann monument at Valmy.
Mr. G. Blondeau, who with Mrs. Maurice Hewlett had such a very unpleasant experience at Plymouth last week, flying at Brooklands on a Farman biplane, with which he in the past has done such fine flying. As we recorded last week, Mr. Blondeau and Mrs. Hewlett in a very sportsmanlike manner returned their fees in view of the clamorous and unbecoming behaviour of the crowd who were kept waiting for a short period for the flying.
Mr. Paterson, of Freshfield, arriving, with Mr. King as passenger, on their Farman biplane at Altcar on the first day, to witness the coursing for the Waterloo Cup.
Mr. C. L. A. Hubert flying high, on his Wolseley-engined Farman, in a mist at the London Aerodrome.
A fine banking by Grahame-White at Hendon on a Henry Farman biplane.
NO NEED TO WORRY. - This is not an aviator in the last spasms of despair "crashing down" to earth, but just Mr. Maurice Ducrocq flying at Brooklands on his Henry Farman with his hands free from all controlling gear. Yet aviation has not advanced since the Wright Bros, first flew!
"CHASSE-CROlSE" IN THE AIR. - Reminiscence of an incident - one of many similar daily - at Rouen Aviation Meeting last year. Dubonnet, on his Tellier monoplane, crossing under Capt. Dickson on his Henry Farman biplane.
AT BROOKLANDS AERODROME. - Mr. Blondeau in the air with Mrs. Hewlett in the Hewlett and Blondeau School Farman, flying over Mr. Eric England's Hanriot monoplane.
AT BROOKLANDS - FLYING AT DUSK. - Mr. Ducrocq, on the Hewlett and Blondeau Henry Farman biplane passing over Mr. Blondeau's machine at rest on the aerodrome.
Weyman, the great pilot of the Nieuport monoplane, in the earlier days was a biplane pilot. Our photograph above shows him and Tetard each on Henry Farman machines rounding a mark tower during a race meeting.
A trio in flight at the London Aerodrome, Hendon. Two Henry Famans and, in the foreground, a Type A Valkyrie.
Mr. Valentine on the Macfie biplane passing over Mr. Ducrocq's Henry Farman at Brooklands last Saturday.
Mr. Amos' flight with Mr. Compton Paterson.
STARTING TO SEE THE OXFORD AND CAMBRIDGE BOAT RACE. - Mr. Grahame-White leaving Hendon on Saturday.
SEEING THE OXFORD AND CAMBRIDGE BOAT RACE BY AEROPLANE. - The finish at Mortlake on Saturday last, with one of the flyers, which appeared upon the scene during the contest, overhead.
The Grahame-White-Bleriot contingent who flew from Hendon on Saturday last and witnessed the Oxford and Cambridge Boat-Race from their aeroplanes, just before their start. From left to right: Mr. Paterson, the Liverpool aviator, who accompanied Mr. Grahame-White as passenger, Messrs. Prier, C. H. Greswell, Claude Grahame-White, Hubert, and G. Hamel.
THE GREAT HENDON DEMONSTRATION. - Two snaps of Grahame-White on his Henry Farnmn biplane when making a sharp turn and a vol plane. These photographs were taken with the camera held perfectly horizontal, so that the machine is seen at the angles at which the evoluticns were actually carried out.
A couple of vol planes by Grahame-White on his Henry Farman at the Hendon Demonstration last week. - In the left-hand photograph Mr. McKenna is flying as passenger with Mr. Grahame-White.
A swoop down across the enclosures and machines from over the hangars by Grahame-White at the Hendon Demonstration last week during one of his exhibition flights. From this it will be seen how close down it is possible with perfect safety to steer.
MR. R. A. KING'S FLIGHT TO COLWYN BAY FROM FRESHFIELD. - Filling up tanks before returning, and iust away.
Mr. R. A. King well up on his return journey to Freshfield from Colwyn Bay.
Lieut. Cammerman, winner of the Lazare Weiller Cross-country Prize for French officers, on his Henry Farman biplane, Gnome motor. Lieut. Cammerman's flight was Bouy-Montigny-sur-Aube-Bouy, 232 kils. in 4h. 2m. 30s.
Mdlle. Helene Dutrieu, winner of the "Femina Cup" for lady flyers, in counsel with Mr. Henry Farman prior to her record flight at Etampes on her Henry Farman (Gnome motor), of 167.2 kiloms. in 2 hrs. 35 mins.
Capt. Burke ready for flying the British Army Henry Farman machine at Aldershot.
Mr. Blondeau ready to start at Brooklands with Mrs. Hewlett as passenger on their Henry Farman biplane.
Mrs. Hewlett, who is now flying one of the Henry Farmans at Brooklands attached to the Hewlett and Blondeau School. Note the sabots to the right which Mrs. Hewlett finds suitable wear this wet weather.
MRS. MAURICE HEWLETT. Who last week, on a Henry Farman biplane, secured her pilot's certificate from the Royal Aero Club, being the first British brevet issued to any woman. Mrs. Hewlett has received her tuition from Mr. Blondeau at Brooklands, and our picture above shows her in her aviation costume, the inset portrait being Mrs. Hewlett in ordinary life.
Mrs. J. V. Martin, who is flying so well at the Grahame-White School at Hendon.
PASSENGER CARRYING AT BROOKLANDS AERODROME. - Mr. Ducrocq, who is now, with his Henry Farman, one of the most energetic passenger-carrying pilots at Brooklands, in the pilot's seat before a start with Mrs. Keith Jones as passenger. Standing in front are, from left to right, Mrs. G. Phillips, Mr. Keith Jones, Mrs. Palmer, a Ducrocq pupil, and Mr. G. Phillips, both these gentlemen being associated as Directors of Messrs. Keith Prowse and Co. with the box office iust opened by that firm on the grounds and in direct communication
w i t h London for the booking of seats for flights, long and short.
Lieut. Snowden Smith, the Army aviator, on the Hewlett and Blondeau Henry Farman, just after taking Naval Lieut. F. E. T. Hewlett for a 10-mile flight at Brooklands.
Mr. J. V. Martin, the American aviator, who has just obtained his Royal Aero Club pilot certificate, on Mr, Grabame-White's E.N.V.-engined biplane at the London Aerodrome.
Mr. C. C. Paterson, with Mr. King as passenger, iust after their arrival at Altcar on their Farman biplane, for the Waterloo Cup.
Mr. C. L. A. Hubert - a Frenchman - who has just secured his R.Ae.C. pilot's certificate at the Grahame-White School at the London Aerodrome, Hendon. Mr. Hubert has been doing a lot of very successful flying on this Farman, which is fitted with a 60-h.p. Wolseley motor.
Lieut. Snowden Smith about to start on a trip from Brooklands on the Blondeau-Hewlett School biplane.
Mr. Ridley-Prentice, a pupil of the Grahame-White School at Hendon, who has made remarkably rapid progress, and has put up some good flights on the school Farman.
Mr. E. F. Driver, one of the recent pilots who have secured their Royal Aero Club brevet at the Grahame-Whlte School. His first cross-country flight was from Hendon to Windsor, which he reached after struggling against a strong wind for an hour and a half. He was accompanied by Capt. Vandeweyer as passenger.
Mrs. de Beauvor Stocks, who is flying so well at the Grahame-White School at Hendon. Mrs. Stocks hoped to qualify officially for her certificate this week.
MRS. C. DE BEAUVOIR STOCKS. The second lady to secure a Royal Aero Club pilot's certificate. Mrs. Stocks graduated for her air brevet at the Grahame-White school at Hendon, becoming proficient on a Henry Farman biplane. Inset is a photograph of Mrs. Stocks as in private life, from a photograph by " Kate Pragnell."
E. G. Norfield's Model Farman.
Detail sketch illustrating the rear elevating plane on the Farman biplane.
UNDERCARRIAGES AT OLYMPIA. - Comparative details in the construction of the Farman type wheel and skid combination.
The Morane monoplane on which M. Vedrines last week accomplished his splendid flight from Poitiers to Issy in 2 hrs. 12 mins. Note the twin skids, tip elevators, and taller rudder.
PARIS-MADRID RACE. - Vedrines' monoplane passing over the Pyrenees,
PARIS-MADRID RACE. - Vedrines' arrival at San Sebastian.
EUROPEAN AVIATION CIRCUIT. - The first man - Vedrines - to arrive at Hendon Aerodrome on Monday, he having started from Calais at 4 a.m., and after making stops at Dover and Shoreham, landed at Hendon at 8h. 34m. 53 1/5 s. To the left is Thiry, and on the right Ramondon, his two trusty assistants throughout the whole race.
DAILY MAIL CIRCUIT OF BRITAIN. - Vedrines on his Morane-Borel just away for Hendon.
The first arrival at Edinburgh. Vedrines planing down over the Timekeeper's hut.
CIRCUIT OF BRITAIN. - Vedrines "at rest" during his compulsory stopping time at Shoreham, before the last lap to Brooklands.
GENERAL VIEW OF THE THIRD PARIS AERO SALON. - The machine at the bottom of the photograph is the Bleriot 100-h.p. "Aeronef," built to the order of M. Henri Deutsch de la Meurthe. On the same side, but towards the centre of the Exhibition, may be seen the Zodiac biplane and the Borel and Deperdussin monoplanes, while opposite are the Train and H. Farman monoplanes and Savary and M. Farman biplanes.
Vedrines, the second man back, on his Morane Borel.
Vedrines, the great French flyer, whose unfortunate accident on Monday has once more laid him by the heels, in a characteristic attitude when on flying bent.
PARIS-MADRID RACE. - Diagrammatic sketches of some of the machines entered in the race.
MONOPLANES AND BIPLANES IN THE DAILY MAIL CIRCUIT ROUND GREAT BRITAIN. - From these every machine can be readily identified either in flight or on the ground.
THE TWO-SEATED NIEUPORT MONOPLANE BUILT TO COMPETE IN THE PARIS-MADRID RACE. - It will be observed that the framework of this machine is entirely covered so as to present minimum resistance to the air, while the chassis is made amply strong in view of landings which might have to be made unexpectedly and on rough ground.
C. T. Weymann, who, on his Nieuport machine, secured the Gordon-Bennett Cup for America in last Saturday's race at the Royal Aero Club's flying grounds, Hastchurch.
Mr. Weymann just before the signal to start from Rheims on his Nieuport monoplane for the final cross-country speed test in the Military Aviation Contest, in which he has been adjudged the premier position, he having covered the 300 kiloms. in the net time of 2 hrs. 34 mins.
MR. CLAUDE GRAHAME-WHITE IN AMERICA. - At the moment of starting on his 70-h.p. Nieuport monoplane at Boston, U.S.A. From a photograph supplied by Miss Grahame-White.
Mr. Claude Grahame-White passing some of the stands on his 70-h.p. Nieuport monoplane at the Boston Meeting, U.S.A.
PARIS AERO SALON. - Another general view, showing the Astra-Torres dirigible. The Roger Sommer exhibit is to the front of the photograph, while behind it is the Nieuport stand.
Grahame-White in his 70-h.p. Nieuport, at Boston. U.S.A., waiting to start for the race round the Boston Light.
PARIS-MADRID RACE. - Diagrammatic sketches of some of the machines entered in the race.
Sketch illustrating the control system on the Nieuport monoplane.
Sketch illustrating the Nieuport undercarriage.
THE NIEUPORT TWO-SEATER MONOPLANE. - Plan and Elevation to Scale.
GLENN CURTISS' START OFF WATER. - On the left the main pontoon is seen, and on the right the biplane is being towed on to the water for the first trial.
A good idea of the general arrangement of the two-seated hydroaeroplane built for the U.S. Navy by Glenn H. Curtiss. It is fitted with duplicate controls, the ailerons being operated by shoulder-braces, while the steering-wheel is hinged so that it may be passed from one to the other by the two occupants of the machine.
Lieuts. Ellyson and Towers on the new Curtiss hydroaeroplane of the U.S. Navy. The braces operating the ailerons can be seen on the shoulders of both officers, while the arrangement of the swinging steering-wheel is also clearly seen.
GLENN CURTISS' START OFF WATER - Sketch showing the position of pontoons at the instant of rising from the water.
Mr. Alec Ogilvie making his flight of 140 miles in 3 hrs. 55 mins., for the British Michelin Cup on his British-built N.E.C.-engined Wright flyer, on Camber Sands last week.
Mr. Ogilvie's Wright biplane in flight, showing the "blinkers" in front.
Mr. Alec Ogilvie, on his N.E.C. engined Short-Wright machine, flying well over the Camber sands during his recent fine flight for the Michelin Cup.
Another view of Mr. Alec Ogilvie rounding one of the mark rowers during his flight for the Michelin Cup on his N.E.C.-engined Short-Wright biplane.
TWO REMARKABLE SNAPSHOTS OF WRIGHT MACHINES IN FLIGHT. - That on the left shows Walter Brookins in the course of making a complete circle in 6 2/5 secs., while the photograph on the right was taken of Hoxsey's machine during the fearful plunge, following a "trick" descent, which caused the aviator's death.
SAN FRANCISCO AVIATION MEETING. - On the left general view of the flying grounds in front of the Grand Stand, with T. Radley's Bleriot and Brookins' Wright biplane ready for flying. On the right Radley at the wheel of his car, with Hubert Latham by his side and U.S. Army officers in the tonneau.
Full warp on Mr. Ogilvie's Wright biplane. Note the position of the rudder. The combined movements are the result of a permanent interconnection between the two mechanisms, and are effected by simply pushing the control lever forward.
View showing the position of the rudder on Mr. Ogilvie's Wright biplane when the handle of the control lever is turned over as illustrated.
View of the warp and rudder-control lever on Mr. Ogilvle's Wright biplane. On the right is the elevator-lever controlling the tail, and by its side is the friction-brake that holds it in position.
The late Capt. Englehard, who was recently killed at Johannisthal, looking over his German-Wright machine before making a flight at the German aerodrome.
Sketch illustrating the control of Mr. Ogilvie's Wright biplane,
Mr Collyns Pizey just about to start off from Salisbury Plain for Brighton with the Bristol biplane for Mr. O. C. Morlson, as described in our last issue. Mr. Fleming is in the foreground, and on the extreme right M. Vusepey. In the right-hand photograph are Mr. Hotchkiss, sitting at wheel of car, and Mr. Fleming, standing, who followed Mr. Pizey to Brighton by road.
Mr. E. Howard Pixton and his "Bristol" biplane, which he recently flew from Amesbury to Hayling Island, where he subsequently made some flights under the somewhat trying conditions of the gales which have been blowing in that district. The left-hand view shows the machine just starting for a flight in front of the Royal Hotel, with Lieut. Burney, R.N., and Mr. Farnall Thurston, of the Bristol firm, as passengers. The float under the seat should be noted, which is provided in case the machine should descend into the sea. The right-hand view shows the machine "camped" out for the night between a house and some bathing machines.
Mr. Low just "off" on his Bristol biplane at Brooklands Aerodrome.
STARTING FOR THE BRIGHTON RACE. - D. Graham Gilmour taking-off at Brooklands in the Bristol Boxkite No. 31 on 6 May, 1911, in the race to Brighton in which he came second.
OVER PORTSMOUTH BY AEROPLANE. - The somewhat suggestive photograph of a trip taken some little time ago by Mr. Graham Gilmour on a Bristol biplane, after having "shelled" Fort Blockhouse, when flying to Portsmouth a few days before. In our picture Mr. Gilmour is seen flying from the Haslar sea wall - a difficult rising ground by reason of the telegraph wires and other obstructions on the ground - out to sea on his way to Brighton.
Mr. Graham Gilmour giving an exhibition flight at Brooklands on the Bristol biplane last Saturday by way of gratifying the disappointed visitors who had foregathered to witness the start for the Brighton flight. At the time a very high wind, amounting almost to a gale, was blowing.
BROOKLANDS TO BRIGHTON RACE. - Graham Gilmour well up over Brooklands for the Brighton Race.
FLIGHT IN AUSTRALIA. - From New South Wales, Mr. A. H. Wakeford sends us the above interesting photographs of Mr. J. Hammond flying on his Bristol biplane at Ascot, Sydney, on May 5th last. On the left Hammond is crossing the main road during a trial spin, and on the right he is finishing the day with a high flight as the sun is setting.
IN THE CLOUDS. - A snapshot of Mr. H. M. Maitland flying over Salisbury Plain recently, the day before he had the accident which has temporarily taken him out of the aviators on the active list.
FLYING OVER SALISBURY PLAIN. - M. Maurice Tetard and Mr. A. R. Low flying their Bristol biplanes over Salisbury Plain. The photograph was taken while M. Tetard (on the right) was ascending for an altitude flight. On the left is the Bristol military type machine with the extended upper plane. The illustration affords an excellent comparison of the two types of machine in flight.
Mr. Low, on his Bristol biplane, getting well into the air at Brooklands. At rest are Mr. Sopwlth's Howard Wright biplane, and in the distance the Hanriot monoplane.
CARS AND FLYING AT BROOKLANDS. - Brooklands has now become quite a centre of activity by reason of the flying attractions daily in operation there. Two pictures, taken on Saturday last, above give some idea of the gatherings which assemble day by day around the actual flying village. In the upper photograph Mr. Tom Sopwith is flying his E.N.V.-engined Howard Wright biplane, one of the very successful Bristol machines being seen to the right. In the bottom picture Mr. Low, one of the expert pilots of the Bristol Co., is making one of his fine flights round the aerodrome.
AVIATION IN SINGAPORE. - Scene during the aviation meeting organised there in March. The photographs show Mr. Joseph Christiaens in full flight on a "Bristol" biplane, and below, his machine being wheeled out ready for "taking off."
FLYING AT BROOKLANDS ON EASTER MONDAY. - In spite of the high wind whteh prevailed at Brooklands, Mr. Pixton, on the Roe biplane, put up a good flight for the Endurance Prize, securing it with 1h. 27m. 32s. In our photograph Mr. Pixton is seen during this flight, the machine on terra firma being one of the famous Bristol biplanes.
AEROPLANES AND THE BRITISH ARMY. - Another photograph secured from Lieut. Barrington Kennett's biplane last week at Salisbury Plain in the early morning. In this some of the cavalry will be seen in the centre of the picture, and, away beyond on the horizon, the regiment is seen in full strength stretching across the plain.
AEROPLANES AND THE BRITISH ARMY. - A general view of Hamilton Camp, Salisbury Plain, where the 4th Cavalry Brigade are encamped in readiness for the divisional training. This picture was secured on Thursday morning of last week, at reveille, from the biplane of Lieut. Barrington Kennett, who has been putting up such splendid flying work recently. Note the shadow of the biplane in the extreme foreground.
STONEHENGE AS SEEN FROM A BRISTOL AEROPLANE. - This is, we believe, the first photograph of this ancient landmark as seen from above. It was secured at 5 a.m. by a member of FLIGHT staff when flying with Mr. C. P. Pizey on a Bristol biplane last week.
A new view of Stonehenge, taken from Mr. H. Busteed's "Bristol" biplane, by Mr. Dacre, a pupil, when flying as passenger.
AVIATION AT THE FRENCH ARMY MANOEUVRES. - Some of the Bessonneau hangars at Vesoul, and the military aeroplanes which are giving such a splendid account of themselves.
Mr. H J. Thomas, nephew of Sir George White, the head of the enterprising British and Colonial Aeroplane Company of Bristol, about to commence a flight on one of the Bristol machines. Mr. Thomas has the proud distinction of being the youngest certificated aviation pilot in Great Britain.
TWO OF THE FLYERS ON BRISTOL BIPLANES AT SALISBURY PLAIN. - On the left Mr. R. W. Philpott, and on the right Mr. E. Hotchkiss, who took his brevet on Tuesday, he being the ninth Bristol pupil to secure his certificate during the last three weeks.
Brigadier-General David Henderson, pupil of the British and Colonial School at Brooklands, who took his flying brevet last week.
LIEUT. B. H. BARRINGTON KENNETT. One of the most prominent aviators in the British Army.
AT THE BROOKLANDS "BRISTOL" SCHOOL. - In the pilot's seat Lieut. Harford, on the left Capt. Harrison, and on the right Mr. Fleming of the Bristol Co.
The Development of the R.E.P. monoplane. 1907. Absence of top fin, inverted Vee. 1908. Vee still inverted, partial remedy by top fin. 1909. Inverted Vee very slight and larger top fin. 1910. Stable Vee, fin above centre diminished.
A PEEP INTO THE POSSIBLE FUTURE. - An up-to-date method in Germany of advertising the German-built Wright flyers under the legend of "Wrights to the Front."
A "SPECIMEN" MODEL. - Model Farman biplane to scale, 1 in. to 1 ft., built by Mr. G. P. Smith, of Fulham, from the Twining Aeroplane Company's No. 10 parcel of materials and working drawings. The model is driven by a Chauviere pattern propeller geared in a ratio of 3 to 1 with the elastic rubber motor. The whole "power plant" is placed on the centre of gravity of the machine. The landing gear is exactly the same as in the prototype, with rubber ring suspension and radial arms. The rudders are moved by foot cross-bar, the elevator by lever on the right-hand side of the aviator's seat. Mr. Smith has put some very neat and careful work into the model, and the Twining Aeroplane Company inform us that they have had other fine examples sent them of Bleriot, Wright, and Antoinette machines made from their well-known sets of materials. These sets are in all cases accompanied by full drawings and instructions, and some twelve different parcels are in all supplied at prices ranging from 1s. to 3s. 9d.
The curious old handkerchief which chronicles the popular jokes of the period under the heading of "The Flying Steam Company. To China in twenty-four hours certain," which were directed at the machine so very much like the Antoinette of to-day, designed about 1848 by Stringfellow and Henson. This picture has been placed at our disposal by the Rev. Sidney Swann.
M. Vedrine, who has been making such fine flights at Issy on the Goupy biplane.
PARIS-MADRID RACE. - Diagrammatic sketches of some of the machines entered in the race.
The Selfridge Military Camp, San Francisco, from and back to which Eugene Ely flew on his Curtiss biplane when making his flight on to the U.S. warship "Pennsylvania." Note the Curtiss machine in readiness for its trip. On the right Eugene Ely is seen in flight across the sea at San Francisco, en route for the deck of the "Pennsylvania."
Mr. Eugene Ely just alighting with his Curtiss biplane on the special landing stage erected on the U.S. warship '"Pennsylvania" at San Francisco. Note the bags of sand connected up to act as brakes in stopping the aeroplane when running up the stage.
General view of the U.S. warship "Pennsylvania" at the moment when Eugene Ely was alighting on the special landing superstructure. Note the human masses of seamen manning every available inch of the vessel giving a sight of the feat.
"INTERNATIONAL AVIATORS" IN AMERICA. - On the left, Hamilton starting away for his scouting trip on the Mexican frontier. The "hangar" is where the machines rest. This holds comfortably twelve machines, which are roped off for exhibition purposes.
FLYING OVER NIAGARA FALLS. - It will be remembered we recently recorded the fact that Lincoln Beachey, on June 27th, flew over the Niagara cataract on a Curtiss biplane. Whatever view one may take of a feat of this character, at least the above picture records a remarkable achievement which will go down to history. The photograph shows Beachey passing under the upper steel bridge at Niagara Falls. After having circled over the cataract he then swooped down beneath the arches of the bridge and continued on down the gorge almost to the whirlpool, finally regaining terra firma on the Canadian side.
Mr. St. Henry flying on a Curtiss biplane at the Dominion Exhibition in Regina, Canada.
Eugene B. Ely. who made the remarkable flight on a Curtiss biplane on January 18th, starting from San Francisco and alighting on the deck of the warship "Pennsylvania" standing 13 miles out at sea, and then returning to his starting place. Beside him is Mrs. Ely.
John Wilmer sends us greeting from Plattsburg, N.Y., in the above photograph, as '"From the man who fell from the balloon last October 2nd, I fly at Ottawa County State Fair, week September 11th."
THE WRIGHT GLIDER IN OPERATION BY ORVILLE WRIGHT AT KILL DEVIL HILL, NORTH CALIFORNIA. - The photograph was taken from beneath, during the time when the glider was stationary in the air.
AT BROOKLANDS AERODROME. - Mr. Blondeau in the air with Mrs. Hewlett in the Hewlett and Blondeau School Farman, flying over Mr. Eric England's Hanriot monoplane.
Mr. Low, .on his Bristol biplane, getting well into the air at Brooklands. At rest are Mr. Sopwlth's Howard Wright biplane, and in the distance the Hanriot monoplane.
Mr. E. V. Beauchamp Fisher, one of our most skilled aviators, in the pilot's seat of his Hanriot monoplane with which he has been doing so much fine flying at Brooklands. Mr. Fisher has now joined Messrs. Vickers, Ltd.
THE 100-H.P. CLERGET-ENGINED HANRIOT MONOPLANE . AT THE MILITARY TESTS AT RHEIMS. - It will be noticed that changes have been made In the landing-carriage, two pairs of wheels now being employed in place of the single pair hitherto adopted. The situation of the petrol reservoir, as mentioned in our article on aeroplane fires in last week's issue, appears to be extremely unfavourable, for if a bad landing were made - one sufficiently rough to carry away the landing-chassls - it is more than probable that the tank would
rupture and a serious fire result.
Mr. England on the Hanriot monoplane at Brooklands.
Quite one of the most interesting experimental machines down at Brooklands is that which was described in very full detail by us as long ago as February 5th last year. Not only does it unusually large size (a total surface of some 1,200 sq. ft.) render it notable, but the entire form of construction is quite unlike that of any of the other aeroplanes now in existence, and is based upon the results of a remarkable series of experiments that were conducted before this particular full-sized biplane was put in hand - results which seem to indicate the possession of an astonishing degree of automatic stability. A good general idea of the hollow rhomboidal (or diamond) shape is conveyed by the above illustration, as also of the special girder construction of the framework, and the disposition of the propelling mechanism.
Another three-quarter view - in this case from the rear - of the unique diamond-shaped biplane now being tested at Brooklands. This photograph shows the elevator and the rudder, both of which are attached at the extreme rear, and also perhaps serves to convey a useful supplementary impression concerning the tout ensemble. In front the converging planes are narrow, being only about 3 ft. deep, whereas those that join the front planes at the point of greatest width of the framework, and meet at the extreme rear, have a depth of some 9 ft. A Humber engine of about 50-h.p. is fitted.
The new Edwards rhomboidal biplane at Brooklands out for an airing on Saturday last. - This machine, it will be remembered, was described in FLIGHT on February 5th, 1910. Flying in perfect form above is Capt. F. H. wood on a Bristol machine.
FLYING IN IRELAND. - The "Mayfly," the Bland biplane, with Miss Lilian E. Bland, its designer and constructor, in the pilot's seat, in full flight at Carnamoney, near Belfast, where this very enterprising lady is carrying on her work of building machines. Our photograph was
secured during a foggy and hard frosty day.
MISS L. E. BLAND'S "MAYFLY." - View showing the general arrangement of the controls. The main lever of the Farman action type is made of steel tubing, and it will be seen that bicycle pedals have been fitted to the footlevers as longer pull was required with new type of rudder. Wire connections have been found better than rods for the petrol and throttle-levers seen at the side of the seat which is enclosed in fabric.
MISS BLAND'S MODEL MAYFLY, TYPE NO. 2. - Towed flight (on left), and soaring (on right).
Front view of the Sanders biplane, Type I.
Side view of the Sanders biplane, Type I.
The Sanders biplane, showing the downturned extremities of the upper planes, and a view showing how the main planes on the Sanders biplanelare hinged in order to temporarily reduce the span.
UNDERCARRIAGES AT OLYMPIA. - The Sanders and Valkyrie varieties of the girder skid.
Captain Sanders at the helm of his biplane.
Sketch illustrating the mechanism of the disappearing axle on the Sanders biplane. By releasing a catch the axle and wheels are drawn above the level of the skids, on which latter members the machine can therefore land direct.
UNDERCARRIAGES AT OLYMPIA. - A comparison of some girder skids.
THE SANDERS BIPLANE. - Plan and elevation to scale.
M. Sommer with his five passengers on his Sommer biplane, with whom he ilew from Douzy to Romilly and back, as recorded in our last issue.
Mr. H. J. D. Astley on his Sommer biplane at Brooklands. - Mr. Astley, on this machine on Saturday, gave a remarkable display of his airmanship when he had to steer between a telegraph pole and Mr. Conway's smashed triplane, with only about 2 ft. clearance to spare.
M. H. Pequet, who has recently returned from his very successful flying exhibitions at Allahabad, where he conveyed the first aerial post ever officially recognised. M. Pequet is flying for Messrs. Humber, Ltd., at Brooklands on a Humber biplane, Sommer type, the machine on which he is seen being the biplane exhibited at the last Olympia Aero Show. Early last Saturday he made two flights of a quarter of an hour's duration, and on Sunday morning he was flying for 1 hr. and 10 mins., during which he first covered several circuits of the Brooklands course, and then made a cross-country flight over Walton and Wey bridge.
Sketch illustrating how the attitude of the tail is adjusted by a hand wheel on the Sommer-type Humber biplane.
The Farman military biplane on the Aeroplane Supply Co.'s stand.
RENAUX'S PARIS-PUY DE DOME FLIGHT. - The Maurice Farman biplane is seen arriving on the left, and on the right a closer view of the machine, with the Observatory in the background.
PARIS-MADRID RACE. - Diagrammatic sketches of some of the machines entered in the race.
UNDERCARRIAGES AT OLYMPIA. - A comparison of some girder skids.
UNDERCARRIAGES AT OLYMPIA. - A crossjoint on the Maurice Farman outrigger.
UNDERCARRIAGES AT OLYMPIA. - Comparative details in the construction of the Farman type wheel and skid combination.
"CHASSE-CROlSE" IN THE AIR. - Reminiscence of an incident - one of many similar daily - at Rouen Aviation Meeting last year. Dubonnet, on his Tellier monoplane, crossing under Capt. Dickson on his Henry Farman biplane.
A Dansette-Gillet engine on a Voisln biplane.
LATEST VOISIN DESIGN. - General view of the body of the two-seater, showing the arrangement of the engine and control.
LATEST VOISIN DESIGN. - Front view of the body of a two-seater, showing the arrangement of the duplicate steering wheels.
LATEST VOISIN DESIGN. - Front view of the two-seater, showing the overhanging upper plane and the lightness of the framework generally, which is built up of steel tubes. This machine, with double control gear is specially intended for the Army.
LATEST VOISIN DESIGN. - View showing the bracing of the overhung portion of the upper plane.
Mr. Gilmour has a look round before settling down in his seat in "Big Bat" Bleriot for a spin round Brookiands Aerodrome.
Mr. Astley, on " Big Bat" Bleriot at Brooklands recently, just getting away with a passenger. - Note the mechanics on the ground helping to hold back the machine by the skid wheels.
AT THE LIVERPOOL A.C. GYMKHANA. - Mr. H. Melly, the Principal of the Liverpool Aviation School, ilying over the gymkhana grounds on Saturday on his 50-h.p. Gnome-Bleriot.
Mr. H. G. Melly on his two-seater Bleriot, as seen from the s.s. "Victorian" lying in the Mersey. This photograph, by Mr. Alex Reid, gives an excellent idea of the height and position of the machine over the Mersey.
AT THE LIVERPOOL POLO GROUND. - A vol plane by Mr. H. G. Melly on his Bleriot.
Liverpool, Manchester and the Mersey, seen fiom Mr. H. G. Melly's two-seater Bleriot, as snapped by his passenger. 1. Leaving Waterloo, looking back over Blundell Sands to the Mersey. 2. Over Rainhill, looking back at Prescot. 3. Leaving Manchester, looking back. 4. Over the Mersey, taken from over the Herculaneum Dock. 5. Looking back over the Sloyne and "Lusitania." 6. Looking down the Mersey to the estuary.
TESTING THE WINGS OF A BLERIOT MONOPLANE WITH SAND LOAD. - Standing on the left are Mr. Grahame-White, M. Bleriot, Col. Bouttieaux, General Roques, &c.
The two hangars erected by the Liverpool Aviation School at Sandheys Avenue, Waterloo, showing the School machine and the two-seater Bleriot on which Mr. Henry G. Melly, the Principal of the School, recently accomplished the circuit of Liverpool and Birkenhead, as recorded in FLIGHT.
Miss Harriett Quimby, a native of California, who has just been awarded the pilot's certificate of the Aero Club of America, this being the first woman's certificate Issued by the Club. Miss Quimby passed her tests at Mineola, Long Island, on a Moisant monoplane.
Miss Harriet Quimby, who on Tuesday last, on a Bleriot monoplane, flew the Channel from Dover to Equihen - the first time the feat has ever been accomplished by a lady pilot unaccompanied.
Miss Mathilde Moisant in the pilot's sieat of her machine just before the start for the Rodman Wanamaker Trophy for height for women at the Nassau Boulevard Meeting on September 24th.
UNDER-CARRIAGES AT OLYMPIA. - A comparison in tail skid construction.
The well-known Bleriot undercarriage.
THE PATERSON BIPLANE. - The view on the left shows how the engine is mounted in the Paterson biplane, while the other view clearly illustrates the extremely neat and handy method of attaching wires and strainers at the point marked X in the left photograph. A new wire can be fitted in ten minutes, all that is necessary being to remove two split pins and replace them after changing the wire.
Another "Aerial Post" is being run unofficially from Freshfield to Southport. Through this channel we have received the picture postcard above of Mr. Hlgginbotham's biplane.
Mr. G. Higginbotham immediately before the start for his aerial post trip from Freshfield to Southport, as recorded in last week's issue. Accompanying Mr. Hlgginbotham is Mr. A. Pochtn's mechanic. Note the stirrup for helping to mount the machine, and the mascot on one of the stays.
Lieut. Samson, R.N., making his British duration record of nearly five hours on a Short biplane at Eastchurch Aerodrome last Saturday. At the top he is seen making a good turn; below, Mr. Travers is seen chalking on a board the time Lieut. Samson had been in the air, this being rendered necessary by reason of the aviator's watch having stopped, a fact which he communicated to the observers by shouting from his aeroplane. On the right Lieut. Samson is seen in the act of dismounting after his splendid flight.
Lieut. Samson, R.N., on a "Short" biplane. He left East church flying grounds for Brooklands on Thursday week at 4.30 p.m., alighting at Horley for the night. Having replenished, he was off again on Friday morning, but missed his way and landed at Hawthorn Hill racecourse, from there making a good flight, and arriving safely at Brookiands,
Lieut. Gerrard, R.M.L.L, in the pilot's seat of the Short biplane upon which he made his world's record cross-country duration flight of 4 hrs. 13 mins. with a passenger, Lieut. Wildman Lushington, R.M.A., at Eastchurch flying grounds on August 16th. Lieut. Gerrard was competing for the Mortimer Singer prize, which is open only to British officers.
Mr. S. F. Cody on Saturday last carried a passenger on his biplane over Laffan's Plain, standing on the lower main plane, 10 ft. 6 ins. away from himself in the pilot's seat, as seen above in our photograph. Mr. Cody, by this means, wishes to emphasise his claim for the great lateral stability of his machine.
Mr. S. F. Cody arrives From Brooklands on his biplane for the Hendon Demonstration. - His fine vol plane to the demonstration grounds.
Mr. S. F. Cody finishing his flight from Brooklands to Hendon.
UNDERCARRIAGES AT OLYMPIA. - The Cody.
Mr. S. F. Cody, with Major Sir Alexander Bannerman, Commandant of the Army Ballon School at Farnborough, as passenger on his biplane, ready for their flight last week,
Mr. S. F. Cody last week carried three passengers - Mdlle. Armand de Lavette and Messrs. Moreton and Bloomfield - for a flight on his biplane. Our photograph shows the disposition of the party ready for their voyage.
GENERAL VIEW OF THE THIRD PARIS AERO SALON. - The machine at the bottom of the photograph is the Bleriot 100-h.p. "Aeronef," built to the order of M. Henri Deutsch de la Meurthe. On the same side, but towards the centre of the Exhibition, may be seen the Zodiac biplane and the Borel and Deperdussin monoplanes, while opposite are the Train and H. Farman monoplanes and Savary and M. Farman biplanes.
GORDON-BENNETT RACE A T EASTCHURCH. - Mr. Weymann. the winner on behalf of America, and his Nieuport monoplane. (1) Just before being timed away for his start; (2) getting away; (3) sharp banking round No. 1 pylone; and (4) bringing home the Nieuport after the race was won.
GORDON-BENNETT RACE AT EASTCHURCH. - M. Chevalier, who flew two Nieuports in the race, just before his start. Inset is M. E. Nieuport flying his Nieuport machine in the race.
GORDON-BENNETT RACE AT EASTCHURCH. - The starting line which the competitors had to cross in flight, as seen from the Press enclosure. At the other end of the line is the Judges' box, and right and left the scoring boards and public announcements. In the air above Mr. Alec Ogilvie is seen on his N.E.C.-engined "Baby" Wright, and below, Weymann, the winner, on his Nieuport monoplane.
NIEUPORT MONOPLANE. - The rudder and tail of the latest model.
UNDER-CARRIAGES AT OLYMPIA. - The Nieuport inverted "A" frame.
MONOPLANES AND BIPLANES IN THE DAILY MAIL CIRCUIT ROUND GREAT BRITAIN. - From these every machine can be readily identified either in flight or on the ground.
UNDER-CARRIAGES AT OLYMPIA. - A comparison of the Nieuport laminated steel spring axle and the Handley Page flexible wooden axle.
The latest Pischoff, illustrated in the above photograph, is a very good example of an underhung load in monoplane design, and also of the use of a motor car type body for the pilot and passenger. Indeed the resemblance goes even further than the arrangement of the seats, for the engine drives a propeller-shaft passing to the rear, and there is a final chain transmission to an overhead propeller-shaft situated on a level with the wings. Constructionally this machine is very interesting on account of the method of introducing a central propeller behind the main planes of a machine that has an outrigger for carrying a tail.
Latest Pischoff machlns, showing the carriage, E.N.V. engine, and two-seated control arrangement.
Tail of the latest Pischoff machine.
The Isaacson stationary radial engine on the Blackburn monoplane.
UNDER-CARRIAGES AT OLYMPIA. - The multiple "A" frame of the Blackburn monoplane.
The Mercury I monoplane (50 hp Isaacson) flying at Filey in 1911. The slipway below the machine led to Robert Blackburn's hangar on the right.
Mr. Hucks flying the Blackburn monoplane over the marked course on Filey Sands last week for his certificate. - In the background is seen the aeroplane shed on the cliffs and the road from the beach.
The Blackburn "Mercury" monoplanes entered for the Daily Mail Circuit of Great Britain, to be piloted respectively by Mr. B. C. Hucks and Mr. Conway Tenkins.
Mr. B. C. Hucks' Blackburn monoplane being brought back to the shed at Cheltenham last week followed by an admiring crowd of Cheltenham collegians, for whom Mr. Hucks has just made an exhibition flight.
THE BLACKBURN MONOPLANE. - View showing the method of mounting and encasing a Gnome rotary engine, when this type of motor is employed.
MONOPLANES AND BIPLANES IN THE DAILY MAIL CIRCUIT ROUND GREAT BRITAIN. - From these every machine can be readily identified either in flight or on the ground.
Sketch illustrating the control on the Blackburn monoplane.
Sketch showing the control system of the Blackburn monoplane.
Sketch illustrating the very neat pulley arrangement combined with a strut socket on one of the skids of the Blackburn monoplane.
Sketch illustrating the mast and special arrangement of guy wires for the support of the main wings on the Blackburn monoplane.
Sketch illustrating the hinged attachment of the rear spar in the main wings to the body of the Blackburn monoplane.
THE BLACKBURN MONOPLANE, 1911. - Plan and elevation to scale.
THE CYRNOS PROPELLER. - The above illustrations show a new propeller in use on the Caudron biplane. The design is due to M. Fillipi, and appears to be based on the assumption that the two blades may together be considered as analogous to one aeroplane. The generally accepted view, however, is that each blade separately should be considered in this light.
Front view of the Valkyrie racing-type monoplane.
AT THE VALKYRIE SCHOOL AT HENDON. - Miss Edith Meeze, a pupil, just about to start. Reading from left to right: Barnes, the engineer-in-charge at the Valkyrie School, Miss Meeze, the School Instructor, and Mr. Harris, Works Manager.
The latest Valkyrie monoplane, with Green engine, at Olympia.
"Valkyrie," with a pupil in charge, at the London Aerodrome.
The Hon. Mrs. Assheton-Harbord, who secured the Royal Aero Club Challenge Cup for ballooning in 1910, about to take her first trip at the London Aerodrome on an aeroplane - the "Valkyrie."
FLYING WORK AT THE LONDON AERODROME. - The "Valkyrie" three-seater ready to start with a full freight.
View of the Valkyrie B monoplane racer, showing the hinged balancing-planes and the outrigged rudders.
View from the side of the Valkyrie monoplane racer.
THE VALKYRIE SCHOOL MACHINE AND SOME PUPILS. - On the left is seen Mr. Clutterbuck at the helm, and just about to start. Standing by the side of the machine is the school instructor and Mr. Cedric Lee, the latest pupil. The right-hand photo shows Mr. Chambers in the pilot's seat just about to start, with two other "Valkyrie" pupils waiting to see his ascent.
The 3-seater Valkyrie, by the Aeronautical Syndicate, at Olympia.
UNDERCARRIAGES AT OLYMPIA. - The Sanders and Valkyrie varieties of the girder skid.
FLYING WORK AT THE LONDON AERODROME. - The "Valkyrie" three-seater in flight.
FLYING AT HENDON. - A snap of the pilot of the Valkyrie School flying at the London Aerodrome with one of the Valkyrie Type A monoplanes recently, during some demonstrations before some thousand or more spectators. The pilot was flying for considerable distances with both hands above his head, during one of which our photograph was secured. The photograph was taken from slightly below the machine, so that the most effective view of the picture is by holding it slightly forward and above one's eyes.
A fine vol plane by Mr. H. Barber on his Valkyrie monoplane last week upon the occasion of his flight from Shoreham to Hendonf accompanied by Miss Edith Meeze as passenger.
PROGRESS AT HENDON. - The first trials of the new Type B "Valkyrie" cross country racing machine fitted with Gnome engine. This machine was tried for the first time on Saturday, May 6th, and has exceeded all expectations of its designer. The speed is estimated to be at least 60-70 miles an hour. The machine has a remarkable rising capacity, which leads one to believe that it would be very easy to sacrifice a little of that quality In order to make the machine even still speedier. During the second trial of the machine it made six rounds of the Hendon Aerodrome, during which time, in order to keep the machine from rising above 200 ft. high, the pilot had to make over twenty vol plane descents. This machine carries a passenger easily, and is specially designed for fast crosscountry work and military service.
During the wait for the start from Hendon for the Daily Mail Circuit of Britain Mr. H. Barber made some very fine exhibition flights on his Valkyries, attaining a height of 2,000 ft., a flight also being made with a passenger. Our photographs show Mr. Barber in flight, and the right-hand picture gives a good idea of the crowds in the distance.
The Valkyrie Military Monoplane, high-flying and in gliding flight at Hendon. In the top photograph she is at a height of 2,000 ft., in the middle picture she is descending, and below, the pilot is completing a spiral vol plane.
A trio in flight at the London Aerodrome, Hendon. Two Henry Famans and, in the foreground, a Type A Valkyrie.
Detail views of the Valkyrie monoplane racer, showing (on the left) the pilot's seat and mounting of the Gnome engine. The right-hand view shows the two small "prows" under the fixed front plane.
Part of the Valkyrie fleet of military aeroplanes on view at Hendon during the recent Parliamentary demonstration.
AN OBJECT LESSON IN MOBILITY. - An all-British "Valkyrie" military monoplane on its own wheels passing the Marble Arch en route from Hendon flying grounds to Brighton last week, where arrangements for exhibition flights have been made. In this manner the Valkyrie military design can travel anywhere with freedom, and the planes, which are attached to the sides, can be fitted in a few minutes, the machine then being in complete flying order.
Miss Edith Meeze, a promising pupil at the Valkyrie Aviation Schcol at Hendon, in the pilot's seat ot the school machine.
AERIAL LETTER POST. - An undress "rehearsal" at Hendon under Post Office conditions. Handing in a "late fee" letter. The aerial post, which will be carried out under the auspices of the Grahame White Co., starts, as referred to elsewhere, en September 9th.
Mr. W. Ridley-Prentice, who is now taking active control in connection with the Aeronautical Syndicate at the Hendon London Aerodrome. Mr. Ridley Prentice is seen in the pilot's seat of the new Valkyrie racer.
Capt. E. B. Loraine, of the Grenadier Guards, who last week secured his Royal Aero Club certificate on a 50-h.p. Gnome-engined Valkyrie at the Valkyrie School at Hendon.
An interesting constructional detail on the latest Valkyrie, showing how the main wing guy-wires are anchored to a solid steel forging that can be detached as one piece from the principal strut. It is a feature of the Valkyrie design that none of the guy-wires are bent at the point of fastening.
Sketch of the aluminium sockets as used for the attachment of the wings.
Constructional details of the new Valkyrie racer equipped with a Gnome motor of 50-h,p., to which we referred last week. One important innovation is the fact that the use of aluminium has been discarded, steel being used in its place.
Sketch illustrating the cane fender under the rear end of the skid of the Valkyrie racer.
Sketch illustrating the manner of adjusting the attitude of the leading plane on the Valkyrie racer.
UNDERCARRIAGES AT OLYMPIA. - Comparative details in the construction of the Farman type wheel and skid combination.
UNDERCARRIAGES AT OLYMPIA. - A comparison of some girder skids.
VALKYRIE RACER. - Plan and elevation to scale.
The De Havilland Army biplane, which emerged from the Army Balloon Factory at Farnborough on Tuesday last, and made a successful initial 10-mile flight, remaining up at about 100 ft. for 15 min.
THE DE HAVILLAND ARMY BIPLANE. - View showing Mr. G. de Havllland - now a member of the War Office mechanical staff - in the pilot's seat on the occasion of the machine's successful flight at Farnborough on Tuesday last. Readers of FLIGHT are well acquainted with the pioneer work carried out by this designer, whose first machine was illustrated In these pages on April 9th, 1910.
Mr. Valentine on the Macfie biplane passing over Mr. Ducrocq's Henry Farman at Brooklands last Saturday.
Mr. Valentine, who is now flying the Macfie biplane at Brooklands.
Capt. Fulton, R.A., and M. Paulhan at St. Cyr after the necessary tests of the Paulhan biplane, before delivery to the British Army, were concluded.
Capt. Fulton, R.A., in the pilot's seat of the Gnome-engined Paulhan biplane, of which he has just taken delivery in France on behalf of the British Army. This machine was fully described in FLIGHT on October 22nd last.
Tail of the Sloan biplane.
R.E.P. MONOPLANE. - Chassis and landing skid of latest model.
R.E.P. MONOPLANE. - Rudder, tail and back skid of the new model.
Pierre-Marie, who, at Buc on December 31st, on an R.E.P. monoplane, in an attempt to secure the French Michelin Prize, covered 530 kiloms. in 6h. 29m. 19 1/5s. Although he put up some new speed records, the cup was secured by M. Tabuteau.
M. Laurens and his passenger on his R.E.P. monoplane, with which he won the Deperdussin Prize for monoplanes by a flight at Buc, on December 21st, of 100 kiloms. in 1 hr. 16 mins., beating all previous records.
PARIS-MADRID RACE. - Diagrammatic sketches of some of the machines entered in the race.
The Development of the R.E.P. monoplane. 1907. Absence of top fin, inverted Vee. 1908. Vee still inverted, partial remedy by top fin. 1909. Inverted Vee very slight and larger top fin. 1910. Stable Vee, fin above centre diminished.
One of the new Deperdussin Monoplanes which were built to take part in the European Circuit. - It will be noticed that the square fuselage is entirely cased in, while another special feature is the long skids which project out in front to protect the propeller.
Mr. W. H. Ewen's start for his recent Lanark-Edinburgh flight on his 28-h.p. Anzani-engined Deperdussin monoplane.
Mr. W. H. Ewen, who on Thursday last week flew across the Firth of Forth, from Portobello to Kinghorn and back again, on his Deperdussin monoplane, fitted with 3-cyl. Anzani engine. In our photograph, Mr. Ewen is seen in the pilot's seat ready for the starting of the propeller.
MONOPLANES AND BIPLANES IN THE DAILY MAIL CIRCUIT ROUND GREAT BRITAIN. - From these every machine can be readily identified either in flight or on the ground.
Mr. Alec Ogilvle's Baby Wright, the smallest machine in the Show. The propellers are the same as those used on the standard model, and together spread across the full span of the machine. An N.E.C. two-stroke engine is htted In this model, which is otherwise the same as that with which Mr. Ogilvie competed on behalf of England in the Gordon-Bennett Race.
GORDON-BENNETT RACE AT EASTCHURCH. - Mr. Alec Ogilvie's N.E.C.-engined "Baby" Wright fills up with petrol. Above, Mr. Ogilvie is seen in his steady flight round the course.
GORDON-BENNETT RACE AT EASTCHURCH. - The starting line which the competitors had to cross in flight, as seen from the Press enclosure. At the other end of the line is the Judges' box, and right and left the scoring boards and public announcements. In the air above Mr. Alec Ogilvie is seen on his N.E.C.-engined "Baby" Wright, and below, Weymann, the winner, on his Nieuport monoplane.
UNDER-CARRIAGES AT OLYMPIA. - The tail skids and the wheels and front skids of the Wright Baby.
UNDERCARRIAGES AT OLYMPIA. - Comparative details in the construction of the Farman type wheel and skid combination.
The Howard Wright biplane, which will be steered by Lieut. Reynolds in the Daily Mail Circuit of Great Britain.
Mr. T. Sopwith, the winner of the Baron de Forest L4,000 Prize, on his E.N.V.-engined Howard Wright biplane during his second attempt at Brooklands for the British Michelin Prize. Note the old method of locomotion, the automobile stuck in the mud being assisted by the original "h.p.'s."
Lieut. Watkins flying well at Brooklands on Saturday last on Capt. Maltland's "No.2" Howard Wright.
AT BROOKLANDS ON SATURDAY. - Tom Sopwith in flight on his Howard Wright, and the Spencer-Stirling machine on the ground.
CARS AND FLYING AT BROOKLANDS. - Brooklands has now become quite a centre of activity by reason of the flying attractions daily in operation there. Two pictures, taken on Saturday last, above give some idea of the gatherings which assemble day by day around the actual flying village. In the upper photograph Mr. Tom Sopwith is flying his E.N.V.-engined Howard Wright biplane, one of the very successful Bristol machines being seen to the right. In the bottom picture Mr. Low, one of the expert pilots of the Bristol Co., is making one of his fine flights round the aerodrome.
Mr. Low, on his Bristol biplane, getting well into the air at Brooklands. At rest are Mr. Sopwlth's Howard Wright biplane, and in the distance the Hanriot monoplane.
A PASSENGER FLIGHT AT BROOKLANDS. - Lieut. Watkins, with a passenger, on Mr. Maitland's Howard Wright biplane, making one of his graceful flights past the hangars. At temporary rest is the Weiss monoplane.
BROOKLANDS AS SEEN FROM ABOVE. - A view when passing over the flight colony at Brooklands Aerodrome on Mr. Tom Sopwith's Howard Wright. Note the "magnetic" sewage farm on the left, and in the far distance the motor test hill, finishing straight, &c.
BROOKLANDS AS SEEN FROM ABOVE FROM MR. TOM SOPWITH'S HOWARD WRIGHT BIPLANE. - Passing over the winding Wey and the Brooklands Club House. Note the bridge across the Wey leading to the aviation grounds.
BY THE KING'S COMMAND. - Mr. Tom Sopwith's visit to Windsor Castle on his E.N.V.-engined Howard Wright biplane on Wednesday of last week, in response to an invitation from King George to fly over from Brooklands. King is seen (X) shaking hands with Mr. Sopwith immediately after landing in front of the terrace.
UNDER-CARRIAGES AT OLYMPIA. - The typical Farman-Wright type as built by Howard Wright.
Lieut. Watkins, with Mr. Cecil Pashley as passenger, just prior to a flight at Brooklands last Saturday on Capt. Maitland's "No.2" Howard Wright.
Sketch showing the arrangement of the framework at the tail of the Howard Wright machine.
UNDER-CARRIAGES AT OLYMPIA. - A comparison in tail skid construction.
MONOPLANES AND BIPLANES IN THE DAILY MAIL CIRCUIT ROUND GREAT BRITAIN. - From these every machine can be readily identified either in flight or on the ground.
The Roe IV triplane at Brooklands.
General view of the Roe triplane from behind.
Sketch of the tail on the Roe triplane.
Sketches illustrating some constructional details on the Roe triplane.
THE ROE TRIPLANE, 1911. - Plan and Elevation.
PARIS-MADRID RACE. - Diagrammatic sketches of some of the machines entered in the race.
Sommer in flight at Mouzon on his new 50-h.p. Gnome-engined monoplane.
AN INCIDENT DURING THE RECENT JOHANNISTHAL FLYING WEEK. - Photograph taken from Pietschker's aeroplane, before he met with his death, of the Johanntsthal aerodrome and of Miss Melli Beese flying on her aeroplane.
AT THE LONDON AERODROME. - Mr. Clutterbuck by Mr. Everett's monoplane, where this machine has been under test.
Mr. Eric England in the pilot's seat of the latest Weiss monoplane which he has been flying at Brooklands.
Side view of the Weiss monoplane, showing the upturned wing-tips.
Front view ot the Weiss monoplane.
View of the front portion of the Weiss monoplane, showing the carriage.
A PASSENGER FLIGHT AT BROOKLANDS. - Lieut. Watkins, with a passenger, on Mr. Maitland's Howard Wright biplane, making one of his graceful flights past the hangars. At temporary rest is the Weiss monoplane.
Sketch illustrating the wing framework on the Weiss monoplane.
Sketch illustrating some lashed joints used In the construction of the Weiss monoplane. The lashing is coated with tyre cement.
Sketch illustrating some lashed joints used In the construction of the Weiss monoplane. The lashing is coated with tyre cement.
Sketch illustrating the body construction of the Weiss monoplane. Spars and diagonals are made of bamboo.
Sketch illustrating how the engine is carried in the Weiss monoplane.
THE WEISS MONOPLANE. - Plan and elevation to scale.
View from the rear of Mr. Carter's novel biplane.
Kaufmann monoplane, type "Demoiselle," which is being successfully flown at Issy.
THE LATEST VOISIN MACHINE. - View from the side of the latest biplane constructed by MM. Voisin Freeres.
BREGI IN FULL FLIGHT ON THE NEW VOISIN, WITH ITS FUSELAGE IN FRONT. - Note in left photograph the head of the pilot just showing above the enclosed fuselage.
The Voisin "Canard" on the Seine, fitted with her floats.
THE NEW VOISIN. - The pilot's seat - Colliex is in charge - showing the arrangement of steering gear, &c.
The Voisin "Canard" equipped with floats.
The Harlan monoplane at the Johannisthal Aerodrome with Grulich in the pilot's seat, who, on this machine on January 8th, flew for 2h. 11m. 15s.
AT BROOKLANDS ON SATURDAY. - Tom Sopwith in flight on his Howard Wright, and the Spencer-Stirling machine on the ground.
A snap from the Spencer biplane when flying at Brooklands, a L. & S.W.R. express being seen in the distance beyond the banking.
Mr. Herbert Spencer, who has just qualified for his pilot's certificate at Brooklands, on a biplane constructed by himself.
A monoplane recently constructed by Messrs. Wilson Bros, and Gibson, of Twickenham, to their own design, and sold to Messrs. Allan Knight and Co. for practice on the London Aviatron Ground, Ealing. The span is 46 ft.
Dawson glider built by Mulliners Coachworks Ltd. for actress Gertrude Robins (Mrs. Dawson).
Mr. Chas. E. Dawson's full-sized glider with which he and his wife, "Miss Gertrude Robins," practise. This machine was built by Messrs. Mulliners, the well-known carriage body builders, and Mrs. Dawson is seen above in charge ready for a glide.
"Miss Gertrude Robins," the authoress of "Pot Luck," who is playing in "Don't Ask Any Questions" at the Palace Theatre, and who in private life is Mrs. Chas. E. Dawson of Naphill, is a great supporter of the art of flying. Miss Robins practises gliding on the machines designed by her husband, and is seen above in the pilot's seat of the biplane.
View of the casing which protects the pilot on Grahame-White's "New Baby" biplane. This photo also shows the arrangement of the skids.
Mr. Grahame-White and his "New Baby" biplane.
ONE OF THE LATEST GRAHAME-WHITE BIPLANES. - This is built up in three parts, rendering it very easy of transport, the centre part forming a single unit which can be dismembered by merely undoing lour bolts. It is claimed to be faster by about 15 m.p.h. than the Farman and Curtiss, of which types it embodies the leading features.
Rear view of the Grahame-White "New Baby" biplane.
Front view of ths Grahame-White "New Baby" biplane.
View of Mr. Grahame-White's "New Baby" biplane from behind, showing the balancing planes and the hinged extension of the upper tail plane.
MR. GRAHAME-WHITE'S "NEW BABY" BIPLANE RECENTLY COMPLETED. - (1) The machine seen from in front just before its first trial run. (2) A view from behind immediately after landing; and (3) "New Baby," piloted by Mr. Grahame-White, getting well up on its first circuit at the London Aerodrome, Hendon.
HENDON-BROOKLANDS-HENDON. - Mr. Martin, on the Grahame-White "New Baby" racer, was one of those who, on Saturday, made fine flights for this competition. In the left-hand photo Martin is just starting away from Hendon Aerodrome. An idea of the rapidity of the "get-off" can be gathered by the fact that although he only started from the spectators in the background, the tail is well up, and the ailerons are flying right out. Only 34 secs, elapsed before the right-hand photo was secured, and in this time Martin had to make a complete turn and double back on his original direction.
DAILY MAIL CIRCUIT OF BRITAIN. - The imaginary starting line from which the whole of the machines were sent off from Brooklands on Saturday. Ready for being started are Nos. 1 and 2, and Compton Paterson's Grahame-White "Baby" biplane.
Compton Paterson taking his run off on the "Baby" Grahame-White.
Views of the engine and the tail on the Grahame-White "New Baby" biplane.
Miss Irvine, who last week became Mrs. Martin, on the "New Baby" Grahame-White biplane. Miss Irvine, in the intervals of learning to fly, has made many long flights with her husband at the London Aerodrome.
Mr. Turner, one of the pupils at the Grahame-White School, and the first Englishman to obtain his pilot's certificate under the new regulations, having passed the necessary tests on Saturday last.
Mr. Compton Paterson, one of the most promising pilots in the Daily Mail Circuit, in the pilot's seat of the Grahame-White "Baby" biplane, upon which he flew from Hendon to Brooklands and back last week.
Sketch illustrating one of the steel sockets which are such a characteristic feature of the Grahame-White "New Baby" biplane.
UNDERCARRIAGES AT OLYMPIA. - Comparative details in the construction of the Farman type wheel and skid combination.
Sketch illustrating the attachment of the tall to the outrigger by means of steel sockets on the Grahame-White "New Baby" biplane.
Sketch illustrating the Steel rudder hinge on the Grahame-White "New Baby" biplane.
Sketch illustrating how some of the guy-wires in the vicinity of the propeller are anchored to one another for safety, in case either breaks, on the Grahame-White "New Baby" biplane.
MONOPLANES AND BIPLANES IN THE DAILY MAIL CIRCUIT ROUND GREAT BRITAIN. - From these every machine can be readily identified either in flight or on the ground.
GRAHAME-WHITE "NEW BABY" BIPLANE. - Plan and elevation.
Mr. J. B. D. Long's monoplane with which he has been making experiments at the Acton Aviation Grounds. - Beautifully constructed by Mr. Long from the high-grade materials supplied by Handley Page, Ltd., this well-designed machine should do well in the near future when the engine troubles, which have up to now bothered the constructor, have been overcome.
The Barnwell aeroplane, which has just won the J. R. K. Law L50 prize open to members of the Scottish Aeronautical Society, in flight.
TWO VIEWS OF THE BARNWELL AEROPLANE. - On the left will be seen the very neat arrangement of the horizontal twin-cylinder engine; on the right the tail will be observed, and also the bracing of the main planes to the body.
The new 4-seated Bleriot monoplane as seen from the side, showing the biplane elevator, the first to be fitted to a Bleriot.
View from behind of the new 4-seated Bleriot monoplane.
The new 4-seated Bleriot monoplane, with the 8 passengers in their places as carried in the air at Pau by M. Lemartin for about eight minutes. Note the eighth passenger, who is sitting behind on the fuselage. The general construction from behind is well seen in this view.
THE NEW 4-SEATED BLERIOT MONOPLANE. - M. Lemartin, who carried the 8 passengers, in the pilot's seat. The skids and forward construction are clearly seen in this picture.
Mr. W. E. Sommerville and his biplane.
A "ONE AND A HALF DECKER" CONSTRUCTED A T THE GERMAN MOTOR SCHOOL AT MAINZ. - The top plane measures 10 metres and the lower one 7 metres.
Front view of the Bristol military type biplane.
Side view of the Bristol military type biplane. The balancing planes and method of supporting the extensions of the top plane are very prominent in this illustration.
View from behind of the Bristol military type biplane.
Mr. Graham-Gilmour preparing his Bristol biplane on Saturday for the proposed flight to Brighton, with a few of the 5,000 visitors to Brooklands looking on.
EUROPEAN CIRCUIT. - Tetard in one of the British Bristols at the moment of starting from Vincennes on Sunday. Note the huge crowd in the distance.
THE VOL PLANE. - Photograph of a superb example of the vol plane executed by Mr. A. R. Low on a Bristol military-type biplane when finishing a flight with a passenger over Salisbury Plain on the occasion of the recent Press visit. It will be observed that the propeller is stationary.
FLYING IN INDIA. - Mr. Henry W. Jullerot giving an exhibition flight over the Calcutta Maidan Racecourse on one of the Bristol biplanes, which are doing such good ''missionary" work in the Indian Empire. The racecourse was specially lent to the British aod Colonial Aeroplane Co's Commission for flying demonstrations, and this is the only occasion upon which flying exhibitions have been given upon it. The Viceregal Party, the Commander-in-Chief, Sir Norman Baker, the Lieut.-Governor of Bengal, and a crowd of about half a million people were present to witness the display.
Mr. Maurice Tetard flying a "Bristol" military biplane at Filton upon the occasion of the recent visit to the British and Colonial Aeroplane Co.'s works of the officers and crew of H.M.S. "Bristol."
Mr. Graham Gilmour on the Bristol biplane, flying over the Brooklands course during the race meeting last Saturday after his return from Windsor.
Graham Gllmour, on a Bristol biplane, gives a few exhibition flights at Eastchurch whilst waiting for the Gordon-Bennett Race to commence.
WINNING THE MANVILLE PRIZE. - Mr. Pixton on the Bristol biplane at Brooklands on Wednesday of last week, when he was competing finally for the Manville Aviation Prize. Mr. Pixton is seen on the Bristol passing over the paddock at Brooklands.
FLYING OVER SALISBURY PLAIN. - M. Maurice Tetard and Mr. A. R. Low flying their Bristol biplanes over Salisbury Plain. The photograph was taken while M. Tetard (on the right) was ascending for an altitude flight. On the left is the Bristol military type machine with the extended upper plane. The illustration affords an excellent comparison of the two types of machine in flight.
The new Edwards rhomboidal biplane at Brooklands out for an airing on Saturday last. - This machine, it will be remembered, was described in FLIGHT on February 5th, 1910. Flying in perfect form above is Capt. F. H. Wood on a Bristol machine.
Detail views of the Bristol military type biplane, showing the balancing planes and the tail. The three rudders in the tail constitute a characteristic feature of this machine.
An example of enclosed pilot's seat on the Bristol military type biplane.
The Czar of Russia inspecting the Bristol military biplane of the British and Colonial Aeroplane Co. at the St. Petersburg Aero Exhibition. Mr. H. White Smith, the special representative of the Company, is seen explaining the machine to His Imperial Majesty. This biplane, it will be remembered, net only secured the gold medal for excellence of workmanship, but was purchased by the Russian War Office for the Engineer Corps of the Russian Army.
Shipping a "Bristol" biplane to Straits Settlements in the Far East per steamship "Glenstree," Glen Line (McGregor, Gow and Co.). Ltd. - We announced recently that amongst other shipments this machine had been despatched.
Sir George White, (on the left), the founder of the British and Colonial Aeroplane Co., Ltd., and M. Jullerot, one of the many eminent pilots now associated with the Company.
The Countess Nora Lutzow as passenger with M. Maurice Tabuteau on the Bristol military biplane at Badminton House, April 17th, referred to in last week's Issue.
Mr. H. Busteed, of the Tarrant Motor Co., Melbourne, on a Bristol biplane at Salisbury Plain, where he has been making many fine flights.
Lieut. Pepper, R.G.A., one of the Bristol pupils at Salisbury Plain, who passed for his Royal Aero Club certificate last week.
Mr. H. R. Fleming, pilot, and Mr. C. P. Pizey, passenger, on the Bristol biplane with which they flew from Ventnor to Amesbury, Salisbury Plain, after having visited by way of the air the scene of the Gordon-Bennett Race; then after flying to Dover and Shoreham to greet their brother flyers in the European Circuit, they continued on to the Isle of Wight, and thence back to Salisbury Plain.
Mr. Walter Lawrence, another Bristol pupil who last week obtained his pilot's certificate at Salisbury Plain.
A group of Bristol pilots, pupils, and assistants at the Bristol schools on Salisbury Plain. Reading from left to right (front row): Mr. O. L. Mellersh, Mr. E. Harrison, Mechanic, Mr. S. P. Cockerell, Mr. Fitzmaurice (British Embassy, Constantinople, visitor), Mechanic; top row (left to right): Naval Cadet N. F. Wheeler, Mr. W. E Gibson, Mr. H. M. Jullerot (Chief Instructor), behind him Lieut. Wyness Stuart, Mrs. Stuart, Mr. R. Smith Barry, Lieut R. J. Watts, Lieut. C. L. N. Newall
Sketches illustrating some minor constructional details on the Bristol military type biplane. That on the left shows the attachment of one of the diagonal struts used for supporting the extensions to the upper plane.
Sketch illustrating the lever attached to the elevator on the Bristol military type biplane.
THE BRISTOL MILITARY TYPE BIPLANE. - Plan and Elevation.
Side view of the Martin-Handasyde monoplane. No. 3.
Martin-Handasyde monoplane No.3 was the previous machine converted to a control stick with wheel for warping and was finally powered by an OHV JAP engine.
General view from in front of the Martin-Handasyde monoplane, No. 3, showing the forward bracing of the wings to the skid.
General view of the Martin-Handasyde monoplane from behind, showing the bracing of the wings. The plate in front of the control-wheel is a shield to protect the pilot from the oil that is thrown out by the engine.
UNDER-CARRIAGES AT OLYMPIA. - The Martin-Handasyde axle and forward skid.
Diagram of the wing-warping and elevator-control on the Martin-Handasyde monoplane, No. 3. The foot-operated cross-bar for controlling the rudder is not shown.
Sketch of the spoon foot on the skid of the Martin-Handasyde monoplane, No. 3.
Sketches illustrating the attachment of the wings to the body, and the details of the undercarriage supporting the body of the Martin-Handasyde monoplane, No. 3.
Under-carriage of the Martin-Handasyde monoplane.
UNDER-CARRIAGES AT OLYMPIA. - A comparison in tail skid construction.
MARTIN-HANDASYDE MONOPLANE, No. 3. - Plan and elevation to scale.
Bartelt ornithopter at Olympia Aero Show in 1911.
MM. Dufaux Frere's Gnome-engined Swiss biplane, which the constructors have recently taken to Issy for practice work. The surface is 44 square metres; weight 300 kilogs.
PAULHAN'S NEW MACHINE. - It will be noticed that in addition to minor changes, M. Paulhan has abandoned the fabre lattice type of construction for the main spars of his machine.
PAULHAN'S NEW MACHINE. - On the left, sketch illustrating the arrangement of the skid on the latest Pauihan biplane, and on the right is seen the rudder. This is made in two sections, which admits of the fabric being kept tight by a simple connection, and the position of the horizontal plane can be varied by adjusting the stays of the vertical rudder post.
The latest Idea in suspension. How the Bristol monoplane is supported on crutches.
Sketch Illustrating the crutch suspension of the Bristol monoplane.
UNDER-CARRIAGES AT OLYMPIA. - A comparison in tail skid construction.
UNDER-CARRIAGES AT OLYMPIA. - The Bristol monoplane showing the crutches.
Three-quarter view of the Dunne monoplane from in front.
Side view of the Dunne monoplane.
Three-quarter view of the Dunne monoplane from behind.
Rear view of the Dunne monoplane.
Front view of the Dunne monoplane.
The Dunne "Auto-Safety" monoplane.
UNDERCARRIAGES AT OLYMPIA. - The Dunne.
Engine and propeller on the Dunne monoplane.
The control levers, pilot's seat, and map case on the Dunne monoplane.
Sketch illustrating the pilot's seat and two control-levers on the Dunne monoplane.
THE DUNNE MONOPLANE, 1911. - Plan and side elevation to scale.
Sketch showing how the wings on the Mulliner "Kny" aeroplane are mounted on a central bearing so that the angle of incidence can be altered during flight. Simultaneous with this movement an alteration in the camber is brought about by means of pivoted rods, as shown above, acting on a special flexible leading edge.
Under-carriage of the Kny aeroplane, built by Mulliner's, of Long Acre and Northampton.
UNDER-CARRIAGES AT OLYMPIA. - The Piggott.
MONOPLANES AND BIPLANES IN THE DAILY MAIL CIRCUIT ROUND GREAT BRITAIN. - From these every machine can be readily identified either in flight or on the ground.
UNDER-CARRIAGES AT OLYMPIA. - A comparison of the Nieuport laminated steel spring axle and the Handley Page flexible wooden axle.
The Bristol biplane of the Breguet type, showing the characteristic enclosed boat body and the single struts separating the upper and lower planes.
UNDERCARRIAGES AT OLYMPIA. - Comparative details in the construction of the Farman type wheel and skid combination.
STARTING FOR THE BRIGHTON RACE. - Mr. H. Pixton getting away for Brighton from Brooklands on the Roe biplane.
FLYING AT BROOKLANDS ON EASTER MONDAY. - In spite of the high wind whteh prevailed at Brooklands, Mr. Pixton, on the Roe biplane, put up a good flight for the Endurance Prize, securing it with 1h. 27m. 32s. In our photograph Mr. Pixton is seen during this flight, the machine on terra firma being one of the famous Bristol biplanes.
CARS AND AEROPLANES AT BROOKLANDS. - Pixton on the Roe biplane during the duration flight at Brooklands on Easter Monday. Below will be noted a race finishing up the straight, with the crowds in the enclosures, and the long wide string of motor cars stretching away beyond the paddock.
Mr. Pixton and the Avro biplane at rest for the night in Mr. England's grounds at Oakwood, Hayward's Heath, May 7th and 8th, en route for Brooklands upon his return flight from Brighton after the recent Brooklans-Brighton Race. On the left the Avro anchored for the night, and on the right ready for the start next morning.
A NAVAL AERO-HYDROPLANE BEING TESTED AT CAVENDISH DOCK, BARROW-IN-FURNESS. - Commander Schwann, of H.M.S. "Hermione," carrying out early morning trials on the Roe biplane, which has been fitted with float attachments of his own invention. The uninitiated should note that the smoking chimney stack has no connection with the biplane.
Mr. F . Conway Jenkins, one of the latest aviators to qualify for the Royal Aero Club pilot's certificate, on the 30-h.p. Green-engined Avro biplane, upon which he passed the tests on the 30th ult. in a 12-15 m.p.h. wind. This was only Mr. Jenkins' fourth time on the Avro machine, and previous to the official tests he was in the air at Brooklands for forty minutes at about 1,000 ft. height, rising to about 1,800 and finishing with a neat vol plane.
Mr. Pixton, just about to carry a lady passenger for a short trip, on the new Roe biplane, with which he so successfully flew at Brooklands on Easter Monday.
MONOPLANES AND BIPLANES IN THE DAILY MAIL CIRCUIT ROUND GREAT BRITAIN. - From these every machine can be readily identified either in flight or on the ground.
Constructional details of the Avro biplane.
The method employed on the Avro biplane of assembling the wing sections.
Arrangement of the tail unit of the Avro biplane.
The Avro method of cross-bracing the main body.
THE AVRO BIPLANE. - Plan and elevation to scale.
THE NEW CLEMENT-BAYARD MONOPLANE AT ISSY. - Weight 400 kilogs., 20 m. surface, R.F. propeller. She is fitted with a 4-cyl, 45-h.p. Clement Bayard motor.
The tail of the new Clement-Bayard monoplane.
THE LATEST R.E.P. RACING MONOPLANE, "L E POUSSIN." - This small machine, under the pilotage of Amerigo, is credited with a speed of 107 kiloms. an hour.
Three-quarter view from behind of the new Henry Farman two-seater monoplane, staged at the Paris Salon.
View from behind of the Henry Farman monoplane.
GENERAL VIEW OF THE THIRD PARIS AERO SALON. - The machine at the bottom of the photograph is the Bleriot 100-h.p. "Aeronef," built to the order of M. Henri Deutsch de la Meurthe. On the same side, but towards the centre of the Exhibition, may be seen the Zodiac biplane and the Borel and Deperdussin monoplanes, while opposite are the Train and H. Farman monoplanes and Savary and M. Farman biplanes.
The Farman stand at the Paris Aero Salon, showing, in addition to the latest type Maurice Farman biplane, the Henry Farman monoplane, described last week in FLIGHT.
Detills of the landing chassis of the Henry Farman monoplane.
AVIATION AS A PASTIME. - Many months ago we stated that the time had arrived when flying could, under reasonable conditions, be regarded as a legitimate pastime to be indulged in by the wider circle of the public comprised in the sportsman, landed proprietor, &c. Corroboration of this comes in the above interesting photograph from Belgium, showing that well-known all-round sportsman, Chevalier Jules de Laminne, and his up-to-date sporting equipment, including a Henry Farman biplane, at the Chateau d'Oudoumont, Verlaise, near Liege. Above are snaps of the castle from different points, secured from the Farman machine by the Chevalier when flying around his estate.
Side view of the Military Henry Farman biplane which participated in the recent French Military Competitions at Rheims.
ROUND FRANCE BY MILITARY AEROPLANE. - Lieut. Menard and his passenger, Lieut. Do Hu, who, on a military Henry Farman, is making a tour round France. On his first day's flight he easily beat the world's record for passenger-carrying across country.
M. Loridan, who last week broke the altitude record by rising on a Henry Farman biplane to 3,280 metres. Note the position of the pilot well in advance of the motor and planes.
Fischer upon his completion, on the Henry Farman biplane, of the final cross-country speed test in the French Military Competition, being welcomed by his wife, and personally congratulated upon his splendid performance by Mr. Henry Farman.
MONOPLANES AND BIPLANES IN THE DAILY MAIL CIRCUIT ROUND GREAT BRITAIN. - From these every machine can be readily identified either in flight or on the ground.
THE TRAIN MONOPLANE. - View from in front of the Train monoplane which was involved in the catastrophe at Issy at the start of the Paris-Madrid Race. M. Train has embodied in his design a system of under-carrlage somewhat similar to that evolved by M. Pischoff, the aviator being seated below the plane and protected by the covered-in body.
GENERAL VIEW OF THE THIRD PARIS AERO SALON. - The machine at the bottom of the photograph is the Bleriot 100-h.p. "Aeronef," built to the order of M. Henri Deutsch de la Meurthe. On the same side, but towards the centre of the Exhibition, may be seen the Zodiac biplane and the Borel and Deperdussin monoplanes, while opposite are the Train and H. Farman monoplanes and Savary and M. Farman biplanes.
THE ISSY ACCIDENT. - Diagrammatic plan of the course, indicated by the dotted line, taken by Train on his monoplane. The X is the spot where the accident actually occurred.
Short S.35 built for the Hon. Maurice Egerton in 1911. Side view, showing the enclosed car for the pilot and passenger. The horizontal rib in the extremities of the main planes, which are cambered elsewhere, is a curious feature of interest.
Front view of the Short biplane 1911 type.
View from behind of the Short biplane, showing the Gnome engine in position.
View of the tail on the latest Short biplane. In the view one of the balancers on the extremities of the upper main planes appears rather like a vertical keel in front of the rudder, due to an absence of proper perspective in the photograph.
Hanging on to the tail of a Short biplane before a trial at the Royal Aero Club's flying grounds at Eastchurch.
View of the pilot's car on the latest Short biplane.
Sketches illustrating some of the joints on the latest Short biplane.
Diagrammatic sketch illustrating the special trussing of the lower main plane to resist the stresses imposed by a rough landing due to the concentration of the load In the centre of the plane and of the weight of the extremities of the planes acting through the leverage of a wide span.
Sketch illustrating the construction of the Short under-carriage and axle.
THE SHORT BIPLANE, 1911 TYPE. - Plan and elevation to scale.
AN AUSTRALIAN BIPLANE. - Mr. J. R. Duigan in flight upon his Australian-built biplane at Mia Mia in Victoria. The machine is about 100 yards from starting point in left-hand photo and 110 yards in right-hand one. The small plane at rear is connected to elevator. The propeller is 8 ft. 6 ins. diameter and 10 ft. pitch, is driven by 3/4-in. Brampton chain, gear 19 teeth and 42. Ordinary Bosch cycle magneto, two brakes, 4-cyl. motor, Schebler carburettor, with inlet-pipe bored out.
OPENING OF THE SCOTTISH AVIATION CO.'S FLYING GROUND AT BARRHEAD, GLASGOW. - This is situated about 5 1/2 miles from the city, and is conveniently served by both rail and tram. Our photographs show the general company assembled on the opening day, and on the right is the Caledonia monoplane built by the Scottish Aviation Co. from designs by Mr. F. Norman, the General Manager of the Company. Mr. Norman is standing by the machine in overalls and talking across to Mr. Wilson, of the W. W. Proofing Co., a firm which is making a speciality of balloon fabrics in Glasgow.
Star monoplane. The second version was tested at Dunstall Park and moved to Brooklands in early 1911.
View of the Star monoplane from in front.
Views illustrating the engine and carriage of the Star monoplane.
Sketch illustrating the joint in the main frame on the Star monoplane, and also the system of wire bracing.
Sketch illustrating the steel engine bearers on the Star monoplane.
Sketch illustrating the control on the Star monoplane.
Sketches illustrating the wing attachment on the Star monoplane.
Sketch Illustrating one of the skids on the carriage of the Star monoplane.
THE STAR MONOPLANE. - Plan and elevation to scale.
EUROPEAN AVIATION CIRCUIT. - Bristol Type T No.45 raced by Maurice Tabuteau in 1911. - M. Tabuteau immediately after his descent at Hendon on the British-built Bristol biplane.
Views of one of the "Bristol" biplanes entered by the British and Colonial Aeroplane Co. for the Daily Mail Circuit of Great Britain. The top plane has a span of 15 metres, while the lower plane is of approximately 8 metres span, the chord in each case being 15 metres. Steel has been substituted for aluminium in the fittings of all machines, and 50-h.p. Gnome engines are fitted to both biplanes and monoplanes.
Pixton making a good start on the Bristol.
Howard Pixton makes a fine vol plane on the Bristol upon his arrival at Hendon.
Graham Gilmour, who was refused - by the Royal Aero Club - permission to take part in the Circuit of Britain, standing by his special Bristol biplane. On the right a creped laurel wreath is being placed on his hangar as a token of mourning for non-participation.
MONOPLANES AND BIPLANES IN THE DAILY MAIL CIRCUIT ROUND GREAT BRITAIN. - From these every machine can be readily identified either in flight or on the ground.
THE NEW ARMY BIPLANE. - View from in front.
THE NEW ARMY BIPLANE. - Side view.
THE NEW ARMY BIPLANE. - Section through body of machine, showing arrangement of control.
THE NEW ARMY BIPLANE. - Plan and elevation to scale.
One of the "Bristol" monoplanes, as seen from the front and behind, entered by the British and Colonial Aeroplane Co. for the Daily Mail Circuit of Great Britain. Note the small tail of this machine. The length overall is about 8 metres, and the span 10 metres. The area of the main plane is approximately 14 sq. metres.
Front view of the Bristol monoplane, showing the engine and landing carriage.
Side view of the Bristol monoplane, showing it on a horizontal keel.
Rear view of the Bristol-Prier school monoplane, showing the tail elevator and the rudder. A low-powered single-seater.
The sole representative of Great Britain at the Paris Salon - the "Bristol" 50-h.p. military two-seater, constructed by the enterprising British and Colonial Aeroplane Co., Ltd.
The Bristol stand - the sole representative of Great Britain - at the Paris Show. It was on a machine of this type that Valentine carried out his daring flight over Paris two days before the opening of the Show.
ANCIENT AND MODERN. - Unique photograph of a Bristol monoplane in flight at Salisbury Plain over Stonehenge.
Six types of landing gear at the Paris Aero Salon.
MONOPLANES AND BIPLANES IN THE DAILY MAIL CIRCUIT ROUND GREAT BRITAIN. - From these every machine can be readily identified either in flight or on the ground.
Side view of the Bristol two-seater monoplane.
Sketch of the Bristol monoplane illustrating the accommodation in the pilot's cockpit and the arrangement of the auxiliary petrol tank. The wires from the cabane are omitted for the sake of clearness.
Sketch illustrating the flexible front skids of the Bristol monoplane and the method of springing the single axle. To avoid complication in the sketch the wheel is omitted, but its hub indicates its position.
THE BRISTOL MONOPLANE. - Plan and side elevation to scale.
The new Cody biplane, constructed to take part in the Daily Mail Circuit of Great Britain.
Cody well away for the first section to Hendon.
Mr. S. F. Cody making his fine flight at Aldershot on Sunday last for the British Michelin prize, when he remained up for over five hours, covering 261 1/2 miles in the time.
Mr. Macfie's V-shaped biplane, which made its first appearance at Brooklands on Tuesday, but had to retire from the Circuit of Britain owing to the chassis being damaged.
DR. MAWSON'S POLAR AEROPLANE. - The above monoplane is doubly interesting: as being one of the first machines built by Messrs. Vickers, Ltd., to the designs of Robert Esnault Pelterie (R.E.P.), and also because it has been ordered for use in connection with Dr. Mawson's expedition to the South Pole. The machine has the characteristic R.E.P. body, built of steel and surfaced with fabric. In front is the R.E.P. semi-radial engine direct coupled to the propeller.
The Vickers monoplane, as seen from behind.
No. 1 monoplane showing fan-type REP engine and typical REP fuselage of steel-tube construction.
Details of control, sketched from the pilot's seat of the Vickers monoplane.
Details of the wing-truss attachment on the Vickers monoplane.
The Vickers Monoplane. - Sketch of tail, showing how the control wires are carried from the short levers on elevator and rudder through the body.
Diagrammatic sketch of the Vickers landing carriage.
The Vickers Monoplane. - Double-bell crank operating warping.
Mr. Percival in the pilot's seat of the Billing biplane at Brooklands, on which he has just obtained his pilot's certificate.
Side view of the Fritz monoplane of 1911 was built by Oylers Ltd.
Front view of the Fritz monoplane, built by Messrs. Oylers, Ltd.
Sketches illustrating some constructional details of the Fritz monoplane. Above, on the left, is seen the method of lacing the Pegamoid fabric to the trailing edge of the wings. Beneath is a little releasing catch intended to enable the pilot to dispense with assistance when starting. On the right is shown the method of mounting the rudder to the tail end of the bamboo frame.
THE FRITZ MONOPLANE. - Plan and elevation to scale.
Mr. Sellers' low-powered quadruplane in flight.
Side view of the Dixon monoplane.
Dixon Nipper No.l monoplane was wrecked on test at Acton in 1911.
View illustrating the undercarriage of the Dixon monoplane.
Sketch showing some details of construction in the Dixon monoplane.
Elevation and plan of the Dixon monoplane.
The latest Voisln biplane built for military use, with extensions on the upper plane. It is fitted with an 8-cyl. 60-h.p. Renault engine. In order that the pilot may see the ground in front of him, a large mica window is fitted in the bottom of the fuselage.
The New World's Altitude with Passenger Record. - Mahieu, the pilot who last week put up a new passenger record for height, on a Voisin biplane, with 2.460 metres. Starting from Issy at 3 o'clock, he returned to terra firma at about 6.30. With him is M, Fay, the passenger who accompanied him.
The Astra Company have just produced a biplane in which the monoplane type of body is the principal characteristic. The above side view, taken at Villacoublay, gives a very good idea of the arrangement of the new machine.
The latest Model Astra Biplane, which is representing the Societe Astra at the French Military Tests. - This machine, with the exception of the landing chassis, which is reminiscent of Antoinette practice, has a striking resemblance to the Avro biplane. It is furnished with double control, and the propulsive effort is obtained from a 75-h.p. Renault motor driving at half speed a "Normale" propeller. It will be noticed that the Horatio Phillips wing cross-section, brought into prominence by the late Edouard Nieuport, has been made use of.
This photograph of the new Astra biplane, which is upholding the credit of that firm in the French Military Tests, gives a good idea of the general disposition of this interesting machine. Seating accommodation is provided for three, one of whom has a seat right in front for observation purposes, while the two seated in tandem behind him are each provided with controls. The motor is an 80-h.p. 6-cyl. Chenu, and drives a large diameter tractor-screw through reduction gearing.
Front of the Astra biplane, showing the general disposition of the under-carriage.
A TRIPLANE, ONE OF THE LATEST PRODUCTIONS OF THE ASTRA COMPANY. - This is another of the machines designed in view of the French military aeroplane competition. The canoe type of body is similar to that of the latest biplane, but other special features are the design and arrangement of the wheels. The span is 12 metres, and the lifting surface 45 sq. metres, while the propeller is driven by a 60-h.p. 8-cyl. Renault motor.
The above photograph illustrates the original monoplane tried by M. Bleriot at Bagatelle and Issy during 1907. In it the use of struts and wire ties was reduced to a minimum, and one of the characteristic features was the upturned wingtips. M. Bleriot has just built a new machine on somewhat similar lines which is to be tried shortly.
Man-carrying glider constructed by Masters Pickering and Willoughby at Knutsford in 1911.
The Short 100-h.p. twin-engined biplane with which Mr. Frank McClean is carrying out such excellent work at the Royal Aero Club's Eastchurch flying grounds. In the left-hand photograph, Mr. McClean is seen in the air on Saturday last, and on the right, Mr. McClean has just finished a passenger flight with the Hon. Maurice Egerton. Reading from left to right are Mr. Frank McClean, Capt, Gerrard, Mr. Horace Short, and the Hen. Maurice Egerton.
MR. FRANK McCLEAN AND HIS SHORT TANDEM TWIN-ENGINED MACHINE. - On the left just starting away from the Eastchurch grounds, with Lieut. Samson as passenger, and on the right Mr. McClean helping to store his machine after his first flight on it.
Mr. McClean just alighting after a flight on the Short twin-engined machine.
Short S.39 Triple-Twin a development to improve control by providing greater coverage of the control surfaces by the slipstream. - General view from the front, showing the two tractor-screws at the ends of the main planes, and the single propeller in the centre behind.
General view from behind of the new Short double-engined biplane, showing the triple rudder. In this the position of the rear propeller and Gnome engine are seen.
THE NEW SHORT DOUBLE-ENGINED BIPLANE. - On the left the front engine, and on the right the rear engine, propeller, pilot's seat, &c.
The New Two-Engined Short Biplane, which has during the past week made such successful flights under the pilotage of Mr. Frank McClean at the Royal Aero Club's Eastchurch flying grounds. On the left Mr. Frank McClean is in the pilot's seat just ready to start, and on the right is a view from behind, showing Mr. McClean up with Lieut. Samson as passenger.
THE NEW SHORT DOUBLE-ENGINED BIPLANE. - Plan and elevation to scale.
Mr. J. Gaunt flying his small biplane over the Southport sands.
THE LATEST PRODUCTION OF M. PAULHAN. - Side view of the triplane which was last week tested in the air.
THE NEW PAULHAN TRIPLANE. - Three-quarter view from the rear.
THE NEW "ZODIAC" BIPLANE. - This, the latest production of the Zodiac Society, was last week tested in the air by M. J. Labouchere at St. Cyr. In general appearance the machine reminds one of the features of the Breguet and Goupy machines, the former by the narrowness of the main planes, the boat-shaped body, and the tractor in front, and the latter by the staggered arrangements of the main planes. The question of rapid dismantling for transport along the road has also been given special attention by the designers.
GENERAL VIEW OF THE THIRD PARIS AERO SALON. - The machine at the bottom of the photograph is the Bleriot 100-h.p. "Aeronef," built to the order of M. Henri Deutsch de la Meurthe. On the same side, but towards the centre of the Exhibition, may be seen the Zodiac biplane and the Borel and Deperdussin monoplanes, while opposite are the Train and H. Farman monoplanes and Savary and M. Farman biplanes.
THE NEW MILITARY PIVOT MONOPLANE. - The span of this machine is 10.5 metres and the lifting surface is 16 square metres, while the weight is given as 310 kilogs. It will be seen that the use of wire stays has been entirely abandoned in favour of steel tubes. Natural stability is adjusted by the two ailerons at the tips of the main plane, and the rudders and elevators at the rear being controlled by a wheel. The motor fitted is a 45-h.p. Rossel Peugeot.
LATHAM'S ANTOINETTE FOR THE MILITARY COMPETITION. - General view from the rear of this new machine which embodies a good many departures from previous Antoinette practice. The body is entirely enclosed, as also is the 100-h.p. Antoinette engine. The body has been so designed that the pilot has a complete range of vision, windows in the floor enabling him to see beneath him. The span of the machine is given as 15.9 metres, and the surface 56 sq. metres. The overall length is about 11 1/2 metres. The chord of the main planes is 4 metres at the junction with the fuselage, and decreases to 3 metres at the tip. The machine in flying order weighs 1,250 kilogs.
DETAlLS OF THE NEW ANTOINETTE. - On the left is seen the fore part of the new machine, showing the way in which the landing chassis is fitted under the wings and is enclosed. This also indicates the location of the 100-h.p. Antoinette engine inside the boat-shaped body and also the shape of the main planes, the trussing of which is all arranged Internally. The landing skids are 3.25 metres long, and each one is fitted with four wheels, two at each end. The view on the right shows the arrangement of the tail and the way in which the fixed plane can be adjusted, while the two landing wheels are also observable.
NEW BLERIOT "CANARD." - Three-quarter view, as seen from behind.
NEW BLERIOT "CANARD." - Three-quarter view, as seen from in front.
NEW RACING TYPE BLERIOT MONOPLANE (No. XXVII). - Many details in the design of Bleriot's two-seater model are incorporated in the new single-seater racer with which Bleriot is now experimenting over the sands at Hardelot. The main body is constructed in the form of a double-ended wedge, at the front of which protrudes the 50-h.p. Gnome engine, mounted in position without the employment of a bearing between the propeller and the engine. The stabiliser, as in the two-seater model, is constructed integrally with the fuselage and at the rear edge is hinged the elevator. The overall length of the machine is 7 metres, and the wings, which have a supporting surface of 12 sq. metres, span 8.90 metres from tip to tip. This new model, which weighs 430 kilogs., has been timed to attain a speed of 130 kiloms. an hour.
Front view of the new Bleriot racer (No. XXVII), showing the reduced landing carriage, the overhung mounting of the engine and propeller, and the peculiarly shaped cowl which prevents the lubricating oil from reaching the pilot. Bleriot, such a strong believer in mounting the engine by bearings on both sides, has, it will be noted, at last abandoned that method in favour of one which renders the motor considerably more accessible. It will be observed that a very slight dihedral angle is employed on this new model, and that the main body has a decided taper towards the front to minimise head resistance.
THE BLERIOT STAND. - At the bottom of the picture, with the warnished wings, is the new "Popular" type Bleriot, fitted with a Y-type Anzani motor of 35-h.p. as listed at L380. The larger monoplane is the 70-h.p. military two-seater, while the tail-half of a machine emerging from under the right wing of the two-seater belongs to the new 50-h.p. Racer.
Six types of landing gear at the Paris Aero Salon.
Sketch of the new 50-h.p. Bleriot racing monoplane.
The R.E.P. stand at the Paris Aero Show, and the new 90-b.p. 7-cyl. R.E.P. motor.
TUBULAR STEEL WORK IN AEROPLANE CONSTRUCTION. - The above photograph is an excellent example of a tubular steel frame for a monoplane body, the machine illustrated being the latest R.E.P. Forming a background to the body are the wings.
THE LATEST R.E.P. MONOPLANE. - The fuselage before the mounting of its planes, &c# showing the method of construction adopted for the framework, landing chassis, fixing of the engine, &c.
Detail view, showing the front section of the beautifully constructed R.E.P. monoplane.
THE GASSIER MONOPLANE AT JUVISY. - A number of interesting points are embodied in the design of this machine, which has a rear elevator as well as a forward one, while the main planes are fitted with ailerons in addition. It will be noticed, too, that the spars of the main plane are very strongly trussed. The engine is a 70-h.p. Gregoire.
FLYING AT BROOKLANDS ON WEDNESDAY OF LAST WEEK. - The Flanders monoplane, and, over the track, the Avro biplane making circuits.
The New 3-seater Biplane that is representing Henry Farman at the Military Tests at Rheims. - This machine has a span of 16 metres, and is driven by a 70-h.p. Gnome engine. It will be noticed that Farman has changed his method of setting planes, for they are now staggered after the manner of the Goupy and the later Zodiac. The manner of seating the three occupants considerably in advance of the main plane is evidently meeting with favour in France, but it will remain to be seen how far it jeopardises the aviator's safety. The landing carriage has also undergone a modification to enable it to stand the strain of the extra weight. In flying trim the machine weighs 950 kilogs.
Side view of the Military Henry Farman biplane which participated in the recent French Military Competitions at Rheims.
The Colossal "Double Monoplane" which has emanated from the Breguet Workshop for the purpose of upholding the firm's honour in the Military Tests. - This machine, whose appearance was foretold in "Air Eddies" columns, is furnished with a Gnome engine of 130-h.p. Its weight, with pilot, passengers, and fuel aboard is 2,420 lbs. Although this machine has been designed to lift three passengers, Breguet is confident of its ability to carry eight.
A 140-h.p. Gnome-engined double Breguet monoplane in tow for the weighing operations at the French military tests at Rheims.
Double Breguet monoplane, fitted with 110-h.p. Salmson motor (Canton-Unne system) at the French military tests at Rheims.
Amongst those machines taking part in the tests promoted by the French military authorities at Rheims the new Blerlot 3-seater possesses considerable interest. It will be seen from the above photograph that Bleriot has reverted to the lifting tail and balanced elevator planes which formed a feature of his early cross-Channel model. Its span is 11.36 metres, and length 8.5 metres. Triple wheels have been fitted to the strengthened landing chassis, and, like the Breguet, is equipped with a Gnome engine of 130-h,p.
A side view of the new passenger-carrying Borel monoplane, furnished with a Gnome motor of 140-h.p. The machine follows broadly the general disposition of the single-seater monoplane of the same maker. The chassis, it will be noticed, is equipped with four wheels, in place of the two on the lighter model, while the skids are more strongly connected with the fuselage. The wings, too, are slightly different, in that their entering and trailing edges taper towards the tips.
"AERO-TORPEDO NO. 1." - The result of the collaboration of Tatin and Paulhan. The photograph gives a good idea of the type of body design that is at present meeting with much favour in France. The ventilated metal shielding under the front of the wings indicates the position of the motor - a 50-h.p. Gnome - driving a propeller at the rear end of the body by means of a hollow universally-jointed shaft. Accommodation is provided for the pilot in advance of the wings.
THE "AERO-TORPEDO" AS IT APPEARS FROM THE REAR. - No provision is made for wing-warping, the upturned wing-tips being expected to endow the machine with a sufficient modicum of lateral balance. It has a span of 9 metres, and its overall length is 8.60 metres. Without fuel or pilot it weighs 350 kilogs.
"Aero Torpedo No. 1," the first experimental machine of this type, with which 88 miles per hour was obtained, with Gaudart at the lever.
Six types of landing gear at the Paris Aero Salon.
Messrs. Walton' and Edwards' biplane in flight at Brooklands.
Grahame Gilmour in the New Martin-Handasyde monoplane. In the background is the Walton-Edwards biplane, in its latest form at the Brooklands aerodrome. This very substantial machine is now carrying out flights on the grounds.
J. V. Martin, who graduated in aviation at the Grahame-White School at Hendon, at the helm of the new 100-h.p. Gnome-engined Martin biplane, which the Queen Aeroplane Co., of New York, have constructed to his designs. On this machine Martin himself has put up a speed of 72 miles per hour flying across country.
The mounting of the 100-h.p. Gnome motor on the new Martin biplane.
The latest Coanda aeroplane, as seen at the French military aeroplane competition at Rheims. The main plane is of 16 metres span, and the supporting surface is about 33 sq. metres. The fin-shaped lower planes fitted at an inverted dihedral angle, and the diagonal arrangement of the tail planes and rudders, is most unusual, while the machine is also unique in having two 70-h.p. Gnome engines, one being placed on each side of the fore part of the fuselage, and driving the four-bladed propeller by gearing.
A man-carrying monoplane designed and constructed in its entirety, including the propeller, by Mr. H. D. Crompton, of Walton-on-the-Hill. The engine, which is a 30-h.p. Alvaston, is slung underneath the main bearers, the pilot's seat being on the top. The span is 30 ft., the length 28 ft., main plane surface 160 sq. ft., and the weight 600 lbs. in flying order, including allowance for pilot. No aluminium is employed, all joints being made from sheet steel.
Two views of the latest genuine Bleriot monoplane, showing the protective roof over the engine and tank and the partially covered framework.
LIEUT. SAMSON, R.N., AND HIS BLERIOT AT THE R.Ae.C.'S EASTCHURCH GROUNDS. - On the right Lieut. Samson is making circuits on the machine.
THE AEROPLANE IN ACTUAL WARFARE. - Capt. Piazza, of the Italian Army, bringing out his Bleriot monoplane at Tripoli for the purpose of reconnoitring the Turkish entrenchments outside the Tripoli fortifications. Note the crowd of Arabs who are following in the wake of the aeroplane.
DAILY MAIL CIRCUIT OF BRITAIN. - The imaginary starting line from which the whole of the machines were sent off from Brooklands on Saturday. Ready for being started are Nos. 1 and 2, and Compton Paterson's Grahame-White "Baby" biplane.
HOLDING BACK A 100-H.P. BLERIOT MONOPLANE. - An "incident" in the successful attempt by Mr. Claude Grahame-White at Belmont Park Meeting, U.S.A., last year, to secure for Great Britain the Gordon-Bennett International Trophy.
DAILY MAIL CIRCUIT OF BRITAIN. - The two first off from Brooklands. At the top,"Beaumont" (Lieut. Conneau) on his Bleriot, and below, Mr. H. J. D. Astley on his Birdling monoplane.
EUROPEAN CIRCUIT. - Two great heroes on the starting line at Vincennes - Garros and Beaumont. The latter (No. 12) is just receiving the signal to get away, his companion following him at the next starting interval.
CIRCUIT OF BRITAIN. - Hamel leaving Chryston on his Bleriot.
PARIS-ROME. - "Beaumont" (Lieut. Conneau) arriving at the Rome Aerodrome.
CIRCUIT OF BRITAIN. - Lieut. Conneau ("Beaumont") finishing on his Bleriot and winning the L10,000 at Brooklands on Wednesday, July 26th.
AVIATION AT THE FRENCH ARMY MANOEUVRES. - Some of the Bessonneau hangars at Vesoul, and the military aeroplanes which are giving such a splendid account of themselves.
THE BLERIOT STAND. - At the bottom of the picture, with the warnished wings, is the new "Popular" type Bleriot, fitted with a Y-type Anzani motor of 35-h.p. as listed at L380. The larger monoplane is the 70-h.p. military two-seater, while the tail-half of a machine emerging from under the right wing of the two-seater belongs to the new 50-h.p. Racer.
Mr. Frank L. Champion with Radley's old Gnome-Bleriot monoplane, on which he is now flying at Los Angeles, South California. Champion, it will be remembered, was a pupil of the Bleriot School at Hendon.
LONDON TO PARIS FLIGHT. - Above is M. Prier in his seat, with route map in front of him, just before his start from Hendon; and below is M. Prier's Gnome-engined Bleriot having its final testing immediately before the start for this record journey last week.
M. Prier, with Mrs. Gordon Jones, a pupil at the Bleriot School of Aviation at Hendon, in the passenger seat, just about to get away for a flight.
M. Roland Garros, who last week put up a new altitude record on a Bleriot monoplane of 13,943 feet at Parame, near St. Malo.
Lieut. R. A. Cammell, the distinguished Array aviator who was killed at Hendon on Sunday last.
MR. W. B. R. MOORHOUSE. Who has recently been making such excellent cross-country flights on his Gnome-Blerlot from Portholme Aerodiome, Huntingdon, to Northampton and the district, and on Friday from Huntingdon to Brooklands.
MONOPLANES AND BIPLANES IN THE DAILY MAIL CIRCUIT ROUND GREAT BRITAIN. - From these every machine can be readily identified either in flight or on the ground.
Three views of Lieut. Dunne's latest aeroplane at the Royal Aero Club's Eastchurch flying ground. - The top photograph shows the machine after its first flight with Lieut. Dunne in the pilot's seat, the lower view giving the machine from the opposite side. On the right the photograph of the pilot's "boat" gives a good idea of the ample room available. To the right of the steering wheel is seen the torque-flap lever; the torque-flap itself is just visible on the right. On the left is the Bosh coil and Elliott counter. The petrol tanks are placed on either side of the boat immediately in front of the engine.
Lieut. Dunne is seen in the left-hand view making a low flight at Eastchurch on his biplane.
A view from the front of Messrs. Forbes and Arnold's novel machine.
THE MILITARY AEROPLANE COMPETITION AT RHEIMS. - Barra, on his Farman, being despatched by the military officials on a long-distance test.
Birra on his Maurice Farman biplane in the final speed test in connection with the French Military Competition.
GENERAL VIEW OF THE THIRD PARIS AERO SALON. - The machine at the bottom of the photograph is the Bleriot 100-h.p. "Aeronef," built to the order of M. Henri Deutsch de la Meurthe. On the same side, but towards the centre of the Exhibition, may be seen the Zodiac biplane and the Borel and Deperdussin monoplanes, while opposite are the Train and H. Farman monoplanes and Savary and M. Farman biplanes.
The Farman stand at the Paris Aero Salon, showing, in addition to the latest type Maurice Farman biplane, the Henry Farman monoplane, described last week in FLIGHT.
At the end of 1911, the famous Louis Bleriot had also built a cabin aircraft for four passengers and a pilot outside. This Bleriot XXIV 'Limousin' was a special order for a certain Henri Deutsch de la Meurthe.
M. Deutsch de la Meurthe's Bleriot "Berline" aeroplane, showing the suspension of the car body part of the machine and the disposition of the Gnome motor, petrol tank, &c. The pilot sits in front of the enclosed body, the cloche being seen in our photograph just projecting forward. Note the special stabiliser fitted to this machine.
GENERAL VIEW OF THE THIRD PARIS AERO SALON. - The machine at the bottom of the photograph is the Bleriot 100-h.p. "Aeronef," built to the order of M. Henri Deutsch de la Meurthe. On the same side, but towards the centre of the Exhibition, may be seen the Zodiac biplane and the Borel and Deperdussin monoplanes, while opposite are the Train and H. Farman monoplanes and Savary and M. Farman biplanes.
Details of the wing construction of the Paterson Biplane. - The sketch on the left illustrates the application of the strut sockets to the built-up front spar.
Two sketches of magnalium-bronze sockets used in the assembling of the Paterson biplane.
Paterson Biplane. - Diagrammatic sketch of engine mounting.
THE PATERSON BIPLANE. - Elevation and plan to scale.
The late Prof. John J. Montgomery on his glider, upon which he met his death at San Jose, California, on October 31st, as recently recorded in FLIGHT.
Grahame Gilmour in the New Martin-Handasyde monoplane. In the background is the Walton-Edwards biplane, in its latest form at the Brooklands aerodrome. This very substantial machine is now carrying out flights on the grounds.
One of the two German aeroplanes at the Salon - the Albatros biplane.
Six types of landing gear at the Paris Aero Salon.
THE BLERIOT STAND. - At the bottom of the picture, with the warnished wings, is the new "Popular" type Bleriot, fitted with a Y-type Anzani motor of 35-h.p. as listed at L380. The larger monoplane is the 70-h.p. military two-seater, while the tail-half of a machine emerging from under the right wing of the two-seater belongs to the new 50-h.p. Racer.
Six types of landing gear at the Paris Aero Salon.
The 50-h.p. Henry Farman biplane, equipped with the new Bronilawsky stabilising system of rotatable planes, shown on the Bronislawsky stand.
The Bronislawski system for lateral stability as applied to a Henry Farman biplane.
The diminutive Caudron monoplane, fitted with 35-h.p. Y-type Anzani motor.
AT THE PARIS AERO SALON. - The current trend of design towards the torpedo type of body is well illustrated by these photographs: the Aero Torpedo on the left is the two-seater Breguet, with Chenu motor, and on the right is the unfinished Morane-Saulnier war monoplane; it is constructed entirely of steel, including the wing skeletons.
PARIS AERO SALON. - Another general view, showing the Astra-Torres dirigible. The Roger Sommer exhibit is to the front of the photograph, while behind it is the Nieuport stand.
THE MILITARY TYPE MAURICE FARMAN BIPLANE. - This view shows clearly the extensions fitted to the machine, and also the arrangement of the chassis.
THE MILITARY TYPE MAURICE FARMAN BIPLANE. - A snapshot of the machine in full flight.
Mr. Maurice Farman and his father after the recent long flight from Buc to Etampes and back, which Farman pere indulged in recently. Mr. Farman, sen., it will be remembered is the well-known Paris correspondent of the "Standard."
Miss Nellie Beese, the first German lady flyer who has secured her pilot's certificate. This she recently gained on a Rumpler Taube monoplane at the Johannisthal aerodrome, near Berlin.
MONOPLANE VERSUS 60-H.P. CAR. - Last week at Brooklands a test of speed was tried between Mr, Hubert Latham on an Antoinette monoplane and Mr. Gordon Watney on a 60-h.p. Mercedes car. In our photograph, which is a specimen of an "unfaked" negative, the race in progress is seen.
Rene Labouchere at Brooklands just released for a flight on his Antoinette monoplane.
Remarkable "snap" of the Antoinette monoplane in midair during the recent disastrous and fatal accident to MM. Laffont and Mario Pola, showing a portion of the planes torn completely away. The tractor-screw, it will be seen, is still in revolution.
Mr. Hubert Latham's Antoinette after its unconventional "call" at the Martin-Handasyde hangar on Whit-Monday at Brooklands. Mr. Latham was quite unhurt.
ON THE BROOKLANDS AVIATION GROUNDS ON WHIT-MONDAY. - Note Latham's smashed machine still "in place" on the root of the right end shed.
GORDON-BENNETT RACE AT EASTCHURCH. - Mr. Gustav Hamel and his 100-h.p. Bleriot just before his start in the race. On the right he is just away, to be brought down, however, after three-quarters of a minute, after rounding the first mark tower, as seen in the wreckage below. Note the rolling method of the assistants in clearing the machine at the moment of starting.
GORDON-BENNETT RACE AT EASTCHURCH. - M. Leblanc and his Bleriot machine, with which he secured second place in the race. Below, M. Leblanc is seen immediately after finishing; above, he is just off for the race; and on the right he is in flight over the course.
The new "Popular"-type Bleriot equipped with a Y-type 35-h.p. Anzani motor.
THE BLERIOT STAND. - At the bottom of the picture, with the warnished wings, is the new "Popular" type Bleriot, fitted with a Y-type Anzani motor of 35-h.p. as listed at L380. The larger monoplane is the 70-h.p. military two-seater, while the tail-half of a machine emerging from under the right wing of the two-seater belongs to the new 50-h.p. Racer.
The new "Popular"'type Bleriot, fitted with 35-h.p. Y-type Anzani motor.
The glider which has been built at Aberdeen by Messrs. Anderson and Singer has been making some excellent glides. The photographs were taken after certain alterations had been carried out as a result of experience gained, and with the machine seen in our pictures the most successful glide obtained was about 25 to 30 yards.
Scale drawings of the Ding Sayers biplane; 1st prize flyer.
M. Pequet in practice flight at Brooklands on the Humber monoplane.
AVIATION IN INDIA. - Mr. Keith Davies with his Humber monoplane under "inspection" by the elephants. Above, Mr. Davies is standing in front of his 3-cyl. Humber-engined monoplane.
M. Pequet and the Humber monoplane he flies at Brooklands.
UNDERCARRIAGES AT OLYMPIA. - A comparison of some girder skids.