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Журнал
Flight за 1914 г.
701

Журнал - Flight за 1914 г.

Side view of the Bristol "Scout" single-seater.
Three-quarter rear view of the Bristol "Scout" single-seater.
Mr. S. V. Sippe on the Bristol Scout at Brooklands Aerodrome.
The small 80 h.p. Bristol single-seater.
Chassis and engine housing on Bristol "Scout."
The tail of the Bristol "Scout" biplane.
Attachment of tail plane on Bristol "Scout."
Wing section of the Bristol "Scout."
THE BRISTOL "SCOUT" BIPLANE. - Plan, front and side elevation to scale.
Of the new machines built in Germany since the beginning or immediately before the war, one which is likely to be employed against the Allies is the new Fokker monoplane illustrated in the accompanying photographs. This machine, it will be seen, is very reminiscent of the rrench Morane monoplane, from which it differs chiefly in the design of under-carriage. As shown in the illustration on the left, the chassis is characterised by short stub axles, whilst the shock-absorbers are placed inside the body, the oblique chassis struts passing through a slot in the side of the fuselage. The engine fitted is an 80 h.p. Gnome.
Igor Sikorsky and his fifteen passengers, whom he took up in his giant aeroplane, "Ilia Mourametz," on February 25th, at Korpusny aerodrome, St. Petersburg, rising to a height of 300 metres and remaining up for 18 mins. 10 secs., a world's record. In the background is seen the cabin portion of this great air 'bus.
Mr. Lusteed, accompanied by a passenger, on the Daily Mail 80 h.p. Avro just off for Shoreham from Brooklands.
F. P. Raynham and his Avro waterplane at Scarborough in connection with the Daily Mail tours.
F. P. Raynham in flight at Scarborough on the Daily Mail Avro waterplane.
An Avro mascot on a car at Hendon on Aerial Derby Day.
PASSING A PYLON AT HENDON AERODROME. - From an original drawing by Mr. Roderic Hill.
An impression of Raynham gliding on the 80 h.p. Avro. From an original drawing by Mr. Roderic Hill.
Chassis and main floats of the Avro seaplane.
The water rudder on the Avro seaplane.
Detail of springing the floats on the Avro seaplane.
CONCENTRATION CAMP AT NETHERAVON. - A B.E. fitted with wireless equipment about to start on a cross-country flight.
A view of the temporary aeroplane sheds at the Concentration Camp at Netberavon.
CENTRAL FLYING SCHOOL, UPAVON. - A view of the machines of A, B, and C Flights on the asphalte in front of the sheds during preparation for the evening practice. The machines missing from the centre of the line are the four Avros, which were undergoing overhaul at the time of our visit.
CENTRAL FLYING SCHOOL, UPAVON. - Some of the machines of C Flight.
THE KING'S BIRTHDAY. - General Smith-Dorrien reviewing troops at Ludgershall. In our photograph the "fly past" of one of the aeroplanes is seen at the moment of dipping before the saluting base.
CENTRAL FLYING SCHOOL AT UPAVON. - A B.E.2a in flight over the gallops, with Netheravon in the distance.
The start for the South of the R.F.C. No. 2 Squadron, Montrose, at 5.30 a.m.
A B.E. and a Henry Farman flying at Upavon.
OUR FLIGHT OFFICERS AT THE FRONT. - Lieut. Lawrence, R.F.C., and Lieut. Wingfield Smith, R.F.C., with a B.E. at ---.
Fig. 2. - Sections of tail planes: A, Avro tail, 1910-11. B, Nieuport tail, 1910-11. C, B.E. tail, 1911. D, B.E. tail, 1912.
Mr. Harold Treloar in his Blerlot at Brooklands.
Chanteloup, the first aviator to loop the loop on a biplane in England, just about to mount his Caudron machine at Hendon on Friday last week.
Chanteloup descending on his Caudron biplane after carrying out his extraordinary loopings at Hendon on Friday.
The 60 h.p Caudron biplane (No. 3).
A QUICK-RISING COMPETITION AT THE RECENT VIENNA MEETING. - Our photograph shows Poulet, on an 80 h.p. Caudron biplane, winning the contest by clearing a wire 10 metres high, starting 30 metres away, giving a climbing angle of 1 in 3.
The "Temple of Heaven," Pekin, China. A photograph by Rene Caudron from a Military 80 h.p. Caudron biplane.
The French quarter of Tien-Tsin, China. A photograph taken by Rene Caudron from a Military 80 h.p. Caudron biplane.
Pilot: Mr. M. Zubiaga.
The Morane-Saulnier "Parasol," and a view of the chassis and engine mounting.
Attachment of wings to fuselage on the Morane-Saulnier "Parasol."
A B.E. and a Henry Farman flying at Upavon.
CENTRAL FLYING SCHOOL, UPAVON. - A Henry Farman in flight and some of the Maurice Farmans of B Flight on the ground.
CENTRAL FLYING SCHOOL, UPAVON. - The Henry and Maurice Farmans of D Flight.
Mr. Thornely on his biplane at the Munster Aerodrome, where he has been giving looping exhibitions last week, during the time that the Prince Henry flight was in progress. Tweer was also looping on a Blerlot.
Mr. J. E. B. Thornely, the very able seventeen-year-old pilot who last week looped the loop at Eastbourne.
MR. J. E. B. THORNELY, who, as recorded in FLIGHT for March 28th, recently looped the loop on a Farman biplane at Eastbourne. Mr. Thornely, who will not be 18 until July 5th next, joined the Eastbourne Aviation Co.'s School in October, 1912, and last year practised on a Bleriot monoplane and later on a Bristol biplane.
Mr. J. Grant's Farman type biplane, constructed from scale drawings which have appeared in FLIGHT.
NEW H. FARMAN CHASSIS. - It will be seen that it consists of four pairs of "U" steel tubes of stream-line section, each pair of which converge at their lower extremities, where they are connected by short transverse distance pieces. It is claimed that this machine can be converted into a hydro, by simply substituting floats for the wheels. For resisting transverse strains when landing with a side wind it would seem that this chassis is an improvement on the older type H. Farman chassis.
The new Maurice Farman biplane at Hendon.
Group of officers, including Col. Sykes, Majors Brancker and Beck, and Mr. O'Brien Hubbard, in front of a Maurice Farman at Netheravon, prior to a flight.
Nacelle and chassis of M. Farman biplane.
The latest M. Farman biplanes produced by the Aircraft Co. are fitted with nacelles of improved design, which add considerably to the comfort of the occupants and reduce head resistance. With this type of nacelle the machines are capable of a speed of 65 m.p.h.
Pierre Verrier on the "Shorthorn" Maurice Farman just starting at Hendon.
M. Verrier flying the Maurice Farman at Hendon.
FLYING AT HENDON. - Mr. Grahame-White on an M. Farman and Mr. Lillywine on the twin-rudder G.-W. 'bus over No. 1 pylon.
The 70 h.p, new M. Farman biplane.
Sketch showing method of adjusting the angle of incidence of the tail plane jon the M. Farman.
One of the tail skids of the M. Farman.
THE ALBATROS BIPLANE. - Side view.
THE ALBATROS BIPLANE. - Three-quarter rear view.
THE ALBATROS BIPLANE. - View from in front.
View from below of the Albatros in flight.
Herr Thelen in the cockpit of the Albatros.
Chassis and engine of Albatros.
Detail of shock absorbing arrangement on Albatros.
Left, method on Albatros of locking propeller on engine shaft; centre, the hand operated brake; and right, attachment of lower plane to fuselage.
Left, the anemometer on the Albatros wfcich is mounted on one of inter-plane struts. Centre, a chassis detail, and right, attachment of inter-plane struts and cress bracing cables to main spars.
Oil and petrol cans mounted on engine inspection door of Albatros.
Aileron crank lever on Albatros.
THE ALBATROS BIPLANE. - Plan, side and front elevations to scale.
A "D.F.W." all-steel biplane, in which the only wood employed is that of the propeller. This machine, which was designed by Mr. Cecil Kny, the Technical Director, will be built in this country as soon as the new works at Richmond are completed. With a full load, including fuel for 5 1/2 hours and two passengers, the machine has climbed to a height of 3,500 ft. in 4 mins. The engine is a 100 h.p. Mercedes, and the speed is 78.4 miles per hour. Inset is a view of the machine in flight.
Two views of the 150 h.p. D.F.W. fast reconnaissance type biplane. Inset, the same machine in flight.
The D.F.W. biplane, fitted with 100 h.p. Mercedes engine, on which Oelrich last week beat the world's height record by going up to 7,860 metres.
THE NEW WORLD'S HEIGHT RECORD. - On the left, Oelrich standing by the record-breaking D.F.W. biplane, with its laurels, while on the right is a photograph of the barograph records duly attested.
11. The D.F.W. Military biplane.
26. The new type L.V.G. biplane.
On the left, an observer in an aeroplane is shown in the act of transmitting a message to the ground, and on the right an observer is seen reading a message, while a signaller is standing by ready to reply thereto.
THE PRINCE HENRY CIRCUIT. - On the left, v. Thuna, the winner of the Kaiserprize, with Lieut, v. Kleist, his observer, and their 100 h.p. Mercedes biplane. On the right (from right to left), Prince Henry of Prussia, Messrs. Trutz, Geheimer Rat Buxenstein, Winter (K.F.A.C.). (From the Allgemeine Automobil Zeitung.)
A German Military (L.V.G) biplane loaded on a railway truck ready to be sent to the Front.
A German Military (L.V.G.) biplane in a somewhat undignified attitude.
The Rumpler biplane on which Herr Basser beat the world's duration record at Johannisthal on June 24th last, with a flight of 18 hrs. 12 mins. duration. The nose of the fuselage round the 100 hjp. Mercedes engine is covered with aluminium, whilst the top of the body is covered with three-ply wood. The rear portion of the fuselage is totally covered in with fabric. Provision has been made for quick erecting and dismantling of the wings, which are separated by 12 steel tube struts of streamline section. The chassis is exactly similar to that of the Rumpler monoplanes, thus allowing of interchange of spare parts.
Two views of the Etrich monoplane covered with Emaillite treating and flown by Lieut. Nittner at Wiener Neustadt. It will be noticed especially from the photograph on the right that the inner construction of the planes can be seen through the top surface.
Mr. Carl Hochhaltinger's Etrich Taube model.
The Bristol Two-seater Biplane (No. 9).
The graceful 80 h.p. Clerget-engined "Bristol" biplane at Brooklands purchased by Mr. Richard P. Creagh.
Messrs. Creagh and Sippe at Brooklands, looking a bit cold on their return to earth after reaching an altitude of 11,000 ft. on Mr. Creagh's Bristol. Needless to say, the cold did not extend to their lower extremities.
The 80 h.p. Bristol two-seater biplane.
The neat door-catch fitted on the engine inspection door of the Bristol two-seater.
Sketch of the neat steel fitting which joins a chassis strut and a wing spar to the lower longeron of the fuselage of the two-seater Bristol.
Mr. Rowland Ding in the Handley Page biplane, with Princess Ludwig of Lowenstein-Werthelm in front, just before their departure from Hendon to fly across the Channel, en route for Paris.
The Handley-Page and Avro biplanes ready to take the air at Hendon.
Mr. Whitehouse flying the Handley Page biplane, with the tail planes removed, at Hendon.
A plan view, from beneath, of the Handley Page biplane with the tail planes removed.
Mr. W. Rowland Ding, flying the Handley-Page biplane at Bath recently.
The Handley-Page G Type biplane, first flown in 1913 and adopted by the RNAS in 1914 for training and home defence.
CENTRAL FLYING SCHOOL, UPAVON. - A B.E. 8 in flight during evening practice.
QUALIFYING FOR ROYAL AIR SERVICE AT HENDON. - An R.E. just about to make a flight.
MR, FRANK McCLEAN AND HIS SHORT WATERPLANE AT CAIRO. - Mr. Frank McClean is seen standing on the ground in the centre of the picture without a hat on, the photograph being taken just prior to Mr. McClean's flight to Assiut.
Another view of Mr. Frank McClean's Short waterplane on which he has been helping to make history on the Nile. Standing on the near float is Mr. Horace Short, the designer and constructor of the machine.
MR. FRANK McCLEAN IN EGYPT. - Banking on a sharp "taxi-turn" on the Nile on his 160 b.p. Gnome-engined Short waterplane.
THE COUPE SCHNEIDER. - The winning Sopwith seaplane, with Mr. Howard Pixton piloting, just rising off tne water at Monaco.
A snap of M. C. Howard Pixton flying the Sopwith seaplane at Monaco during his sucessful flight for the Schneider Cup.
A remarkable photograph secured by Mons. E. Marchessaux at Monaco on April 20th, during the final contest for the Schneider Aviation Cup. - This negative absolutely untouched, and shows Mr. Howard Pixton's Sopwith machine passing the Franco-British seaplane piloted by M. Burri. The above is one of the autograph photographs of the amateur photographer which he presented to the two pilots who finished for this cup.
The special racing chassis fitted on the Sopwlth Scout flown by Mr. Barnwell in the Aerial Derby.
Victor MabI, the nominated pilot for the Sopwith tractor.
ROUND BRITAIN MACHINES. - No. 1. The Sopwith tractor biplane.
The landing chassis of the new Sopwith biplane at Brooklands.
THE SCHNEIDER CUP VICTORY. - From right to left: Mr. T. O. M. Sopwith, the designer and builder of the winning seaplane; Mr. C. Howard Pixton, the pilot; and that important "accessory," the expert mechanician, Mr. Victor Mahl.
The Sopwith Scout (Nos. 19 and 20).
Mr. C. Howard Pixton on the Sopwith "tabloid"just getting off at Brooklands.
THE SOPWITH "TABLOID" A T BROOKLANDS. - Mr. Howard Pixton banking for a turn.
R. H. Barnwell, the scratch man and the last man to leave in the Aerial Derby, just off from Hendon Aerodrome on the Sopwith biplane on Saturday last.
AT BROOKLANDS. - Mr. Hawker in flight on the Sopwlth Tractor during the past season.
Mr. Victor Mahl, who has just secured his pilot's certificate on a Sopwith machine. It will be remembered Mr. Mahl was the mechanician who assisted Mr. Howard Pixton recently during his flight at Monaco in connection with the Schneider Cup, & c.
Lieut. Spencer Grey flying the new Sopwith biplane at Hendon. From an original drawing by Roderic Hill.
THE DEPERDUSSIN STAND. - On the left is seen the Gordon-Bennett racer, and in centre the Dep. hydro.
PARMELIN'S FLIGHT OVER MONT BLANC. - A photograph showing a portion of this snow-dad height, over which M. Parmelin passed, a Deperdussin monoplane, on which the feat was accomplished, being seen in the photograph.
Parmelin s arrival at Aosta, after crossing Mont Blanc on his Deperdussin monoplane. A snapshot taken within three minutes of his touching earth.
Lieut. Norman Spratt, R.F.C.
A neat way of mounting the instruments on the Deperdussin monoplane.
Mr. Cecil Pashley flying with a passenger at Shoreham Aerodrome.
Cecil Pashley banking one of the Farmans round a pylon in last Saturday's speed race at the Shoreham Aerodrome.
The Franco-British seaplane, piloted by Burri, the only other machine besides the winning Sopwlth seaplane to finish the course for the Schneider Cup at Monaco.
A remarkable photograph secured by Mons. E. Marchessaux at Monaco on April 20th, during the final contest for the Schneider Aviation Cup. - This negative absolutely untouched, and shows Mr. Howard Pixton's Sopwith machine passing the Franco-British seaplane piloted by M. Burri. The above is one of the autograph photographs of the amateur photographer which he presented to the two pilots who finished for this cup.
THREE HISTORIC MACHINES IN LINE AT HELIOPOLIS. - In the centre is Marc Pourpe's 60 h.p. Gnome-Morane-Saulnier, which he flew from Cairo to Khartoum and is now flying back - this is the identical machine on which Garros crossed the Mediterranean on the left is Vedrines 80 h.p. Gnome Bleriot which was flown from Paris to Cairo; while on the right is Bonnier's 80 h.p. Gnome-Nieuport, which has also been flown from Paris to Cairo.
FLYING AT HELIOPOLIS. - The first Hangar in Egypt to fly the British flag. The machine in front is Mr. W. Oswald Watts' 60 h.p. Blerlot single-seater, and behind inside may be noticed Marc Pourpe's Khartoum 60 h.p. Morane-Saulnier on which, half an hour after the photograph was taken, he started away and flew to Suez in 1 hr. 10 mins., very fine going.
Earl S. Daugherty, the American aviator, in his Gnome-engined Morane-Borel monoplane. This machine is the fifteenth Mr. Daugherty has piloted. On the right he is seen just getting away.
The Morane Monoplane (Nos. 10, 12, 17, 21).
Mr. Noel just "off" on his Morane at Hendon.
A turn round Hendon Aerodrome on the Morane-Saulnier.
Mr. Frank Goodden flying the Morane-Saulnier at Hendon Aerodrome.
The first man to return to Hendon Aerodrome in the Aerial Derby. - Louis Noel on his Morane.
LONDON-MANCHESTER-LONDON RACE. - Finish by Brock on his Morane-Saulnier machine on Saturday last, when he won this race in magnificent time. The time estimated by the handicapper for him to arrive back at Hendon was 5.60 p.m., and within ten seconds of that time Mr. Brock passed the winning post. Note the clock in our photograph, which points exactly to the 5.50.
Louis Noel, on the 80 h.p. Morane-Saulnier, after having finished first in the final heat of the speed handicap at Hendon last Saturday, completing an extra lap whilst the other competitors are finishing the heat.
THE FINISH OF THE AERIAL DERBY AT HENDON. - Mr. W. L. Brock passing over the finishing line on his Morane.
R. H. Carr winning the Cross-Country Race, with Miss Saunders as passenger, on the Morane-Saulnier mono, at Hendon on Saturday.
LOOPING THE LOOP BY COMMAND OF THE KING. - Mr. Gustav Hamel upside down over Windsor Castle before the King on Monday. Our photograph shows the spectators watching the evolutions from the Long Walk.
A MEMORY. - The late Mr. Philippe Marty flying in a race at Hendon.
The winner of the Aerial Derby, W. L. Brock, just come to rest in the Hendon Aerodrome.
LORD CARBERY the well-known amateur who files a Morane for sport. He made a surprise flight from Paris to London in the middle of last August, soon after securing his brevet. He has entered for the Aerial Derby.
LONDON-PARIS LONDON RACE. - Brock's superb landing at Hendon on his return from Paris.
LONDON-PARIS-LONDON RACE. - Brock standing up in his machine immediately on his,return to Hendon after his splendid achievement in the Paris flight.
LONDON-PARIS-LONDON RACE. - Brock's reception at Hendon after winning the race. On the left, the Pilot, the Press and the People; on the right Brock being "carried" round the enclosures after his victory.
LONDON-PARIS-LONDON RACE. - Garros, the second man, arriving from Paris. On the left he is seen coming into the aerodrome on his first return, when, being informed he had missed the turning point at Harrow Church, he at once took wing again and flew back and rounded this point. On the right he is returning after this little episode, and thus formally ranking as second in.
A neat way of exhibiting a machine - one of the Morane-Saulnier monoplanes.
Garros in his machine in which be obtained second place in the London-Paris-London Race.
A seasonable card from Louis Noel to hand this week, whose greetings we sincerely reciprocate, both on behalf of ourselves and, we feel sure, of our readers, who have followed in our pages all the good work which he has done here, and is now adding to on the side of the Allies.
An impression of looping the loop with Noel at Hendon.
A MEMORY. - Mr. Gustav Hamel, whose disappearance since Saturday has caused such widespread sorrow, flying his Morane monoplane on which he has accomplished such daring feats during the past months. From an original drawing by Roderic Hill.
LONDON-PARIS-LONDON RACE. - The return of Garros; he swept into the aerodrome only to find that he was - second! From an original drawing by Roderic Hill.
Diagrams illustrating simple wireless telegraphy sets. Fig. 1. - The simplest form of transmitting and receiving set. Fig. 2. - The transmitting set of a more modern system. Fig. 3. - The receiving set for the same system.
Fig. 4. - Sketch showing the fitting of a "counterpoise," which takes the place of "earth" on a biplane; also showing the transmitting and receiving aerial.
Fig. 5. - Sketch showing the Marconi method of fitting the aerial to a Morane-Saulnier monoplane.
Fig. 6. - Detail views of the three Marconi units as fitted to a Morane-Saulnier monoplane. A, high frequency alternator and rotary disc-discharger. B, transmitting unit; 1, transformer; 2, choke coils; 3, condensers; 4 , jigger primary; 5, jigger secondary: 6, disc-discharge terminals; 7, aerial and counterpoise terminals. C, receiving unit: 2, batteries ; 3. battery cut-out; 4, telephones; 5, operating key; 6, aerial tuning inductance; 7, detector-crystal holder; 8, switches; 9, valvetuning condenser: 10, intensifier; 11, potentiometer.
The tandem-seater military Nieuport.
THREE HISTORIC MACHINES IN LINE AT HELIOPOLIS. - In the centre is Marc Pourpe's 60 h.p. Gnome-Morane-Saulnier, which he flew from Cairo to Khartoum and is now flying back - this is the identical machine on which Garros crossed the Mediterranean on the left is Vedrines 80 h.p. Gnome Bleriot which was flown from Paris to Cairo; while on the right is Bonnier's 80 h.p. Gnome-Nieuport, which has also been flown from Paris to Cairo.
Fig. 3. Nieuport monoplane, 1910-1911.
The leaf spring of the Nieuport tandem two-seater.
Fig. 2. - Sections of tail planes: A, Avro tail, 1910-11. B, Nieuport tail, 1910-11. C, B.E. tail, 1911. D, B.E. tail, 1912.
Gibert's monoplane after his landing on the roof of some sheds near Paris. Note how, under the circumstances, comparatively little damage of any sort was done, either to the building or the machine.
6. The new type A.E.G. biplane.
5. The Albatros seaplane.
5. The Albatros seaplane.
The latest Fokker monoplane with a 100 h.p. Mercedes engine, flying at the Johannisthal aerodrome.
Prince Bismarck, a grandson of the first Chancellor of the German Empire, passed the necessary tests for his pilot's certificate under the new regulations on January 17th on a Fokker monoplane at Schwertn in Mecklenburg. Prince Bismarck is only sixteen years of age, but gives promise of becoming a skilful aviator.
17. The Rumpler Flying Boat.
General view of the Burgess-Dunne hydro-biplane floating on the water.
View from the front of the Burgess-Dunne hydro-biplane, showing how it is equally supported on the water by all three floats.
The Burgess-Dunne hydro-biplane in flight at Marblehead, piloted by Clifford L. Webster.
THE BURGESS-DUNNE HYDRO-BIPLANE. - Plan, side and front elevations to scale.
THE CURTISS HYDRO-AEROPLANE FITTED WITH DISC STABILIZER. - On the fight the machine in flight.
THE "AMERICA," THE CURTISS TRANS-ATLANTIC FLYING BOAT. - The following are the chief dimensions: Length over all, 34 ft.; length of hull, 30 ft.; width of hull, 4 ft.; depth of hull, 6 ft.; length of cabin, 7 ft.; height of cabin, 5 ft.; width of cabin. 4 ft; span of upper plane, 74 ft.; span of lower plane, 4 6 ft.; chord, 7 ft.; gap, 7 ft. 6 ins.; weight, empty, 3,000 lbs.; weight, fully loaded, 5,000 lbs.; speed, 62-65 m.p.h.
The Curtlss flying boat "America," at rest on the water.
The "America" hydroplaning.
THE ATLANTIC FLIGHT AS IT MAY BE. - From an original drawing by Roderic Hill.
WATERPLANE RACING AT LAKE MICHIGAN. - A snap of a Curtiss flying boat, with two passengers on board, by the passenger in another Curtiss flying boat when racing neck and neck along Lake Michigan. Beyond is seen Lincoln Park (Chicago) Yacht Harbour.
The gyroscopic installation on the Sperry-Curtiss machine.
The Curtiss flying boat.
E. Baumann at Hendon Aerodrome passing over Pylon I on the Wright biplane.
Mr. Beatty flying the Wright school biplane at Hendon recently.
The dual control and power plant of the Wright flyer at the Beatty School, Hendon Aerodrome.
THE DUAL CONTROL ON MR. BEATTY'S WRIGHT BIPLANE. - As Mr. Beatty is accustomed to and prefers the original Wright control, the school machines are equipped with this type for the instructor, whilst the pupils' controls are similar to those most favoured by European designers, consisting of a hand wheel for the warp, mounted on a steel tube structure to which is connected the elevator, and a foot bar for the rudder. These are ingeniously interconnected with the Wright control so that both act simultaneously.
The new Wright biplane in flight.
Krumsick on a Grade monoplane at the Munster aerodrome.
TWO OF THE LATEST GRADE MONOPLANES. - Top: The new 100 h.p. Grade monoplane, which is fitted with a 4-cyl. air-cooled Grade engine. In spite of the small number of cylinders this engine is said to be remarkably free from vibration. The oil consumption is 4/5 gal. per hour, and petrol consumption 7.7 gals, per hour. The speed of the machine is 75 m.p.h. Below: The 16-24 h.p. Grade monoplane, which weighs 265 lbs. only, and for which a speed variation of 50 per cent, is claimed.
THE SOMERVILLE BIPLANE. - Type 1 Aileron fitted on 1910 experimental biplane, and also used in 1911.
THE SOMERVILLE BIPLANE. - Type 2 Aileron used in 1910 experimental biplane.
Fig. 2. - Sections of tail planes: A, Avro tail, 1910-11. B, Nieuport tail, 1910-11. C, B.E. tail, 1911. D, B.E. tail, 1912.
Fig. 4. Avro biplane, 1910-11.
CENTRAL FLYING SCHOOL, UPAVON. - The Maurice Farmans of B Flight.
CENTRAL FLYING SCHOOL, UPAVON. - The Henry and Maurice Farmans of D Flight.
CENTRAL FLYING SCHOOL, UPAVON. - A Henry Farman in flight and some of the Maurice Farmans of B Flight on the ground.
Mr. Noel, at Hendon, flying on the Maurice Farman with Miss Kitty Kent, who is so prominent in "The Girl from Utah."
AT HENDON AERODROME. - Louis Noel on the Maurice Farman rounding No.1 Pylon towards evening.
A fine bank by J. Alcock on his M. Farman biplane, 100 h.p. Sunbeam engine, at the Shoreham Aerodrome.
Mr. L. Noel on the Maurice Farman, flying hands off during the speed handicap on Saturday. Above is seen the Caudron piloted by Goodden.
CLOSE FINISHING AT HENDON DURING THE SUMMER RACING SEASON. - Mr. Lillywhite on the Grahame-White biplane and Mr. Birchenough on a Maurice Farman.
RACING AT HENDON. - The second heat of the Speed Handicap on Whit Saturday. From left to right the machines are: Messrs. R. J. Lillywhite (G.-W. twin rudder), Verrier (Maurice Farman), W. Birchenough (G.-W.-Maurice Farman), and L. Noel (Bleriot).
Byfleet, 1,000 ft. up, as seen from the 100 h.p. Sunbeam-engined Maurice Farman, piloted by Mr. J. Alcock.
Staines Reservoir, from 4,300 ft. up, another snap taken from Mr. J. Alcock's 100 h.p. Sunbeam-engined Maurice Farman.
A snap of the Whitsun Motor Race Meeting at Brooklands from Mr. Jack Alcock's Sunbeam-englned biplane.
THE "CITY OF DISTANCES," AS MADRAS IS CALLED. - Photographs taken bv Mr. Wilfred R. Wills from Mr. Madeley s Maurice Farman biplane, of the residential quarter of Madras at 6.45 a.m. Each house has a large compound, and the town covers a very large area. The Ghosha people came on to their roofs in numbers to look at the aeroplane when it dropped to 300 ft. The photograph on the right was taken at 1.000 ft. On the left is seen the mouth of the Adzar river looking towards the sea. This was taken at 7.15 a.m., the best time for flying except sometimes in the evening.
MR. MADELEY'S NEW WATERWORKS SCHEME FOR MADRAS. - The filter beds and the round elevated tank can be clearly seen in these photographs, which were secured by Mr. Wilfred R. Wills from Mr. Madeley's Maurice Farman biplane. Mr. Madeley is Special Engineer to the Corporation of Madras.
Another photograph by Mr. Wilfred R. Wills from Mr. Madeley's Maurice Farman biplane, taken, like the rest of Mr. Wills' photographs, with an ordinary Kodak. The above snap was taken during a vol plane, Mr. Madeley's hangar being seen just to the left-centre of the picture. Note the crowds of natives round about it, who are a very great nuisance when landing, as they insist upon running towards the machine. The spot is the "Mount," a military station six miles from Madras, where Mr. Madeley keeps his machine.
The Sunbeam engine power plant on the Maurice-Farman at Brooklands.
Miss Kitty Kent, who is appearing in "The Girl from Utah" at the Adelphl Theatre, is taking up flying at Hendon. Our photograph shows Mr. Noel just about to give her some practical experience in the air.
Mr. J. Alcock, on the Sunbeam-engined M. Farman, about to make a flight at Brooklands Aerodrome.
Jack Alcock in the pilot's seat of his M. Farman biplane, 100 h.p. Sunbeam engine, at the Shoreham Aerodrome.
MR. J. ALCOCK, who has recently been flying the 100 h.p. Sunbeam-engined Maurice Farman so splendidly at Brooklands. Trained as an engineer, he joined Mr. Maurice Ducrocq, and was his chief mechanic for 2 1/2 years. In Nov., 1912, he took his ticket on Mr. Ducrocq's Farman, on which he won several competitions in 1913. For a short time last year he was instructor at the Avro School at Shoreham.
The skeleton of the all-steel R.E.P. fuselage.
A start for a cross-country race at Hendon Aerodrome with the opening of the present season.
THE START FOR THE AERIAL DERBY AT HENDON AERODROME. - Filip Bjorkland running his engine on his Bleriot just prior to getting away.
Mr. S. Summerfield about to start on a flight at Melton Mowbray on his Bleriot. Note the little mascot cat above the wings.
A sharp rise by Mr. B. C. Hucks on his Bleriot during his recent visit to Leicester for exhibition flying.
Sopwith on his Bleriot, the first man back to the London Aerodrome on Saturday, June 8th, 1912, in the First Aerial Derby, who, however, was disqualified for passing inside the Purley control.
Louis Noel on the Bleriot overtaking Louis Strange flying the Grahame-White Boxkite during a race at Hendon on 14 March, 1914.
RACING AT HENDON. - The second heat of the Speed Handicap on Whit Saturday. From left to right the machines are: Messrs. R. J. Lillywhite (G.-W. twin rudder), Verrier (Maurice Farman), W. Birchenough (G.-W.-Maurice Farman), and L. Noel (Bleriot).
The two-seater Bleriot Monoplane (No. 6).
In connection with M. Bieriot's candidature for the Seine General Council, as we mentioned last week, Bleriot monoplanes were utilised for the dissemination of handbills and other election literature on behalf of M. Bleriot. Above is seen one of the machines used at Buc, on the left being M. Bleriot and in the pilot's seat M. A. Bidot, who piloted this 80 h.p. military machine in a 90 kilometre wind, the handbills being thrown out by Mr. T. Elder Hearn, who is also seen in the above machine.
The above snaps are of considerable historical interest from the fact that they show the scene at Buc uoon the occasion when Pegoud for the first time "looped the loop" on his Bleriot. On the left Pegoud is seen pointing out to those concerned the exact spot where he Intended to make his first loop. In the centre picture is the late M. Perreyon, and in the righ-hand picture from right to left MM. Pegoud, Domenjoz and Perreyon.
THREE HISTORIC MACHINES IN LINE AT HELIOPOLIS. - In the centre is Marc Pourpe's 60 h.p. Gnome-Morane-Saulnier, which he flew from Cairo to Khartoum and is now flying back - this is the identical machine on which Garros crossed the Mediterranean on the left is Vedrines 80 h.p. Gnome Bleriot which was flown from Paris to Cairo; while on the right is Bonnier's 80 h.p. Gnome-Nieuport, which has also been flown from Paris to Cairo.
Two Bedouin watchmen, known locally as Gafirs, on guard over Mr. W. Oswald Watts' Bleriot at Heliopolis.
FLYING AT HELIOPOLIS. - The first Hangar in Egypt to fly the British flag. The machine in front is Mr. W. Oswald Watts' 60 h.p. Blerlot single-seater, and behind inside may be noticed Marc Pourpe's Khartoum 60 h.p. Morane-Saulnier on which, half an hour after the photograph was taken, he started away and flew to Suez in 1 hr. 10 mins., very fine going.
A couple of interior views of the new British Bleriot works at Brooklands. On the left a view of half a dozen machines in the shop, and on the right a portion of the wood-working department is seen.
Miss Trehawke Davies handing Mr. Gustav Hamel his goggles prior to ascending with Mr. Hamel in his monoplane at Hendon on Friday, January 2nd, for the purpose of looping the loop, Miss Davies being the first woman to go through this remarkable experience in Great Britain.
Mr. Vivian Hewitt and his lamb passenger.
Mr. T. Elder Hearn, who was just taken his brevet in France, after 4 hrs. 40 mins. work at the Bleriot School at Buc. He writes that after some further practice he intends to try the "loop" and thereby score a record for rapid advance in piloting, and hopes to follow it up immediately afterwards with a flight from Paris to London.
Mr. Salmet and his passenger, Mr. T. Elder Hearn, just before their flight from Buc to Hendon last week. Mr. Hearn hopes to make the same trip as pilot himself in about three weeks' time.
Marcel Desoutter, who is now flying again, about to leave Brooklands on Sunday last for Hendon on Lord Edward Grosvenor's Bleriot.
Mr. R. Skene in the pilot's seat of Lord Edward Grosvenor's Bleriot.
Mr. Landry, the first French Canadian to take his F.A.I. brevet at Buc.
OUR FLIGHT OFFICERS AT THE FRONT. - Lieut. James Valentine, R.F.C., with his Bleriot at ---.
Capt. Oswald Watt (now with the French Army) starting for a flight, with Mr. Wallace Barr as passenger, from the aerodrome at St. Cyr.
The 70 h.p. Bleriot two-seater monoplane.
Chassis and nacelle of the Nieuport-built Dunne biplane.
Sketch illustrating the method of springing employed on the Nieuport-built Dunne biplane.
A SOUTH AFRICAN-BUILT BIPLANE. - In the pilot's seat is seen Mr. Compton Paterson, the designer and pilot, and standing on his right is Mr. H. Carpenter, the constructor.
A SOUTH AFRICAN-BUILT BIPLANE. - Final adjustments outside the hangar just previous to its first ascent.
Recently Mr. Prosser had occasion to visit the Austin Motor Co.'s works at Northfield, Birmingham, when he required some work done to his engine, and he adopted the plan of making his call via the air. Our photograph shows Mr. Edwin Prosser in the pilot's seat of his biplane soon after landing in the field adjoining the Austin works, the extent of which may be gauged from the enormous range of buildings seen in the picture.
The 35 h.p. Caudron Biplane (No. 1).
View of the biplane which Mr. Delfosse Badgery has built in Australia, and which is fitted with a 45 h.p. Anzanl motor.
Mr. A. Delfosse Badgery in the seat of his Anzani-engined biplane at Sutton Forest, New South Wales. On Sunday, July 19th, Mr. Badgery was up to over 2,000 feet, taking the air in 20 yards, and climbing the first 1,000 feet in 2 minutes 46 seconds. The distance travelled during the day was 30 miles, despite the somewhat high winds.
Mr. Scotland, the New Zealand aviator who has been making such good headway in introducing flying at the Antipodes, with his 45 h.p. Anzani-Caudron at Athletic Park, Wellington, on March 21st.
A recollection of Hendon during the past season, with Rene Desoutter negotiating No. 1 pylon on a Caudron. Very different are scenes there now under the regime of our Air Services.
MR. L. HALL MAKING A TRIAL FLIGHT IN HIS NEW SCHOOL MACHINE. - In the background may be noted some of the tents of the R.N.R., and the big hangar which the Grahame-Whlte Aviation Co. have put up.
MR. A. W. JONES FLYING HIS ANZANI-CAUDRON IN AUSTRALIA. - On the left at Cheltenham Race Course, Adelaide, South Australia; on the right at Perth Oval, Western Australia.
MR. A. W. JONES IN AUSTRALIA. - On the left, flying his Caudron at Kalgoorlie Race Course, June 15th; on the right at Boulder Race Course, June 29th. In both photos, the gold miner are seen in the background. In the right-hand photo. Mr. Jones is just re-filling his tanks.
Mr. L. Noel on the Maurice Farman, flying hands off during the speed handicap on Saturday. Above is seen the Caudron piloted by Goodden.
Mr. A. W. Jones and his Anzani-Caudron in South Australia.
Mr. P. Legh. - One of two recent pilots who have secured their brevets on Mr. Prosser's Caudron biplane at Hendon aerodrome.
Mr. J. Rose, Instructor at the Hall School, Hendon, who recently obtained his brevet on the school 45 h.p. Caudron. His altitude in the test was 1,500 ft.
Mr. Scotland's machine in the tries after his mishap at Newton Park, N.Z. on March 24th.
Edward Baumann's "return from the stars" on his 60 h.p. Caudron biplane at Hendon Aerodrome.
Fig. 2. - Sections of tail planes: A, Avro tail, 1910-11. B, Nieuport tail, 1910-11. C, B.E. tail, 1911. D, B.E. tail, 1912.
The Hanriot monoplane flying at Hendon Aerodrome on a recent Saturday.
Major Gordon, R.F.C., N.W., flying Short 42 at the Leven Air Station. A snap from the passenger's seat at 2,000 ft.
A Borel waterplane taxying, as seen from behind.
A Borel hydro-aeroplane getting under way.
Lieut. Oliver, R.P.C, N.W., arriving at Leven from Dundee on Borel 89 in dirty weather.
Tail planes and float of H. Farman seaplane.
Nacelle and chassis of H. Farman seaplane.
The 80 h.p. H. Farman seaplane.
One of the main floats with its attachment on the H. Farman seaplane, and on right the tail float.
Detailed sketch showing method of springing on H. Farman seaplane.
Left, the coil springs incorporated in chassis stay wires on Henry Farman seaplane. Centre, the leaf spring skid on the heel of the main skid of the M. Farman. On right, a neat steel clip which takes the place of the usual chain link on the Farman.
Sketch showing starting handle and petrol tank mounting on H. Farman seaplane.
Tail planes and float of H. Farman seaplane.
H. FARMAN SEAPLANE. - Plan, side and front elevations to scale.
A NEAR THING FOR OUR PHOTOGRAPHER. - A direct snap from in front of Mr. Reginald Carr on the G.-W. biplane at Hendon Aerodrome.
Louis Noel on the Bleriot overtaking Louis Strange flying the Grahame-White Boxkite during a race at Hendon on 14 March, 1914.
RACING AT HENDON. - A G.-W. 'bus, and on the left "Lizzie."
AS EVENING DRAWS IN AT HENDON AERODROME. - Above, Mr. H. P. Carr, and below, Mr. M. D. Manton on Grahame-Whlte biplanes rounding one of the pylons.
An exquisite specimen of the silversmith's art, being a scale model in silver of the Grahame-White biplane used by Mr. Birchenough, the winner of the trophy. This trophy was presented by the distributors of Shell Motor Spirit for a special speed contest. The model is the work of Messrs. Mappin and Webb, Ltd., of Oxford Street.
THE CLEMENT BAYARD MONOPLANE. - View of the chassis and front, and on the right a view from behind.
Tail planes of Ciement-Bayard monoplane, and on the right a Clement-Bayard wing with steel spars.
The 80 h.p. Clement Bayard monoplane.
Attachment of lift cables to wing on Clement-Bayard monoplane.
Attachment of lift cables to lower member of fuselage on Clement-Bayard monoplane, and a chassis detail.
AT THE FREJUS NAVAL AIR STATION. - Launching a Nieuport waterplane. The method adopted is to warp it out to an anchored buoy about 100 yards from thi shore; the cradle on which it travels on land is then unlashed and sinks, to be drawn in shore later, the pilot starting the engine himself from the seat.
A REMINISCENCE OF THE MONACO AERIAL RALLY. - A couple of snaps during the competition of M. A. Mallard on his Nieuport waterplane at Marselles.
A Nieuport hydro-aeroplane in full flight.
Seaplane flying at St. Raphael, the French Mediterranean aviation station. - Levasseur flying a Nieuport.
Nose and chassis of Nieuport hydro.
Tall planes and float of Nieuport hydro.
The 100 h.p. Nieuport seaplane.
View from underneath of one of the Nieuport floats.
ATTACHMENT OF FLOAT TO CHASSIS ON NIEUPORT HYDRO. - On right upper pylon.
HELEN'S NIEUPORT MONOPLANE WHICH HAS COVERED A DISTANCE OF ABOUT 20,000 KILOMS.
THE NOSE OF THE ARMOURED NIEUPORT MONOPLANE.
THE ARMOURED NIEUPORT MONOPLANE WHICH HAS DONE SO WELL DURING ITS TRIALS. - This machine is covered in front with special nickel-steel armour plate of 3 mm. thickness. The chief characteristics are: Span, 40 ft. 6 ins.; length 26 ft. 6 ins.; area, 261 sq. ft.; weight, empty, 1,433 lbs.; useful load includes pilot, gunner, gun and ammunition with petrol for 2 hours; engine, 160 h.p. Gnome; diameter of propeller, 8 ft. 9 ins.; speed with full load, 74.5 m.p.h.; climbing 1,640 ft. in 7 mins.; starting after run of 328 ft.; alighting and stopping after run of 262 ft.
A wing of the Moreau aeroplane which was at the Paris Salon. It will be seen that the man standing behind the planes is as visible as the one in front.
A FEW OF THE MACHINES COMPETING IN THE "CONCOURS DE LA SECURITE" EN AEROPLANE." - 4. The Moreau "Aerostable," which was exhibited at the last Paris Aero Show, when we gave a description of it.
The Moreau " Aerostable."
The D.F.W. biplane, as seen from the side.
10. The D.F.W. Arrow biplane.
THE D.F.W. BIPLANE. - A three-quarter view from the back.
The D.F.W. biplane from the front.
The front part of the D.F.W. biplane, showing the engine in place.
Some fine speciment of banking on the 100 h.p. D.F.W. all-steel Arrow biplane, when being flown recently by Lieut. C. H. Collet, of the Naval Wing of the R.F.C. at Brooklands.
Lieut. Collet, R.N.A.S., who took such a prominent part in the air raid on the Zeppelin sheds on Tuesday, will be remembered as doing some notable flying at Brooklands. Above we give a couple of photographs showing him banking steeply on the D.F.W. all-steel Arrow biplane.
Herr Roempler, the skilful pilot of the D.F.W. aeroplane, now at Brooklands.
Lieut. Collet, of the Naval Wing of the R.F.C., in the pilot's seat of the 100 h.p. D.F.W. Arrow biplane, prior to his testing the machine on a long flight at Brooklands.
Lieut. C. H. Collet, who was to have piloted the British-built Beardmore D.F.W. tractor biplane in the Round Britain Race.
Sketch showing front part of fuselage and landing chassis of the D.F.W. biplane.
THE TAIL PLANES OF THE D.F.W. BlPLANE. - Note the wheel outside fuselage by means of which the angle of incidence of the tall plane may be altered during flight.
Sketch showing how angle of incidence of D.F.W. tail plane is altered.
Universal-joint on end of struts of D.F.W. biplane.
One of the "Domes of Silence" fitted on leading edge of D.F.W. wings to facilitate moving them about inside hangar.
Section of D.F.W. wing spar.
Sketch showing how plane struts are hinged in the centre of the D.F.W. biplane.
One side of landing chassis showing mounting of wheels.
The flexible rear portion of the D.F.W. ribs.
THE D.F.W. BIPLANE. - PIan, side and front elevations to scale.
This photograph gives a good idea of the general arrangement of the new Grahame-White military biplane. At present the pilot occupies the front seat, but when the machine has been put through its experimental tests it is intended to reverse the positions of the pilot and passenger so as to allow of mounting a gun in the nose of the nacelle.
Front portion of the new Grahame-White two-seater.
Front view of Grahame-White two-seater biplane.
Nacelle and chassis of Grahame-White two-seater. Right, the pilot's cockpit.
Method of joining plane strut and tail boom to rear spar.
THE DEPERDUSSIN STAND. - On the left is seen the Gordon-Bennett racer, and in centre the Dep. hydro.
Details of the Dep. float attachment.
Three-quarter front view of the Sopwith bat boat.
A view of the Round Britain Sopwith Bat Boat.
Mr. C. Howard Pixton, the pilot who was nominated for the Sopwith Bat Boat in the Round Britain Race.
The 200 h.p. Sopwith flying boat.
The brass channel which leads air to the step of the Sopwith bat boat.
One of the wing-tip floats on the Sopwith bat boat.
Streamline snatch-cleat on the bow of the Sopwith bat boat.
THE ROUND BRITAIN SOPWITH BAT BOAT. - Plan, front and side elevations.
Chassis of the Bleriot hydro.
The 80 h.p. Bleriot seaplane.
The water rudder on the Bleriot hydro.
Attachment of chassis forks to float on Bleriot hydro.
Attachment of front chassis members on Bleriot hydro; on the right the tail float.
The Handley-Page and Avro biplanes ready to take the air at Hendon.
OFF FOR EASTCHURCH. - Mr. Raynham starting away from Brooklands on Monday to deliver a 50 h.p. Gnome-Avro to the Admiralty at Eastchurch.
A silhouette against the clouds at Hendon of J. L. Hall on the Avro.
Mr. J. L. Hall in the pilot's seat of the Avro at Hendon.
Mr. C. F. Lan-Davis in the Avro at Hendon.
Mr. J. L. Hall takes Miss Elsie Spencer, who is so successfully appearing in the "Marriage Market" at Daly's Theatre, for a flight at Hendon on his 50 h.p. Avro.
Mr. A. W. Schaef's 35 h.p. Y Anzani monoplane (built by himself.) at Newton Park (New Zealand) Aviation Meeting on March 24th. This machine, it will be remembered by our readers, was shown in flight in these pages some months ago.
AVIATION IN NEW ZEALAND. - A. W. Schaef on his Anzani-engined Amphibian monoplane (No. 2), which he constructed entirely himself. The photograph shows preliminary tests at Lyall Bay, Wellington, N. Z., in March last year, when it flew about 20 ft. above water for a short stretch.
AVIATION IN NEW ZEALAND. - A. W. Schaef's workshop at Wellington, N.Z., where he built his monoplane, .No. 1, in 1909, without any knowledge or experience other than that he obtained from the pages of FLIGHT. Our photograph shows the fuselage and landing chassis in its early stage, also the self-made propeller.
The Burgess flying boat,
A Rumpler Taube with a 100 h.p. inverted Mercedes engine.
Linnekogel and a cinematograph operator on the Rumpler Taube.
Front wings and main floats of the Langley tandem monoplane.
Side view of Langley tandem monoplane.
The machine, minus its wings, in its open-air "garage," and on the right, one of the wings of the old Langley machine being strengthened at the Curtiss works at Hammondsport.
Rear view showing cruciform tail planes and large dihedral angle on main planes of Langley tandem monoplane.
The Langley machine over the surface of Lake Keuka.
MONACO HYDRO-AEROPLANE MEETING. - A general view of the bay. On the landing stage are seen the two Morane-Saulniers of MM. Garros and Brindejonc de Moulinais, and on the water are a couple of other competitors, whilst the Foudre is seen at the quay on the right.
The remains of a wrecked waterplane at Cannes on March 16th, flown by M. Garros and which came to grief on the rocks during the same evening. The photograph shows the remnant of the machine after being partially dismantled, prior to its being carted away.
THE NEW 100 H.P. 9-CYL. GNOME LAND AND WATER CAUDRON FOR THE FRENCH NAVY. - Ready for launching and getting away.
Rene Caudron in the pilot's seat of the new Caudron land and water biplane with, as passenger, the French naval pilot who will be flying this craft.
The First Lord of the Admiralty in Navy Seaplane No. 95 in Portsmouth Harbour prior to his ascent last Monday.
IN THE SMOKE OF H.M.S. "PRINCE OF WALES." - The Navy seaplane, with the First Lord of the Admiralty - Mr. Winston Churchill - on board, following the "Prince of Wales" as she is passing out of Portsmouth Harbour.
Part of the chassis of the Grahame-White five-seater.
The parachute descent of Mr. W. Newell at Hendon on Saturday last, when he descended from a height of 2.000 ft. by means of this parachute from a Grahame-White biplane piloted by Mr. Reginald Carr, the descent from the time of his leaving the aeroplane occupying 2 mins. 22 secs. Mr. Newell is seen on the skid exactly as he ascended for the feat, immediately above him being Mr. F. W. Goodden, who assisted him to jump from the aeroplane, whilst in the pilot's seat is Mr. Carr, with Mr. J . Lillywhite in the centre.
Mr. W. Newell, who has been again making parachute descents at Hendon, comfortably tucked up on his perch, prior to a descent last week-end.
Mr. W. Newell's parachute descent from aeroplane at Hendon. - a distant snap taken a few moments after he had parted from the aeroplane.
Loading up the five-seater Grahame-White biplane at Hendon Aerodrome, as seen from the pavilion.
The 100 h.p. five-seater Grahame-White biplane.
AS EVENING DRAWS IN AT HENDON AERODROME. - Above, Mr. H. P. Carr, and below, Mr. M. D. Manton on Grahame-Whlte biplanes rounding one of the pylons.
FLYING AT HENDON. - Mr. Grahame-White on an M. Farman and Mr. Lillywine on the twin-rudder G.-W. 'bus over No. 1 pylon.
CLOSE FINISHING AT HENDON DURING THE SUMMER RACING SEASON. - Mr. Lillywhite on the Grahame-White biplane and Mr. Birchenough on a Maurice Farman.
RACING AT HENDON. - The second heat of the Speed Handicap on Whit Saturday. From left to right the machines are: Messrs. R. J. Lillywhite (G.-W. twin rudder), Verrier (Maurice Farman), W. Birchenough (G.-W.-Maurice Farman), and L. Noel (Bleriot).
R. J. Lillywhlte, on the.bi-rudder G.-W. 'bus, completing his first lap and passing over two machines still waiting to start in the Cross-Country Handicap at Hendon on Saturday.
Chas. Weber, the Hungarian pilot who has taken his brevet at the Grahame-White School recently.
The 60 h.p. Ponnier monoplane.
CHASSIS AND ENGINE HOUSING OF THE 60 H.P. PONNIER. - On the right the nose of the 160 h.p. Ponnier-type Gordon-Bennett.
The Grahame-White Lizzie - a popular winner of races at Hendon during 1913.
Three-quarter rear view of the Grahame-White tractor biplane.
The Grahame-White Tractor Biplane (No. 2).
The Grahame-White tractor biplane as seen from behind.
RACING AT HENDON. - A G.-W. 'bus, and on the left "Lizzie."
Sketch of pilot's cockpit in the Grahame'White tractor biplane.
Strut socket and pulley for aileron cable, method of joining struts and cross-members to fuselage longeron, and tail plane of the Grahame-White tractor biplane.
Chassis and engine mounting of the Grahame-White tractor biplane.
THE GRAHAME-WHITE TRACTOR BIPLANE. - Plan, side and front elevation to scale.
A view from above of the Sanchez-Besa biplane.
Nacelle and chassis of Sanchez-Besa biplane.
Tail planes of the Sanchez-Besa biplane.
Left: Inter-plane strut attachment and control-cable pulleys on Sanchez-Besa biplane. On the right: Detail sketch of wheel brake.
SANCHEZ-BESA BIPLANE. - Plan, side and front elevation to scale.
The 80 h.p. Bleriot cocque monoplane.
Diagrammatic sketch of the de Beer controls.
The Goupy single-seater.
CHASSIS AND ENGINE MOUNTING OF THE GOUPY SINGLE-SEATER. - On the right the tandem-seater Goupy biplane.
Tall planes of the Goupy biplane.
THE PAUL SCHMITT BIPLANE. - On the left are seen the tail planes.
A view of the Paul Schmitt biplane in the air and of the chassis, &c.
Diagrammatic sketch showing method of altering the angle of incidence in the Paul Schmitt biplane.
Tail planes of the Paul Schmitt biplane.
Sketch showing the very substantial chassis of the Paul Schmitt biplane.
THE PAUL SCHMITT BIPLANE. - Plan, side and front elevations to scale.
A Maurice Farman hydro-biplane piloted by Mr. Maurice Farman personally, making "rings" round the Boulogne-Folkestone boat, off the French coast.
The Nieuport single-seater.
The Nieuport military scout.
The 60 h.p. Nieuport single-seater.
Lower pylon of Nieuport scout.
Chassis and engine housing on Nieuport scout.
DETAIL OF CHASSIS ON NIEUPORT. - On right shock absorber and radius rod.
A view of the Wright aero-boat in flight.
The new Wright aero-boat, as seen from the side.
The Wright flying boat on the beach.
The latest Wright flying boat at its moorings.
Photograph showing how admittance to the pilot's cockpit is gained through a small side door similar to those of a motor car.
Sketch of the Wright aero-boat.
The Wright flying boat.
THE NEW WRIGHT AERO-BOAT. - Plan, side and front elevation to scale.
THE WRIGHT AEROBOAT. - Plan, front and side elevations to scale.
THE EULER HYDRO-TRIPLANE. - View from the front.
THE EULER HYDRO-TRIPLANE. - Three-quarter front view.
THE EULER HYDRO-TRIPLANE. - Side view.
THE EULER HYDRO-TRIPLANE. - As seen from behind.
THE SOMERVILLE BIPLANE. - Type 3 Aileron used on 1912 biplane.
THE SOMERVILLE BIPLANE. - Type 4 Ailerons on 1913 machine.
THREE VIEWS OF THE THOMAS FLYING BOAT. - Left: The machine at rest on the water. Right: Starting. Inset: The boat in flight.
The Curtiss monoplane flying boat.
The Curtiss monoplane flying boat.
Front view of boat.
THE CURTISS MONOPLANE FLYING BOAT. - Plan, side and front elevations to scale.
The Benoist flying boat.
24. The L.F.G. Arrow biplane.
28. The Roland Arrow biplane.
TWO GERMAN MACHINES WHICH HAVE EXCELLENT PERFORMANCES TO THEIR CREDIT. - Left, the "Roland" biplane, and right, the "Roland" Taube. Both built by the Luft-Fahrzeug-Gesellschaft, Berlin.
Herr Bruno Langer and his Roland-Pfeil biplane on which his big record was accomplished recently.
24. The.L.F.G. Arrow biplane.
Christofferson Hydro 1913
The Christofferson flying boat.
Nose and fuselage of the Eastbourne Aviation Co.'s 80 h.p. tractor machine.
A three-quarter rear view of the 80 h.p. tractor machine exhibited on the Eastbourne Aviation Co.'s stand.
Tail planes and rudder of the Eastbourne Aviation Co.'s 80 h.p. tractor biplane.
Chassis and engine housing of the E.A.C. biplane.
Attachment of plane strut and quick release devices on the E.A.C. biplane.
Method of mounting upper main plane on E.A.C. cabane.
A neat way of joining struts and cross members to fuselage longeron of the E.A.C
Attachment of lower spar to fuselage of E.A.C. biplane. Note streamline casing round spar where wing has been left uncovered.
THE E.A.C. BIPLANE. - Plan, side and front elevation to scale.
The aileron pulley in the Avro pusher.
Avro Arrowscout at Hendon with F. P. Raynham standing by the tail.
The Avro Scouting Biplane (No. 14).
Mr. Raynham, in the Avro scout, just getting off at Hendon Aerodrome,
The 80 h.p. Avro tractor biplane.
The air brake on the Avro scout.
The streamline casing round the plane struts of the Avro scout.
Chassis and engine housing on Avro scout.
A fuselage joint on the Avro biplane.
THE AVRO SCOUT BIPLANE. - Plan, side and front elevations to scale.
View from underneath of the hull of P.B. 1, and on right the step in the hull.
One of the strut sockets on the supermarine P.B. 1, and on the right the tail planes.
Total visibility type Bleriot monoplane.
The XI-2 Vision Totale of July 1914: the Xl-2 Tandem was modified as a parasol to take an observer.
The new 80 h.p. Bleriot single-seater.
Sketch showing method of mounting the wings on the visibility type Bleriot.
Nacelle and floats of Hamble River seaplane.
Engine mounting on Hamble River seaplane.
The 150 h.p. Hamble River seaplane.
The seaplane dinghy and one of the floats of the Hamble River machine.
The steel clip connecting the main spars, inter plane strut, compression tube and tall boom of the Hamble River seaplane, and a detail of wing construction.
THE PERRY BEADLE FLYING BOAT. - On right the tail planes.
The 60 h.p. Perry Beadle and Co. flying boat.
The Perry Beadle boat with wings removed, and on right strut socket and hinge attachment of wing to fuselage.
Streamline casing round propeller-shaft of Perry Beadle flying boat, and on the right strut socket and aileron pulley.
The 100 h.p. Vickers tractor biplane.
Mounting of altimeter on Vlckers tractor.
Mr. R. E. B. Hunt in the pilot's seat of his 50 h.p. Gnome tractor biplane, designed by Mr. E. L. Gassier (standing by the machine) and built by the Eastbourne Aviation Co., Ltd.
View of the cabin on the Albessard monoplane, which accommodates three passengers.
View from above of the Albessard double monoplane, which is fitted with a pendulum automatic stability device. The span is 11 metres and the overall length 12 metres. It is fitted with a 100 h.p. Anzani motor, and weighs 750 kliogs. empty.
From the beginning of aviation people had fantastic visions of future possibilities and a few made first efforts to bring them into practice. Like Albessard who built a tandem monoplane with a passenger cabin in 1912. He gave up on the aircraft after unsuccessful tests which were performed with only the pilot aboard.
The Albessard monoplane, which was illustrated in FLIGHT the week before last, in the air.
THE LATEST IDEA FOR LOOPING THE LOOP. - Pilot Gustav Tweer has been making trial flights on the above machine, constructed so that he can land upside down if necessary, having, as is seen, chassis and wheels both above and below the plaaes. He has been flying this machine at Bork.
A "D.F.W." scouting biplane, which is credited with a maximum speed of 106 to 110 miles per hour, and a minimum speed of 51 miles per hour. She will climb to an altitude of 3,500 ft. in about 6 mins.
Herr Max Schuler (centre), who established a world's distance record with two passengers (seen in the photograph) by flying from Leipzig to Breslau - a distance of 205 miles - where he competed in the East German Race on his 150 h.p. D.F.W. scouting biplane. It was on the same machine, it will be remembered, that Herr Schuler won the German "Triangular" Race a short time ago.
Watson No. 2, 1912, showing balancing plane in operation.
Watson No.3 biplane. The final rocking wing machine was built in 1913-1914.
Three-quarter front view of chassis and nacelle of the Watson No. 3, showing slots in main planes through which the pilot raises his legs when lying down inside the nacelle.
Three-quarter rear view ol Watson No. 3, now at Buc.
A FEW OF THE MACHINES COMPETING IN THE "CONCOURS DE LA SECURITE" EN AEROPLANE." - 2. The only British machine entered for the competition - the Watson rocking wing aeroplane. We are told by Mr. Summerfield, of Melton Mowbray, who piloted this machine, that the "Watson" was ruled out of the competition for no apparent reason, as it flew quite well once Mr. Summerfield got used to the rather novel control.
The Army aeroplane, R.E. 1 which was flown before the King and Queen, on Tuesday last, by Mr. E. T. Busk, with Major Clive Wigram as passenger. It was this machine that was referred to by Col. Seely at the Wright Memorial Banquet, and by Dr. Glazebrook in his lecture on Wednesday before the Aeronautical Society, on the "Development of the Aeroplane." In general appearance the R.E. 1 resembles the B.Es., and its stability is not due to any radical departures in design, but must be explained, we think, by careful scientific proportioning of surfaces and distribution of weights. From the accompanying photograph it will be seen that ailerons are fitted to both planes, presumably more in order to inspire confidence on the part of the pilot than because they are actually needed.
One of the wings "in the making" of the Martinsyde trans-Atlantic "liner."
Mr. Robertson's home-made South African biplane. - 1. Mounting the 60 h.p. Anzani engine. 2. Before the smash, sheltering from the wind. 3. After the smash.
A snap of the brothers James on their biplane at Narberth, South Wales, where they are doing regular air work. The photograph shows the machine getting off in a field with the limited space of 200 by 220, which should give good practice for cross-country work.
The Mitchell brothers seaplane was taxied on the River Medway in 1914 but capsized before flight was possible.
FRENCH ARMOURED BIPLANE BUILT AT CHALAIS-MEUDON. - This new product of the French military aircraft factory has a tractor type fuselage, but is a propeller biplane having two 160 h.p. Gnome engines mounted in streamline casings in the manner shown in the accompanying photograph, and each driving a separate propeller. The font portion of the fuselage is armoured with 3 mm. thick steel plates, and a Hotchkiss machine gun is mounted in the extreme nose of the fuselage, a position which provides a very wide angle of action.
Dorand biplane armoured interceptor (80 hp le rhone engines)
French military biplane designed and constructed at the military aircraft factory at Chalais-Meudon. - This machine is characterised by a very long and narrow fuselage, which carries at its rear end a biplane type elevator. The engine is a 200 h.p. horizontal Salmson (Canton-Unne system) driving through bevel reduction gearing a single tractor screw situated in front of the main planes and above the nose of the fuselage. Several seats are provided, and the machine is fitted with a complete set of instruments for wireless telegraphy.
A FEW OF THE MACHINES COMPETING IN THE "CONCOURS DE LA SECURITE" EN AEROPLANE." - 3. The R.E.P. monoplane, total visibility type, which is fitted with standard control.
AVIATION IN GREECE. - On the left Mr Collyns P. Pizey in the Sopwith "pusher" seaplane with his first pupil, Lieut. Morlattnts. On the right, Mr. Pizey and Capt. Leigh, of the British Mission, and pilot of Farman schools.
AVIATION IN GREECE. - On the left, bringing in the Anzani-engined Sopwith "pusher" seaplane at the Eleusis Air Station after morning flying by Mr. Collyns P. Pizey of the Royal Hellenic Marine Service. On the right Admiral Mark Kerr with Mr. Collyns P. Pizey, punting out on Astra float to the Sopwith seaplane. The man on the slipway is Lapray, one of Mr. Pizey's English "boys."
THE NEW VICKERS GUN-CARRYING BIPLANE. - Three-quarter front view.
Side view of the new Vickers gun-carrying biplane.
TWO GERMAN MACHINES WHICH HAVE EXCELLENT PERFORMANCES TO THEIR CREDIT. - Left, the "Roland" biplane, and right, the "Roland" Taube. Both built by the Luft-Fahrzeug-Gesellschaft, Berlin.
A NEW CAUDRON BIPLANE. - This machine, it will be noticed, is fitted with a fuselage similar to that of the small Caudron monoplane on which Mr. Ewen crossed the Channel in 1912. The span is comparatively short, and the usual overhang of the upper plane has been greatly reduced. Instead of the flexing tall a hinged divided elevator is fitted. The engine is a 100 h.p. Anzani.
The G.-W. waterplane, contracted for the Circuit of Britain, leaving Hendon for Southampton on Saturday last.
ROUND BRITAIN MACHINES. No. 4. - GW Type XIII Circuit of Britain biplane in seaplane form.
ROUND BRITAIN MACHINES, No. 4. - The Grahame-Whlte tractor biplane. Plan, side and front elevations to scale.
ROUND BRITAIN MACHINES. - No. 2. - The British-built Beardmore-D.F.W. (120 h.p. Beardmore-Austro-Daimler (British-built) engine) tractor biplane.
THE ROUND BRITAIN MACHINE No. 2. - Another sketch from behind of the British-built Beardmore D.F.W. tractor biplane.
THE "ROUND BRITAIN" MACHINES. - No. 2. The British-built Beardmore D.F.W. biplane. Plan and side elevations, to scale.
A three-quarter view from behind of the Ponnier biplane.
The Ponnier biplane, as seen from the front.
Chassis and engine housing of Ponnier biplane.
Tail planes of the Ponnier biplane.
THE PONNIER SCOUTING BIPLANE. - Plan, side and front elevations to scale.
1. The Ago-Arrow biplane.
1. The Ago Arrow biplane.
2. The Ago Racing monoplane.
Three-quarter front view of P.B. IX Scout.
Sketch showing method of joining struts and cross members to fuselage longerons of P.B. IX.
Chassis and engine housing on P.B. IX scouting biplane.
Tail planes of P.B. IX scouting biplane.
P.B. IX SCOUTING BIPLANE. - Plan, side and front elevation to scale.
ROUND BRITAIN MACHINES, No. 5. - The E.A.C. biplane.
Sketch showing the general arrangement of the alighting gear on the E.A.C. "Circuit" tractor. Note the air tubes bitween the front of the float and the steps.
ROUND BRITAIN MACHINES, No. 5. - The E.A.C. biplane. Plan, front and side elevations to scale.
20. The Harlan Arrow Taube.
20. The Harlan Arrow Taube.
21. The Jatho Steel Taube.
The 150 h.p. Sunbeam-engined Avro seaplane which was to have taken part tin the "Circuit of Britain" race, at Calshot, July 1914.
ROUND BRITAIN MACHINES, No. 7. - The Avro biplane.
ROUND BRITAIN MACHINES, No. 7. - The Avro biplane. Plan, side and front elevations to scale.
34. The Union Arrow biplane.
ROUND BRITAIN MACHINES, No. 8. - Side view of the Blackburn Tractor seaplane. The wheels shown do not form part of the chassis, but are merely used for running the machine down to the water.
Three-quarter view from behind of Blackburn tractor seaplane.
ROUND BRITAIN MACHINES, No. 8. - The Blackburn tractor biplane. Plan, side and front elevations to scale.
1. The A.E.G. Tractor seaplane.
3. The Ago Tractor seaplane.
4. The Albatros Tractor seaplane.
4. The Atbatros Tractor seaplane.
9. The D.F.W. Flying Boat.
Fig. 2. - Plan and side elevation of the 1913 type Boland "Tailless" biplane.
Fig. 1. - Details of the Boland Jib Control. Top: Two views of one of the jibs, on the left in normal position, and on the right pulled in. Bottom: (a) machine in normal flight; (6) correcting a bank; (c) starting a left-hand turn.
Fig. 3. - Plan, side and front elevation of the Boland monoplane flying boat.
Fig. 4. - Side elevation of the new Boland biplane flying boat.
Mr. L. G. Ryley's glider, of which a description appeared in FLIGHT of November 6th. On the left is seen the glider at rest, where it will be noticed how the elevator and its outrigger are clipped along the planes in order to facilitate transport. On the right the "Dragon-fly" is just getting off. Mr. Ryley can be seen in the rear actuating the elevator by ropes.
SOME CONSTRUCTIONAL DETAILS ON THE RYLEY GLIDER. - A. Sheet-steel fitting on which the elevator pivots. B. Steel pegs. C. Bamboo plugged and sawn down 3 Ins. D. One-sixteenth inch diameter steel pegs. E. Sheet steel. F. Bamboo bound with twine and glued. Right: A simple tube joint connecting elevator, outrigger and landing skid. G. Bamboo outrigger. H. Steel tube socket. I. Ash skid. J. Section of ash skid.
Left: Some sheet steel and twine joints in the chassis. A. Strut connecting skids. On the right is shown attachment of one of the elevator booms to upper front wing spar. B. Steel tube socket. C. Front spar. D. Detachable elevator boom.
E. Inter-plane strut.
Ryley glider 'Dragonfly I'. Its use was curtailed bv the outbreak of war in 1914.
Mr. W. Rowland Ding on the monoplane just off the surface of Lake Windermere.
Mr. Rowland Ding well up over Lake Windermere on the waterplane.
View of Bowness and part of Lake Windermere, showing the Lakes Flying Co.'s hangar as seen from the waterplane.
A couple of views taken at Windermere from Mr. W. Rowland Ding's waterplane. The top photograph shows one of the passenger steamers crossing Lake Windermere, and the lower photograph is a near view of Bowness.
Fig. 2. - One of the Curtiss model J scouts.
Fig. 1. - Sketch-plan and elevation of the Curtiss model J reconnaissance tractor biplane.
Fig. 3. - The latest Curtiss tractor biplane, built for the U.S. Army Trials.
Miss Irvine in her professional aviation costume at Avondale, New Jersey, where she is now flying Capt. J. V. Martin's machines.
The Steco hydro-aeroplane.
The Carey stability biplane.
30. The new Rumpler Taube.
На основе "Таубе" был создан расчалочный моноплан Румплер 4С.
Three-quarter fiont view of the L. and P. biplane.
Three-quarter rear view of the 35 h.p. L. and P. biplane.
THE CONSTRUCTORS OF THE L. AND P BIPLANE. - From left to right: G. W. Smiles, W. Warren, H. S. Gist (the man who built the nacelle), and M. J. Lindsay.
A FEW OF THE MACHINES COMPETING IN THE "CONCOURS DE LA SECURITE" EN AEROPLANE." - 1. The Deperdussin monoplane, total visibility type with automatic stability.
THE GREAT NAVAL REVIEW AT SPITHEAD. - Seaplane No. 77 flying over the super-Dreadnoughts "Iron Duke" and " Marlborough" (on right) and "Centurion" (on left).
Hoisting a seaplane aboard H.M.S. "Hibernia."
Nose of Vickers gun-carrying biplane.
Sketch showing attachment of pulley for aileron cable employed on Vickers biplanes.
Nose of Vlckers gun-carrying biplane.
Harold Blackburn and passenger in the Type I as it was in November 1913 with rudder inscription and modified engine cowling. The tail-up attitude was provided by two gentlemen whose likenesses were obliterated from the original print.
The 80 h.p. Blackburn monoplane which will be among the exhibits. A machine of similar design, piloted by Mr. Blackburn, won the Inter-County Air Race held at the latter end of last year in Yorkshire.
Chassis and engine housing of Blackburn monoplane.
Front view of Blackburn monoplane.
Pulleys and steel ring incorporated in warping system on Blackburn monoplane.
THE 100 H.P. CURTISS FLYING BOAT. - Three-quarter view from behind.
W&T Curtiss type flying boat. An improved version of the Curtiss F was flown at Middleton in March 1913.
THE 100 H.P. CURTISS FLYING BOAT. - The Curtiss Model F was the epitome of elegant flying-boat design in the pre-war years. This one was built under licence in England at the White & Thompson works at Middleton, Sussex, in 1913. The classic Curtiss inter-wing ailerons have been replaced by conventional ailerons on the upper wing trailing edge.
THE 100 H.P. CURTISS FLYING BOAT. - View from behind.
ROUND BRITAIN MACHINES, No. 6. - Three-quarter rear view of the White and Thompson flying boat.
ROUND BRITAIN MACHINES, No. 6. - Front view of the White and Thompson (Curtiss Pat.) flying boat.
ROUND BRITAIN MACHINES, No. 9. - The White and Thompson (Curtiss) flying boat.
The nose of the Curtiss flying boat, and on the right the tail skid.
One of the inter-plane strut sockets of the Curtiss flying boat, and on the right one of the wing tip floats.
View from underneath of the step in the Curtiss flying boat.
THE 100 HP. CURTISS FLYING BOAT. - Plan, side and front elevation to scale.
ROUND BRITAIN MACHINES, No. 6. - The White and Thompson (Curtiss) flying boat. Plan, front and side elevations to scale.
ROUND BRITAIN MACHINES, No. 9. - The White and Thompson flying boat. Plan, side and front elevations to scale.
7. The New Albatros Tractor seaplane.
The "Wight" seaplane alighting. This photograph gives a good idea of the small wake set up by the long narrow floats.
VIEW FROM ABOVE OF THE WIGHT SEAPLANE. - This photograph clearly shows the peculiar double cambered upper surface of the wings.
THE 200 H.P, SALMSON ENGINE ON THE WIGHT SEAPLANE. - On right, tail planes of the Wight seaplane.
Left: The very substantial anchor of Wight seaplane. Right: Attachment of upper nacelle longerons to plane strut. Centre: Method of attaching struts to longerons in nacelle of Wight seaplane.
8. The new Aviatik biplane.
Herr Karl Ingold and his 100 h.p. Mercedes Aviatik-Pfeil biplane on which he made his recent record flight.
11. The F.F. Tractor seaplane.
A.E.G. Z 3 [95 hp NAG motor, wings could be folded / German Patent 274.115]
5. The A.E.G. biplane.
THE GREAT NAVAL REVIEW AT PORTSMOUTH. - A view of some of the Navy seaplanes at their moorings with the battleships at Spithead, awaiting the King's inspection.
One of the inspection doors in the floats of the Sopwith tractor hydroplane.
The leaf spring, which provides the springing of the floats, on the Sopwith tractor seaplane.
The "Wight" hydro-aeroplane, built by Messrs. J. S. White and Co., of Cowes. - A slightly modified design will be seen at Olympla, the principal alterations being the fitting of a 200 h.p. Canton-Unne engine and the provision of two additional struts between the ffoats and the upper planes at the rear of the machine.