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Журнал
Flight за 1918 г.
495

Журнал - Flight за 1918 г.

F.2B of No. 22 Sqn at Vert Galand on 1 April 1918, the birthday of the R.A.F.
A famous R.A.F. Squadron on the British Western Front in France during the present German offensive. At least three enemy machines have been brought down by every pilot and observer in the above group.
R.F.C. SALVAGE WORK. - Renovating and re-assembling aeroplanes.
Side view from behind of the D.H. 5 biplane on view in Trafalgar Square in connection with the Y.W.C.A. Blue Triangle Week.
A D.H. 5 biplane on view in Trafalgar Square in connection with the Y.W.C.A. Blue Triangle Week. Front view.
Details of the undercarriage of the D.H.5.
Detailed view of the body of the D.H.5 in side elevation and plan
General arrangement of the D.H.5 biplane.
DIPPING AT THE "SALUTING POINT" ON THE EDGE OF THE AERODROME. - Mr. H. Sykes on his Martinsyde at Hanworth.
ON THE BRITISH WESTERN FRONT IN FRANCE. - With our night bombing planes in France. One of our night bombing machines returning after a flight.
A Sunday morning service in an aerodrome on the British Western front in France. - The Chaplain conducting Service from the nose of an aeroplane.
With Our Night-Bombing Planes on the Western Front in France. - The observer has very often occasion to use the gun fitted to his seat, and his method is seen when firing down on the enemy.
PRESENTATION OF AEROPLANES AT BROOKLANDS ON JULY 6TH. - One of the machines presented by the Hon. H. Burton, K.C., a representative of the Union of South Africa, to the R.A.F., and accepted by Major J. L. Balrd, Parliamentary Secretary of the R.A.F.
THE GERMAN OFFENSIVE ON THE WESTERN FRONT IN FRANCE. - R.A.F. scouts ready to start away on a "stunt."
THE GERMAN OFFENSIVE ON THE WESTERN FRONT IN FRANCE. - R.A.F. scouting squadron, who fly low to use their machine guns on the enemy masses.
32 Squadron arrived in France in May 1916 and spent the rest of the war as a fighter unit, acquiring a distinguished reputation. Here, in early 1918, the crews stand with their SE5a aircraft.
Pilots of a renowned R.A.F. Scouting Squadron which has done good work on the British Western Front in France.
A squadron of scouts on the British Western front in France, where they have been doing first-class work.
R.A.F. fighting planes leaving their aerodrome in France, in formation, for the enemy lines.
A Cosmopolitan Group of Pilots in an RAF. Squadron on the British Western Front in France. - An American, Canadian, New Zealander, Englishman, and South African.
Three-quarter rear view of a S.E.5 Biplane, captured by the Germans.
ENGLISH S.E.V.A. SINGLE-SEATER FIGHTER. - The front part of the body, with machine gun pointed upwards.
Elevator and variable tailplane arrangement, with steerable tail-skid of the S.E.
The English S.E.VA. single-seater fighter.
The English S.E.V.A. single-seater fighter.
Some aeroplanes of the Fifth Army of France: Sopwith.
Three-quarter front view of the Sopwith triplane.
Rear view of the Sopwith triplane.
Side view of the Sopwith triplane.
THE END OF THE JOURNEY. - A Sopwith triplane in the hands of the enemy.
Attach merit of middle wing to body strut on the Sopwith triplane.
Interplane strut attachment to middle wing of Sopwith triplane.
Attachment of interplane strut to lower wing on the Sopwith triplane.
Middle wing of the Sopwith triplane.
Three-quarter front view of the Sopwith "Camel."
Three-quarter rear view of the Sopwith "Camel."
WITH THE BRITISH FORCES IN ITALY. - The squadron that has accounted for many Hun planes, lined up before departure.
The arrangement of the machine guns and telescopic sight on the Sopwith "Camel."
The 130 h.p. Clerget motor of the Sopwith "Camel," seen from the front.
A Sopwith single-seater fighter shot down in an aerial fight on the Western Front. Note the peculiar painting on the engine cowl and the two fixed machine guns.
WITH THE BRITISH FORCES IN ITALY. - Scene at an aerodrome.
Side elevation and. plan of the fuselage of the Sopwith "Camel."
General arrangement, and some details, of tbe Sopwlth "Camel."
THE LONG AND THE SHORT OF IT. - A Handley-Page bomber and a Nieuport single-seater are objects for Hun curiosity.
Some aeroplanes of the Fifth Army of France: Nieuport.
A Scout aeroplane on the British Western Front being prepared for a moonlight flight.
ON THE BRITISH WESTERN FRONT. - A British scouting squadron. Aeroplanes lined up ready to fly over the enemy lines.
A well-known photograph of the Nieuports of No.l Squadron, RFC, in the snow at Bailleul on December 27 1917. This is a mixed assembly of Nie.24bis and Nie.27; unfortunately, the wartime censor had obliterated the serial numbers of the aircraft. The nearest is a Nie.27 that has an oddly dark-coloured lower wing, perhaps a replacement on an otherwise aluminium-painted aircraft. The second in the line, a Nie.24bis, has what appears to be a camera gun on the overwing mounting.
A bombing machine on the British western front in France tucking its eggs under its wings prior to a daylight trip, with one of its attendant fighting scouts in waiting.
On the British Western Front in France. A Gotha strafer, who recently brought down a Gotha aeroplane.
Major Raoul Lufberry, the American "Ace" of the American Expeditionary Force in France, who was shot down on May 19th at the American front, and his plane.
Предполетная проверка двигателей на "ньюпорах-28" 95-го американского дивизиона, Франция, 1918 г.
WITH THE U.S. ARMY. - Waiting for an "Alert."
Some aeroplanes of the Fifth Army of France: SPAD.
Lieutenant Fonck, the very successful French pilot, in one of the machines which have helped him to do such execution.
"I turned quickly and let the nearest one have a handful of lead, which seemed to deter him somewhat, for he dived away East."
AT THE ENEMY AIRCRAFT VIEW ROOMS. - Although not including all the captured German aeroplanes, this drawing gives a good idea of the excellent arrangement of these trophies, the detail construction of which can be readily inspected owing to the machines being partly stripped as shown. Commencing with the machine in the foreground, the aeroplanes are: Albatros Scout D.V., Albatros Scout D.I., D.F.W.-Aviatik, L.V.G, Albatros Fighter, and Rumpler Fighter.
Side View of a captured Albatros Type D.V. (photographed in April, 1918).
Albatros Scout D. 5 A. (G. 97), fitted with 180 h.p. Mercedes engine, showing radiator in centre of top plane.
Front view of Albatros Scout G. 97, showing exhaust manifold.
A British machine on the tail of an Albatros D.V.
AT THE ENEMY AIRCRAFT VIEW ROOMS. - Although not including all the captured German aeroplanes, this drawing gives a good idea of the excellent arrangement of these trophies, the detail construction of which can be readily inspected owing to the machines being partly stripped as shown. Commencing with the machine in the foreground, the aeroplanes are: Albatros Scout D.V., Albatros Scout D.I., D.F.W.-Aviatik, L.V.G, Albatros Fighter, and Rumpler Fighter.
Three views of a German Pfalz monoplane, from a recent German publication. This machine is, so far as one is able to ascertain, an exact copy of the pre-war French Morane. The machine has not, we believe, been built for several years.
Side view of the Pfalz single-seater fighter, 160 h.p. Mercedes engine.
Front view of the Pfalz single-seater fighter, 160 h.p. Mercedes engine.
View from above of the Pfalz single-seater fighter, 160 h.p. Mercedes engine.
Fig. 1. - Side elevation and plan of the Pfalz body to scale.
Fig. 2. - Sketch showing construction of body former and attachment of longeron.
Fig. 3. - The wing roots are formed, on the Pfalz, integrally with the body. On the left is shown the construction of these roots, and on the right the final shape.
Fig. 4. - Perspective view of the Pfalz body, stripped of its ply-wood covering.
Fig. 5. - <...> showing method of covering with ply-wood the body of the Pfalz.
Fig. 6. - Sketch showing mounting of the tail plane root on the Pfalz. The plywood covering of the root has been omitted for the sake of clearness.
Fig. 7. - Some tail plane details of the Pfalz.
Fig. 8. - The rudder of the Pfalz is built up of steel throughout. The sketches show the main features of the detail construction.
Fig. 9. - Sketches showing safety-belt attachment on the Pfalz
Fig. 10. - Perspective drawing of the Pfalz controls. Note the adjustable foot-bar arrangement.
Fig. 11. - The control handle of the Pfalz biplane. The left-hand handle is rotatable, and operates the throttle via Bowden cable.
Fig. 12. - Guide tubes for the rudder and elevator control cables of the Pfalz biplane.
Fig. 13. - Sketch showing the nose of the Pfalz body, with "spinner,'' air scoops and inspection doors.
Fig. 14. - Sectional view of the stream-lining of the axle on the Pfalz biplane.
Fig. 15. - Details of the Pfalz undercarriage. In the centre a general view of the undercarriage.
Fig. 16. - Wiring Diagram of the Pfalz Single-Seater. The bracing of the centre-section struts does not run across the top of the body.
Fig. 17. - Attachment of centre section struts to body on the Pfalz.
Fig. 18. - Quick-release attachment of lower wing spars to fixed wing roots of the Pfalz single-seater.
Fig. 19. - General arrangement of the wings of the Pfalz.
Fig. 20. - Upper and lower wing sections of the Pfalz. Inset sections of the wing spars.
Fig. 21. - Attachment of centre-section struts to top plane of the Pfalz. On the right the fitting is shown from a different point of view. The inset shows the wiring lug plate, which also serves as a guide for the end of the compression tube.
Fig. 22. - Details of the attachment of inter-plane struts to lower plane of the Pfalz single-seater. The smaller insets show a section of the inter-plane struts and - in the left-hand corner - the attachment of the wing ribs to the spars. The top flange is shown cut through so as to show the details below.
Fig. 23. - The aileron crank lever of the Pfalz.
Fig. 24. - The machine-guns on the Pfalz single-seater are totally enlosed, with the exception of the muzzle. Note the scoop in the engine housing.
Fig. 25. - The mounting of one of the two synchronised Spandau machine-guns which constitute the armament of the Pfalz.
Fig. 26. - The radiator of the Pfalz is mounted in the top plane, and the cooling is varied by means of a shutter. The details of the locking device which enables the shutter to be left in any desired position are shown in the inset.
THE PFALZ SINGLE-SEATER FIGHTER. - Plan, side and front elevation to scale.
Three-quarter rear view of the Roland single-seater chaser, D. II.
The curious body of the German Roland single-seater chaser biplane. The centre sections of the wings are left in place, and show where the planes are attached. The top plane, it will be noticed, is attached to the top of the fuselage. Note the balanced rudder and elevators.
The upper plane of the Roland D. II.
One of the main plane ribs of the Roland D. II.
Diagram of "bump" supporting top plane and radiator on the Roland D. II.
The quick-release bolt for attaching main planes on the Roland D. II.
THE ROLAND SINGLE-SEATER CHASER, D. II. - Plan, side and front elevations to scale.
The Siemens Single-Seater. From the fact that It is said to be the type D I, and a publication of the illustration in a German paper has been allowed, it appears improbable that this is one of the Siemens-Schuckert machines of which a good deal in now heard are seen on the Western Front. The machine has a distinctly "Nieuporty" appearance.
121 h.p., the 120 being provided by the motor. - Wheeling a Fokker triplane out n the aerodrome.
GettingReady to Start. - A pair of Fokker triplanes in their native land.
THREE-QUARTER REAR VIEW OF THE FOKKER TRIPLANE. - This illustration gives a good idea of the general arrangement of this interesting machine. Note the small ply-wood plane enclosing the wheel axle.
THREE-QUARTER FRONT VIEW OF THE FOKKER TRIPLANE. - The thickness of the wings can be imagined from an inspection of this drawing. The pin-jointed struts are really ties rather than struts as they are working in tension.
Fig. 1. - Plan and elevation of the body of the Fokker triplane to scale. Note the slot for accomodating the lower wing spar, and the drop in the top longerons for the fixed tail plane.
Fig. 2. - Sketch showing the bracing system employed in the body of the Fokker triplane. The wires only appear to be in duplicate. Inset shows tubular quadrant serving as an anchorage for all the bracing wires.
Fig. 3. - Sketch showing the three-ply fairings and their attachment on the Fokker triplane. The fork end brackets for the two machine guns should be noted.
Fig. 4. -The pilot's seat of the Fokker triplane. By means of the split collar and bolt arrangement shown in the inset, the seat may be quickly raised or lowered to suit the pilot.
Fig. 5. - The controls and some of their detail on the Fokker triplane. The insets show a typical clip and some of the purposes for which it is employed.
Fig. 6. - General arrangement of the engine mounting on the Fokker triplane.
Fig. 7. - Details of the engine mounting on the Fokker triplane.
Fig. 8. - The tail skid and its attachment on the Fokker triplane. On the right, details of the shock absorbing arrangement.
Fig. 9. - Sketch showing construction of casing around axle of Fokker triplane. On the right, details of the shock absorbers.
Fig. 10. - The tail planes of the Fokker triplane.
Fig. 11. - Some of the wing details of the Fokker triplane.
Fig. 12. - Details of the wing tip and its skid on the Fokker triplane.
Fig. 13. - Attachments of wing spars to body on the Fokker triplane. On the left is shown the attachment of the bottom plane, while the sketch on the right shows how the middle plane is secured to the top body rails.
Fig. 14 - The wing section, to scale, of the Fokker triplane. The web of the rib is made of very thin three-ply wood, and the flanges of spruce. The composite spar consists of four strips of spruce and of a box made of plywood.
Fig. 15. - A comparative sketch showing differences between the Fokker wing section and Dr. Schukowsky's aerofoil, described in "Properties of Aerofoils," by A. W. Judge. The Fokker section is shown in full lines. It will be noticed that only the trailing portion of the upper surfaces of the two sections coincide.
A side view of the Fokker D.VII (D.7) Biplane, showing the curious strut arrangement.
Three-quarter rear view of the Fokker biplane.
Rear view of the Fokker biplane.
"HANGING ON THE PROP." - The Fokker biplanes are said to be able to assume an attitude similar to that shown in this sketch, and to remain apparently stationary for long periods.
THREE-QUARTER FRONT VIEW OF THE FOKKER BIPLANE, TYPE D VII. - In the machine captured the wings have been somewhat badly damaged, and it has not, therefore, been possible to represent exactly the shape of the wing tips. The upper plane has probably been approximately as shown in the drawing, but of the lower wing sufficient did not remain intact from which to reconstruct the shape of the tip. The unusual strutting of the top plane should be noticed. Inset are some constructional details.
Fig. 15 of the Official Report on the Fokker biplane. Reproduced to show omission of important tubes in the framework. (Compare with "FLIGHT" sketches of same subject.)
Fig. 2. - A good idea of the extent to which welding is carried in the body of the Fokker biplane can be formed from the accompanying sketch, which shows a joint, or rather a series of joints, where eight different parts meet and are welded together. Needless to say, the making of such a joint would call for the highest skill.
Fig. 3. - Two sketches showing, from different points of view, the engine bearers and their mounting in the Fokker biplane. The inset shows the split collars by means of which the engine is secured to the two longitudinal bearers.
Fig. 4. - Some constructional details of the rear part of the body and of the elevator and rudder of the Fokker biplane. At A is shown the attachment of the vertical fin to the cross tube of the tail plane. At B and C are shown details of the hinges employed for rudder and elevator, and also for the ailerons. The sketch at D shows the split collar by means of which the diagonal tubes that reinforce the body at the point where occur the lifting handles are secured to the lower longeron. At E is shown the springing of the tail skid, and the cable limiting its travel, while at F is illustrated the tail skid attachment to the vertical body strut. The tubular quadrant and wiring of the body is shown at G.
Fig. 5. - Sketch showing controls of Fokker biplane. The insets show the aileron control crank arms and the rudder cable shackles respectively.
Fig. 6. - Diagram of aileron control system on Fokker biplane.
Fig. 7. - The tank of the Fokker biplane is slung by means of brackets and bolts as shown in sketch. There are no bands or other supports for the bottom of the tank.
Fig. 8. - The mounting of the compass on the Fokker biplane. Note the adjusting magnets mounted on a square section brass rod under the base plate. These magnets are locked in position and sealed by a lead seal.
Fig. 9. - Sketch showing mounting of one of the Spandau guns on thel Fokker biplane. Inset, the clips securing the cartridge boxes to the fuselage.
Fig. 10. - The lower ends of the chassis struts of the Fokker biplane are welded to sheet-steel boxes, which carry the shock absorbers, and to which is also attached (by rivets) the aluminium box surrounding the axle.
Fig. 11. - Four typical sections of the wings of the Fokker biplane.
Fig. 12. - Maximum cross sections of the four main spars of the Fokker biplane.
Fig. 13. - Some details of the wing construction on the Fokker biplane.
Fig. 14. - Some details of the spar attachments and aileron pulleys of the Fokker biplane.
THE FOKKER BIPLANE, TYPE D VII. - Plan, side and front elevations to scale.
The Austrian-Berg single-seater fighter.
Fig. 1. - Side elevations and plan, to scale, of the body of the Berg single-seater.
Fig. 2. - Sketch showing attachment of struts to longerons on the Berg single-seater.
Fig. 3. - Sketch showing engine mounting on the Berg single-seater.
Fig. 4. - Three-quarter rear view of the front portion of the Berg. The covering has been removed to show the internal construction. In the top plane it would appear at first glance that only one spar is fitted. This is not, of course, the case, but is caused by the fact that the front spar is very close to the leading edge, and is therefore, in this particular view, covered by the rear spar.
Fig. 5. - Sketch of the controls of the Berg.
Fig. 6. - Analytical sketch of one of the pulleys over which the rudder cables travel.
Fig. 7. - The control cables on the Berg are carried, where passing through the sides of the body, in guides. The top sketch shows the metal guide on the outside of the body, while the lower drawing illustrates the wood guide employed on the inside of the three-ply body covering.
Fig. 8. - The tail skid of the Berg is mounted, as shown in this sketch, on a structure of wood strips, covered with three-ply. The shock absorbers are in the form of coil springs.
Fig. 9. - The tail planes of the Berg single-seater.
Fig. 10. - Wing section of the Berg single-seater. All the dimensions are in mm.
Fig. 11. - Attachment of front centre-section struts to fuselage of the Berg single-seater.
Fig. 12. - Attachment of rear centre-section struts to top longerons on the Berg single-seater.
Fig. 13. - Attachment of lower rear spar to fuselage on the Berg single-seater.
Fig. 14. - Attachment of front lower spar and of lift cables to body on the Berg single-seater.
Fig. 15. - General sketch of internal bracing and of inter-plane strut attachment on lower plane of the Berg single-seater.
Fig. 16. - Analytical sketch of inter-plane strut attachment, lift cable attachment, internal drift bracing and compression tube in lower plane of the Berg single-seater.
Fig. 17. - View from outside of the strut fitting dissected in Fig. 16, also showing mounting of pulleys for aileron control cables.
Fig. 18. - Sketch showing part of top plane and one of the ailerons of the Berg single-seater.
Plan, side and front elevations, to scale, of the Berg single-seater.
"Prisoners of War." - A batch of Allied aeroplanes captured by the Germans. In the foreground is a Handley-Page bomber.
THE LONG AND THE SHORT OF IT. - A Handley-Page bomber and a Nieuport single-seater are objects for Hun curiosity.
При перелете первой группы бомбардировщиков с Британских островов на фронт, один из HP O/100 по ошибке сел на вражеской территории. На снимке: германские специалисты изучают трофейный самолет
This photograph of a Handley-Page bomber, published In a German aviation journal, has the following inscription: "The machine has a span of 30 metres, a length of 20 metres, and a height of 6 1/2 metres. It has two motors, each of 260 h.p., which drive two four-bladed propellers. Armament: 3 machine guns. Crew: 5 men. By undoing several connections the wings can be folded back."
The Handley Page bombing machine, fitted with Sunbeam-Coatalen aircraft engines, photographed whilst flying over London. Note the Army airship in the bottom of the picture.
Even journalists are now allowed officially to fly the Channel upon occasion, just for the experience of the thing on their way to the fighting front. Here is such a "freight" for an "H.P." in flying kit, ready for their journey.
ON THE WESTERN FRONT IN FRANCE. - A "Baby" R.A.F. machine being tuned up before starting off for Germany with a load of bombs.
On the British Western Front in France - A trio of R.A.F. fighting men in the nose of a Handley-Page.
Bombing the stranded "Goeben" in the Dardanelles.
A group of "Tails up" pilots belonging to a bombing squadron on the British Western front in France.
H.R.H. Capt. Prince Albert crosses to France in an "H.P." with Major Greig as pilot. Prince Albert and Major Greig are seen in flying kit, and, in the 'plane (at the rear), ready to start.
FROM THE SUNNY SOUTH. - One of the Caproni biplanes which are doing such excellent work with our Italian Allies.
Some aeroplanes of the Fifth Army of France: Caproni.
One of the "smaller" Caproni bombing biplanes, fitted with three motors of 200 h.p. each.
Some aeroplanes of the Fifth Army of France: Letord.
Some aeroplanes of the Fifth Army of France: Moineau.
A German Twin-engined Bomber. - It will be seen that at last the enemy has apparently been obliged to employ four-bladed airscrews. Hitherto there has been a marked tendency on the part of German constructors to stick to the two-bladed propeller. Also note in place the wire guards protecting against the propeller tips.
F. Three-quarter rear view of fuselage and engine mounting.
J. Three-quarter front view of nacelle and engine egg.
Three-quarter Front View of the A.E.G. G.IV Bomber. 1918 type. (G.105)
B. Underside of the nacelle showing bomb magazines and racks, also trap-door in rear cockpit.
A. Instrument board in pilot's cockpit.
C. Front cockpit and gun mount.
L. Gun mounting in rear cockpit.
Fig. 1. - Aerofoil section A.E.G. aeroplane.
Fig. 2.
Fig. 6. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. Fig. 9.
Fig. 10. Fig. 11. Fig. 12.
Fig. 13. Fig. 14. Fig. 15.
Fig. 16. Fig. 17. Fig. 18.
Fig. 20. Fig. 21. Fig. 22.
Fig. 23. Fig. 24. Fig. 25.
Three-quarter front view of the type G2 Gotha bomber.
SIDE VIEW OF A GOTHA BOMBER. - This machine is one of the older type with four-wheeled undercarriage. In more recent machines of this make an additional pair of wheels has been added to each undercarriage. On the right the machine is seen in the air.
The moonlight raider.
Friedrichshafen G II, 131/15, seen here, was powered by two 215hp pusher-mounted Benz Bz IVs and carried a three man crew. The G II became operational in early 1916, but was only built in small numbers, being succeeded by the much larger Friedrichshafen G III, of which nearly 350 were built.
Fig. 1. - Centre section of lower main plane with three-ply surfacing removed.
Fig. 20. - View looking down inside of fuselage from the main nacelle, showing trap-door and after-gunner's folding seat.
Fig. 22. - Front portion of the nacelle.
Fig. 23. - Inside of the front cockpit.
Fig. 30. - The exhaust pipe of the 260 h.p. Mercedes engine.
Fig. 37. - Gravity petrol tank let into the centre section of the upper plane. Its fabric cover is held down by press buttons. Note the detachable panel in the trailing edge of the plane.
Figs. 40 and 41. - Front and side views of the propeller. Note the two additional bolt holes.
Fig. 46. - Main landing chassis with fabric fairing removed.
Fig. 47. - Landing wheel under the front portion of the nacelle.
Fig. 48. - Tail skid.
Fig. 49. - Machine gun mounting in the front portion of the nacelle.
Fig. 54. - View of bomb-rack in nacelle. Behind it can be seen the spring of trimming gear.
Fig. 56. - Bomb-release gear inside front cockpit.
Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6.
Fig. 11. Fig. 12. Fig. 13. Fig. 14. Fig. 15.
Fig. 16. Fig. 17. Fig. 18. Fig. 19.
Fig. 31. Fig. 32.
Fig. 33. - Radiator, with shutter open.
Fig. 34.
Fig. 35. - Oil tank. This is placed Immediately behind the radiator.
Fig. 36.
Fig. 50. Fig. 51. Fig. 52. Fig. 53.
General arrangement drawings of the Friedrichshafen bomber.
Fig. 47. - Gear box and oil radiator of four-engined giant.
Fig. 48. - Gear-box anf shaft of four-engined giant.
Fig. 49. - Radiator of four-engined giant.
Fig. 53. - Flywheel and female clutch of four-engined giant.
Fig. 54. - Empennage of four-engined giant.
Fig. 55. - Empennage of four-engined giant.
Fig. 56. - Undercarriage of four-englned giant.
Fig. 57. - Axles and wheels of four-engined type.
Fig. 58. - General view of wreckage of four-engined giant.
Fig. 59. - Rear end of fuselage and tail-skid of four-engined giant.
Fig. 60. - Power plant of four-engined giant.
Fig. 61. - Main planes and ailerons of four-engined giant.
Fig. 62. - Attachment of struts and compression tube on four-engined giant.
Fig. 63. - Bomb carrier of four-engined giant.
Fig. 64. - General view of wreckage of four-engined giant.
Fig. 46. - Engine mounting of four-engined giant.
Fig. 50. - Spar sections of four-engined giant.
Fig. 51. - Rib of four-engined giant.
Fig. 52. - Rudder of four-engined giant.
Fig. 42. - General arrangement drawings of the four-engined giant.
Fig. 43. - Front elevation of four-engined giant.
Fig. 44. - Side elevation of four-engined giant.
Fig. 45. - Plan view (probable construction) of four-engined giant.
Some constructional details of the five-engined giant. - 67. Long gear box, complete with male clutch. 68. Long gear box seen from underside. 69. Broken gear box (long type), with bearers and oil radiator. 70. Driving pinion. 71. Windmill.
Fig. 72. - Oil radiator and gear pump of five-engined giant.
Some more details of five-engined giant. - 73. Pusher screw and driven pinion. 74. Tractor screw and pinion. 75. Oil filter of gear box. 76. Engine control levers.
Fig. 77. shows engine bearer transverse-girder. 78. "Douglas" type wireless and heating generator.
The five-engined giant. - 79. Pump and transformer, 80. Rear view of engine and flywheel. 81. Wireless generator. 82. Cowling and dynamo drive.
Fig. 65. - Engine bearers of five-engined bomber.
Fig. 66. - Tail skid of five-engined type.
The German Offensive on the Western Front in France. - Fixing bombs to drop on massed Germans.
Bringing back the photographic evidence of bombs dropped during a day raid on the British western front in France.
A daylight bombing squadron preparing for business on the western front in France. Note the Liliputian "egg."
A bombing machine on the British western front in France tucking its eggs under its wings prior to a daylight trip, with one of its attendant fighting scouts in waiting.
THE GERMAN OFFENSIVE ON THE WESTERN FRONT IN FRANCE. - A day-bombing squadron. Some of the big bombing machines.
Fig. 7. - Side view of the de Havilland IV biplane.
Fig. 15. - Three-quarter rear view of the de Havilland IV biplane.
Fig. 14. - Three-quarter front view of the de Havilland IV biplane.
Fig. 5. - Front view of the de Havilland IV biplane.
Fig. 6. - Rear view of the de Havilland IV biplane.
Fig. 11. - Undercarriage of the de Havilland IV biplane.
Orville Wright (left) in front of a Liberty D.H. 4.
Fig. 1. - Scale drawing of the de Havilland IV biplane.
Fig. 3. - Wing section and tail plane section of the de Havilland IV biplane.
Fig. 4. - Scale drawing of the body of the de Havilland IV biplane.
Fig. 8. - Inter-plane strut attachment.
Fig. 12. - Bomb sight of the de Havilland IV biplane.
Fig. 13. - Tail plane incidence gear.
Fig. 16. - Control lever in the observer's cockpit of the de Havilland IV biplane.
A de H. 9 biplane at the Enemy Aircraft Exhibition, Agricultural Hall. - These machines have done some excellent work at the front, and a similar machine is now going to be turned to more peaceful pursuits, for we learn that Sir Arthur Du Cros has ordered one from the Aircraft Manufacturing Co., Ltd., for his private use.
ON THE BRITISH WESTERN FRONT IN FRANCE. - An observation flight over the German lines by our aeroplanes.
ON THE BRITISH WESTERN FRONT IN FRANCE. - Our aeroplanes, on observation bent, over the German lines.
On the British Western Front. - Preliminaries to a bombing expedition.
Attaching bombs to the racks beneath an RE8 of 69 Squadron at Savy, October 1917. The unit subsequently became 3 Squadron AFC at Bailleul.
On the British Western Front in France - C.O., with pilot and observer, referring to the photos, and maps prior to setting out for the German lines.
WAR LOAN WEEK IN TRAFALGAR SQUARE. - The Italian S.I.A. biplane, in which Capt. the Marquis Laureati made his Turin-London non-stop flight, with a nearer view of its engine and the extra petrol tank.
Some aeroplanes of the Fifth Army of France: Breguet A V.
Some aeroplanes of the Fifth Army of France: Voisin.
A FRENCH FIGHTER DURING A BOMBARDMENT. - L'Adjutant C - "snapped " by his gunner during flight.
Four views of the French, A.R. biplane.
Some aeroplanes of the Fifth Army of France: AR (Dorand).
Petrol system of the A.R. biplane.
General arrangement, and some details, of the French A.R. biplane.
Plan and elevation of the body of the French A.R. biplane.
The Spad two-seater, 200 h.p. Hispano-Suiza engine.
KING ALBERT OF BELGIUM REVIEWS HIS ARMY FROM AN AEROPLANE. - The Royal plane, taken from another plane above it. Below may be seen the Belgian lines, roads, &c., and at the top of the picture the inundations.
The Spad two-seater, S.XI, 200 h.p. Hispano-Suiza engine.
The Spad two-seater, S.XI, 200 h.p. Hispano-Suiza engine.
Some aeroplanes of the Fifth Army of France: Farman F.90.
For Winter Wear only. - A German biplane fitted with skids instead of wheels for starting from and landing on the snow.
AT THE ENEMY AIRCRAFT VIEW ROOMS. - Although not including all the captured German aeroplanes, this drawing gives a good idea of the excellent arrangement of these trophies, the detail construction of which can be readily inspected owing to the machines being partly stripped as shown. Commencing with the machine in the foreground, the aeroplanes are: Albatros Scout D.V., Albatros Scout D.I., D.F.W.-Aviatik, L.V.G, Albatros Fighter, and Rumpler Fighter.
Views of the Type C. VI. L.V.G. Biplane.
Some L.V.G. Constructional Details. - 1. Spar fitting on cabane of the Type C.V. L.V.G.; 2. Lug on spar engaging with fitting in 1; 3. Bottom front spar Joint; 4. Bottom rear spar joint; 5. Wing spar lug on the C.VI. Type; 6. Upper and lower wing sections of C.VI.; 7. C.VI. upper section with RAF. 14 section superimposed.
L.V.G. Constructional Details. - 8. C.VI. wing spar sections; 9. Front spar section of C.V.; 10. Field repair of broken spar; 11. Aileron crank of C.VI.; 12, Aileron crank of C.V.; 13. Aileron hinge of both types.
L.V.G. Constructional Details. - 14. C.V. inter-plane strut; 15. C.VI. inter-plane strut socket; 16. Attachment of strut to spar; 17. Attachment of centre section strut to spar on C.VI.; 18. Centre section struts and bulkheads of C.VI.; 19. Bracing tube between rear chassis strut and engine bearer on C.V.
L.V.G. Constructional Details. - 20. The bulkheads of the C.V. fuselage; 21. Mounting of the tail plane; 22. Stern of fuselage, showing plywood covering and mounting of tail skids; 23. Protection piece for balanced portion of elevator; 24. Tail skids of the two types.
25 and 26. Undercarriage_details.
L.V.G. Constructional Details. - 27. Controls of C.V.; 28. Details of C.VI. controls; 29. Aileron pulleys; 30. Rudder bars of the two types; 31. Aluminium strip protectors of bulkheads against oil.
L.V.G. Constructional Details. - 32. Exhaust pipes of C.VI.; 33. C.V. Radiator supports and radiator; 34, C.VI. radiator shutter; 35. Camera hole and cover of C.V.; 36. Wireless generator mounted on chassis strut of C.VI.; 37. Release gear for unknown object on C.V.; 38. Gun ring of C.VI.
General Arrangement Drawings of the Type C. VI L.V.G. biplane.
Rear view of the 2-Seater Rumpler.
THE C. IV-TYPE RUMPLER BIPLANE. - Three-quarter front view of the 206 h.p. Mercedes model.
The exhaust manifold and engine cowling of the 2-Seater Rumpler.
Tail and Fin Bracing of the Rumpler. Note the saw-teeth on the low tail stay type to prevent mechanics from lifting the machine by this tube.View of the 2-Seater Rumpler tail.
THE 2-SEATER RUMPLER, C. 5 TYPE. - Figs. 1 to 18.
THE C.IV-TYPE RUMPLER BIPLANE. - Plan, side and front elevations to s:ale.
THE 2-SEATER RUMPLER, C. 5 TYPE. - General arrangement to scale.
ON THE BRITISH WESTERN FRONT IN FRANCE. - Winged by Australians on the Western Front. A German bombing and reconnaissance machine brought down by a machine gunner. It reminds us very much of the Halberstadt 2-seater illustrated in our Issue of August 1st.
Front view of the Halberstadt fighter.
A. View of underside of centre section, showing radiator and shutter, machine gun and cabane struts.
B. View of cockpits, showing aileron cranks, gun ring, radiator and gravity petrol tank.
Perspective drawing of the body of the Halberstadt two-seater biplane, 160 h.p. Mercedes engine. Inset is a sketch of the tail planes.
Some constructional details of the Halberstadt fighter. (Figs. 1. to 17.)
More constructional details of the Halberstadt fighter. (Figs. 18 to 31.)
Side view of dismantled Halberstadt CL. IV.
Rear view of tail and fuselage of Halberstadt C.L. IV.
Photograph showing internal construction of lower plane of Halberstadt C.L. IV. Notice the pronounced wash-out.
Some constructional details of the Halberstadt C.L. IV. - 1. Top plane wing section. 2. Comparison between the section shown in 1 and the R.A.F. 14. 3. The three-ply surrounds to the spars, drawn to scale. 4. Fuselage fitting for bottom plane. 5. Shock absorber and undercarriage cross-tubes. 6. Tail plane attacnmeni. 7. Adjustable mounting of seat.
General arrangement drawings of the Halberstadt C.L. IV.
Three-quarter front view of the biplane tail of the Hannover.
The undercarriage of the Hannover biplane.
THE HOME OF THE "HANNOVERANERS." - A batch of Hannover biplanes in the grounds in front of the HAWA. (Hannoveranian coach works) offices. The building on the left is part of fhe erecting shop.
Instrument board and control handle of the Hannover biplane. On the right the air-speed indicator, which is mounted on an inter-plane strut.
The gun ring of the Hannover biplane, showing lock.
THE HANNOVER OR "MYSTERY" BIPLANE. - Three-quarter front view of the body. The chief feature of this machine, apart from the biplane tail, is the enormously deep fuselage, built in the usual German fashion, of a light framework covered with three-ply wood.
THE HANNOVER OR "MYSTERY" BIPLANE. - Two views of the biplane tail. The elevator of the lower tail plane, it will be noticed, is divided, while the upper elevator is carried right across from side to side. The two elevators are interconnected by a vertical rod inside the fin, joining the cranks of upper and lower elevators.
DIAGRAMMATICRECONSTRUCTION OF THE GERMAN "H.W." BIPLANE. - Fig. 1, as reconstructed from wreckage. Fig. 2, as observed by Lieut. Mussat.
THE JUNKER ARMOURED BIPLANE. - Front portion of fuselage, with engine.
THE JUNKER ARMOURED BIPLANE. - End view of top-plane centre-section.
A FAST TWIN-ENGINED BOMBER. - One of the Aircraft Manufacturing Co.'s machines designed by Capt. G. de Havilland. This is a de H. 10a, and is fitted with two Liberty engines, each of 400 h.p. The machine has an extraordinarily good performance, its speed at ground level being 134 m.p.h. and at 10,000 ft. 124 m.p.h. The climb to 10,000 ft. takes only 10.3 minutes, while it is capable of reaching an altitude of 22,500 ft. The military load is 1,000 lbs. and the machine has a range of 700 miles. Note its similarity to D.H. 3, except that it is a tractor instead of a pusher.
The prototype single seat Sikorsky S.20, serial no 267, is seen here with the insignia of the Imperial Russian Air Service on its rudder. Designed at the close of 1916, the S.20 was the victim of double misfortune in being underpowered and emerging just a few short months before Russia was to sue for peace as part of its political collapse in the spring of 1917. Two S.20s were built, the first using an 80hp Le Rhone, while the second machine had a 110hp Le Rhone. Top level speed of the higher powered S.20 was cited at 118mph, while it took 6 minutes 20 seconds to reach 6,540 feet. Its armament was to have been a single .303-inch Vickers, putting it at a disadvantage compared with contemporary foes.
THE SIKORSKY SCOUT. - Three-quarter front view of this machine fitted with 110 h.p. Le Rhone engine.
The Italian " Macchi" flying boat, equipped with a 200 h.p. engine.
Side view of the Italian "Macchi" flying boat.
Three views of the Italian "Macchi" flying boat in flight. Note the steep climbing angle in the right-hand view.
Three-quarter rear view of the Hispano-Suiza-motored F.B.A. flying boat.
View from the rear of the Hispano-Suiza-motored F.B.A. flying boat.
French seaplanes ready for patrol work at a French Seaplane Station on the Mediterranean coast.
American aeroplane types of 1917-18: Wright-Martin "F.B.A." Flying Boat.
1. Wing-Spar Butt and intermast Ribs of the A.E.G. 2. Centre-Section Strut and Fuselage Junction of the A.E.G. 3. Tail-plane Adjustments. 4. Tail-stay Adjustments. 5. Rudder-post Arrangements. 6. Tail-skid Arrangement. 7. Method of Attaching Armour. 8. Method of fixing guns to fire through floor. 9. Triggers for fixed guns. 10. Cradle for Movable Gun. 11. Locking device for Movable Gun. 12. Method of Fuselage Bracing.
The A.E.G. armoured aeroplane.
AN INTERESTING ENEMY BOMBER. - The Albatros type G. biplane. This machine, it will be noticed, has only one pair of inter-plane struts outside the engine on each side. The formation of these struts is unusual, diagonal struts having, apparently, taken the place of incidence wires. The upper plane appears to be of a very deep section, as in the latest Fokker machines, and it would seem probable that this feature accounts for the small number of inter-plane struts.
Launching a German Seaplane from a Mother Ship. In the background a U. boat.
A picture of a German seaplane which has captured a Russian sailing vessel in the Baltic.
A recent type of German L.V.G. biplane of the C.V class.
Side view of the L.V.G. C. V. biplane.
Front and rear views of the L.V.G. C. V. biplane.
Three views of the Type C. V. L.V.G. Biplane.
THE L.V.G. C.V. BIPLANE. - Sketch of one of the interplane strut fittings.
THE L.V.G. C.V. BIPLANE. - The locking hinge-pin for the aileron. The top view shows the pin removed, with the locking key in position for insertion. Below, the pin in position with the key "locked."
Some L.V.G. Constructional Details. - 1. Spar fitting on cabane of the Type C.V. L.V.G.; 2. Lug on spar engaging with fitting in 1; 3. Bottom front spar Joint; 4. Bottom rear spar joint; 5. Wing spar lug on the C.VI. Type; 6. Upper and lower wing sections of C.VI.; 7. C.VI. upper section with RAF. 14 section superimposed.
L.V.G. Constructional Details. - 8. C.VI. wing spar sections; 9. Front spar section of C.V.; 10. Field repair of broken spar; 11. Aileron crank of C.VI.; 12, Aileron crank of C.V.; 13. Aileron hinge of both types.
L.V.G. Constructional Details. - 14. C.V. inter-plane strut; 15. C.VI. inter-plane strut socket; 16. Attachment of strut to spar; 17. Attachment of centre section strut to spar on C.VI.; 18. Centre section struts and bulkheads of C.VI.; 19. Bracing tube between rear chassis strut and engine bearer on C.V.
L.V.G. Constructional Details. - 20. The bulkheads of the C.V. fuselage; 21. Mounting of the tail plane; 22. Stern of fuselage, showing plywood covering and mounting of tail skids; 23. Protection piece for balanced portion of elevator; 24. Tail skids of the two types.
25 and 26. Undercarriage_details.
L.V.G. Constructional Details. - 27. Controls of C.V.; 28. Details of C.VI. controls; 29. Aileron pulleys; 30. Rudder bars of the two types; 31. Aluminium strip protectors of bulkheads against oil.
L.V.G. Constructional Details. - 32. Exhaust pipes of C.VI.; 33. C.V. Radiator supports and radiator; 34, C.VI. radiator shutter; 35. Camera hole and cover of C.V.; 36. Wireless generator mounted on chassis strut of C.VI.; 37. Release gear for unknown object on C.V.; 38. Gun ring of C.VI.
Sketch showing the Austrian Ago Sea-Pursuit flying boat "A-25,'' in flight.
THE AUSTRIAN AGO TYPE PURSUIT FLYING BOAT. - Plan, side and front elevations to scale.
The wing-float used on the "K-301," an Austrian 3-seater flying boat of the Lohner type.
American aeroplane types of 1917-18: Aeromarine.
American aeroplane types of 1917-18: Aeromarine.
American aeroplane types of 1917-18: Curtiss 3-engine Cruiser.
American aeroplane types of 1917-18: Curtiss H12 Flying Boat.
WITH THE AMERICAN ARMY AVIATION SECTION. - Cross-country formation flying, snapped from one of the aeroplanes by the official photographer. Eleven aeroplanes are, in all, in evidence In this photograph.
WITH THE AMERICAN FLYING SECTION. - A couple of pictures taken in the air of formation and cross-country flying at Kelly Field, San Antonio, Texas.
Lieut. W. J Stutt at the wheel of his Curtiss machine in which he made his record flight in Australia.
American aeroplane types of 1917-18: Curtiss "JN-4B".
American aeroplane types of 1917-18: Curtiss "F" Flying Boat.
American aeroplane types of 1917-18: Curtiss "N9" Hydro.
American aeroplane types of 1917-18: Gallaudet Pusher.
American aeroplane types of 1917-18: L.W.F. Tractor.
American aeroplane types of 1917-18: Standard "J-R" Pursuit.
American aeroplane types of 1917-18: Sturtrevant "S".
American aeroplane types of 1917-18: Thomas-Morse Scout.
Side view of the United Eastern training tractor biplane.
The fore part of the United Eastern training tractor biplane, showing the 90 h.p. Curtiss engine and the landing chassis.
American aeroplane types of 1917-18: United Eastern.
American aeroplane types of 1917-18: Wittemann-Lewis.
American aeroplane types of 1917-18: Wright-Martin "R".
American aeroplane types of 1917-18: Wright-Martin "V".
One of the Four-engined Sikorsky Ilya Mourometz heavy bombers that served so well from 1915. Type B used four Salmson-Canton-Unne radials of 200 h.p. (two each), weighed 10,580 lb, could carry 1,102 lb of bombs, and flew at 60 miles per hour.
A Sikorsky biplane fitted with snow skids for winter flying.
It appears that the Gotha and Friedrichshafen firms are not having a monopoly in twin-engined bombers, the above illustrations showing a machine produced by the Rumpler firm. - From the numbers painted on the fuselage it appears that this machine was built as long ago as 1915.
M. Passat with one of early experimental machines.
Some aeroplanes of the Fifth Army of France: Curtiss (training).
The latest production of Captain Jas. V. Martin, who will be remembered for his flying at Hendon previous to the War, and who for some years has been at work in the U.S.A. The machine includes several novel features: a folding chassis, K bar cellule truss, wing end ailerons, shock-absorber rudder, and a rubber hinge closing the gap between the fuselage and the rudder.
American aeroplane types of 1917-18: Curtiss "Twin JN".
American aeroplane types of 1917-18: Curtiss Twin "JN" Hydro.
A Dutch Aeroplane. - A military tractor scout produced by the well-known Spyker motor car firm at Trompenburg, Amsterdam.
Launching a "Short" seaplane on Lake Tanganyika.
Assembling a Sunbeam-Coatalen "Short" waterplane in East Africa.
American aeroplane types of 1917-18: Curtiss "H-S 1" Flying Boat.
American aeroplane types of 1917-18: Curtiss Triplane.
American aeroplane types of 1917-18: Pierce Sport Tractor.
American aeroplane types of 1917-18: Burgess "HT-2" Scout Hydro.
American aeroplane types of 1917-18: Burgess "B.P." Tractor.
American aeroplane types of 1917-18: Burgess Twin Seaplane.
American aeroplane types of 1917-18: Lawson "MT-1".
American aeroplane types of 1917-18: Harley-Stromer.
American aeroplane types of 1917-18: Breese "Penguin".
American aeroplane types of 1917-18: Berckmans Scout.
A speedy American pusher biplane, built by the Continental Co., having a speed of about 95 m.p.h. It is fitted with a 135 h.p. Hall-Scott motor.
A front view of the American Continental pusher biplane, which is fitted with a 135 h.p. Hall-Scott motor, and has a speed of about 95 m.p.h.
American aeroplane types of 1917-18: Continental Pusher.
Three-quarter rear view of the Albatros biplane.
Side view of the Albatros biplane.
Front view of the Albatros biplane.
Rear view of the Albatros biplane.
View from above of the Albatros biplane.
Three-quarter front view of the Albatros biplane.
THE ALBATROS C.V-TYPE BIPLANE. - The chassis and engine, showing the gearing to the tractor screw.
CORNERED. - An Albatros C5 caught by a couple of British machines.
Fig. 1. - Half sections of some of the more important bulkheads of the Albatros fighting biplane. Inset, dimensions of some of the members.
Fig. 2. - Sketch showing engine bearers of the Albatros biplane.
Fig. 3. - Section of the engine bearers of the Albatros biplane.
Fig. 4. - Construction of the vertical fin on the Albatros biplane.
Fig. 5. - The tail skid and its attachment on the Albatros biplane. Inset, upper right-hand corner, details of the skid pivot. Upper left-hand corner, the collar which prevents the rubber cord from slipping along the tube. These collars are apparently made up of two stampings - bowl-shaped - welded together along their peripheries. In the bottom left-hand corner is shown the bracket attaching the cross tube to the ply-wood bulkhead.
Fig. 6. - Sections and dimensions of the longerons of the Albatros biplane.
Fig. 7. - Sketch showing turnbuttons securing engine cowl to upper longerons. The bulkhead is prevented from shifting by a wood screw going through the longeron into the bulkhead.
Fig. 8. - General arrangement of the Albatros body. Side elevation and plan to scale.
Fig. 9. - Sketches of the tail plane and its attachments on the Albatros biplane.
Fig. 10. - Details of the tail plane and elevator attachment on the Albatros biplane. In the upper left hand corner a view from above of the fuselage stern post, the tail plane trailing edge, and the elevator tube. In the upper right hand corner is shown the attachment of the trailing edge to the fuselage. Bottom: details of the steel clip bearings for the elevator tube; also the wood block to which the elevator fabric is attached around the hinge. The attachment of this wood block must be attended with some difficulty, as the wood screw and screw driver have to be inserted through a hole in the opposite wall of the steel tube. Probably a special tool is employed.
Fig. 11. - General arrangement and dimensions of the members of the tail plane on the Albatros biplane.
Fig. 12. - The main petrol tank of the Albatros biplane. The pilot's seat is placed in the recess, and is prevented from sliding about by the steel clips shown. On the right is shown a section of the tank, with the internal bracing rods and baffle plates. The insets show the brackets supporting the tank, and the arrangement for tightening the straps that hold the tank.
Fig. 13. - The controls of the Albatros biplane. Insets show the ball and socket joint for the control lever locking arrangement, and the hand grip with the gun trigger on the main control lever.
Fig. 14. - Diagrammatic sketch of the claw brake on the Albatros.
Fig. 15. - The brackets supporting the pulleys over which pass the control cables are of a somewhat complicated nature. In the top left-hand corner is shown the pulley over which the elevator cable passes after leaving the crank lever on the rocking shaft (see Fig. 13). The pulley in the top right-hand corner is bolted to the middle longeron just ahead of the tail plane, and serves to guide the elevator cable. In the bottom left-hand corner is shown the pulley mounted on the top longeron in front of the tail plane, over which passes the elevator control cable, and the pulley shown in the bottom right-hand corner guides the rudder cable in front of the foot bar, where its direction changes from a lateral to a longitudinal one.
Fig. 16. - Diagram of the aileron control system of the Albatros.
Fig. 17. - The elevator and rudder crank levers on the Albatros biplane. A shows the elevator crank lever with its ball and socket joint for the turnbuckle. In C is shown the mounting of the rudder, and in B the bottom rudder bracket and crank lever.
Fig. 18. - The machine gun and its mounting on the Albatros Fighter. The bag for the spent cartridges should be noted. When not in use the butt of the gun rests in the clip shown. The two insets show the locking devices for the gun pivot and gun ring respectively.
Fig. 19. - So as to be out of the way when the gunner is firing from a standing position, the seat on the Albalros Fighter is hinged and sprung as shown in this sketch.
Fig. 20. - Details of the bomb gear on the Albatros biplane.
Fig. 21. - General arrangement of the upper left-hand wing of the Albatros biplane, to scale.
Fig. 22. - Sheet steer spar box and socket for compression tube of the upper plane of the Albatros biplane. The bottom sketch shows the attachment of the terminals for the interplane cables and struts.
Fig. 23. - Sections, to scale, of the leading edge, main spars, and false spar of the Albatros biplane.
Fig. 24. - The wing section of the Albatros biplane.
Fig. 25. - The spar box and its attachment to the fuselage of the Albatros fighting biplane.
Fig. 26. - The wing flap and some wing details of the Albatros fighting biplane.
Fig. 27. - The cabane supporting the radiator and upper plane of the Albatros biplane. Note the manner of carrying the water tube through one of the cabane legs.
Fig. 28. - Sketch showing lugs on root of upper main wing spars of the Albatros.
Fig. 29. - Some details of the undercarriage of the Albatros. 1. General arrangement of the undercarriage. 2 and 3. Detail of cable terminal. 4. Steel strip passing under body, to which is welded the front chassis strut socket. 5. Attachment of rear chassis strut to body. 6. Lower attachment of chassis struts and shock absorbers. 7, 8, and 9. Details of same.
Fig. 30. - Arrangement of wing flap control cable pulleys in bottom wing of the Albatros. After passing over pulleys on rear spar, the control cables pass through the spar horizontally.
THE ALBATROS BIPLANE. - Plan, front and side elevation to scale.
American aeroplane types of 1917-18: Thomas-Morse.
American aeroplane types of 1917-18: Thomas-Morse Seaplane.
American aeroplane types of 1917-18: Ordnance Engineering.
American aeroplane types of 1917-18: Sturtrevant.
American aeroplane types of 1917-18: Standard "D" Twin Hydro.
FROM THE CHRISTIANIA AERO SHOW. - The stand of Eloch Thulins Aeroplane Works. On the left is the Bleriot monoplaile on which Lieut. Tryggve Gran crossed the North Sea; hanging from the roof is a sporting monoplane; in the background is seen a biplane single-seater fighter; and in the centre a three-engined seaplane, all built at the Thulin works at Landscrona, Sweden.
THREE VIEWS OF A GOTHA BOMBING BIPLANE. - It will be seen that it differs slightly from that described in "FLIGHT" for December 27th last, in that there is little or no sweep back, and that the engine housings are considerably modified.
The Gotha G V used the same engines as the Gotha G IV, following it into operational service in 1918. Top level speed of the G V was 87mph, while cruising speed was 80.8mph. Range of the G V was quoted as 522 miles, but this figure clearly reflects operations with a reduced bomb load. 120 G Vs are reported to have been built, plus 25 G Va and 55 G Vb, the latter two variants being equipped with biplane tail units.
Getting Ready to Start. - Hanging the "eggs" underneath the body of a German bomber.
Gotha GV bombers flew night attacks on Britain from mid 1917 to May 1918, the normal bomb load being 660lb (300kg). The type was not produced in large numbers and it was only moderately effective.
Figs. 38 and 39. - Two views of the biplane tail and fuselage of the twin-engine Gotha bomber. Illustrations and a brief description of this tail were published in our issue of October 3rd.
Fig. 40. - Rear view of biplane tail of the twin-engined Gotha.
Fig. 41. - Twin-engine Gotha. Front of fuselage. Note Morell anemometer air-speed indicator.
A Gotha biplane tail.
SOME CONSTRUCTIONAL DETAILS OF THE GOTHA BOMBER. - Figs. 1 to 9.
Some constructional details of the Gotha twin-engine bomber. Figs. 10 to 17.
Some more constructional details of the Gotha twin-engine botnber. Figs. 18 to 27.
Constructional details of the Gotha twin-engine bomber. Figs. 28 to 37.
Three-quarter front view of one of the four-wheeled Gotha undercarriages. On the right a more detailed drawing of the shock-absorbing arrangement.
THE GOTHA BOMBER. - General arrangement drawings.
American aeroplane types of 1917-18: Wright-Martin "S".
The C. IV-type Rumpler biplane fitted with a 250 h.p. Maybach engine.
The 300 h.p.Maybach engine, installed in the Rumpler C.4 biplane.
Three-quarter front view of the Italian S.V.A. fighting scout.
Front view of the Italian S.V.A. fighting scout (S.V.A.5 Primo Biplane).
An S.V.A. scout equipped with twin pontoons.
THE ITALIAN S.V.A. FIGHTING SCOUT BIPLANE. - Plan, side and front elevation to scale.
The Italian Pomilio fighting scout.