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Журнал
Flight за 1917 г.
365

Журнал - Flight за 1917 г.

GETTING HER HEIGHT. - The Bristol Scout climbing.
THE ROYAL VISIT TO THE BRITISH WESTERN FRONT. - Queen Mary interested in one of our aeroplanes.
In captivity. - A Bristol biplane captured by the Germans.
A de Havilland biplane. The top plane, it will be seen, is staggered backwards.
A de Havilland biplane, brought down in an air fight.
DIVERTING THE CARDINAL WOLSEY RIVER AT HANWORTH PARK. - Mr. H. Sykes, on his Martinsyde, looping in a gale of wind. The machine is travelling away from the spectator, and is in the inverted position.
WINTER FLYING. - On a Martinsyde at Hanworth.
The presentation of an aeroplane to India by the City of Leeds. Lord Desborough after his flight.
Side view of, according to Flugsport, "de Havilland" fighter.
Front view of, according to Flugsport, "de Havilland" fighter.
Some unique sketches of aircraft at work overseas by Captain K. H. Riversdale Elliot, Scottish Rifles and R.F.C.. The drawings are particularly accurate and full of movement, and carry the greater weight as from an active pilot.
Some unique sketches of aircraft at work overseas by Captain K. H. Riversdale Elliot, Scottish Rifles and R.F.C.. The drawings are particularly accurate and full of movement, and carry the greater weight as from an active pilot.
A Sopwith single-seater lands on its back, apparently with never a fracture, after a fight over the German lines.
Some unique sketches of aircraft at work overseas by Captain K. H. Riversdale Elliot, Scottish Rifles and R.F.C.. The drawings are particularly accurate and full of movement, and carry the greater weight as from an active pilot.
Some unique sketches of aircraft at work overseas by Captain K. H. Riversdale Elliot, Scottish Rifles and R.F.C.. The drawings are particularly accurate and full of movement, and carry the greater weight as from an active pilot.
A three-decker in the hands of the enemy . - Another view of the machine "standing'' on its nose which was reproduced in "FLIGHT" on page 920, September 6th. We reproduce the illustration exactly as it appears in an enemy newspaper, and it will be noticed that emphasis is laid upon the fact that the machine is uninjured, which appears to be correct subject to the propeller and very minor details.
AT THE RECENT SOPWITH SPORTS AT NORBITON. - A snap of a Sopwith "Camel" during an exhibition flight.
FROM "THE WAR IN ITALY." - An Italian Nieuport biplane as seen from the front.
From "The War in Italy." - An Italian Nieuport biplane.
Nieuport 1 1/2-plane,Type 16. The rockets are used for attacking kite balloons and airships.
Side view of the Nieuport 1 1/2-plane,Type 16.
Nieuport two-seater, Type 12. Motor 110 h.p. Clerget.
Nieuport two-seater, Type 12. The Vee struts slope outwards.
The body of the Nieuport 1 1/2-plane.
Body and tail skid of the Nieuport 1 1/2-plane.
Controls and pilot's seat of the Nieuport 1 1/2-plane.
Framework of a Nieuport top plane.
Rear view of the Nieuport 1 1/2-plane,Type 17.
Front view of the Nieuport 1 1/2-plane, Type 17.
Nieuport single-seater fighter, Type 17, with fixed machine gun.
Nieuport single-seater fighter, Type 17, with fixed machine gun.
Aeroplane versus anchor cable. - Returning from a flight on his Nieuport, Sergt. Courtois, who had had his propeller damaged by bullets, was making for home against the sun. This accounted for the fact that he failed to see the anchor cable of a French kite balloon. As luck would have it, it was the propeller which struck the cable, otherwise the issue might have been serious. As it was, the Nieuport seemed to hesitate an instant, then, as the cable parted, it resumed its flight. On landing it was found that some ten yards of cable was twisted round the propeller shaft, otherwise no damage had been done. The observer in the kite balloon managed to land safely at Eure-et-Loir.
Scale drawings (in mm.) of the Nieuport single-seater.
A view of the Spad used by the Lafayette Escadrille.
Edward F. Hinckle, of the Lafayette Escadrille, standing in front of the first aeroplane to carry the American flag over the French lines.
THE ALBATROS D. 1. - Side view.
THE ALBATROS D. 1. Three-quarter view from the front.
THE ALBATROS D. 1. - View from the front.
THE ALBATROS D. 1. - Three-quarter view from behind.
A CAPTURED GERMAN AEROPLANE. - Bringing home the spoils.
THE ALBATROS D. 1. - View of the nose and of the tail.
THE ALBATROS D1. - A general view of the control, showing the two gun-triggers inside the grip, and immediately underneath the locking lever.
"THE NAVY-THAT-FLIES." - When he was about 150 yards behind me I looked straight over him, and coming out of the loop dived at him and fired a good long burst."
THE ALBATROS D.I. - Top: On the right a view of the exhaust side of the 170 h.p. Mercedes engine, and on the left the inlet side. Both views show the location ot the machine guns. The right-hand lower sketch gives a view of the cockpit, and on the left a view below the nose of the fuselage, showing the mounting of the chassis and the abutments for the wing attachment.
One of the radiators mounted on the side of the Albatros D. 1.
The sockets securing the chassis struts to the fuselage. The struts may quickly be detached by loosening the bolts on the sockets.
The shock absorber on the landing chassis. It will be seen that the rubber strands are interlaced.
The Albatros D. 1. - The attachment of the cabane to the fuselage, showing the screw adjustment for alteration of stagger.
The adjustment of the top plane on the cabane.
The fuselage construction.
The quick release attachment of the lower plane to the fuselage on the Albatros D. 1.
The adjustable interplane strut attachment.
The anchorage of the lift cables on the Albatros D. 1.
The interplane strut attachment to the top plane, and the aileron crank lever.
The aileron pulley inspection door on the lower plane.
A diagram showing the cartridge-feed to the machine guns on the Albatros D. 1.
The Albatros D. 1. - Section of fuselage at the junction of the rudder post.
THE ALBATROS D.I "CHASER" BIPLANE. - Plan, side and front elevations to scale.
A recent German machine brought down by Capt. Heurtaux, who has now 21 machines to his credit. This is one of the latest types of Albatros,
A Fighting Squadron, under the command of Von Richthoven ready for starting on its work.
Transporting a German aeroplane . (Albatros) to the front. A single-seater Albatros, with 8-cylinder 250 h.p. Mercedes engine, and geared-down airscrew. This type has been replaced by the D IV type with a 6-cylinder 260 h.p. engine.
Chassis and engine housing of the Halberstadt biplane.
Three-quarter rear view of the Halberstadt biplane.
Side view of the Halberstadt biplane.
A CAPTURED HALBERSTADT BIPLANE. - Three-quarter front view.
The control of the 1916 Halberstadt biplane, showing the adjusting link, forward of the rudder bar, for varying the distance from the latter to the seat.
Two views of a somewhat badly strafed Halberstadt biplane brought down "somewhere in France." The planes, struts, chassis, &c, form the heap in the background.
THE 1916 HALBERSTADT FIGHTING BIPLANE. - Drawing of the machine in flight, seen from the rear.
Some unique sketches of aircraft at work overseas by Captain K. H. Riversdale Elliot, Scottish Rifles and R.F.C.. The drawings are particularly accurate and full of movement, and carry the greater weight as from an active pilot.
The trap-door under the wing, giving access to the aileron cable pulleys, on the 1916 Halberstadt biplane.
Method of attaching the lower plane to the fuselage of the 1916 Halberstadt biplane. Note the spring locking device on the pin.
The interplane strut fitting and quick release bracing cable attachment of the 1916 Halberstadt biplane.
Sketch showing the construction of the fuselage of the 1916 Halberstadt biplane.
The foot-step trap-door on the fuselage of the 1916 Halberstadt biplane, seen from the inside.
The tail-skid of the 1916 Halberstadt biplane.
Sketch showing metal construction of the elevators and rudder of the 1916 Halberstadt biplane.
THE HALBERSTADT BIPLANE. - Plan, side and front elevations.
TESTING THE ENGINES. - The two Rolls-Royce engines on the "H.P." having a trial run before the start on the London-Constantinople bombing expedition.
The successful Handley-Page biplane built in England since the outbreak of war and now doing extremely useful work.
GETTING READY. - A Handley Page biplane of a type similar to that which made the magnificent flight from London to Constantinople. A good idea of the dimensions of the machine is provided by comparison with the people in front.
THE HANDLEY PAGE TWIN-ENGINED BIPLANE. - A view of the fuselage from the front.
THE HANDLEY PAGE TWIN-ENGINED BIPLANE. - A rear view of the engine mounting and fore part of the fuselage.
THE HANDLEY PAGE TWIN-ENGINED BIPLANE. - Lifting the tail. A similar photograph to the above was shown on the screen in connection with Mr. Handley Page's recent paper at the Aeronautical Society, and in connection with which the author explained that the tail is really quite easy to lift, the extra help seen in the photograph being rather due to the well-known fact that when a film is being taken, everybody wants to help - by getting into the photograph.
THE HANDLEY-PAGE BOMBER FLIGHT TO CONSTANTINOPLE. - On left: Flight-Commander Savory, D.S.O. and bar, who took part in this raid, with his greyhound mascot. On the right: Squadron-Commander Smyth-Piggot, D.S.O., with his mascot.
TWO VIEWS OF THE ROLLS-ROYCE ENGINES WHICH MADE THE FLIGHT POSSIBLE. - On the left, a front view of an R.R. installed in the wings of the Handley-Page. The engine housing has been removed to give a better view of the engine. On the right, a three-quarter rear view of the Rolls-Royce engine. In the space behind the engine the petrol tank is carried.
In the Hands of the Enemy. - A Handley-Page biplane shot down in Flanders by anti-aircraft guns. The machine according to Flugsport, had a crew of three and carried sixteen bombs, each weighing 50 kilogs.
What might have been, and even yet may be.
Front view of Caproni Ca 3 biplane of 1916-18, with the most common arrangement of three 150 h.p. Isotta-Fraschini V4B inline engines. Maximum speed 85 m.p.h. in Ca 33 form.
THE 600 H.P. ITALIAN CAPRONI TRIPLANE. - This huge machine, the size of which may be judged by the man standing just in front, is equipped with three 200 h.p. engines, and has a speed of about 80 m.p.h.
Another view of the 600 h.p. Italian Caproni triplane, which has been doing such good raiding work on the Italian front. The machine is seen returning from a flight.
The French Caudron "G6" twin-engine fuselage biplane.
THE A.E.G. BOMBING BIPLANE. - Three-quarter front view.
THE A.E.G. BOMBING BIPLANE. - Three-quarter rear view.
THE A.E.G. BOMBING BIPLANE. - The attachment of the outer to the central sections of the top plane.
THE A.E.G. BOMBING BIPLANE. - Sketch of one of the ailerons, showing the operating crank.
THE A.E.G. BOMBING BIPLANE. - The tubular fuselage construction.
THE A.E.G. BOMBING BIPLANE. - Plan, front and side elevations to scale.
THE GOTHA TWIN-ENGINED BOMBING BIPLANE. - Three-quarter front view.
A GERMAN GOTHA TWIN-ENGINED BIPLANE. - The span of this big German fighter is 78 ft. 6 ins., length 41 ft. The wings are of about the same span, with balanced ailerons on the upper plane. Three pairs of struts, in addition to the engine struts, are fitted on each side of the body. The latter is of rectangular section covered with three-ply wood in front. Two machine gunners are carried, one in front and one behind, a gangway connecting them. In the floor there is a trap door for firing downwards, the armament consisting, in addition to the machine guns, of three bomb tubes holding 144 bombs. The engines are 6-cyl. Mercedes, each of 260 h.p., driving airscrews placed to the rear of the wings. One of these machines, it is stated by L'Acrophile, was brought down by Captain George Guynemer, the famous French "Ace."
A group of the double-engine Gotha raiders, now familiar to these shores, drawn up at their starting-point.
The interplane strut fitting on the Gotha twin-engined bomber.
THE GOTHA TWIN-ENGINED BOMBER. - One of the under-carriages, in which steel compression springs and cable within the chassis struts, and connected to the axle, takejthe place of rubber shock absorbers.
The attachment of the bracing tie-rod and cable on the chassis of the Gotha bomber.
Diagram showing the shock-absorbing device on the Gotha bomber.
THE GOTHA TWIN-ENGINED BOMBER. - Plan, front and side elevations to scale.
The presentation of the aeroplane "South Africa" by the London Chamber of Commerce, through the Imperial Air Fleet Committee, to the Right Hon. Lieut.-General J.C.Smuts, K.C., as representing the Union of South Africa. Lef to right, from the top: General Smuts and Lord Desborough; Lord Desborough being strapped into the machine previous to his flight with Captain Hucks. Centre: Captain Hucks just getting off. Below: the christening, and Captain Hucks with Lord Desborough about to land.
THE GREAT FLIGHT ACROSS SOUTH AFRICA. - General Smuts recently, when accepting the aeroplane subscribed for by the London Chamber of Commerce, had reason to refer to the retaining of the supremacy of the air as being the forerunner of victory. He has intimate knowledge of the activities at the front, and has also in mind the 300 miles South African flight carried out by Captain Moore in the German East African Campaign. In our photograph above, Captain Moore has arrived safely back, the aeroplane being taken, into the hangar.
Captain Moore, the pilot (on the right), studying the route map before his start on the 300 miles flight in the German East African Campaign.
AIR PATROLLING IN THE EASTERN MEDITERRANEAN. - One of our air patrols photographed in the air from another machine.
A BRITISH BOMBING MACHINE CROSSING THE LINES ON THE WAY TO AN ENEMY POSITION. - Such a scene as the above may be witnessed any fine day on the Western Front. A bombing raid carried by the R.F.C. in progress. The aeroplanes are seen maling their way over the lines under heavy anti-aircraft fire. In the lower right-hand corner a small hostile patrol has sighted the raid, and has decided that discretion in the better part of valour. A well-known sector of the lines is here shown, the woods appearing as weird dark shapes on the vast panorama. The long straight roads, so typical of France, stretch away over the wide expanse, dotted with little villages strewn, as it were, carelessly over it. As the eye follows them, fading gradually to an ill-defined horizon, it is baffled by the heavy pall of mist which hangs like a purple curtain abruptly from the sky, above which the summits of clouds appear as giant icebergs.
THE ROYAL VISIT TO THE BRITISH WESTERN FRONT. - King George at an aerodrome.
Capt. the Marquis Laureati, standing beside the S.I A . biplane with F.I.A.T. A 12 bis engine, allowing 124 m.p.h., on which he made his non-stop flight of 1,000 miles from Turin to Naples and back. On the Turin-Naples trip Capt. Laureati flew alone, but on his flight from Turin to London he carried a mechanic. The S.I.A. Company, the builders of the machine, is a subsidiary of the Fiat Co. of Turin.
In the Hands of the Enemy. - A French Voisin biplane captured by the Germans. Under the nacelle can be seen a bombrack and a search-light.
Aerial guardians of Paris, who day and night keep watch against attacks by the air, upon the capital, a monotonous task of strenuous duty, which carries with it little glory by reason of its complete effectiveness as an antidote to the Zeppelin marauders.
AVIATION IN JAPAN.- At Tokorozawa Military Central Aerodrome. A Japanese 70 h.p. Maurice Farman type of the Japanese Aerial Force.
AVIATION IN JAPAN.- A 90 h.p. Maurice Farman on the home ground.
A REMARKABLE ESCAPE. - In these days of high-power high-speed machines it may be well to look back lest one forgets that earlier in the war much excellent work was done on machines which did not begin to compare with the modern aeroplane as regards efficiency and performance. The above photograph, which Is reproduced by courtesy of La Guerre Aerienne, shows the appearance of a biplane on which, in 1915, Captain Morris, since taken prisoner by the Germans, and Corporal de Ram had been for a reconnaissance flight. The machine was heavily shelled, several struts and other wing parts being broken. Corpl. de Ram, in spite of the unsecure foothold offered, climbed out on the lower wing, while at a height of 2,000 metres, and made fast, as well as possible under the conditions, some of the broken parts, which feat enabled the machine to reach home in safety.
A Paul Schmitt hydravion, built in 1916 for the United States Government.
THE PAUL SCHMIDT TRACTOR SEAPLANE. - A similar machine was presented by Mr. August Belmont to the U.S. Navy, and is now undergoing tests at Pensacola.
Three-quarter front view of the 1916 Aviatik fighting biplane.
The 140 h.p. engine, and chassis of the Aviatik fighting biplane.
Three-quarter rear view of the 1916 Aviatik fighting biplane.
Rear view of the 1916 Aviatik fighting biplane.
Skeleton view of the fore part of the fuselage, showing the ply-wood engine bearer supports on the 1916 Aviatik biplane.
Mounting and housing of vertical water-cooled engines.
General arrangement and detail of the gun mounting on the 1916 Aviatik biplane.
The attachment of the lower plane to the fuselage on the Aviatik biplane. A fork on the wing spar engages with the eye of the tubular cross-member mounted on the fuselage, and a pin, for which a slot is cut in the inner rib of the wing, holds them in place. The pin is locked by means of a spring clip.
The 1916 Aviatik Biplane The attachment of the interplane struts by ball and socket joint, and the anchorages for the bracing cables.
The general arrangement of the upper and lower planes of the 1916 Aviatlk biplane.
The wing section of the 1916 Aviatik biplane.
The tail planes and balanced rudderon the 1916 Aviatik biplane.
Fuselage bracing clip on the Aviatik biplane.
One of the metal clips carrying the tubular compression strut between the spars.
The chassis of the 1916 Aviatik biplane.
THE 1916 AVIATIK FIGHTING BIPLANE. - Plan, side and front elevations to scale.
A captured German (A.E.G.) biplane with 175 h.p. Mercedes engine. Note the peculiar shape of the ailerons.
AERIAL RECONNAISSANCE IN THE SNOW. - A German Albatros off for a trip over the lines of the Allies.
Mounting and housing of vertical water-cooled engines.
A German aeroplane flying over Volhynia.
A D.F.W. biplane as built by the Aviatik works. It will be noticed that the wings are no longer swept back, otherwise the machine follows closely along the lines of the prewar type D.F.W. biplanes. The engine in this instance is a 225 h.p. Benz 6-cyl., with exhaust collectors. Two machine guns are carried, one firing forward "through" the propeller, and the other on a turntable in the rear cockpit.
A German aeroplane brought down at Aardenburg in Holland; the occupants were interned. The machine appears to be an Aviatik D.F.W.
An interesting photograph of the landing of an enemy machine with pilot badly injured and the observer killed. Our contemporary, La Guerrv Aerienne, states in regard to the above that on January 10th, 1915, near Villers-Bocage, Sub - Lieut. Eugene Gilbert, the well-known aviator, brought down this Aviatik. The landing was quite normal, the motor having been stopped through a bullet smashing the radiator. When the French soldiers arrived to seize the machine, the observer, Lieut. von Falkenstein, was noticed to be sitting perfectly still, and it was soon realised that he was dead, whilst the pilot, Lieut. Keller, was completely hors de combat through being seriously wounded.
Another view of the 260 h.p. C.IV-type Rumpler biplane. - The annexed illustration, appears to indicate an attempt by the Rumpler firm at better stream-lining, as a hemispherical nose-piece is fitted over the boss of the airscrew, and the sides of the front part of the body are rounded off to gradually carry the curve of the nose-piece into the flat sides of the rear portion of the fuselage. Also, judging by the illustration, it appears that the span is somewhat smaller than in the older type Rumpler biplanes.
FROM "THE WAR IN ITALY." - An Austrian Aviatic captured by the Italians.
FROM "THE WAR IN ITALY." - An Austrian biplane of the Aviatik type captured by the Italians.
A Short Type 184 seaplane with 225 h.p. Sunbeam engine, beached on the bank of the Tigris for repairs, during the operations against Kut-el-Amara.
WITH THE BRITISH FORCES IN MESOPOTAMIA. - A seaplane returning to the slipway at Bazra after trials.
A seaplane, in what was German East Africa, about to start a flight over the German cruiser "Konigsberg," for the purpose of "spotting" for artillery work.
Another view of salving a seaplane after an accident.
An Italian Navy F.B.A. flying boat. (Donnet-Denhaut DD.8)
Two views of the F.B.A. flying boat as used by the Allies. (Donnet-Denhaut DD.8)
Aviation in Japan. - A 100 h.p. Nieuport at the Tokorozawa Aerodrome.
THE AGO BIPLANE. - Some general views. Top: three-quarter front view. The openings in the top plane for the radiator and petrol service tank should be noted. Bottom: view from above, showing in diagrammatic form the construction of top plane. Inset: the tail planes.
THE AGO BIPLANE. - Some constructional details. 1. The gunner's seat. 2. The rear cabane. 3. A cable attachment extensively employed on the Ago. The cup-shaped socket is machined out of the solid, and has a slot through which passes the shank of the strainer. Three-ply packing is placed between the plate of the fitting and the base so as to make up the thickness of the socket. 4. The petrol service tank lying on its side on the floor. When in place on the machine it is carried in the opening in the upper wing to the left of the cabane.
THE AGO BIPLANE. - More Constructional Details. 1. Dimensions of lower front spar near body. 2. Attachment of tubular struts to fuselage longerons. 3. The hardwood distance piece at the crossing of the internal wing-bracing cables. 4. Section of the lower front spar at the point of attachment of the inter-plane wire. 5. Perspective sketch of same joint. 6. Section of rear spar. 7. (A) construction of false spar and aileron leading edge; (B) An aileron rib (not to scale); (C) Aileron crank and attachment of inter-aileron strut.
A CAPTURED AGO BIPLANE. - Plan, side and front elevations to scale.
HOISTING HER HOME. - Bringing a German seaplane into its hangar by means of a crane.
A COLD JOB. - A German seaplane on its return from a flight over the North Sea in winter.
ON THE ICE. - German seaplanes outside their station. Note the twin-engine seaplane on the left.
The co-operation of German Air-Raiders with Hun U-Boats. - A German pilot going aboard a U-boat from his seaplane.
THE MERCEDES HAS A COLD BATH. - A German seaplane after a rough "landing."
A German (Gotha) seaplane over Constantinople.
ON THE ICE. - German seaplanes outside their station. Note the twin-engine seaplane on the left.
A batch of Hungarian Lloyd biplanes.
Side view of the Aeromarine training tractor biplane, land type.
Three-quarter rear view of the Aeromarine training tractor biplane, land type.
Side view of the Aeromarine training tractor seaplane.
Three-quarter rear and three-quarter front views of the Aeromarine training tractor seaplane.
The fuselage construction of the Aeroniarine tractor biplane.
One of the lower planes of the Aeromarine tractor biplane showing construction.
AT THE AMERICAN AERO SHOW. - Some constructional details. Various examples of interplane strut fittings, including the early Wright-type.
THE AEROMARINE TRAINING TRACTOR BIPLANE, LAND TYPE. - Plan, side and front elevations to scale.
THE AEROMARINE TRAINING TRACTOR SEAPLANE. - Plan, side and front elevations to scale
Front view of the Burgess type "U" seaplane.
THE BURGESS TYPE "U" SEAPLANE. - Plan, side and front elevations to scale.
A large flying boat hull, built by the Burgess Co., of Marblehead, Mass., U.S.A. In the background is a Burgess-Dunne seaplane.
AT THE AMERICAN AERO SHOW. - Some constructional details. The rear strut attachment to the nacelle of the Burgess-Dunne seaplane.
The cabin of the Curtiss flying boat "America," on which Commander J. C. Porte, R.N., was to have attempted to cross the Atlantic in the summer of 1914.
One of the large Curtiss H-12 flying boats, which has a wing spread of 92 ft. 8 1/2 ins., an overall length of 46 ft. 5 1/2 ins., and weighs 5,945 lbs. The power plant consists of two 200 h.p. VX-3 Curtiss motors, and the speed is in the neighbourhood of 85 m.p.h.
THE UNITED STATES AVIATION SCHOOL AT SAN DIEGO, CAL. - A general view.
The Curtiss aero-yacht de luxe, built for the America Trans-Oceanic Co. It is luxuriantly fitted up, and carries five passengers. We hope to give further details of this machine shortly.
TWO VIEWS OF THE LATEST CURTISS TRIPLANE SCOUT. - Several modifications on the model illustrated in our issue for January 25th last will be noticed. It is of smaller span, and all three planes are equal. The body is of better streamline form, and the chassis struts are arched.
Two views of the Lawrence inherently stable flying boat, showing it leaving the water from a standing start in under 5 secs.; and, inset, the machine in flight.
The Laurence tractor flying boat, built and flown near Chicago during 1915-16.
Three-quarter front view of the L.W.F. tractor biplane.
Three-quarter rear view of the L.W.F. tractor biplane.
AT THE NEW YORK AERO SHOW. - The L.W.F. tractor biplane.
Side view of the L.W.F. tractor biplane.
The laminated wood fuselage of the L.W.F. tractor biplane.
The mounting of the top plane sections to the cabane on the L.W.F. tractor biplane.
The attachment of the lower plane to the fuselage of the L.W.F. tractor biplane.
The L.W.F. Tractor Biplane. - The tail-brace fitting.
The interplane strut attachment on the L.W.F. tractor biplane.
AT THE AMERICAN AERO SHOW. - Some constructional details. Various examples of interplane strut fittings, including the early Wright-type.
THE L.W.F. TRACTOR BIPLANE. - Plan, side and front elevations to scale.
AT THE NEW YORK AERO SHOW. - The Standard military tractor.
Side view of the Standard H-3 tractor biplane.
The Standard -H-3 tractor biplane and its designer, Charles H. Day.
Several Standard H-3 fuselages in course of construction.
Mounting and housing of vertical water-cooled engines.
AT THE AMERICAN AERO SHOW. - Some constructional details. The shock-absorbing device on the chassis of the Standard tractor.
The "Pantograph" shock-absorbing device on the Standard H-3 chassis.
Sketch showing the attachment of the interplane strut and compression rib to the main wing spar, with fittings.
AT THE AMERICAN AERO SHOW. - Some constructional details. Various examples of interplane strut fittings, including the early Wright-type.
THE STANDARD H-3 TRACTOR BIPLANE. - Plan, side and front elevations to scale.
Three-quarter front view of the Standard model J tractor biplane.
Rear view of the Standard model J tractor biplane.
View showing the mounting of the 90 h.p. Hall-Scott 4-cyl. vertical engine in the Standard model J tractor biplane. The arrangement of the three-wheeled landing chassis is also clearly shown.
The tail end of the fuselage of the Standard model J tractor biplane.
Three-quarter front view of the Standard model J-R tractor biplane.
Side view of the Standard model J-R tractor biplane.
The rear cockpit of the Standard model J tractor biplane.
The Standard Model J Training Tractor Biplane. - Plan, side and front elevations to scale.
The Standard Model J-R Tractor Biplane. - Plan, side and front elevations to scale.
Mounting and housing of water-cooled engines.
Mounting and housing of water-cooled engines.
An American "one-and-a-half-strutter" scout. The latest Thomas-Morse tractor biplane.
The Wittemann-Lewis 90 h.p. model T.T. tractor biplane, built at Newark, N.J., U.S.A. Note the deep cowling totally enclosing the engine.
AT THE AMERICAN AERO SHOW. - Some constructional details. The Witteman-Lewis bridge-type shock-absorber.
AT THE AMERICAN AERO SHOW. - Some constructional details. Various examples of interplane strut fittings, including the early Wright-type.
Side view of the Wright-Martin tractor biplane. Note the small vertical fin under the tail.
A three-quarter rear view of the Wright-Martin tractor biplane.
THE WRIGHT-MARTIN MODEL "R" TRACTOR BIPLANE. - The machine viewed from the front.
The Wright-Martin Model "R" tractor biplane seen from the rear.
The Wright-Martin tractor lands after a successful flight.
The front portion of the Wright-Martin tractor biplane, showing the 150 h.p. Hall-Scott engine.
The landing chassis of the Wright-Martin tractor biplane, showing the bridge-type rubber shock absorbers.
Wright-Martin tractor seaplane. The convertible land or water model R.
The Wright-Martin fuselage, showing method of construction.
AT THE AMERICAN AERO SHOW. - Some constructional details. Various examples of interplane strut fittings, including the early Wright-type.
Three-quarter front view of the Wright-Martin Type V tractor, with 150 h.p. Hispano-Suiza engine.
THE WRIGHT-MARTIN MODEL " V " TRACTOR BIPLANE. - View from the rear.
The Wright-Martin two-seater reconnaissance tractor biplane used by the U.S. Government. This machine differs from the model R ("FLIGHT," March 1st, 1917) in many respects, notably the equal-span wings, the tail and chassis.
The tail components of the Wright-Martin model "V" tractor biplane.
Sketch of the chassis of the Wright-Martin model "V" tractor biplane.
A captured French machine on view at the German Aeronautical Exhibition of War Booty.
A pronounced example of the stream-line form body, the Piggott monoplane exhibited at the Olympia Aero Show of 1911. The entire framework of this machine is enclosed in a light fabric-covered shell, access to which is obtained from beneath. There is room for pilot and passenger inside, both of whom have an outlook through various small windows. The propeller-boss is conical, and forms a sharp point on the otherwise hemispherical head. The radiator forms a kind of crest above the forehead.
The pilot at the controls of the Type XXIV, in front of the 4-passenger cabin. Note conical windshield mounted forward.
The Avro Type F cabin monoplane showing the famous 35 h.p. Viale radial engine which is now preserved for all time.
The enclosed Etrich Taube, built and flown in Austria in 1912.
The enclosed Avro biplane, built for the Military Trials of 1912.
AT THE AMERICAN AERO SHOW. - Some constructional details. Various examples of interplane strut fittings, including the early Wright-type.
Mounting and housing of water-cooled engines.
The Curtiss J.N. twin-engined biplane.
A large twin-engined seaplane built by the New York Aero Construction Co. The planes measure 73 ft. and 44 ft. span, 7 ft. 6 ins. and 6 ft. 6 ins. chord top and bottom respectively. The engines are two 100 h.p. Hall-Scott 7-A models.
AN AMERICAN VARIABLE ANGLE OF INCIDENCE AEROPLANE. - Three views of the Lanzius tractor biplane, designed and built by the Lanzius Aircraft Co. of New York, U.S.A. We hope to give particulars of this interesting machine later.
Another view, from above, of the Lanzius variable angle of incidence biplane.
THE G.A.C. "VERVILLE " PUSHER SEAPLANE. - Three-quarter front view.
Side view of the G.A.C. "Verville" pusher seaplane.
Three-quarter front view of the G.A.C. "Verville" pusher biplane, fitted with wheel landing chassis instead of floats.
Rear view of the land-type G.A.C. "Verville" pusher biplane.
THE G.A.C. "VERVILLE " PUSHER SEAPLANE. - Plan, front and side elevations to scale.
THE W.F. AND E. CO. BIPLANE. - Three-quarter front view.
W.F. & E. biplane. Built at Tipton in 1914 and tested by Rene Desoutter at Dunstall Park.
THE W.F. AND E. CQ. BIPLANE. - Side view.
The Curtiss "Autoplane" exhibited at the 1917 New York Aero Show.
AT THE AMERICAN AERO SHOW. - Some constructional details. The front steerable wheels on the Curtiss "Autoplane."
Two further views of the Curtiss model F.L. triplane flying boat, which was illustrated in a recent issue of "FLIGHT."
The Curtiss triplane flying boat about to "land."
The new 200 h.p. Curtiss H-S-1 flying boat on the Niagara River, just before its flight from Buffalo to Detroit and back.
The Curtiss H-S-1 flying boat in full flight.
The Model L was a side-by-side two-seater and a contemporary of the JN-4.
The 100 h.p. Curtiss triplane, on which Miss Ruth Law proposes to make an attempt on an American coast to coast flight, following on her recent record, when she flew from Chicago to New York. Her idea is to start from San Francisco for New York in the spring.
AT THE AMERICAN AERO SHOW. - Some constructional details. Various examples of interplane strut fittings, including the early Wright-type.
Aviation in Japan. - A Japanese military machine of the Curtiss type.
AT THE NEW YORK AERO SHOW. - Two views of the Benoist steel-clad tractor biplane,
AT THE AMERICAN AERO SHOW. - Some constructional details. Various examples of interplane strut fittings, including the early Wright-type.
AT THE AMERICAN AERO SHOW. - Some constructional details. Various examples of interplane strut fittings, including the early Wright-type.
A large twin-engine seaplane, built for the U.S. Navy, at the U.S Naval Yard, Washington, to the designs of Constructor Holden C. Richardson. It has a span of 57 ft., a chord and gap of 9 ft. 6 ins. and 10 ft. respectively, and a total supporting surface of 1,000 sq. ft. The engines are Curtiss VX type, 160 h.p., and the speed range is 45-80 m.p.h., the full flying load being 6,000 lbs.
The U.S. Navy twin-engine Seaplane. - Note the central pontoon float and the two auxiliary floats, located one under each engine.
The Bavarian Motor and Aircraft Works monoplane at the Berlin Show of 1912.
The Rumpler Taube with enclosed body shown at the Berlin Exhibition of 1912.
The new Marlin scout, which has been constructed in Texas, its speed being put at 100 miles an hour.
Three-quarter rear view of the Burgess speed scout seaplane.
Side view of the small Burgess "single-strutter" tractor seaplane, a front view of which appeared in "FLIGHT" for May 31st last.
Side view of the Burgess speed scout seaplane.
Three-quarter front view of the Burgess speed scout seaplane.
A small "single-strutter" tractor seaplane scout, built by the Burgess Co., of Marblehead, Mass., U.S.A. Pilot Earl S. Doherty is standing in front of the machine (on right).
THE BURGESS SPEED SCOUT SEAPLANE. - Plan, side and front elevations to scale.
Three-quarter front view of the Burgess training tractor biplane. In this view the arrangement of the struts is clearly shown.
Side view of the Burgess training tractor biplane.
Three-quarter rear view of the Burgess training tractor biplane.
THE BURGESS TRAINING TRACTOR BIPLANE.-Plan, side and front elevation to scale.
A Morane Monoplane flown by one of the members of the Lafayette Escadrille.
The Grinnell tractor biplane, an American machine somewhat reminiscent of the Flanders biplane in Brooklands' days of old.
The latest twin-motored Burgess seaplane, at Marblehead, Mass., U.S.A.
BURGESS TWIN-MOTORED SEAPLANE. - Plan, side and front elevations to scale.
Three-quarter front view of the Lawson training tractor biplane.
Side view of the Lawson primary training tractor biplane.
Three-quarter rear view of the Lawson training tractor biplane. Inset, the machine in flight.
A view of the uncovered fuselage of the Lawson primary training tractor biplane.
Rear view of the Maryland twin-engined flying boat.
Two views of the twin Ford-motored Harley-Stromer hydro-biplane. It is said that in the 19 months the machine has been in use over 700 flights have been made. A new model is being constructed which it is proposed to sell for $3,000 each.
The Breese - Penguin monoplane, which has been constructed in America for school work at the Plattsburg Camp, N.Y.
The Albatros B.F.W. (type C. V).
AT THE AMERICAN AERO SHOW. - Some constructional details. Control-surface crank-lever on the Thomas tractor.
AT THE AMERICAN AERO SHOW. - Some constructional details. Tail-skid on the Thomas tractor.
The Thomas (U.S.A.) model S H-4 tractor seaplane, designed mainly for training purposes.
Front view of the Thomas SH-4 tractor seaplane.
Wright-Martin tractor seaplane. The larger model S.
AVIATION IN JAPAN. - Mr. Yukiteru Oxaki, the famous pilot of the Japanese Aeronautical Society.
An Italian single-seater tractor biplane, constructed by the Societe Gio Ansaldo. It will be noticed, that the Warren system of interplane strut bracing, which was dealt with by "Marco Polo" in our issue of October 11th, has been adopted.
The seaplane type tractor biplane, constructed by the Italian Societe Gio Ansaldo.